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Thread: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    ....and since then there has been so much prevarication, dithering, fencing and deliberate foiling of democracy by those who are ‘in power’ due to the ‘grace’ of the globalists, by whatever ‘arm-twisting’ scenarios in their background (May’s father linked to paedophile activities, internet tried to be scrubbed) this fiasco has dragged on for years. An absolute disgrace, everyone seems to be being blackmailed by the vile tendrils of those who perpetrate EU. The ‘yellow jackets’ are a shot across their bows. Of course, us ‘plebs’ in the UK are just being ‘sold down the river’, confused by the lying media, and just wishing our ‘democracy’ was actually - er - democratic!
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    (Bloomberg) -- Remainers were jubilant when an adviser to the European Union’s top court said the U.K. should be able to change its mind about Brexit.

    But the opinion of Advocate General Manuel Campos Sanchez-Bordona is non-binding on the EU’s Court of Justice -- meaning judges can decide for themselves as they prepare to issue a landmark ruling on whether Britain could unilaterally revoke the “Article 50” letter that started the clock ticking on Brexit.

    The ruling date has been set for Dec. 10, just a day before the U.K. Parliament’s vote on Prime Minister Theresa May’s much-maligned withdrawal agreement with the EU.

    The multibillion-pound question is: Will the EU judges agree with Sanchez-Bordona? Lawyers predict that, on balance, they probably will.

    “The meaning of Article 50 is an easily grasped issue on which everyone has an opinion, so this is not the sort of case in which the advocate general’s opinion is automatically followed,” said David Anderson, a lawyer at Brick Court Chambers in London.

    “It is the confidence with which the advocate general has expressed himself, rather than the likely persuasive effect of his opinion, that leads me to think the court is of essentially the same view,” said Anderson, who’s pleaded more than 150 cases at the Luxembourg-based court.

    In a clear and detailed opinion on Dec. 4, Sanchez-Bordona said that EU law allows a country to revoke an Article 50 notice “until such time as the withdrawal agreement is formally concluded.”

    He rejected the U.K.’s arguments that the question is premature and academic, saying that the court’s ruling will help “resolve a genuine dispute between two parties.”

    “It seems to me that the relevant time to dispel doubts as to whether the notification of the intention to withdraw is revocable is before, not after, Brexit has occurred and the United Kingdom is inexorably immersed in its consequences,” he wrote.

    Possible Abuse

    The one point which the court may want to refine could be the risk of a possible abuse of a right to revocation, said Steven Peers, professor of EU law at the University of Essex.

    The court could find “that the prospect of a member state revoking its Article 50 notification and then sending another notification to gain more negotiation time is too big a risk,” said Peers. “It will come down to whether they think the risk of unilateral revocation can be dealt with by a good faith rule, or whether they will just rule it out.”

    The matter ended up in Luxembourg after the U.K.’s failed bid to kill it in domestic courts. The government lost a final attempt last month to derail the case after the country’s Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal on blocking the referral to the EU judges, whose power over British law pro-Brexit supporters want to sever.

    The U.K. Supreme Court on Thursday also announced it would rule on Dec. 13 in a separate Brexit case in which Scottish leader Nicola Sturgeon seeks to maintain devolved powers when EU law is converted into British law.

    Despite May’s opposition, some say a ruling that Article 50 can be unilaterally revoked could even help the prime minister by encouraging hardliners to support her plan.

    Scottish Case

    A Scottish court decided in September to seek the EU tribunal’s guidance on the case brought by pro-Remain lawyer Jolyon Maugham, along with a group of Scottish and English lawmakers seeking to reverse the Article 50 process.

    The issue is so complicated because while Article 50 of the EU’s Lisbon Treaty tells member states how to start the process of leaving the bloc, it offers no help on what to do if they change their mind.

    The ruling will be handled by the full court, which in this case means 25 judges. Having such a large number is very rare. University of Essex’s Peers said this could make it harder to predict because judges aren’t used to having to confer with so many colleagues.

