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Thread: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

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    Avalon Member Bob's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    After living years past his expected demise, Stephen succumbed tonite..

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-43396008

    RIP Stephen.. Time and space will not be the same after your passing..



    Physicist Stephen Hawking has died at the age of 76, a spokesman for his family has said.

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    Stephen Hawking, the brightest star in the firmament of science, whose insights shaped modern cosmology and inspired global audiences in the millions, has died aged 76.

    His family released a statement in the early hours of Wednesday morning confirming his death at his home in Cambridge.


    A brief history of Stephen Hawking's Brief History of Time

    Hawking’s children, Lucy, Robert and Tim said in a statement: “We are deeply saddened that our beloved father passed away today.

    “He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work and legacy will live on for many years.

    “His courage and persistence with his brilliance and humour inspired people across the world.

    “He once said, ‘It would not be much of a universe if it wasn’t home to the people you love.’ We will miss him for ever.”

    For fellow scientists and loved ones, it was Hawking’s intuition and wicked sense of humour that marked him out as much as the broken body and synthetic voice that came to symbolise the unbounded possibilities of the human mind.

    Hawking was driven to Wagner, but not the bottle, when he was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 1963 at the age of 21. Doctors expected him to live for only two more years. But Hawking had a form of the disease that progressed more slowly than usual. He survived for more than half a century and long enough for his disability to define him. His popularity would surely have been diminished without it.

    Hawking once estimated he worked only 1,000 hours during his three undergraduate years at Oxford. “You were supposed to be either brilliant without effort, or accept your limitations,” he wrote in his 2013 autobiography, My Brief History. In his finals, Hawking came borderline between a first and second class degree. Convinced that he was seen as a difficult student, he told his viva examiners that if they gave him a first he would move to Cambridge to pursue his PhD. Award a second and he threatened to stay at Oxford. They opted for a first.

    Those who live in the shadow of death are often those who live most. For Hawking, the early diagnosis of his terminal disease, and his witnessing the death from leukaemia of a boy he knew in hospital, ignited a fresh sense of purpose. “Although there was a cloud hanging over my future, I found, to my surprise, that I was enjoying life in the present more than before. I began to make progress with my research,” he once said. Embarking on his career in earnest, he declared: “My goal is simple. It is a complete understanding of the universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all.”

    He began to use crutches in the 1960s, but long fought the use of a wheelchair. When he finally relented, he became notorious for his wild driving along the streets of Cambridge, not to mention the intentional running over of students’ toes and the occasional spin on the dance floor at college parties.

    Hawking’s first major breakthrough came in 1970, when he and Roger Penrose applied the mathematics of black holes to the entire universe and showed that a singularity, a region of infinite curvature in spacetime, lay in our distant past: the point from which came the big bang.

    Penrose found he was able to talk with Hawking even as the latter’s speech failed. It seemed that whenever Penrose misunderstood, it was a joke or an invitation to dinner. But the main thing that came across was Hawking’s absolute determination not to let anything get in his way. “He thought he didn’t have long to live, and he really wanted to get as much as he could done at that time,” Penrose said.

    In discussions, Hawking could be provocative, even antagonistic. Penrose recalls one conference dinner where Hawking came out with a run of increasingly controversial statements which seemed hand-crafted to wind Penrose up. They were all of a technical nature and culminated with Hawking declaring that white holes were simply black holes reversed in time. “That did it so far as I was concerned,” an exasperated Penrose told the Guardian. “We had a long argument after that.”

    Hawking continued to work on black holes and in 1974 drew on quantum theory to declare that black holes should emit heat and eventually pop out of existence. For normal black holes, the process is not a fast one, it taking longer than the age of the universe for a black hole the mass of the sun to evaporate. But near the ends of their lives, mini-black holes release heat at a spectacular rate, eventually exploding with the energy of a million one-megaton hydrogen bombs. Miniature black holes dot the universe, Hawking said, each as heavy as a billion tonnes, but no larger than a proton.

    His proposal that black holes radiate heat stirred up one of the most passionate debates in modern cosmology. Hawking argued that if a black hole could evaporate into a bath of radiation, all the information that fell inside over its lifetime would be lost forever. It contradicted one of the most basic laws of quantum mechanics, and plenty of physicists disagreed. Hawking came round to believing the more common, if no less baffling explanation, that information is stored at the black hole’s event horizon, and encoded back into radiation as the black hole radiates.

    Marika Taylor, a former student of Hawking’s and now professor of theoretical physics at Southampton University, remembers how Hawking announced his U-turn on the information paradox to his students. He was discussing their work with them in the pub when Taylor noticed he was turning his speech synthesiser up to the max. “I’m coming out!” he bellowed. The whole pub turned around and looked at the group before Hawking turned the volume down and clarified the statement: “I’m coming out and admitting that maybe information loss doesn’t occur.” He had, Taylor said, “a wicked sense of humour.”

