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    Avalon Member Bob's Avatar
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    Exclamation Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Large recall issued due to Salmonella bacteria contamination found from an egg production farm in Hyde County, North Carolina. Check the LOT numbers, and brands described below if you use eggs in the US in the following States, and if you order Eggs at local eateries (restaurants).

    These eggs were shipped to Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia by direct delivery to retail stores and restaurants.


    Rose Acre Farms of Seymour, IN late Friday recalled 206,749,248 eggs because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella Braenderup, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. - contact information: http://www.goodegg.com/about-us/contact-us "Good EGG" - if one has experienced illness contact one's health provider for antibiotic treatment, and/or Rose Acre Farms, at 812-497-2557.

    Acre decided to initiate the recall after at least 22 illnesses on the East Coast were traced back to its egg production farm in Hyde County, North Carolina, which produces 2.3 million eggs a day from 3 million laying hens. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is involved in an investigation that has included an inspection of the facility and interviews of the victims.

    Healthy individuals infected with SalmonellaBraenderup can experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella Braenderup can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

    The potentially contaminated eggs from the Hyde County farm reached consumers in ten states including Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia by direct delivery to retail stores and restaurants.

    More than 550 million table eggs were called from two Iowa egg farms owned by Austin (Jack) DeCoster in 2010 involving a nationwide Salmonella outbreak that sickened thousands.

    Afterward, Jack and his son Peter DeCoster each plead guilty to one count of allowing misbranded and adultered food to enter interstate commerce.

    They and their company, Quality Egg LLC, ended up paying $7 million in fines and both DeCosters served three months in federal prison.

    The affected eggs this time are from plant number P-1065 with the Julian date range of 011 through the date of 102 printed on either the side portion or the principal side of the carton or package, as follows:

    Lot Codes 011 – 102

    Item ..........Description.............. Carton.............. UPC
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK A LARGE X 30 DOZEN 077236000302
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK A LARGE X15 DOZEN 077236000302
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK A JUMBO X24 DOZEN 077236000500
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK A MEDIUM X30 DOZEN 077236000203
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK A XLARGE X30 DOZEN 077236000401
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK A JUMBO X12 DOZEN 077236000500

    FOOD LION A JUMBO X 12 DOZEN 035826089618
    FOOD LION A MEDIUM X15 DOZEN 035826089649
    FOOD LION A XLARGE X 15 DOZEN 035826089625
    FOOD LION A 18PK LARGE X15 DOZEN 035826089601
    FOOD LION A LARGE X15 DOZEN 035826089588
    FOOD LION A 6PK LARGE X 15 DOZEN 035826089632

    LOOSE A USDA SMALL X 30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE A USDA MEDIUM X 30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE A XLARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE A XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE A MEDIUM X 15 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE A MEDIUM X30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA AA XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA AA XLARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA AA LARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA AA LARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA AA MEDIUM X30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE AA XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA AA LARGE PFG X 30 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA AA LARGE PFG X 15 DOZEN N/A
    LOOSE USDA A XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A

    NELMS A JUMBO X24 634181000018

    WAFFLE HOUSE LOOSE USDA A LARGE X 30 DOZEN N/A

    CRYSTAL FARMS A MEDIUM X30 077236000203
    CRYSTAL FARMS A 18PK MEDIUM X 30 077236000258
    CRYSTAL FARMS A 2.5 DOZ MEDIUM X 25 077236000124

    COUNTRY DAYBREAK A XLARGE X15 DOZEN 077236000401
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK USDA GRADE A XLARGE X 240 DOZEN PULP 077236700400
    COUNTRY DAYBREAK USDA GRADE A LARGE RACK X 240 DOZEN PULP 077236700301

    COBURN FARMS A MEDIUM MP X 30 DOZEN 051933182608
    COBURN FARMS A LARGE X 30 DOZEN 051933190801
    COBURN FARMS A 18PK LARGE X 30 DOZEN 051933182509

    SUNSHINE FARMS A JUMBO X 12 DOZEN 804879457336

    GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE LARGE (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
    GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE LARGE (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
    GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE MEDIUM (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
    GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE XLARGE (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
    GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE MEDIUM (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
    GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE XLARGE (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A