    Still, in this situation, “once a preponderant view has become evident, it may well be that the judgment will go through relatively easily,” said Anderson.

    Denis Waelbroeck, an attorney at law firm Ashurst in Brussels, who’s also pleaded many cases before the bloc’s top court, said he would be “very surprised” if the court did not follow the opinion in its final ruling, which can’t be appealed.

    “Not only does the court follow the AG in the overwhelming majority of cases, but in this particular case, I just fail to see how it could take a different position,” he said. “Full court cases are in my experience the more political ones -- so if anything this should presumably mean that it will go in the same direction as the AG.”
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    EU politicians dismiss ‘almost insane’ idea of renegotiating Brexit deal

    European politicians have given a final strongly-worded warning to British MPs preparing to vote against the Brexit deal, with one branding the belief it could be renegotiated almost “insane.”

    Both Conservative and Labour MPs are coming in for harsh criticism on the continent for opposing the deal negotiated over the last 18 months.

    With opponents on both sides of the Commons, it’s widely expected the deal will be rejected next Tuesday by MPs motivated by the hope of a securing better terms.

    But suggestions of any renegotiations are being brutally dismissed on the EU side.

    “I found this idea of renegotiating the deal quite strange, not to say on the verge of being insane,” Swedish liberal MEP Jasenko Selimovic told Euronews.

    READ MORE: Barnier hits back at claim Brexit deal is a ‘humiliation’ for the UK

    “They’ve been negotiating for two years and they got the deal. This is the deal. Now they want another two years to negotiate? And then what? Then they will have another say? This is the deal that is done.”

    Selimovic suggested that Theresa May would have to put the deal to a referendum if it is rejected by MPs.

    “That’s up to them to decide,” he added. “But having an idea to change this deal after two years of negotiation is kind of strange to me.”

    Separately, French MEP Philippe Juvin accused Conservative MPs of acting like children.

    “They put conditions on everything and are continuing to ask, a bit like a child in front of father Christmas, things that they know are impossible to implement,” he told French TV.

    Urging French voters to turn away from populist parties, he said: “Look at what’s happening to the British – they are in the process of suicide and I don’t what that for my country.”
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Former deputy prime minister Lord Michael Heseltine will warn politicians that Britain’s youth will “never forgive us” unless they are offered the chance to reverse Brexit.

    The Tory veteran, 85, will address a rally calling for a second referendum ahead of Tuesday’s crunch Commons vote on Theresa May’s Brexit deal.

    He will claim that the Government appears to have “lost control” and there were signs that MPs were prepared to take action to “assert the authority” of Parliament.

    Highlighting a generational split in the result of the 2016 referendum, he will say “those of a certain age who voted 70:30 to leave” are “rapidly being replaced by a younger generation who voted 70:30 to stay”.

    At the rally in London’s ExCel centre, which will also be addressed by politicians including Liberal Democrat leader Sir Vince Cable, Tory former ministers Anna Soubry and Philip Lee and celebrities including Charles Dance and Jason Isaacs, Lord Heseltine will claim that those campaigning for a second vote are “British patriots” who are “proud of our Commonwealth and empire”.

    The event, organised by the Best for Britain and People’s Vote campaigns, will feature politicians from the Tories, Labour, Liberal Democrats, Green Party and Plaid Cymru.

    Heseltine will hit out at Brexiteers who have called pro-EU politicians “traitors”, saying: “May our opponents never be forgiven for their allegations that it is us who are letting Britain down.”

    He will say: “Let us make our position clear. We are the British patriots.

    “We want a Britain at the heart of Europe because we want the voice of Britain, the tolerance of Britain, the culture of Britain, at the heart of Europe. We are proud of our Commonwealth and empire. Our voice is their voice in Europe.

    “It is the Brexiteers who seek to belittle us, to undermine our influence, to slam windows, to close doors with the suggestion that our membership of the European community blunts our influence.”