    Hawking’s run of radical discoveries led to his election in 1974 to the Royal Society at the exceptionally young age of 32. Five years later, he became the Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge, arguably Britain’s most distinguished chair, and one formerly held by Isaac Newton, Charles Babbage and Paul Dirac, the latter one of the founding fathers of quantum mechanics. Hawking held the post for 30 years, then moved to become director of research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology.

    Hawking’s seminal contributions continued through the 1980s. The theory of cosmic inflation holds that the fledgling universe went through a period of terrific expansion. In 1982, Hawking was among the first to show how quantum fluctuations – tiny variations in the distribution of matter – might give rise through inflation to the spread of galaxies in the universe. In these tiny ripples lay the seeds of stars, planets and life as we know it. “It is one of the most beautiful ideas in the history of science” said Max Tegmark, a physics professor at MIT.

    But it was A Brief History of Time that rocketed Hawking to stardom. Published for the first time in 1988, the title made the Guinness Book of Records after it stayed on the Sunday Times bestsellers list for an unprecedented 237 weeks. It sold 10m copies and was translated into 40 different languages. Some credit must go to Hawking’s editor at Bantam, Peter Guzzardi, who took the original title: “From the Big Bang to Black Holes: A Short History of Time”, turned it around, and changed the “Short” to “Brief”. Nevertheless, wags called it the greatest unread book in history.

    Hawking married his college sweetheart, Jane Wilde, in 1965, two years after his diagnosis. She first set eyes on him in 1962, lolloping down the street in St Albans, his face down, covered by an unruly mass of brown hair. A friend warned her she was marrying into “a mad, mad family”. With all the innocence of her 21 years, she trusted that Stephen would cherish her, she wrote in her 2013 book, Travelling to Infinity: My Life With Stephen.

    In 1985, during a trip to Cern, Hawking was taken to hospital with an infection. He was so ill that doctors asked Jane if they should withdraw life support. She refused, and Hawking was flown back to Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge for a lifesaving tracheotomy. The operation saved his life but destroyed his voice. The couple had three children, but the marriage broke down in 1991. Hawking’s worsening disability, his demands on Jane, and his refusal to discuss his illness, were destructive forces the relationship could not endure. Jane wrote of him being “a child possessed of a massive and fractious ego,” and how husband and wife became “master” and “slave”.

    Four years later, Hawking married Elaine Mason, one of the nurses employed to give him round-the-clock care. Mason was the former wife of David Mason, who designed the first wheelchair-mounted speech synthesiser Hawking used. The marriage lasted 11 years, during which Cambridgeshire police investigated a series of alleged assaults on Hawking. The physicist denied that Elaine was involved, and refused to cooperate with police, who dropped the investigation.

    Hawking was not, perhaps, the greatest physicist of his time, but in cosmology he was a towering figure. There is no perfect proxy for scientific worth, but Hawking won the Albert Einstein Award, the Wolf Prize, the Copley Medal, and the Fundamental Physics Prize. The Nobel prize, however, eluded him.

    He was fond of scientific wagers, despite a knack for losing them. In 1975, he bet the US physicist Kip Thorne a subscription to Penthouse that the cosmic x-ray source Cygnus X-1 was not a black hole. He lost in 1990. In 1997, Hawking and Thorne bet John Preskill an encyclopaedia that information must be lost in black holes. Hawking conceded in 2004. In 2012, Hawking lost $100 to Gordon Kane for betting that the Higgs boson would not be discovered.

    He lectured at the White House during the Clinton administration – his oblique references to the Monica Lewinsky episode evidently lost on those who screened his speech – and returned in 2009 to receive the presidential medal of freedom from Barack Obama. His life was played out in biographies and documentaries, most recently The Theory of Everything, in which Eddie Redmayne played him. “At times I thought he was me,” Hawking said on watching the film. He appeared on The Simpsons and played poker with Einstein and Newton on Star Trek: The Next Generation. He delivered gorgeous put-downs on The Big Bang Theory. “What do Sheldon Cooper and a black hole have in common?” Hawking asked the fictional Caltech physicist whose IQ comfortably outstrips his social skills. After a pause, the answer came: “They both suck.”

    In 2012, scientists gathered in Cambridge to celebrate the cosmologist’s 70th birthday. It was one of those milestones in life that few expected Hawking to reach. He spent the event at Addenbrooke’s, too ill to attend, but in a recorded message entitled A Brief History of Mine, he called for the continued exploration of space “for the future of humanity.” Without spreading out into space, humans would not “survive another thousand years,” he said.

    He later joined Tesla’s Elon Musk and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak to warn against an artificial intelligence military arms race, and called for a ban on autonomous weapons.