    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 18PK XLARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127132
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK XLARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127128
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA TWIN 18PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127101
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 6PK LARGE X 15 DOZEN 078742127095
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK MEDIUM X 15 DOZEN 078742127224
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127071
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 18PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127088
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A 12PK JUMBO X 22 DOZEN RPC 078742127149
    GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 5DZ LARGE X 5 DOZEN 078742127118

    ref: Rose Acre food safety -
    http://www.goodegg.com/food-safety
    http://www.goodegg.com/food-safety/f...oring-programs

    FDA - recall notice - https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm604640.htm

    Food Safety News - http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2018/0...ll-since-2010/

    Quote The voluntary recall was a result of some illnesses reported on the U.S. East Coast, which led to extensive interviews and eventually a thorough FDA inspection of the Hyde County farm, which produces 2.3 million eggs a day. The facility includes 3 million laying hens with a USDA inspector on-site daily.

    Consumers who have purchased shells eggs are urged to immediately discontinue use of the recalled eggs and to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

    Consumers with questions may contact the company at (855) 215-5730 between the hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Standard time.
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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Hi there, I just wanted to coment on the thread to say that all eggs have Salmonella, all. The canal by which the egg comes out of the chicken is very densely populated by Salmonella. There is no way the egg would come out sterilized. There is then a very important part for the farmer and the rest of the production chain to care for the product in a way that it won't spoil fast before gettin to the consumer. There is also the consumer's strong inmune system to be able to eat this egg and not become ill.

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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    It would be interesting to see what method the FDA uses to determine what amount and/or serotype of Salmonella is considered dangerous. (eggs left to incubate for instance and have extra salmonella growth). There was no immediate data on if the eggs were contaminated from trans-shell external exposure or if the chickens were sick.

    Salmonella bongori major group (type), not the normal Salmonella Enterica was present in this infection. (S. bongori). The variant that appeared is called: Salmonella Braenderup - it is an uncommon serotype in the United States.

    It should NOT have shown up. That is what is suspicious. It was previously found in nut-butters and mango contaminations.

    And if there are certain sterilization procedures in place (US laws) to deal with external contamination were they adequate or was there any other mitigating factor or factors.

    Apparently for larger US producers, there are sterilization procedures in-place, but NOT for smaller producers (or when someone has chickens in their back yard obviously). It varies by country what steps are taken to minimize excessive salmonella growth.

    from: https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceReg.../ucm170615.htm

    USA and other country regulations are different for how eggs are treated. Such as decontamination, pasteurization methods and/or storage temperature.

    Here's some science below on the contamination/decontamination issues:

    Quote Salmonella enteritidis can contaminate the contents of clean, intact shell eggs as a result of infections of the reproductive tissue of laying hens. The principal site of infection would appear to be the upper oviduct. In egg contents the most important sites of contamination are either the outside of the vitelline membrane or the albumen surrounding it.

    In fresh eggs, only few salmonellas are present and as albumen is an iron-restricted environment, growth will only occur once storage-related changes to vitelline membrane permeability, which allow salmonellas to invade yolk contents, have taken place. When this happens high populations are achieved in both yolk contents and albumen.

    Some eggs from naturally infected hens have been found to contain large numbers of S. enteritidis. The rate of change in membrane permeability is temperature-dependent. In eggs stored at 20 degrees C, yolk invasion is uncommon until eggs have been stored for 3 weeks. In stimulated kitchen conditions where temperatures reached 30 degrees C, salmonellas could grow rapidly after a few days.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a regulation expected to prevent each year approximately 79,000 cases of foodborne illness and 30 deaths caused by consumption of eggs contaminated with the bacterium Salmonella Enteritidis.

    The regulation requires preventive measures during the production of eggs in poultry houses and requires subsequent refrigeration during storage and transportation.

    Egg-associated illness caused by Salmonella is a serious public health problem. Infected individuals may suffer mild to severe gastrointestinal illness, short term or chronic arthritis, or even death. Implementing the preventive measures would reduce the number of Salmonella Enteritidis infections from eggs by nearly 60 percent.

    The rule requires that measures designed to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis be adopted by virtually all egg producers with 3,000 or more laying hens whose shell eggs are not processed with a treatment, such as pasteurization, to ensure their safety.

    Meaning, the shells are processed with a treatment of some kind to remove the Salmonella (normally).

    Smaller producers may not do such a sterilization procedure..

    The Egg Rule - on Sterilization and decontamination - https://wayback.archive-it.org/7993/.../UCM232271.pdf

    Salmonella excess comes from an active infection of the reproductive system of the chicken. Apparently the recall in effect comes from either active infections, or lack of decontamination.

