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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Hi AngelFire - OK.. then it's Sleep Apnea.. I don't think you want to use sleep inducers with airway obstruction. Still best thing is to see what your awake and sleeping oxygen levels are.. That will let you know about lung function, possibly one can see what happens allergy-wise with having some gluten consumed possibly hidden in foods.. (or other allergy causing components)..

    That you mention Gluten being an issue is understood as one of those triggering items.. I can induce sleep apnea here with me with overdoing it on late night cheese/nachos (chock full of gluten) and I suffer fitfully with snoring.. I can solve it with a proper anti-histamine and bronchial dilator.. pain in the butt for having pigged out late nite on junkfoods..


    I mentioned also a mouth appliance which moves the lower jaw forward:
    https://www.sleep-apnea-guide.com/ma...nt-device.html - - ( http://www.dentalartslab.com/product...pliances/tap3/ )

    This is a picture of one of those appliances, which holds the lower jaw infront of the upper...

    One can try moving your lower jaw forward, while lying down, on one's favorite pillow, and see if moving the lower jaw forward (by yourself) has you breathing better and actually feeling better after a few minutes... (it helps me when I am feeling congested)..




    There are other things to check as the other members have mentioned, my gut feeling based on experience (and your feedback) still is sleep apnea.. What induced it originally should be addressed..

    Some say a lower jaw appliance is much better than being tethered to a CPAP machine..

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    You might be helped by Royal Peruvian Maca, especially if your problems are glandular related.
    See: http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...=1#post1065843
    and
    http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...l=1#post739273
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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    I really feel for all of my fellow insomniacs; few people realize how debilitating it can be when your day is defined by how tired to exhausted you are - and it's every day for years and decades. It causes many health issues from cardio-vascular problems, to diabetes, brain damage, depression and more.

    I've tried almost everything applicable posted above with 2 exceptions: Iodine/magnesium and mag/melatonin/oleamide combo. Some work for a short time but nothing works well. So, something else to try, thank you!

    I hope all insomniacs can find some help here.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Good article here today from Dr. Mercola:
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/a..._rid=355500842
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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Quote Posted by Bob (here)
    Hi AngelFire - OK.. then it's Sleep Apnea.. I don't think you want to use sleep inducers with airway obstruction. Still best thing is to see what your awake and sleeping oxygen levels are.. That will let you know about lung function, possibly one can see what happens allergy-wise with having some gluten consumed possibly hidden in foods.. (or other allergy causing components)..

    That you mention Gluten being an issue is understood as one of those triggering items.. I can induce sleep apnea here with me with overdoing it on late night cheese/nachos (chock full of gluten) and I suffer fitfully with snoring.. I can solve it with a proper anti-histamine and bronchial dilator.. pain in the butt for having pigged out late nite on junkfoods..


    I mentioned also a mouth appliance which moves the lower jaw forward:
    https://www.sleep-apnea-guide.com/ma...nt-device.html - - ( http://www.dentalartslab.com/product...pliances/tap3/ )

    This is a picture of one of those appliances, which holds the lower jaw infront of the upper...

    One can try moving your lower jaw forward, while lying down, on one's favorite pillow, and see if moving the lower jaw forward (by yourself) has you breathing better and actually feeling better after a few minutes... (it helps me when I am feeling congested)..




    There are other things to check as the other members have mentioned, my gut feeling based on experience (and your feedback) still is sleep apnea.. What induced it originally should be addressed..

    Some say a lower jaw appliance is much better than being tethered to a CPAP machine..

