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    Default The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    This is a thread to collect items related to the Space Economy and associated Space Politics (domestic and international).

    Items that might be relevant are:
    - private space investment
    - satellite programmes etc.
    - space stations and developments
    - national, regional and international space ventures
    - militarisation of space

    There may be other related items that come up but this is my first guess of what might fall into the category.

    The main objective is to collate items in the newly rejuvenated space sector - both private and public - which seems to have been injected with new impetus. Trends, themes and patterns may also emerge.
    The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.
    (= History moves ahead, no matter the criticism it may attract. The saying is found in many languages from the Middle East to India.)

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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    First, the latest announcement from President Putin on Russia’s space programme; remarks delivered on Cosmonautics Day, 12 April 2018:

    Quote Putin lays out priorities of Russia’s space program on Cosmonautics Day
    Tomasz Nowakowski
    Russian President Vladimir Putin visiting the Cosmos pavilion at the all-Russian Center of Achievements of the National Economy (VDNKh) in Moscow on April 12, 2018.
    Russian President Vladimir Putin visiting the Cosmos pavilion at the all-Russian Center of Achievements of the National Economy (VDNKh) in Moscow on April 12, 2018. Photo Credit: kremlin.ru

    Russian President Vladimir Putin made remarks regarding essential elements of his nation’s space program on Thursday, April 12, when the country celebrated Cosmonautics Day.

    Cosmonautics Day in Russia celebrates the anniversary of Yuri Gagarin becoming the first person to orbit the Earth. For Russian officials, the day is considered to be the perfect occasion to recall the achievements of the country’s space program – and to outline potential future goals.

    This year, Putin visited the Cosmos pavilion at the all-Russian Center of Achievements of the National Economy (VDNKh) in Moscow, where he made remarks about Russia’s future space exploration plans. In one of his first statements, Putin declared when the first tests of a new super-heavy rocket will be carried out.

    The super-heavy rocket, the first trial is planned in 10 years,” Putin said.

    These tests are currently planned to be conducted at the Vostochny Cosmodrome in Russia’s Far East. However, Putin added that in order to perform these trials, a special infrastructure is needed there, including a dedicated launch compound.

    One more launch pad needs to be created at the Vostochny Space Launch Center,” the Russian president acknowledged.

    Putin went on to note that work on the rocket and the launch site required to support it – should be carried out simultaneously.

    “When we discussed all these issues, we agreed that one project should be synchronized with the other, so that we can have the launch pads and rockets simultaneously. Otherwise it makes no sense,” Putin said.

    Answering questions from cosmonauts, including Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space, Putin also promised to push ahead with the nation’s lunar program. He noted that the first step of a crewed mission to the Moon by 2030 is creating a space station in lunar orbit. He was referring to the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, formerly known as the Deep Space Gateway – an international cislunar space station.

    “A Moon orbiter will come first. Then modules on the Moon itself will emerge. At least that is what the plans are. I hope they will come true,” Putin revealed.

    The Russian president added that the super-heavy rocket is planned to play a major role in Russia’s lunar program as well as the next-generation spacecraft known as “Federation.” RKK Energia, the spacecraft’s manufacturer, plans to complete the construction of the first vessel by 2021.

    In addition to remarks regarding the super-heavy rocket and lunar program, Putin also told the crowd that Russia has no intention of withdrawing from international cooperation in space. The statement came when tensions between Moscow and the West are rising and there are concerns that this growing tension could jeopardize international space projects, like the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway.

    “We are not going to upset anything or to quit these programs. We are determined to complete them. We have partners in the exploration of Mars and the Moon – the United States, Canada, Japan, and the European Union,” Putin said.
    From here: http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/or...monautics-day/
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    Isnt it interesting that Russia still tows the deep state 'party line' that we can only get to deep space using 'heavy rockets'. Russia already has publicly published research that shows that mass can be reduced.

    In fact, the black ops have known about antigravity for more than half a century, as evidenced by the testimony of Bill Uhouse, who worked in Area 51 on antigravity flight simulator in the 1950’s and met aliens:



    The deep state and black ops have known about alien moon bases as well, as noted by Sgt Karl Wolfe, Secret Structures on the Moon:



    A blackops antigravity craft is the TR-3B, the manmade black flying triangle

    http://www.darkgovernment.com/news/tr-3b/

    Also, the u.s.a. has already militarized space:
    Last edited by Justplain; 16th April 2018 at 18:03.