    Quote Storage conditions present issues in contamination with focus on duration, temperature, and environmental hygiene.

    Different countries have different regulations.

    Storage limits for table eggs in the United Kingdom were 3 wk at 8 °C (Kinderlerer 1994), while in Israel 3 mo for refrigerated eggs and 16 d at room temperature (Lublin and Sela 2008). In many countries, eggs are required to be stored at low temperatures to restrict microbial growth.

    In Germany, legislation required that egg cooling be applied at 5 to 8 °C for 18 d maximum post lay (EFSA 2009).

    And in the United States, either shell eggs packed for consumers or eggs that receive a treatment from egg producers were required to be kept at 45 °F (7.2 °C) no later than 36 h after the eggs are laid during storage and transportation (FDA 2010). In this scenario, it is more advisable to apply low-temperature storage in order to minimize the possibility that eggs infected with S. Enteritidis are transmitted to humans.

    This recommendation is supported by the study of Gast and Holt (2000), which showed that low temperatures were more effective for controlling S. Enteritidis multiplication in the yolk when high concentration of S. Enteritidis was artificially introduced into egg contents. (Gast and Holt 2000).

    On the other hand, low temperature can slow down the process of penetration (Chousalkar and others2010).

    However, Kang and others (2006) suggested that it is preferable to store eggs at 37 °C for a certain period of time first, instead of 4 °C directly, to allow the endogenous bactericidal activity of egg albumen to kill the contaminating S. Enteritidis.

    This reasoning is valid especially when most eggs are infected through trans-shell contamination.

    While in the case of vertical transmission, this application awaits more research. Further studies show that, although low preservation temperature for table eggs will limit the multiplication of Salmonella, it does not reduce the existing Salmonella concentration.

    It may indeed prolong the survival of Salmonella because Salmonella may be increased by low storage temperature (Baker and Balch 1962; Radkowski 2002; Messens and others 2006) and reduced with higher temperature (Rizk and others 1996).
    Does egg washing do any good? (Depends on if the chicken has a severe salmonella infection (is sick).

    Quote The use of egg washing is a continuous debate despite its broad commercial application.

    Current concerns focus on whether egg washing increases the internal microbial load.

    Within the European Union, egg washing is prohibited except in Sweden and parts of the Netherlands.

    The reason offered is that egg-washing procedures may damage the quality of the cuticle enhancing the opportunity for bacterial invasion (Peebles and Brake 1986; Bialka and others 2004; EFSA 2005).

    Factors related to cuticle damage caused by egg washing include presence of water on the eggshell, presence of iron in the wash water, physical brushing damage, and high pressure (Commission of European Communities, 2003).

    These are the reasons that class A eggs for human consumption are not eligible for the practice of egg washing by European Union legislation and eggs will be downgraded if any forms of disinfection are used.

    However, this reasoning is at odds with research that showed the washing procedure did not appear to affect the incidence of open pores and the overall cuticle quality.

    Meanwhile, it was also indicated that brown eggs in general were of better quality in terms of their cuticle scores than the white eggs when 4 standards, such as mechanical damage, debris, open pores, and cuticle coverage, were considered (Messens 2009).

    And the use of egg washing is authorized in Canada, America, Japan, Australia, Russia, and Mexico for the reason that egg washing can reduce the total microbial load on the surface of sanitized eggs by approximately 2 to above 5 log units (Hutchison and others 2004; Rodríguez Romo 2004).

    Given the controversy on the advantages and disadvantages of egg washing, other procedures are being evaluated.
    The eggs in question were flagged by US rules and sold in the USA by the aforementioned company. FDA flagged the amount of salmonella to be sufficient to cause severe infection in the humans that consumed such.

    In addition, Salmonella Braenderup is the particular variant of the Salmonella infection in this recall. Typically the eggs (and chickens) are checked for Salmonella Enterica, the 'normal' infection.

    https://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index...dborne_illness

    If one chicken contains the Salmonella bacteria, the organism can spread rapidly through thousands of others.

    When these chickens are processed and sent to stores all over the country, a mass Salmonella outbreak can occur.

    A serotype of Salmonella infection bacteria, Salmonella Bongori's background - (it's not ur normal chicken salmonella)

    It is typically considered a microbe of cold-blooded animals, unlike other members of the genus, and is most frequently associated with reptiles (lizards)

    It was discovered in 1966 from a lizard in the city of Bongor, Chad, from which the specific name bongori was derived. After decades of controversy in Salmonella nomenclature, it gained the species status in 2005.