    After another really bad night when I think I could have slept, I think you're right Bob. It was very hard for me to breathe and I was scared to fall asleep because of that. I ended up with four pillows which helped slightly but today I am wiped out, feeling weak and very down.
    I was diagnosed by a kinesiologist and herbalist as having a salycylate intolerance a few years ago and it may be that the curry I had last night contained spices that kicked off a reaction as I hadn't had any gluten yesterday.
    I really feel my heart is becoming weaker because of the insomnia and it's hard to stay positive at the moment. I will look into ordering the jaw appliance.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Quote Posted by onawah (here)
    Good article here today from Dr. Mercola:
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/a..._rid=355500842
    Thank you, onawah,, there's a wealth of good advice in that article.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    It helps me to leave exhaust fans on at night and the furnace fan running constantly.
    This brings in fresh air and gets rid of the carbon dioxide buildup (esp. when there are several family members in sleeping areas).
    Otherwise, I wake up from the "stuffy feeling" from lack of oxygen.
    Also, I do not use any electronics for a few hours before bed, preferring to read a book.
    As others have mentioned, herbs such as chamomile tea with lemon and honey, along with turning off any wifi devices, provides a better sleep environment.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Quote Posted by latte (here)
    I really feel for all of my fellow insomniacs; few people realize how debilitating it can be when your day is defined by how tired to exhausted you are - and it's every day for years and decades. It causes many health issues from cardio-vascular problems, to diabetes, brain damage, depression and more.

    I've tried almost everything applicable posted above with 2 exceptions: Iodine/magnesium and mag/melatonin/oleamide combo. Some work for a short time but nothing works well. So, something else to try, thank you!

    I hope all insomniacs can find some help here.
    I really hope so too, latte it's such a huge problem for so many people.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Hi AngelFire - O2 (Oxygen levels) - if you could schedule a test for resting (awake) and asleep that should be a good indication.

    There are personal monitors, and I note when I'm feeling "winded" that I'll take a look at my pulse and oxygen level with this type of monitor (mine is an older version without the graph):


    https://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/pulse-oximeter

    Granted you can't look at it while asleep, but if you have a friend who could while you are sleeping, that may help at least with peace of mind.

    Without getting into medical stuff, but just asking some questions to possibly help you ask your practitioner some questions: Have you had your blood pressure checked (and pulse rate), for resting and with exercise, and looked at both the left and right sides of the body for the measurement of blood pressure. Normals vary for age and weight... So of course one would need to know what the ideal weight is for your age. Another test is called "cardiac sufficiency" to verify that one is pumping adequate blood.. So the tests basically start from the easiest (oxygen levels) and pulse and blood pressure and progress further.

    An earlier post by a member mentions the thyroid levels. I've not had thyroid issues with me, but I have seen a person with out-of-range thyroid (hypo or low) need to use a CPAP because of the sleep apnea. With oxygen supplementation and positive air pressure that seems to help with getting thyroid levels correct..

    Being a holiday here in the States, I just absolutely HAD to over-do it with party food, and of course 3 hours later (at bedtime) I paid the price again, needing 3 pillows, and finally I had to pull out a decongestant and something to thin mucous (never overeat before bedtime and most certainly keep the beer at bay long before bedtime ) - I am pretty certain there is something in the party foods that are affecting me like with a food allergy, which can exacerbate sleep apnea issues..

    There are proper diets (and foods to avoid) that one can look at to help deal with sleep apnea too - https://www.livestrong.com/article/3...p-apnea-worse/

    So things like mucous build-up, or puffiness in the nasal area/throat or even acid reflux (where something like heartburn feelings appear), can induce upper airway inflammation.. (Burping up a little bit of stomach acid and then getting some of that, all it takes is a drop or two, into the windpipe, and one gets irritation that the body wants to flood out of the way, and of course one's sleep gets disrupted trying to cough)..

    Step 1, check the O2 levels and then go thru the list

    hugs, I know the feeling..

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    If you google "Dr. Mercola, insomnia" a lot of good articles will come up. It's a subject he has devoted a lot of attention to.
    Quote Posted by angelfire (here)
    Quote Posted by onawah (here)
    Good article here today from Dr. Mercola:
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/a..._rid=355500842
    Thank you, onawah,, there's a wealth of good advice in that article.
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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    See entering sleep as a change in states of being. And, requires quite a bit of energy in the body to do so. The inability to actually sleep can be an absence of the vitality to do so.

    Here is a great time. If you have a bath (many don't have one these days). Have one with a cup of epson salts and a cup of crystaline salt (such as Himalaya). Epson Salts have magnesium that aids in relaxation. But, this aids the energy field and body repair. It works on the unseen level. Don't just do it once and thing because you don't get results its doing nothing. Get ritual, ceremonial and routine. Be proactive. If you don't have a bath, get a wide bucket and foot baths help too.