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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    Thanks both for the contributions above.

    @Cider, in answer to the question: yes, I think there is a shift going on with many more private corporations playing more transparently in the Space Economy. I think this is the “corporatisation” of space. I believe we are going to start seeing far more about mining in space etc. from private companies. Perhaps this will be a little like the British East India company being the company that controlled and drove much of the British colonialisation... and they simply called in the British military to back them up when things got too hot for them to handle.

    I guess the overall idea is to track the growing mercantilism of space.

    So, the last story you posted, about Rolls Royce and Boeing investing in a UK space engine is the type of thing I wanted to collate and collect here.
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    Quote Posted by Justplain (here)
    Isnt it interesting that Russia still tows the deep state 'party line' that we can only get to deep space using 'heavy rockets'.
    They’re not towing the deep state party line completely, just enough to not give the game away and provoke the wrath of the deep state space factions that want to remain secret. Russia announced a couple years ago that they’ve invented a nuclear powered rocket that can get us to Mars in 6 weeks. Now that may not be anti-gravity tech but 6 weeks is still short enough to provide a pretext for colonising Mars.

    https://www.rt.com/news/334416-russi...uclear-engine/
    Quote A nuclear power propulsion system could propel a spacecraft to Mars in just over a month, a huge step forward from the current 18 months required. Russia might test a nuclear engine as early as 2018, the head of the Rosatom nuclear corporation revealed.
    Another advantage of a nuclear engine is that it enables a spacecraft to maneuver throughout the flight, whereas existing technology only makes a defined trajectory flight possible.

    Radiation makes Mars travel impossible today…let’s fly faster!
    A nuclear power unit makes it possible to reach Mars in a matter of one to one and a half months, providing capability for maneuvering and acceleration,” the head of Rosatom Sergey Kirienko said. “Today's engines can only reach Mars in a year and a half, without the possibility of return,” Kirienko said.

    The nuclear engine project was launched in 2010 and by 2012 an engineering design had been created. The project’s budget is estimated at 20 billion rubles (about $US274 million).

    It has been reported that a prototype nuclear drive could start testing by 2018. Traditional rocket engines are believed to have reached the limit of their potential and can’t be used for deep space exploration.

    An operable module with a nuclear drive would facilitate space exploration both for close-range expeditions to the Moon and deep-space autonomous robotic missions to the outskirts of the Solar system
    What I find interesting, is Putins announcement of their ‘invincible’ nuclear powered missiles, that can keep a nuclear warhead in flight indefinitely, with unlimited range, and is most likely derived from the same technology they’re putting into their heavy-rockets. And from the gist of the video below, it sounds like the concept of heavy-rocket is more to do with the physics of keeping a space station locked into a lunar orbit where the gravity isn’t as strong as the Earths.


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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    Quote Posted by Jayke (here)
    ... Russia announced a couple years ago that they’ve invented a nuclear powered rocket that can get us to Mars in 6 weeks. Now that may not be anti-gravity tech but 6 weeks is still short enough to provide a pretext for colonising Mars.

    https://www.rt.com/news/334416-russi...uclear-engine/
    Quote A nuclear power propulsion system could propel a spacecraft to Mars in just over a month, a huge step forward from the current 18 months required. Russia might test a nuclear engine as early as 2018, the head of the Rosatom nuclear corporation revealed.
    Another advantage of a nuclear engine is that it enables a spacecraft to maneuver throughout the flight, whereas existing technology only makes a defined trajectory flight possible.

    Radiation makes Mars travel impossible today…let’s fly faster!
    A nuclear power unit makes it possible to reach Mars in a matter of one to one and a half months, providing capability for maneuvering and acceleration,” the head of Rosatom Sergey Kirienko said. “Today's engines can only reach Mars in a year and a half, without the possibility of return,” Kirienko said.

    ...

    It has been reported that a prototype nuclear drive could start testing by 2018. Traditional rocket engines are believed to have reached the limit of their potential and can’t be used for deep space exploration.

    An operable module with a nuclear drive would facilitate space exploration both for close-range expeditions to the Moon and deep-space autonomous robotic missions to the outskirts of the Solar system
    What I find interesting, is Putins announcement of their ‘invincible’ nuclear powered missiles, that can keep a nuclear warhead in flight indefinitely, with unlimited range, and is most likely derived from the same technology they’re putting into their heavy-rockets.....
    This is a “doozie”, thanks for posting!