    Hawking was happy to court controversy and was accused of being sexist and misogynist. He turned up at Stringfellows lap dancing club in 2003, and years later declared women “a complete mystery”. In 2013, he boycotted a major conference in Israel on the advice of Palestinian academics.

    Some of his most outspoken comments offended the religious. In his 2010 book, Grand Design, he declared that God was not needed to set the universe going, and in an interview with the Guardian a year later, dismissed the comforts of religious belief

    “I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark,” he said.

    He spoke also of death, an eventuality that sat on a more distant horizon than doctors thought. “I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the last 49 years. I’m not afraid of death, but I’m in no hurry to die. I have so much I want to do first,” he said.

    What astounded those around him was how much he did achieve. He leaves three children, Robert, Lucy and Timothy, from his first marriage to Jane Wilde, and three grandchildren.
    Each of us play our part in creating a new story for humanity and our planet ~

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Party on Mr. Hawking in the great Beyond.



    The conquering of self is truly greater than were one to conquer many worlds.
    Edgar Cayce

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Each of us play our part in creating a new story for humanity and our planet ~

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Did Stephen Hawking die tonight?
    Having watched one of my closest friends die from MND in a typical ~3yrs from diagnosis, & having asked various medical professionals about this case (ALL of whom drew a blank when it came to throwing any light on this *unique* case of someone outlasting initial prognosis *by many decades* - not a single other case comes close), personally I have to wonder.
    Is this Miles Mathis piece worth consideration?
    http://milesmathis.com/hawk3.pdf

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Best of Big Bang Theory - "Stephen Hawking"




    ================================================== =

    Stephen Hawking dies at the age of 76

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZT-5_C81MkA
    Published on 13 Mar 2018
    Renowned British scientist Stephen Hawking, known for
    his breakthrough ideas in theoretical physics and space
    research, has died at the age of 76, his family says.

    ================================================== =

    Physicist Stephen Hawking has died
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uA8GdJJqz_s
    Published on 13 Mar 2018
    World renowned theoretical physicist, cosmologist, astronomer and
    mathematician Stephen Hawking has passed away at age 76.

    ================================================== =
    Last edited by Cidersomerset; 14th March 2018 at 07:37.

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Everything happens in cycles... Einstein's birthday - 14 March 1879. Notice?

    RIP Stephen Hawking - one of the greatest minds of our generation.
    Last edited by KiwiElf; 14th March 2018 at 09:12.

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Next incarnation I wish to have a top of the line cosmic soul vehicle

    I for one will join in with anyone, I don't care what color you are as long as you want to change this miserable condition that exists on this Earth - Malcolm X / Tsar Of The Star - Will YOU?

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Richard Branson promised him to take him into space in 2007. But Virgin Galactic did never deliver, epic fail and a broken promise. Shame on you Richard Branson.
    Rest in peace dear soul

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Believe me, I first knew who is Stephen Hawking through the movie "The Theory of Everything" and started to look up about him. Then I was amazed by his work and achievements. So yes of course today, when the news was telling me he is no longer with us, apart of me is dead too.

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    RIP to the real Stephen Hawking, whenever he really died, most probably in the mid 80s).

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Here’s as close as he got:



    Hopefully the doctors are able to apply his longevity with his ALS variant to other patients, if they’re interested.

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    RIP Stephen Hawking. Thank you for your wonderful discoveries and insights. A true genius of our time.

    Quote “I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark,” he said.
    Well, you didn't quite know it all.

    But now that you're blissfully free at last of this heavy realm, I do hope you enjoy your new view of the Universe. You spent your life trying to understand it. But it's a great deal larger, and grander, than you thought...
    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace."
    ~ Jimi Hendrix

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Stephen's kids -



    2015



    Stephen Hawking (lower Center) arrives on the red carpet with former wife Jane Hawking (Left) and daughter Lucy Hawking (Right) for the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Opera House in London on February 8, 2015

    In 2015, Timothy discussed his father’s motor neuron disease.

    “My dad was able to speak with his own, natural voice for those first years, but it was incredibly difficult to understand what he was saying — particularly for me at such a young age,” he said in a BBC documentary. “As a 3-year-old, I had no understanding of what he was saying. I didn’t really have any communication with him for the first five years of my life.”

    Timothy said that it was only when his father got a voice synthesizer that he was able to speak to him.

    “It was somewhat ironic that Dad losing his voice was actually the start of us being able to form a relationship,” he said.



    Each of us play our part in creating a new story for humanity and our planet ~

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)


    " Humanity must continue exploring space to reach 'beyond our humble planet'. " 16th November 2016 Stephen was saying such to university students and professors at Oxford Union.