    Most importantly, look to clear out the intestine. We store our emotional shadow (cr@p) for a reason. Colonics, herbal laxatives, fasting etc depending on where you are at will aid you in that altering from awake to dreamtime. Our dreaming body resided in the dantian or Solar Plexus (ie Colon, lower intestine area). If it has to fight through the 'stuff' unprocessed it can add to the volume of energy to change states. It could indicate parasite or candita issues also.

    I personally am proactive on these things. I take 10mg melatonin tablets myself also. They are out there. I feel incredible from them. That is my own experience. I like my sleep time to be what i call 'Operation Log Maximus' lol

    Best of luck
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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Quote Posted by Bob (here)
    Hi AngelFire - O2 (Oxygen levels) - if you could schedule a test for resting (awake) and asleep that should be a good indication.

    There are personal monitors, and I note when I'm feeling "winded" that I'll take a look at my pulse and oxygen level with this type of monitor (mine is an older version without the graph):


    https://www.ebay.co.uk/bhp/pulse-oximeter

    Granted you can't look at it while asleep, but if you have a friend who could while you are sleeping, that may help at least with peace of mind.

    Without getting into medical stuff, but just asking some questions to possibly help you ask your practitioner some questions: Have you had your blood pressure checked (and pulse rate), for resting and with exercise, and looked at both the left and right sides of the body for the measurement of blood pressure. Normals vary for age and weight... So of course one would need to know what the ideal weight is for your age. Another test is called "cardiac sufficiency" to verify that one is pumping adequate blood.. So the tests basically start from the easiest (oxygen levels) and pulse and blood pressure and progress further.

    An earlier post by a member mentions the thyroid levels. I've not had thyroid issues with me, but I have seen a person with out-of-range thyroid (hypo or low) need to use a CPAP because of the sleep apnea. With oxygen supplementation and positive air pressure that seems to help with getting thyroid levels correct..

    Being a holiday here in the States, I just absolutely HAD to over-do it with party food, and of course 3 hours later (at bedtime) I paid the price again, needing 3 pillows, and finally I had to pull out a decongestant and something to thin mucous (never overeat before bedtime and most certainly keep the beer at bay long before bedtime ) - I am pretty certain there is something in the party foods that are affecting me like with a food allergy, which can exacerbate sleep apnea issues..

    There are proper diets (and foods to avoid) that one can look at to help deal with sleep apnea too - https://www.livestrong.com/article/3...p-apnea-worse/

    So things like mucous build-up, or puffiness in the nasal area/throat or even acid reflux (where something like heartburn feelings appear), can induce upper airway inflammation.. (Burping up a little bit of stomach acid and then getting some of that, all it takes is a drop or two, into the windpipe, and one gets irritation that the body wants to flood out of the way, and of course one's sleep gets disrupted trying to cough)..

    Step 1, check the O2 levels and then go thru the list

    hugs, I know the feeling..
    Many thanks again, Bob, it really helps when someone understands the fallout from insomnia.
    I will ask for an oxygen sleeping test though my doctor isn't too receptive to my requests as she doesn't like the fact that I weaned myself off the heart meds and won't take a statin (!!). When in Germany a couple of years ago I did have the full right/left blood pressure test and it was fine. Don't know if they do that in UK what with the struggling NHS, but I will ask.
    Coincidentally last night life presented me with an opportunity to learn Pranayama breathing from a friend who's quite an expert now and I'm going to pursue that too.
    I will let you know how I get on with all of this.

    Blessings to you.

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    Quote Posted by Alpha141 (here)
    See entering sleep as a change in states of being. And, requires quite a bit of energy in the body to do so. The inability to actually sleep can be an absence of the vitality to do so.

    Here is a great time. If you have a bath (many don't have one these days). Have one with a cup of epson salts and a cup of crystaline salt (such as Himalaya). Epson Salts have magnesium that aids in relaxation. But, this aids the energy field and body repair. It works on the unseen level. Don't just do it once and thing because you don't get results its doing nothing. Get ritual, ceremonial and routine. Be proactive. If you don't have a bath, get a wide bucket and foot baths help too.