    I guess when your funds are limited (Russia’s economy is relatively small) you have to look at ways of sharing expertise and expense across different programmes.... as a result we may be seeing the “two birds with one stone” outcomes of collaborative efforts in the form of two variants of the same underlying nuclear engine.
    The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    And here’s another development to enable / facilitate the mercantilism of space: galactic space positioning, courtesy NASA.

    Quote NASA's Got a Plan for a 'Galactic Positioning System' to Save Astronauts Lost in Space
    By Rafi Letzter, Live Science Staff Writer | April 17, 2018 07:00am ET

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Outer space glows with a bright fog of X-ray light, coming from everywhere at once. But peer carefully into that fog, and faint, regular blips become visible. These are millisecond pulsars (https://www.space.com/32661-pulsars.html), city-sized neutron stars rotating incredibly quickly, and firing X-rays (https://www.livescience.com/32344-what-are-x-rays.html) into the universe with more regularity than even the most precise atomic clocks. And NASA wants to use them to navigate probes and crewed ships through deep space.

    A telescope mounted on the International Space Station (ISS), the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), has been used to develop a brand new technology with near-term, practical applications: a galactic positioning system, NASA scientist Zaven Arzoumanian told physicists Sunday (April 15) at the April meeting of the American Physical Society.

    With this technology, "You could thread a needle to get into orbit around the moon of a disant planet instead of doing a flyby," Arzoumian told Live Science. A galactic positioning system could also provide "a fallback, so that if a crewed mission loses contact with the Earth, they'd still have navigation systems on board that are autonomous."

    Right now, the kind of maneuvers that navigators would need to put a probe in orbit around distant moons are borderline impossible. In the vastness of outer space, it's just not possible to figure out a ship's location precisely enough to engine-firing just right. That's a big part of why so many of the most famous planetary missions NASA has managed — Voyager 1 (https://www.livescience.com/39620-ho...ar-system.html), Juno, and New Horizons among them — have been flybys, where spacecraft have flown close to, but just past, major planetary objects.

    Relying on Earth for navigation is also a problem for crewed missions, Arzoumian said. If that signal, connecting Earth and a distant spacecraft like a long and tenuous thread, gets somehow lost, astronauts would be hard-pressed to find their way home from Mars.

    Here's how the galactic positioning system would work

    A galactic positioning system would go a long way toward solving that problem, Arzoumian said, though he cautioned he's more a pulsar expert than a navigator. And it would work a great deal like the Global Positioning System (GPS) on your smartphone.
    ...
    From here: https://www.space.com/40325-galactic...stem-nasa.html

    ==========

    Interestingly, Dr Paul LaViolette speculated that pulsars could form some kind of galaxy wide communications network in his book, “Decoding the Message of the Pulsars”:

    Quote Decoding the Message of the Pulsars presents evidence for the existence of interstellar radio beacons of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) origin that are beaming signals toward the solar system. Dr. LaViolette announced this important discovery to the astronomical community on January 12, 2000 at the 195th meeting of the American Astronomical Society held in Atlanta, Georgia (abstract). His findings were well received.

    First time proof of the existence of interstellar radio signals of intelligent origin being sent to us.
    Evidence that pulsars are part of a vast network of ETI communication beacons.

    This exhaustive study presents first time proof that astronomers have been receiving radio signals of intelligent origin. As early as 1967 and continuing to the present, radio astronomers have been carefully studying and cataloging unusual interstellar beacons called pulsars thinking them to be stars of natural origin. Dr. LaViolette, who has been researching pulsars for 35 years, shows that, up to now, the nature of these radio sources has been grossly misunderstood. He has discovered that a number of very unique pulsars are nonrandomly distributed in the sky and mark key Galactic locations that have particular significance from an ETI communication standpoint. He also presents evidence of unusual geometric alignments among pulsars and intriguing pulse period relationships. Equally compelling is the message they are sending-a warning about a past Galactic core explosion disaster that should help us avert a future global tragedy.
    • Contains extensive analysis of pulsar data, revealing new ideas about the origins and functions of pulsars
    • Provides proof of an extraterrestrial communication network
    • Includes information about the formation of crop circles and force-field-beaming technology
    From here: http://etheric.com/decoding-message-of-the-pulsars/

    ==========

    I wonder if there is a kind of galactic Piri Reis map (http://www.sacred-texts.com/piri/index.htm) we have “found” and are using for this galactic positioning system?