    S. bongori is classically regarded as the Salmonella of lizards.

    However, discrete investigations contradict the notion of strict host-specificity as there emerged reports of occurrence in dogs and birds.

    In animals, unlike those of other Salmonella, infection is generally asymptomatic and does not cause discernible effects. However, infection of pet animals is associated with diarrhea.

    Further, human infections have been substantiated, with conclusive reports from Italy.

    The majority of these cases are among children of less than three years, who are more prone to oral contact with animal droppings. Symptoms are typified by diarrhoea with fever, and acute enteritis. The first observations, from Messina and Palermo, starting from late 1984, were followed by other cities in Sicily.

    Salmonella Braenderup variant - Salmonella Braenderup is found in low percentage (>1%) in animals in the U.S. One report identified that serovar Braenderup can penetrate the eggs of turtles.

    Potential reservoirs for serovar Braenderup are cattle, chicken and turtles. However, isolation from these sources are sporadic.

    S. Braenderup is widely distributed, countries with reports of this serovar included countries in North America (U.S. and Canada), Latin America (Colombia, Cuba, Venezuela), Europe (Greece, Austria, U.K), and Asia (China, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan).

    The incidence for this serotype of Salmonella was mostly found in MANGO infections in the US in 2012, and in 1993 in Switzerland in MeatPies. In 2004-2008 US and Japan in Tomatoes.

    So the point being, this particular infection is 'not normal'..
    Last edited by Bob; 15th April 2018 at 19:54.
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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Are chickens and their eggs safe (a good general question) - in 1998, its been a while, a study was done for chickens sold in the market place (US) - here is what was found..

    February 23, 1998

    CONSUMER REPORTS FINDS 71 PERCENT OF STORE-BOUGHT CHICKEN CONTAINS HARMFUL BACTERIA

    YONKERS, NY – Microbiological tests of store-bought chickens, published in the March issue of Consumer Reports magazine, found Campylobacter, a rod-shaped bacterium and the leading cause of food poisoning nationwide, in 63 percent of the chickens tested, while Salmonella was found in 16 percent of the chickens. Those numbers include eight percent of the total number tested that had both Campylobacter and Salmonella. Only 29 percent were free from both. The testing is the most comprehensive of its kind ever published in the US, and uses a sample size of almost 1000 fresh chickens purchased at retail stores in 36 cities.

    Public health officials estimate that the annual cost of illnesses caused by Campylobacter is up to $5.6 billion and salmonella is up to $3.5 billion. Campylobacter is responsible for 1.1 to 7 million food-borne infections and 110 to 1000 deaths each year. And Salmonella sickens some 700,000 to 4 million people, though it’s deadlier, killing up to 2000.

    The two bacterial contaminants can be eliminated if the chicken is cooked to an interior temperature of 180° (breasts to 170°). But cooking a chicken to the proper temperature is only half the battle – cooks have to be careful not to spread the bacteria via contaminated implements, pans, cutting boards, kitchen towels, and sponges.

    Other key findings in the report:


    Microbiological contamination
    • As a group, premium chickens – including free-range birds – were most contaminated.
    • One in 20 birds were nearly spoiled, and even a fresh bird is not necessarily free of disease-causing bacteria.
    • No one brand was consistently cleaner than others.

    Some generic E. coli (an indicator of fecal contamination) is present on virtually every chicken on the market, but the levels were almost always low.

    In addition to bacterial contamination, Consumer Reports also tested for taste. Key findings:

    Despite their reputation and price, the free-range chickens tasted no better overall than other types.

    Chickens from all the brands were acceptable in taste. But there were enough differences overall among brands that some could be identified as slightly better or worse than others. However, the taste variations noted were often as great within a single brand as among the brands. And if seasonings or sauces are used, differences among brands will likely be minimal.