    Most importantly, look to clear out the intestine. We store our emotional shadow (cr@p) for a reason. Colonics, herbal laxatives, fasting etc depending on where you are at will aid you in that altering from awake to dreamtime. Our dreaming body resided in the dantian or Solar Plexus (ie Colon, lower intestine area). If it has to fight through the 'stuff' unprocessed it can add to the volume of energy to change states. It could indicate parasite or candita issues also.

    I personally am proactive on these things. I take 10mg melatonin tablets myself also. They are out there. I feel incredible from them. That is my own experience. I like my sleep time to be what i call 'Operation Log Maximus' lol

    Best of luck
    I had forgotten about Epsom salts/salt baths so thanks for the reminder, Alpha and I do understand the importance of energetic clearing.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    To help with breathing I have found that an ioniser helps. With all the pollution and chemtrailing there are more positive ions in the air. Placing an ioniser in your home will make it feel like a trip to the seaside or a walk in a forest.

    In the article below about positive/negative ions it states..

    "Positive ions or the lack of negative ions may cause serotonin hyperfunction syndrome or "irritation syndrome" involves sleeplessness, irritability, tension, migraine, nausea, heart palpitations, hot flashes with sweating or chills, tremor and dizziness. The elderly become depressed, apathetic and extremely fatigued."

    Here is the full article
    http://ion_effects.tripod.com/

    An Ioniser I have found to be very good is sold on Amazon. The link is below.


    https://www.amazon.co.uk/PureMate%C2...ywords=ioniser

    Trisher

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    There might be a chance your body wants/needs/prefers to sleep at "abnormal" times. After many decades I tried going to sleep at 9am and getting up at 3pm and I love it!

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Quote Posted by Antagenet (here)
    There might be a chance your body wants/needs/prefers to sleep at "abnormal" times. After many decades I tried going to sleep at 9am and getting up at 3pm and I love it!
    Good point, Antagenet!
    Perhaps you are a "night owl" now, Angelfire?
    Many people can live comfortably on a few hours sleep here and there throughout the night and day.
    Of course, your lifestyle has to allow that type of schedule.

    Also, are there reasons your mind races and you are having a hard time "shutting it off"?
    I found that when I am under a lot of stress, I have a hard time sleeping due to my mind racing.
    I don't fight it and read until I am drowsy, even if it takes hours.

    So, I try to eliminate the stress in my life and to simplify my "existence".

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    I am also a light sleeper. When I am in stress, specially with the job or the financials, I only get maybe a couple hours of good sleep a night. Wit me, when I solve those issues, sleep comes also much easier. I also meditate every day and practice yoga. If no sleep comes to me, I do those or I go for walk in the night, then I can usually sleep ok. I know this is no insomnia, but maybe something similar.

    I tried alcohol before going to bed, it helps for an hour, then I wake up and can't fall asleep for hours. A bit of warm milk and honey helps. But for me, only meditation, exercise, and resolving my stressful problems helped. Now I sleep quite well, though still wake couple times in the night.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    I sometimes dream I am awake and tossing and turning. Then when I do wake up from the tossing I think I have not slept at all. This happens often, maybe once or twice a week. I gauge the hours I've actually slept by how thick my fingers feel. If they feel thick then I haven't slept much.

    This adds up all week and then my weekends are all about catching up on my rest. Then come Sunday night I start all over again. I loose about a night's sleep every week. That's fifty nights of no sleep a year. Sometimes I worry about that. But that is how my entire life has been. And it is a major reason I have trouble holding down a job for extended periods. I have to quit to get my sleep...

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Quote Posted by Gunther (here)
    I am also a light sleeper. When I am in stress, specially with the job or the financials, I only get maybe a couple hours of good sleep a night. Wit me, when I solve those issues, sleep comes also much easier. I also meditate every day and practice yoga. If no sleep comes to me, I do those or I go for walk in the night, then I can usually sleep ok. I know this is no insomnia, but maybe something similar.