    Can’t have our space trawlers and expeditionary vehicles getting lost, can we?
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    Here is an article about managing traffic in space.... yes, it seems we have now shifted from “space junk” to “space traffic”. This signals that there may be some planning for more activity and the need for frameworks, agreements and systems potentially outside of the military domain or at least some parts outside of the military domain.

    Couple this with the fact that several of the world’s largest companies have revenues and market capitalisation larger than those of many nation states and it may be that corporations outside of the military industrial complex are seeking to widen the participation in space.

    The language used in this article is interesting.... it speaks of “space traffic control”, obviously drawing on the idea of air traffic control and evoking the idea of busy airports and multiple flights.....

    Quote Space traffic control: technological means and governance implications
    by Nayef Al-Rodhan
    Monday, April 16, 2018

    Since the first human-made object was launched into space in October 1957, the number of objects orbiting the Earth has risen into the thousands. The term “space traffic” refers to all spacecraft (both active and inactive) and space debris that are currently orbiting the Earth. The current amount of space traffic in orbit is quite striking. According to NASA, there are more than 500,000 pieces of debris the size of a marble or larger, orbiting the Earth, travelling at speeds of up to 28,000 kilometers per hour, enough to damage a satellite or spacecraft upon contact. In fact, at that speed, even “tiny flecks of paint can damage a spacecraft”. Data provided by the United States Space Surveillance Network (SSN) quotes that there are around 21,000 objects larger than 10 centimeters orbiting the Earth and more than 200,000 smaller objects.

    The “over-congestion” of key orbits greatly decreases their utility, as collisions become far more likely. Collisions between existing objects can create further debris, subsequently increasing the chance of collision and jeopardizing future space travel.

    The variety of objects in space is large. Orbital debris comprises expired spacecraft, spent rocket boosters, individual pieces of space assets, and even objects such as gloves. The last few decades have seen a drastic increase in the amount of objects in the low Earth orbit (LEO) domain—between 200 and 2,000 kilometers in attitude—which is by far the most congested orbit and contains important space assets such as the International Space Station (ISS) and other crewed spacecraft, as well as the Hubble Space Telescope. The economic importance of the LEO domain is growing rapidly with the emergence of new space systems, comprising hundreds to thousands of small or medium-size satellites, for Earth observation and telecommunications. These new space systems create new space traffic risks and are themselves at risk from others satellites and debris.

    The amount of traffic in space complicates the task of launching new satellites. Launch windows already depend on a variety of factors and thus must be very carefully planned. Windows for launch can be limited, and the need to assess space traffic to avoid collisions simply adds another factor for consideration. Today, more than 60 nations spend a portion of their national budgets on space projects and, increasingly, private companies are launching new objects into orbit. Over the course of several years, scientists have noted a stark increase in the number of times two space objects have passed closer to each other than the minimum distance generally understood as safe. Any object larger than one centimeter can cause damage to satellites and other space assets, and most space debris are uncontrolled travel at high speed. The “over-congestion” of key orbits greatly decreases their utility, as collisions become far more likely. Collisions between existing objects can create further debris, subsequently increasing the chance of collision and jeopardizing future space travel.

    ...
    Continues here: http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3473/1
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    So, Airbus together with Masayoshi Son, the CEO of SoftBank, and Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft, are planning a 500 satellite network - EarthNow LLC - that will provide “unmatched” video coverage of the earth:

    (Side note: SoftBank is also in a joint venture with Google to run an AI as a mayoral candidate in Japan: http://otaquest.com/tama-city-ai-mayor/)

    Quote Satellite Project Draws Airbus, SoftBank, Bill Gates as Investors
    Constellation of some 500 powerful satellites designed to provide real-time, continuous global coverage

    April 18, 2018 5:17 a.m. ET
    By
    Andy Pasztor

    Airbus SE and two of the world’s most recognizable tech billionaires, Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates and SoftBank Group Corp. chief executive Masayoshi Son, propose to build and launch some 500 small satellites intended to provide unmatched video coverage of the globe.