    " No matter how difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and be good at. "
    Each of us play our part in creating a new story for humanity and our planet ~

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Now he's free from his physical limitations and is at home with God again. I wish him happy journeys!
    "When you've seen beyond yourself, then you may find, peace of mind is waiting there." ~ George Harrison

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Look what you created, Journey well Stephen.

    When you express from a fearful heart in the now moment, You create a fearful future.
    When you express from a loving heart in the now moment, You create a loving future.

    Have no fear, Be aware and live your lives journey from a compassionate caring nurturing heart to manifest a compassionate caring nurturing future. Billyji


    Peace

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Well, Stephen...what about do some maths on the other side and send us a postcard ?


    People say Rest in Peace because they did not figure out what’s on the other side...

    but there’s work

    there’s food

    Thinking of moving on as well ..



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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    He did not believe in life beyond death. He said it was for people who are afraid of the dark. I wonder if he still thinks the same now, or perhaps does not think at all since he now has no his brain to think with?
    I wish him well in his onward journey, if there is one.
    Last edited by Lettherebelight; 14th March 2018 at 18:51.

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Update: Dear moderators, I should have looked at the existing threads more closely and seen that a similar thread already exists. Please do your thing!

    It was one of Richard D Hall's presentations that first alerted me to the fact that the Stephen Hawking portrayed in the media may not be who we think he is:



    What has really surprised me recently in light of his recent death is an article in the Mail from January 2018 that suggests the real Hawking in all likelihood must have died quite some decades ago, given the typical prognosis of someone in his condition.

    Every so often an article will appear in the mainstream media that really (and fearlessly) goes right against the grain and comes up with a peach of an article. I consider this article to be one of them

    Here is a chunk from the Mail article:

    Quote A lot of the theories presented by Hawking are difficult to prove.

    An example of this can be seen in a TV programme, hosted by Magnus Magnusson, where Hawking appeared alongside science fiction writers Arthur C. Clarke and Carl Sagan. The voice from the machine spoke.

    It said: 'There are two kinds of time. There is what's called real time. This is the kind of time that's measured by a clock, the time that we feel passing, the time in which we grow older… Then there is imaginary time… a well-defined mathematical concept… Imaginary time has no beginning or end. Imaginary time is closed in on itself, like the surface of the earth. The surface of the earth doesn't have any beginning or end…'

    So why the need for a 'puppet professor'?

    If what the conspiracy theorists say is true and if the real Hawking has been switched, the question would obviously be: why?

    The most common theory is that it was – and still is - important for those in control to push science and 'lose' God. The powers that be want people to feel that they are tiny unimportant dots in an infinite universe, on one of a trillion planets, in a sea of countless suns, the reason being that people who feel insignificant and small also feel powerless and unimportant, thus making them easier to control.

    They also want to get the public used to accepting theories as fact.

    The substitute Hawking, they claim, is used as a puppet to instill fear in the general population, promoting the idea that the human race has only 100 years left, that aliens exist and that contact with them – which may be imminent - could be catastrophic. All this scaremongering puts the public in a fearful state, again making them easier to manipulate.

    Sceptics have observed that the 'puppet professor' is also a great proponent of Artificial Intelligence and science, claiming that 'philosophy is dead', that there is no God and that science has the answers to everything – all of which goes against his earlier philosophical stance and theories.

    The Hawking of the last ten years has also pushed global warming, is anti-Trump, anti-Scottish Independence and anti-Brexit. He is suddenly very political, seemingly allowing his name to be tacked onto anything and everything in an attempt to make certain ideas or political agendas more credible; and, because the general public believe Professor Hawking is one of the most intelligent scientists of all time, this works.

    In recent years, he's waxed lyrical about climate change, is a supporter of The Paris Agreement and, in an article in The Guardian last year, was quoted as being in support of carbon tax. He also recorded a tribute for the Democratic candidate Al Gore and was part of an academic boycott of a conference in Israel. There are many more examples of how Hawking's name has been attached to various political agenda, which truth-seekers find highly suspicious.
    Full Mail article here:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...ed-puppet.html
    Last edited by happyuk; 14th March 2018 at 19:52.

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    Default Re: Stephen Hawking died today (14 March 2018, UK time)

    Quote Posted by Lettherebelight (here)
    He did not believe in life beyond death. He said it was for people who are afraid of the dark. I wonder if he still thinks the same now, or perhaps does not think at all since he now has no his brain to think with?
    I wish him well in his onward journey, if there is one.
    I hope he is very surprised still being able to think and now at last freed from that malfunctioning body. But, then it must be hell not able to communicate his findings back to us. Just catch up with Nicola Tesla for a change and leave Albert Einstein for what he was. That may bring some clarity in the situation you now hopefully may find yourself.

    Anyway, Stephan, thanks for the good but also some bad thinking works on our planet.

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