    I tried alcohol before going to bed, it helps for an hour, then I wake up and can't fall asleep for hours. A bit of warm milk and honey helps. But for me, only meditation, exercise, and resolving my stressful problems helped. Now I sleep quite well, though still wake couple times in the night.
    Thanks, Gunther. You are right about meditation though I seem to have a huge resistance to regular practice. However, I am now signed up for a ten day Vipassana retreat in September which I'm hoping will make a difference.
    Yoga I know is wonderful - I need to become more disciplined but it's hard when you're constantly tired.

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    Quote Posted by Ernie Nemeth (here)
    I sometimes dream I am awake and tossing and turning. Then when I do wake up from the tossing I think I have not slept at all. This happens often, maybe once or twice a week. I gauge the hours I've actually slept by how thick my fingers feel. If they feel thick then I haven't slept much.

    This adds up all week and then my weekends are all about catching up on my rest. Then come Sunday night I start all over again. I loose about a night's sleep every week. That's fifty nights of no sleep a year. Sometimes I worry about that. But that is how my entire life has been. And it is a major reason I have trouble holding down a job for extended periods. I have to quit to get my sleep...
    My sympathies, I know exactly how you feel. Perhaps this thread will be of help to you too.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    Quote Posted by angelfire (here)
    Thanks, Gunther. You are right about meditation though I seem to have a huge resistance to regular practice. However, I am now signed up for a ten day Vipassana retreat in September which I'm hoping will make a difference.
    Yoga I know is wonderful - I need to become more disciplined but it's hard when you're constantly tired.[COLOR="red"]
    This is only my experience, but I see a lot of parallels between Meditation and Sleep. They are very similar state of mind. If you observe yourself just before fall asleep, it feels like sinking into some sort of fluid. When you relax and let go it feels like you expand a little bit outside your body and there's some sort of warm, fluid like substance that envelops you. I can even hear the sound of it flowing around me. When I go in deep meditation it is very similar, especially when lying down on my back.

    My advice would be to first all get tired before going to bed, maybe go for a walk. A warm bath with dimmed lights might be good to follow. Then when you lie in bed, meditate for at least half hour. I do it by lifting one or both arms up to ensure flow of energy. You only need to lift the forearm, not the whole arm. If you can get the energy flowing and relaxing, you should be able to fall asleep more easy. At least that has been my experience as I really struggled with sleep a few times in the past.

    But, if you have any stress in your life or unresolved issues, it is very important to get rid of those or to resolve them. For me that is always the main cause of sleeplessness. If you need, ask for help from people around you. Whatever it is that is bothering you, or causing stress, they are usually more than happy to help.

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    Default Re: Help with debilitating insomnia

    I thought this update might be interesting (and maybe really valuable) to some.
    I'll add my experience here up front, as opposed to at the end, because it might be important for some not to miss.

    The article (do read it!) concludes: A little nudge is as effective as a big push.

    When I first read the article, just out of mild interest, that lodged in my mind. I occasionally take melatonin, but the only size dose available in Ecuador is 3 mg. That's actually common everywhere.

    I take it very occasionally because my sleep rhythms get disrupted sometimes, I suspect because of strenuous hiking trips: so when needed, I just try to normalize things again.

    But each time, melatonin leaves me groggy in the morning, and increasingly what happens is that I sleep deeply for about 4-5 hours and then wake up unable to get back to sleep again, groggy as I am. It's weird, feels unnatural, and I don't like it.

    So I tried taking the "a little nudge is as effective as a big push" advice. Instead of taking all 3 mg of the tablet, I shaved off a very tiny portion with a knife... really a tiny tiny amount, just a few crumbs: I'm guessing about 200 mcg. (That's 0.2 mg, almost nothing.) And each time I did that, I slept perfectly soundly for 8 hours, with no grogginess.

    To my surprise, this really worked. It was ideal. No way will I ever take more than that tiny amount again.

    For anyone who's been taking large (3 mg) melatonin doses, try a far smaller amount, and see what happens.

    Here's the article:

    ~~~

    Read This If You Take Melatonin To Sleep At Night
    18 March, 2016

    Melatonin is a very popular sleep aid. It’s naturally produced in your body. You don’t need a prescription for it and can buy it in gummy form or in a fruity drink. But is it as effective and safe as we think?