    The EarthNow LLC project, slated to be unveiled Wednesday, is still in its formative stage without a firm price tag, launch schedule or technical details, according to founder and chief executive Russell Hannigan.
    ...
    From here: https://www.wsj.com/articles/satelli...ors-1524043058
    (I cannot get the remainder because I do not have a subscription)

    ==========

    Russell Hannigan, mentioned in the article as being the EarthNow project’s chief executive, used to do business development for Intellectual Ventures.... and that company has been involved in making Tesla’s wireless power a reality with their initial focus being drones.

    (Side note: wasn’t Google also doing work on AI for drones for the US military: https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...en-tensorflow:)

    Quote Wireless energy for drones? Intellectual Ventures beams power with metamaterials
    by Alan Boyle on February 1, 2017 at 7:00 am

    BELLEVUE, Wash. – Wireless power transmission has been a dream since the days of Nikola Tesla (https://www.geekwire.com/2016/pbs-do...ero-for-geeks/), but Intellectual Ventures (http://www.intellectualventures.com/) is adding a twist to make it so, and make it profitable.

    The twist is a little something called metamaterials (http://www.iop.org/resources/topic/a...metamaterials/), a technology that has already spawned several spin-outs from the Bellevue-based company. Russell Hannigan, senior director of business development for Intellectual Ventures’ Invention Science Fund (http://www.intellectualventures.com/.../category/isf/), says a decision on how to commercialize the technology is just “a few months away.”

    ...

    Our driving application – the one that’s the most lucrative – is drones,” Hannigan said.

    ...
    From here: https://www.geekwire.com/2017/intell...ls-beam-power/

    ==========

    Intellectual Ventures does not have such a rosy reputation (see for instance here: https://www.cnet.com/news/inside-int...mpany-in-tech/) having been accused of buying up and hoarding patents.

    It also seems to be at the confluence of quite a few leading edge scientific development commercialisations:

    Quote ... Intellectual Ventures’ past spin-outs in the field include Kymeta, which focuses on flat-panel antennas; Echodyne, which works on drone-friendly radar scanners; and Evolv, which is building security scanners. Yet another metamaterials venture based in Bellevue, Pivotal Communications, can trace its lineage to the Invention Science Fund.

    ...

    The lab’s power-beaming system shoots microwaves at a metamaterials-based reflective array the size of a chalkboard, which focuses the waves on their intended target. In real-world applications, the reflector’s focus can be shifted electronically to track a moving target without having to reposition the antenna.

    ... the University of Washington’s Matt Reynolds, is also a consultant for the new project that Intellectual Ventures has in mind. ... “In order to get longer-range wireless power … you need to use fundamentally different physics,” he said.

    ...
    Microwaves being shot at a metamaterials array? A link to the new 5G system perhaps.... or maybe something to do with space weapons?

    And,
    Quote “you need to use a fundamentally different physics”
    How interesting: this is reminiscent of the statement of Lockheed Martin’s Ben Rich statement that there is “an error in the equations”. Perhaps the zero point energy ideas might be dripping through from the black budget world.

    ==========

    Back to EarthNow and its founder and CEO: Richard Hannigan is an interesting guy (https://www.linkedin.com/in/russell-hannigan-7722562).
    • Before this EarthNow project, he worked for Intellectual Ventures for eight years.
    • He has a number of patents to his name.
    • He started his career at British Aerospace Systems in 1985 and
    • He attended an educational programme at the “International Space University” in 1988

    Quote The International Space University Central Campus and global headquarters are located in Illkirch-Graffenstaden near Strasbourg, France. ... for educating and training space professionals and post-graduate students. As of January 2014, there were over 3700 ISU alumni from more than 100 countries. In November 2017 the International Space University hosted a conference in Strasbourg that led to the formation of the Moon Village Association. [2][3]

    The ISU faculty members include astronauts, space agency leaders, space engineers, space scientists, managers, and experts in space law and policy comprising an international collection of experts in technical and non-technical space-related fields.

    The Chancellor of the International Space University is Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin,[4] who succeeded then–European Space Agency Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain and acclaimed science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke, in 2004. The fifth President of the International Space University is Prof. Walter Peeters, who took office in September 2011.
    From here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inte...ace_University

    So was he “selected” all those years ago? Or is he returning to his real passion, space?

    =========

    So, it seems this project for 500 satellites might have quite a bit of support from long time players in the space game....