    In comments echoing a youthful William Hague’s address to the Tory conference in 1977, when he told his ageing audience “half of you won’t be here in 30 or 40 years’ time” as he discussed the future, Heseltine is expected to add: “Let me repeat his warning. Let me paraphrase his words. ‘I certainly won’t be here.’ But neither will my generation.

    “Those of a certain age who voted 70:30 to leave is rapidly being replaced by a younger generation who voted 70:30 to stay. The parents, the grandparent will have gone. The younger generation, they will be here. They will be here.

    “They will never forgive us if we now exclude them from the corridors of European power. Offered a seat in an anteroom as others decide behind closed doors. Invited to submit their views in writing so others may decide behind closed doors.

    “Trying to negotiate trade deals on behalf of the United Kingdom in competition with a European Union six times our size offering bigger, better deals behind closed doors.”

    “No-one can predict the events of next week,” Hestletine will add, according to a transcript of his speech given to media. “Every news bulletin, every headline, every leak tells us of a Government that has lost control. These are the first promising signs that a growing number of members of the House of Commons are prepared to assert the authority and sovereignty of that place.

    “Our country’s future depends on their judgment and will. They must act in the national interest. Their conclusions must be put back to the people for their endorsement.”
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    my prediction is that a second referendum is inevitable. the population will vote or appear to vote in great favour of staying in the EU..so much so that the UK will adopt the EURO as its currency.

    it has most likely been the plan from the start ...
    the leave camp appealed to old fashioned values, racism and long gone imperialism..
    there is no way that a modern educated population would have voted to leave the EU.. its a setup...

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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Agree meat suit.
    Nothing happens by chance in Governing the human race.
    Im not sure about the Euro--that might be a step too far.
    All this "debating" when really the end result could be seen ages ago.

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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Latest here...

    The European Court of Justice has ruled the UK can cancel Brexit without the permission of the other 27 EU members.

    The ECJ judges ruled this could be done without altering the terms of Britain's membership.

    A group of anti-Brexit politicians argued the UK should be able to unilaterally halt Brexit, but they were opposed by the government and EU.

    The decision comes a day before MPs are due to vote on Theresa May's deal for leaving the EU.

    MPs are already widely expected to reject the proposals during a vote in the House of Commons on Tuesday night.

    BBC Brussels correspondent Adam Fleming said the ruling made staying in the EU "a real, viable option" and that may "sway a few MPs" in the way they vote.

    But he said "a lot would have to change in British politics" to see the UK remain in the EU, with Mrs May and the government having to change its mind to make it a "political reality".

    A senior ECJ official - the advocate general - said last week he agreed the UK should be able to change its mind about leaving. His opinion was not legally binding, but the court tends to follow his advice in the majority of cases.

    Full article here further reading
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotla...itics-46481643

    More here
    The UK has the legal power to stop Brexit by unilaterally revoking Article 50, the EU's top court has ruled.

    The ruling matches legal advice given to the court last week by its advocate general, who said as a sovereign country Britain could reverse its decision even at this late stage.
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...-a8675541.html

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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Half a league, half a league,
    Half a league onward,
    All in the valley of Death
    Rode the six hundred.
    “Forward, the Light Brigade!
    Charge for the guns!” he said.
    Into the valley of Death
    Rode the six hundred.

    As Theresa May rides towards an all but certain defeat in parliament this week, some of her more historically minded colleagues are likening the prime minister to the doomed Charge of the Light Brigade. That’s a little unfair. The Crimean war commanders of that suicidal assault on Russian guns didn’t know they had ordered a disaster. By contrast, Mrs May is fully conscious that she is galloping into the valley of parliamentary death. She has been given ample warnings that the cannon of the hard Brexiters are to the right of her, the cannon of the unreconciled Remainers are to the left, and the cannon of the opposition parties are in front of her. She won’t be able to say she wasn’t told. She will not be able to make a fall guy of the chief whip, Julian Smith, and blame him for messing up the maths. He’s done the numbers and told the prime minister that the chances of success are bleak.