    Natural melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland, helps humans fall asleep ― and synthetic melatonin has been available as a sleep aid for nearly three decades. But the synthetic version’s effects have not been extensively studied, and since it’s classified as a “dietary supplement,” it is almost completely unregulated by the FDA.

    It’s important to take a closer look at this common supplement. “Any person in the sleep world will tell you the same thing: melatonin is not harmless, is vastly overused and should not be used as a sleep aid to treat insomnia,” Michael Grandner, a sleep researcher at the University of Arizona, told HuffPost.

    How it works

    Melatonin is meant to reset the body’s internal clock ― for example, it’s appropriate to use the supplement to counter the effects of jet lag, or help someone sleep if they have an unusual work schedule or suffer from a circadian rhythm disorder. It should not be used for general insomnia.

    The proper dosage, according to a seminal2001 study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is 0.3 milligrams. The research was conducted by Richard Wurtman, who pioneered the pharmaceutical use of melatonin as a sleep aid in 1994.Pills and supplements often sell 10 times that suggested amount in a single dose. This can lead to higher plasma melatonin levels the next day, which can cause a “hangover” effect that leaves users groggy.
    “Any person in the sleep world will tell you the same thing: Melatonin is not harmless, is vastly overused and should not be used as a sleep aid to treat insomnia.”
    — Michael Grandner, University of Arizona
    According to a 2005 meta-analysis of melatonin studies from MIT, also led by Wurtman, researchers found that the widely available high doses of melatonin are ineffective. “After a few days, it stops working,” wrote Wurtman, in a press release accompanying the study. When the brain’s melatonin receptors are exposed to too much of the hormone, they become unresponsive, he said.

    Safety concerns

    Melatonin may also be unsafe for children. David Kennaway, the director of the circadian physiology lab at the University of Adelaide in Australia, told Science Daily that the use of melatonin to treat children’s sleep disorders is “rather alarming.”

    He said there is “extensive evidence from laboratory studies that melatonin causes changes in multiple physiological systems, including cardiovascular, immune and metabolic systems, as well as reproduction in animals,” and its effects on children’s developing bodies is yet unstudied.

    “The word ‘safe’ is used very freely and loosely with this drug,” said Kennaway, “but there have been no rigorous, long-term safety studies of the use of melatonin to treat sleep disorders in children and adolescents.”

    Even for adults, the unregulated nature of the supplement gives cause for reconsideration. Although synthetic melatonin is “chemically identical” to natural melatonin, commercially available supplements “often contain fillers, inert and other ingredients that may cause effects that would not be expected with natural melatonin,” Clete Kushida, a sleep researcher at Stanford University School of Medicine, told HuffPost in an email.

    “This is a concern that clinicians should relay to patients, especially since the contents of the supplements are not regulated by the FDA,” said Kushida. “And since it’s not regulated by the FDA, the long-term effects/consequences have not been studied in a controlled and systematic manner.”
    “The word 'safe' is used very freely and loosely with this drug.”
    — David Kennaway, University of Adelaide
    The verdict

    So why do people still use it?

    “Unfortunately, it’s acquired a reputation as a safe, ‘natural,’ over-the-counter quick-fix for sleep that will be hard to shake,” said Grandner.

    That conviction may explain why melatonin is so popular even though it’s apparently not that effective.

    Consumer Reports said melatonin supplements helped users fall asleep “only 7 minutes faster and sleep 8 minutes longer on average,” according to a 2013 analysis. And the same report notes that “about 20 percent of users in our survey reported next-day grogginess,” and recommended that users exercise caution before driving the next day.

    “Melatonin is not an insomnia cure,” Grandner emphasized. “The main reasons regular people find it hard to sleep ― tossing and turning, ruminating in bed ― will not be affected by melatonin.” He suggested that the vast majority of people who struggle to fall asleep would be better served by establishing a consistent routine, practicing good sleep hygiene in the bedroom and getting lots of daytime light exposure.

    And for those who do continue to use melatonin, he said to be mindful of the dosage. “A little nudge is as effective as a big push,” he said.

  35. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    Cara (24th October 2019), Franny (25th October 2019), leavesoftrees (27th October 2019), Valerie Villars (24th October 2019), Yoda (24th October 2019)

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