    An additional fact that might give credence to this view is that I can’t find another article on it aside from the one in the Wall Street Journal (published by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp, which is part of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire).
    This points to a carefully orchestrated and managed PR campaign with connections to people of influence (I draw this conclusion based on my time managing marketing and PR campaigns for a multi national company).
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    A request to all posters regarding this thread:

    It’s purpose is to focus on the economic and commercial side of space developments as a means to track the mercantilism in space.

    Whether this is an ethical or moral direction to take is not what this thread is intended to discuss. There certainly are ethical issues and concerns but this is not the purpose of this thread.

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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    China’s interests in space are developing apace. Here an article on their plans for a shuttle:

    Quote Chinese space shuttle flights planned for 2030
    Proposed reusable craft would launch from back of a plane


    April 18, 2018 07:14 JST

    CHONGQING -- China will have a reusable space shuttle ready for test flights in 2030, the head of a state-owned aerospace company tells Nikkei.

    China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp., which also produces missiles and other military systems, aims to build broadband communications networks using low-orbit satellites as well.

    "Technological advances have brought space development into the commercialization phase in a range of fields," Chairman Gao Hongwei told Nikkei in a written interview. The company will partner with aircraft maker Aviation Industry Corp. of China and rocket builder China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp. in the country's aerospace push.

    Developing a "spaceplane" shuttle -- which can take off and land horizontally, like an airplane, unlike American shuttles that blasted off vertically using rockets -- is one of CASIC's key commercial projects. The company sees the craft carrying out operations including satellite launches, space travel and resupplying space stations.

    According to Chinese media, the spaceplane would consist of two winged vehicles: a large carrier for launching and a smaller one for spaceflight, which rides atop the launch craft. The carrier would fly the smaller vehicle to an altitude of 30km to 40km before separating and landing, while its companion would carry on up to space, fulfill its duties and finally return to Earth.

    The ability to reuse both craft would significantly heighten CASIC's ability to compete on cost. It is currently researching technologies for parts such as engines and fuselages. The initial goal is to make a craft as capable as or better than the U.S. military's unmanned X-37B shuttle-like vessel, said a source affiliated with the project.

    CASIC's other key space projects, which represent an unusual breadth even among global players, involve building communications networks using drones and low-orbit satellites, which would create access in places that would normally be difficult to reach. Such networks can be used for weather observation and natural disaster response, for instance. The company aims to have a constellation of 156 satellites in place and offer broadband service by 2025.


    The Kuaizhou 1A, developed by China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp., can launch three satellites at once. (Photo from company web site)

    The state-owned company is also ramping up its satellite-launching business. It has successfully launched its Kuaizhou 1A vehicle, which can deliver three satellites at once. That vehicle offers per-kilogram costs far below launch prices in the international market, according to Chinese media. CASIC aims to slash launch prices further -- to about $10,000 or less -- by developing a rocket capable of carrying twice as many satellites as the Kuaizhou 1A.

    Reusable space shuttles are a common goal among international space players. U.S. company Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX -- fronted by Tesla entrepreneur Elon Musk -- has worked to cut launch costs by making vehicles reusable, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency plans to hold takeoff and landing tests for reusable craft next spring. CASIC aims "to join the top ranks of businesses with global competitive power," said Gao.

    But concerns of security, including in the cyber realm, have made many international players wary of dealing with Chinese businesses. CASIC's military ties in particular will probably lead to calls for transparency inmanagement if it is to do more business with foreign companies.
    From here: https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Tec...anned-for-2030
    Last edited by Searcher; 19th April 2018 at 08:10.
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    It seems there is some jockeying for positioning among various players in the US space arena.

    1. The US Airforce says they “can handle it”, no need for a separate space force:

    Quote Air Force leaders say they're the right force for space
    While the Air Force wouldn't take direct aim at Trump administration trial balloons about creating a new military branch for space, leaders Tuesday used the Space Symposium to show such a force isn't needed -- the Air Force can do the job just fine.
    ...
    From here: http://gazette.com/air-force-chiefs-...rticle/1624514

    2. The military industrial complex “old boys club”, are still playing...

    Here’s Lockheed Martin evoking a sense of history to show their long credentials to continue to be in the game:

    Quote Lockheed CEO: Time is now to inspire next generation of space pioneers
    The nation's space sector has a golden opportunity to inspire a generation of youth to pursue space careers, Lockheed Martin Corp. CEO Marillyn Hewson said Tuesday in Colorado Springs.