    This is a highly unusual event in the annals of politics: a prime minister is heading knowingly towards defeat. The only previous occasion in recent history that I recall this happening was when Tony Blair was in the no-one-likes-me-and-I-don’t-care phase of a long premiership. He pressed ahead with a vote on anti-terrorism legislation, which his whips had told him he couldn’t win. He duly lost, a defeat that was a contributory factor in his departure from Downing Street.

    So, on the face of it, Mrs May is being wildly reckless when she insists that she will press ahead with the parliamentary vote on her Brexit deal this Tuesday even though no one thinks she can possibly win it. She faces defeat partly because her deal has very little appeal to anyone. The report of the all-party select committee on Brexit, published today, joins the chorus denouncing the withdrawal agreement as the worst of all worlds. Even those Tory MPs who are offering support to the prime minister are doing so with fingers clamped on noses, backing her only because they like the alternatives even less or fear constitutional chaos. Defeat beckons for Mrs May also because Number 10’s strategy for manipulating the argument in its favour has not worked. The prime minister and the cabinet colleagues prepared to speak for her have framed the choice as “this deal, no deal or no Brexit”. Her hope was that Brexiters would be scared into line for fear of losing their prize and Remainers would be frightened into supporting her deal in dread of Britain going off the edge of the cliff without a parachute. This tactic has worked on some MPs, but has had the reverse effect on others. The Brexit ultras will vote against her because they want a no deal or believe, on no evidence whatsoever, that rejecting this agreement will magically stimulate improved terms from the EU. The government’s tactics have simultaneously emboldened those who seek to soften or reverse Brexit. They will vote against the deal in the hope of getting a different kind of departure from the EU or paving the way to another referendum.

    Having come to their own conclusions that the government is staring at defeat, some in the cabinet have been trying to persuade Mrs May to retreat by postponing the vote. So has Sir Graham Brady, the important chairman of the 1922 Committee of Tory backbenchers and a consistent friend to Mrs May during her premiership. I thought it significant that Sir Graham, normally the acme of discretion, went public with his suggestion that she ought to delay the vote.

    As I write, she is displaying no signs of heeding this advice, even when it is tendered by allies. Many will say that this is characteristic of Mrs May, a woman who often acts as if there is no greater virtue than to be stubborn. Yet in this case she may well be correct to calculate that there is nothing to be gained by trying to evade the moment of truth in parliament. There is no reason to suppose that delay will suddenly induce a fresh offer from the EU that will be so much more palatable to the Conservative party that it will significantly reduce the cohorts of backbench rebels. Some have suggested that the vote be put off to later in the month in the hope that Mrs May might extract some last-gasp concessions at the European council meeting this Thursday. But members of the cabinet worry, with good reason, that this could set her up for more humiliation because European leaders will give her a dusty answer and she will return from Brussels with nothing.

    There are no good grounds for thinking that a bit more time would give Mr Smith an opportunity to substantially change the parliamentary maths. The usual levers of the government’s enforcers aren’t working in this context. The issue is too momentous; their power is too feeble. You can’t threaten a rebel MP with career-terminating consequences if he or she has already resigned from the government payroll to vote against the prime minister. There are far too many Conservative MPs against the deal and they are far too entrenched in their views for an extra week or so to make a meaningful difference.

    In normal circumstances, we would expect the resignation of the prime minister to follow a defeat of such magnitude

    Pressing on with the vote comes with great risks for Mrs May. If parliament rejects her deal, she will have been repulsed on the defining task of her premiership. That is big. In normal circumstances, we would expect the resignation of the prime minister to follow a defeat of such magnitude. But these circumstances aren’t normal. Brexit has suspended, distorted or inverted the laws of political physics. It is life, Jim, but not as we are accustomed to it. Last week the government was held in contempt of parliament for its initial refusal to publish the attorney general’s legal advice on the withdrawal agreement. That was another of the baleful precedent-busters that have been unleashed by Brexit. Yet no one resigned – and there was no expectation that anyone would do so. All our usual assumptions about how politics is supposed to function have been torn apart by the Brexit maelstrom.