    Recommendations to improve chicken safety

    The US. Department of Agriculture certifies a chicken as free from visible signs of disease, but not free of disease-causing microorganisms. The USDA has made several recent enhancements (the latest put into place on January 26, 1998) to inspection systems required at poultry processing plants, including testing for Salmonella, but not Campylobacter. Among measures that would make for cleaner chickens, Consumer Reports recommends:
    • Test for Campylobacter – which is not currently required at chicken plants;
    • Lower the Salmonella limit — USDA regulations allow that up to 20 percent of a plant’s chickens can test positively for salmonella;
    • Congress give USDA real enforcement power by authorizing recalls and civil penalties;
    • Carry out research and education initiatives as proposed in the Administration’s Fiscal Year ’99 Food Safety budget request.

    ref:
    Contact: Rana Arons Silver, 914-378-2000
    Consumer Union Yonkers Office
    http://consumersunion.org/news/consu...mful-bacteria/

    Last edited by Bob; 15th April 2018 at 21:18.
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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Over the last few years there have been MASSIVE recalls of meats and eggs. Although there is a real danger to factory and intensive farming practices I also find it a very convenient way to divert foods out of the supply chain.

    Why would anyone do this?
    A. Increase prices
    B. Divert food to very cheaply stockpile it for later use....
    C. Sew fear among consumers to push forward plans and agendas for things like irradiation.

    Perhaps I am a bit too conspiratorial......but seriously 200 MILLION eggs!!!

    and HUNDREDS of million of pounds of meats and other foods.

    http://http://www.businessinsurance....n-u-s-history/

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    History of food recalls since 1996

    https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal...l-case-archive

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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Stories like this make me glad I have three hens who provide me with fresh eggs every day.

    Everyone should keep a few chickens around. They are one of the easiest animals to take care of as long as you have a yard. Plus if everyone had their own chickens there would be no need for the factory chicken houses.

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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Ditto for rabbits

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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Quote Posted by Oddball (here)
    Stories like this make me glad I have three hens who provide me with fresh eggs every day.

    Everyone should keep a few chickens around. They are one of the easiest animals to take care of as long as you have a yard. Plus if everyone had their own chickens there would be no need for the factory chicken houses.
    and as long ad you don`t live in a country where it can go 20 centigrade below - frozen chicken
    How to let the desire of your mind become the desire of your heart - Gurdjieff

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    Default Re: Salmonella in US Eggs - Indiana - Recall issued

    Love your waffles, do you eat out at Waffle House?


    The Washington Post (and about every other news agency) picked up the story too.

    Many of the TV MSM networks didn't get into the 'science' behind the contamination, or the type of bacteria, just lumping it as "salmonella".. They focused on the numbers, both sick from the salmonella and the amount of eggs produced and the amount of hens generating the food product.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.833b7c06cef1

    An investigation by the federal agency led to an inspection of the farm, which is located in Hyde County, N.C., and produces 2.3 million eggs a day from 3 million hens. Eggs produced at the farm are distributed to retail stores and restaurants in Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and the Carolinas.

    The recalled eggs were sold under brand names such as Great Value, Country Daybreak and Crystal Farms.

    They were also sold to Waffle House restaurants and Food Lion stores.

    The particular egg-farm in question is in Hyde County, N.C., and produces 2.3 million eggs a day from 3 million hens.

    Rose Acre Farms is a family-owned company headquartered in Seymour, Ind., and has 17 facilities in eight states.

    The Washington Post tried to reach the company Sunday. Possibly nobody in the office picks up the phone on Sunday. In an earlier post, the numbers for reporting, plus reaching the company were provided.


    Waffle House does search for quality products/ingredients for its food.

    Consumer Affairs website - comments and complaints - https://www.consumeraffairs.com/food/waffle_house.html

    There was no mention of the contaminated eggs on their website or facebook page - https://www.wafflehouse.com/

    Reports from 'The Daily Meal' - https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/10-...t-waffle-house

    Quote Waffle House brings in more than $1 billion in revenue annually, yet it remains a private company and never advertises. Even though it’s a major chain, part of the company’s philosophy is to encourage social interaction between the patrons and servers and to greet regular customers by name. Waffle House is also pretty quirky: they cater, there’s a Waffle House food truck in the Atlanta area, they’ll accept your package deliveries, servers give out free hats to kids, and the company even has an Instagram page for its test kitchen.

    The numbers are staggering when it comes to the sheer amount of food that Waffle House employees serve per minute: 341 strips of bacon, 238 hash brown orders (hash browns are a specialty), 145 waffles, and 127 hamburgers. If you were to lay the bacon they serve in a year end-to-end it would stretch all the way around the Equator; if you were to stack all of the sausage patties they serve daily on top of one another they’d be four times as tall as the Empire State Building; and every year they serve enough coffee to fill eight Olympic swimming pools.
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