    Hewson compared President Donald Trump's reformation of the National Space Council, headed by Vice President Mike Pence, to a speech by President John F. Kennedy just four months into his term that called for putting a human on the moon by the end of the 1960s.
    ...
    From here: http://gazette.com/article/1624513

    Maybe they’re feeling left out with all this hype about Elon Musk and SpaceX?

    3. The new space heroes - SpaceX, RocketLab, etc. - (and some old: Virgin Galactic) are busy with their rockets and their PR campaigns, for instance just in the last two days:

    Wednesday, April 18
    Rocket Lab just got a leg up on the race to launch tiny satellites
    CNNMoney.com — 6:45 am ET (1045 GMT)

    Weather, technical issues delay Rocket Lab's first commercial launch
    Hawke's Bay (NZ) Today — 6:44 am ET (1044 GMT)

    Rocket Lab pushes back first commercial launch by 'weeks'
    Stuff.co.nz — 6:42 am ET (1042 GMT)

    Virgin Galactic Releases Update on New Mexico Spaceflight Operations
    KRWG-FM Las Cruces, NM — 6:41 am ET (1041 GMT)

    SpaceX set for second TESS launch attempt Wednesday evening
    Orlando Sentinel — 6:26 am ET (1026 GMT)

    SpaceX Will Build Its Next-Gen Mars Rocket in Los Angeles
    SPACE.com — 5:39 am ET (0939 GMT)

    Forecast clear for SpaceX launch of NASA planet hunter Wednesday
    Florida Today — 5:19 am ET (0919 GMT)
    Tuesday, April 17
    Rocket Lab aiming for two space flights a month and a second launch pad video
    Stuff.co.nz — 5:56 am ET (0956 GMT)

    Virgin Galactic Works On Space Flight Cabin
    Aviation Week — 5:53 am ET (0953 GMT)

    SpaceX will build BFR spaceships and rocket boosters at Port of Los Angeles
    Los Angeles Times — 5:51 am ET (0951 GMT)

    SpaceX to build Mars rocket at the Port of Los Angeles
    CNNMoney.com — 5:50 am ET (0950 GMT)

    SpaceX Will Make Massive, Mars-Bound ‘BFR’ Rocket at L.A. Port
    Bloomberg News — 5:41 am ET (0941 GMT)

    Elon Musk’s latest SpaceX idea involves a party balloon and bounce house
    TechCrunch — 5:35 am ET (0935 GMT)

    SpaceX is about to launch a NASA satellite designed to discover thousands of planets
    CNBC — 5:30 am ET (0930 GMT)

    SpaceX Launch of NASA's TESS Space Telescope Scrubbed for Today
    Popular Mechanics — 5:29 am ET (0929 GMT)

    SpaceX to launch a small planet hunter for NASA on Monday
    Ars Technica — 5:22 am ET (0922 GMT)

    It’s official: SpaceX will build its monster rocket in California
    Ars Technica — 5:21 am ET (0921 GMT)

    Elon Musk has a new idea, and it involves a rocket and a party balloon
    Mashable — 5:19 am ET (0919 GMT)

    SpaceX scrubs first attempt to launch TESS on a mission to search for near-Earth exoplanets
    NasaSpaceFlight.com — 5:08 am ET (0908 GMT)

    Watch SpaceX Loft NASA’s New Planet-Hunting Mission Into Orbit
    Wired News — 5:07 am ET (0907 GMT)

    NASA and SpaceX Delay Launch of TESS, a New Planet Hunter
    New York Times — 5:05 am ET (0905 GMT)

    Elon Musk Says SpaceX Will Try to Land a Rocket with a 'Giant Party Balloon'
    SPACE.com — 4:55 am ET (0855 GMT)

    SpaceX scrubs TESS launch, targets Wednesday attempt
    Orlando Sentinel — 4:46 am ET (0846 GMT)

    NASA, SpaceX targeting Wednesday launch of planet hunter after scrub
    Florida Today — 4:35 am ET (0835 GMT)

    Mayor says SpaceX to build new rocket in Port of Los Angeles
    AP — 4:31 am ET (0831 GMT)
    ===========

    This volume of press coverage points to a very significant, coordinated public relations campaign. Some parties are pushing this VERY HARD.