    In normal circumstances, a leader would be expected to quit because defeat on the central plank of the government’s programme would be held to have shredded prime ministerial credibility. But this rule doesn’t really apply in Mrs May’s case because her authority has been shattered multiple times already. You can’t lose what you’ve already lost.

    She might face the challenge to her leadership of the Tory party that the blowhard Brexiters have kept threatening without ever delivering. Or it is possible that Mrs May might feel impelled to leave of her own volition if she is defeated by a crushing margin. It is conceivable that she could declare that she has tried her best, express regret that parliament can’t agree, and announce that she is leaving the stage to let someone else see if they can do any better. That’s not impossible, but quitting in that fashion would be out of character. Walking away from messes of their own creation is what juvenile males like David Cameron and Boris Johnson do. Whatever transpires on Tuesday, it is not an absolute given that she will have to quit. Nor is there evidence that this is what voters will expect of her. The pollsters are reporting a paradoxical mood among the public: the majority don’t like her deal, but only a minority think she ought to resign if it goes down in parliament.

    Beyond the relatively trivial question of what happens to the prime minister, there is a compelling argument for getting on with this vote in the national interest. You may have noticed that time is desperately short. There is a little over three months left before Britain is scheduled to leave the EU. If Mrs May’s deal can’t be got through parliament, that needs to be established as rapidly as possible so that MPs can start trying to navigate towards a non-catastrophic resolution of this nightmare. That could mean attempting to find agreement on a different form of Brexit or throwing the question back to the people with another referendum. Defeat for the prime minister’s deal will open up possible routes of escape from this hideous trap.

    We have reached a point in the Brexit derangement where charging into the mouth of hell is perhaps not crazy at all, but the sanest thing that Mrs May can do for herself and her country.

    • Andrew Rawnsley is an Observer columnist
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    I hope this is the end of May, by choice, and we get a swift replacement in No 10 who will announce there will be no deal and no compromise, and a hard exit.


    I know the government has done a lot of prepping for a hard exit, so it's got as good a chance as any, despite the parliamentary mind think that they can impose an outcome. All No 10 has to do between now and April is simply NOTHING. That's a hard exit.
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    I hope this is the end of May, by choice, and we get a swift replacement in No 10 who will announce there will be no deal and no compromise, and a hard exit.


    I know the government has done a lot of prepping for a hard exit, so it's got as good a chance as any, despite the parliamentary mind think that they can impose an outcome. All No 10 has to do between now and April is simply NOTHING. That's a hard exit.
    Apparently she is giving a statement at 15.30, about what I don't know.

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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    I look forward to that statement--probably more of the same though.
    Vote for the deal or face the consequences.

    I dont have a preference-as the end result wont bring much change at my time of life.
    However I hope whatever end result brings stability and a good future for the youth of today.
    Politicians are economical with the truth to support their own agenda.
    I haven't voted since I was 18

    Chris
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Theresa May is hosting an emergency conference call with her Cabinet this morning amid reports that Tuesday’s historic Brexit vote in Parliament has been cancelled.

    The prime minister scheduled the conference call with her Cabinet for 11.30am on Monday, one day before MPs had been due to vote on her EU withdrawal agreement.

    Despite Downing Street insisting all morning that the vote would go ahead on Tuesday as planned, there were reports that it has been scrapped.
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Hazeltine saying the next generations will hate us for not staying in the EU is a complete 180 on what the next generations will feel about us.


    They will be glad we slammed the NWO into reverse.


    Of course, if we fail, they will be far too stupid to know any difference, anyway.
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Teresa May still claiming that the backstop would not be used.
    So same story with minor variations.
    She sounds confident but!!!

    Thats my understanding of her speech so far.
    On going with questions being answered.
    The Irish border the ongoing challenge.
    Chris
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    Scotland Avalon Member greybeard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    DUP Mp is exasperated.
    Teresa May says she listens.
    He cant believe she dosent get that there is no way the Northern Ireland party DUP will support the deal.
    That the house will vote against the deal-- how come she does not get this?
    The Conservatives need the DUP vote to stay in Government.
    Madness.

    Chris
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Good !... she's OUT ! . . . there's hope yet.
    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    Good !... she's OUT ! . . . there's hope yet.
    What makes you say that Norman?
    There is no way she is quitting as far as I can see.
    She is going back to get European clarification on the Irish Border backstop

    Blinkers on--she has
    Chris
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Didn't know the vote was cancelled.

    Ever optimistic, she might be delaying the switch to a new Prime minister to get closer to the deadline, so giving the remainers less time to organise against a hard exit.

    I cannot believe we've gone through all this just be either still a member, or a vassal state.

    I think the queen was fully behind the exit vote. I think the queen still wants out of the EU. May meets the queen every week for a private natter. My hope is that the queen and May have a plan. "IF you get us out of the EU, you are forever my hero and honoured".




    edit:


    The silence of the tory exiteers is very telling. If they were really being bounced they would be screaming from the rooftops every hour of every day. They are not. That tells me there is a plan and they are sticking to it.
    Last edited by norman; 10th December 2018 at 17:22.
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Theresa May told to 'govern or go' as she confirms delay to crucial Brexit vote

    PM ‘defers’ crucial vote after conceding Government would’ve lost by ‘significant margin’
    Mrs May also admits Government are ‘stepping up plans’ for no-deal Brexit’
    Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says May’s Government are ‘in disarray’
    PM says fundamental question for MPs is: ‘Do they want to deliver Brexit?’
    She also issued warning: ‘As long as we fail to agree a deal, the risk of no-deal increases.’
    PM: ‘Inescapable fact’ that N.I./Ireland border would become external EU border on Mar 30.

    Tory MPs today told Theresa May she must ‘govern or go’ as she delayed her crucial Brexit vote to avoid a ‘significant’ defeat.

    The Prime Minister told MPs she was ‘deferring’ the vote, despite Downing Street insisting all morning the vote would go ahead as planned.

    Delivering a speech in the Commons, Mrs May said that if it had gone ahead, the Government would have been heavily defeated.

    The PM during also admitted during a raucous Commons debate that the Government was ‘stepping up preparations’ for a no-deal Brexit.
    Mrs May said she would now try and secure ‘additional reassurance’ on the Irish backstop from the EU before MPs vote on the deal she has negotiated.After delivering her speech, MPs including Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg said the PM must ‘govern or quit’.

    Mrs May told MPs: ‘I have listened very carefully to what has been said in this chamber and out of it by Members from all sides.
    Mrs May said she believed there was “a majority to be won” in the Commons on her deal, if she is able to “secure additional reassurance on the backstop”.

    The PM said the fundamental question for MPs to answer was: ‘Does this House want to deliver Brexit?’

    If so, she said that they needed to ask themselves whether they were willing to make compromises.

    Mrs May was heckled with shouts of ‘Resign’ from the Labour benches in the Commons as she delivered her speech.

    Mrs May said it was an “inescapable fact” that the Northern Ireland/Ireland border would become the external EU border on March 30.

    She told the Commons: ‘The challenge this poses must be met, not with rhetoric, but with real and workable solutions.

    ‘Businesses operate across that border, people live their lives crossing and recrossing it every day.

    ‘I have been there and spoken to some of those people, they do not want their every-day lives to change as a result of the decision we have taken. They do not want a return to a hard border.

    ‘If this House cares about preserving our Union it must listen to those people because our Union will only endure with their consent.’


    https://uk.news.yahoo.com/theresa-ma...113625048.html
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    Default Re: Brexit: UK Cabinet revolt as ministers resign over Theresa May's new Brexit plan, 9 July 2018

    Its the best drama on TV of the moment.
    Ch
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