    4. President Trump’s administration is taking an active role, shifting the space sector out of complete control of the military and to the department of commerce. VP Pence and republican Ross are on point as the “talking heads”:

    Pence:
    In Colorado, Pence says commerce dept. will play role in space traffic management
    Florida Today — 4:35 am ET (0835 GMT)

    National Space Council Will Deliver Space-Junk Plan to Trump, VP Pence Says
    SPACE.com — 4:54 am ET (0854 GMT)

    White House readies new system for space traffic management, VP Mike Pence says
    GeekWire — 5:18 am ET (0918 GMT)

    Vice President Pence talks up private-sector space, U.S. dominance during Colorado address to industry
    Denver Business Journal — 5:42 am ET (0942 GMT)

    Mike Pence tells Colorado Springs crowd about going to the moon and cleaning up space junk
    Denver Post — 5:41 am ET (0941 GMT)

    VP Mike Pence reaffirms commitment to return to the moon and beyond
    KOAA-TV Colorado Springs — 5:48 am ET (0948 GMT)

    VP Pence: Commerce Department will oversee new space debris policy
    CNBC — 5:48 am ET (0948 GMT)

    Trump administration aiming high in space exploration, Pence says at Space Symposium
    Colorado Springs Gazette — 5:44 am ET (0944 GMT)
    Ross:
    Ross: Space is getting crowded and Earth debris needs serious attention
    Florida Today — 5:19 am ET (0919 GMT)

    Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross lays out his plan to streamline space regulations
    GeekWire — 6:17 am ET (1017 GMT)

    And see story below from Salon.
    Broader positioning:
    Commerce to take responsibility for space traffic management under new policy
    Space News — 4:58 am ET (0858 GMT)

    A year later, a new political reality for military space
    Space News — 5:03 am ET (0903 GMT)
    5. The “intelligentsia” fire back from the sidelines with sarcasm:

    Quote Team Trump, lost in space: Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross wants a “gas station” on the moon
    The administration’s focus on frivolous space travel is amusing. It also distracts attention from real problems

    This week’s headlines about climate change should be alarming enough to nudge even the most environmentally-unconscious among us to contemplate the fate of our planet. Climate change is reportedly causing an uptick in Lyme disease. As heat waves increase due to climate change, so do heat-related illnesses and deaths. Oh, and a prominent lawyer, David Buckel, set himself on fire over the weekend and sent an email to The New York Times that read: “Most humans on the planet now breathe air made unhealthy by fossil fuels, and many die early deaths as a result — my early death by fossil fuel reflects what we are doing to ourselves.”

    I'm sure you're surprised to learn that none of this news has apparently penetrated the Trump administration. Instead, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross -- a banking billionaire who is likely far wealthier than President Trump -- appeared on CNBC on Tuesday to discuss the future of business . . . in space. He did not mention the internet-beloved “Space Force” idea that Trump semi-coherently name-dropped during a speech at the Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in March. But believe it or not, there was talk about building a gas station on the moon. The interview was a continuation of the announcement that the Department of Commerce will oversee a new space traffic management policy, which Vice President Mike Pence announced on Monday.

    Ross began by explaining how profitable space tourism could be in the future.
    ...
    From here: https://www.salon.com/2018/04/18/wil...-space-mining/

    6. NASA and Jet Propulsion Laboratories (JPL) still play a role but it’s as opaque as ever....

    NASA:
    NASA Authorization Bill Clears Committee with Bipartisan Support After Last Minute Negotiations
    SpacePolicyOnline.com — 6:01 am ET (1001 GMT)

    Republicans move to force vote on Trump pick to head NASA
    Atlanta Journal-Constitution — 5:26 am ET (0926 GMT)

    And stories above show a high level of coordination with SpaceX
    JPL:
    Under cover of a celebration of a milestone achievement, JPL asks for USD 2 billion:

    On 60th Anniversary of First U.S. Satellite, Rep. Chu Requests $2 billion for JPL
    South Pasadenan — 6:34 am ET (1034 GMT)
    https://southpasadenan.com/on-60th-a...llion-for-jpl/

    (Note, when I follow the story URL, I get redirected to Google’s home page. Perhaps they have been “chastised” for this story?)
    ==========

    There certainly are concerted efforts going on here by multiple players.
    Last edited by Searcher; 19th April 2018 at 08:26.
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    [Mod Note: I have moved ~ 15 posts from this thread to constitute this new thread: Space, New Technologies and Better Living per the request in its post # 13, Hervé]
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    Default Re: The Space Economy and Space Politics: News and Developments

    Thank you @Hervé
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