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Thread: The strangeness of the California Fires

  1. Link to Post #341
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Quote Posted by James Newell (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by James Newell (here)
    MASSIVE EXPLOSION Strikes N. CA 50 miles wide!
    I'd like to better understand what we're being shown here. For instance:
    • How speeded up is this?
    • What's the time lapse between images?
    • What program is he using to generate the images?
    • Can this be examined retrospectively/historically?
    • If so, what's the link?
    An 'explosion' is something that happens in seconds. Something unusual may be happening, for sure, but there's almost certainly some hyperbole here. All clarifications are more than welcome.
    It is difficult to tell if there is any speed up of images, but if you look closely you can see the clouds moving at a standard rate of speed so from that it appears not doctored. I believe he got it by going through the weather data satellite at that time period. Which means anyone should be able to retrive that data and verify it.I will see if I can locate the weather satellite link.
    Here is another observation on this event. The first video footage shows a large object flying over the fire area and when it is directly above the fire, an explosion occurs. The second, astronomical observation video shows the paths of 2 comets crossing paths at the exact location of the explosion.


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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Quote Posted by SunSea (here)
    The second, astronomical observation video shows the paths of 2 comets crossing paths at the exact location of the explosion.

    Do you mean meteors?

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Hi Delight, He calls them comets and they have names which I didn't catch. At some place in space, these two crossed paths and the intersection was above this explosion. Hmmm, sounds interesting. The programs he's using look real interesting. In one he can go frame to frame which allows you to see things not seen when looking at it as a whole. The astonomical one is also fascinating. Maybe someone can find those if they're interested.

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  7. Link to Post #344
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Hey SunSea,

    I think the first video that Igor Kostelac disects can also be seen, without pause, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nb2m8KKuwxk

    I suspect it's footage from the "Barham North" camera which is looking to the northwest at the Kincade fire about 20 miles or so away. A live stream of the camera can be found here: http://www.alertwildfire.org/northbay/

    If so, the footage doesn't actually zoom in (as Mr. Kostelac says it does around 8:10 in his video). He then comments that whatever is passing over the fire at 9:24pm (the "big ball", which looks to be causing the explosion), is moving at tremendous speed. I really don't think it's much faster than the jets moving by earlier. (I'd like to be proven wrong.)

    At 16:40 he displays the second video, showing the path of the comet NEOWISE (and McNaught) which he says passes over the fire at 9:36pm. Is he saying it's the same object that's passing over at 9:24pm from the first video?

    A couple of other things to note:

    (1) The Kincade fire is well north of the path between San Francisco and Sacramento. Actually, it's north of Atlas as well--closer go Geyersville as the CA Dept of forestry shows here: https://fire.ca.gov/incidents/. So, if NEOWISE is passing overhead, it's more like 9:32pm, not 9:36pm from what I can estimate.

    (2) The other note is about NEOWISE. Is it a comet (meteor) as he says, or is it NASA's "Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer " described here: https://www.seeker.com/neowise-is-ba...768165079.html

    IMO, there's a lot of things to question in his video.
    Last edited by Alecs; 30th October 2019 at 12:19.

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  9. Link to Post #345
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    This article is from April 2009... and may be something to consider here. It seems that PG&E (apparently beleaguered provider of electrical power in USA California) was looking into sourcing solar power from space. I don’t know if this deal ever came to fruition or went “dark” and off-the-books?

    Quote PG&E makes deal for space solar power
    Utility to buy orbit-generated electricity from Solaren in 2016, at no risk

    By Alan Boyle
    msnbc.com
    updated 4/13/2009 10:41:47 PM ET

    California's biggest energy utility announced a deal Monday to purchase 200 megawatts of electricity from a startup company that plans to beam the power down to Earth from outer space, beginning in 2016.

    San Francisco-based Pacific Gas & Electric said it was seeking approval from state regulators for an agreement to purchase power over a 15-year period from Solaren Corp., an 8-year-old company based in Manhattan Beach, Calif. The agreement was first reported in a posting to Next100, a Weblog produced by PG&E.

    Solaren would generate the power using solar panels in Earth orbit and convert it to radio-frequency transmissions that would be beamed down to a receiving station in Fresno, PG&E said. From there, the energy would be converted into electricity and fed into PG&E's power grid.

    PG&E is pledging to buy the power at an agreed-upon rate, comparable to the rate specified in other agreements for renewable-energy purchases, company spokesman Jonathan Marshall said. Neither PG&E nor Solaren would say what that rate was, due to the proprietary nature of the agreement. However, Marshall emphasized that PG&E would make no up-front investment in Solaren's venture.

    "We've been very careful not to bear risk in this," Marshall told msnbc.com.

    Solaren's chief executive officer, Gary Spirnak, said the project would be the first real-world application of space solar power, a technology that has been talked about for decades but never turned into reality.

    "While a system of this scale and exact configuration has not been built, the underlying technology is very mature and is based on communications satellite technology," he said in a Q&A posted by PG&E. A study drawn up for the Pentagon came to a similar conclusion in 2007. However, that study also said the cost of satellite-beamed power would likely be significantly higher than market rates, at least at first.

    In contrast, Spirnak said Solaren's system would be "competitive both in terms of performance and cost with other sources of baseload power generation."

    Solaren's director for energy services, Cal Boerman, said he was confident his company would be able to deliver the power starting in mid-2016, as specified in the agreement. "There are huge penalties associated with not performing," he told msnbc.com. He said PG&E would be "our first client" but was not expected to be the only one.

    The biggest questions surrounding the deal have to do with whether Solaren has the wherewithal, the expertise and the regulatory support to get a space-based solar power system up and running in seven years. "Quite a few hurdles there to leap," Clark Lindsey of RLV and Space Transport News observed.

    In the Q&A, Spirnak said his company currently consists of about 10 engineers and scientists, and plans to employ more than 100 people a year from now. He said each member of the Solaren team had at least 20 years of experience in the aerospace industry, primarily with Hughes Aircraft Co. and the U.S. Air Force. Spirnak himself is a former Air Force spacecraft project engineer with experience at Boeing Satellite Systems as well.

    "The impetus for forming Solaren was the convergence of improved high-energy conversion devices, heavy-launch vehicle developments, and a revolutionary Solaren-patented SSP [space solar power] design that is a significant departure from past efforts and makes SSP not only technically but economically viable," Spirnak said.

    Boerman said Solaren's plan called for four or five heavy-lift launches that would put the elements of the power-generating facility in orbit. Those elements would dock automatically in space to create the satellite system. Boerman declined to describe the elements in detail but noted that each heavy-lift launch could put 25 tons of payload into orbit.

    "We've talked with United Launch Alliance, and gotten an idea of what's involved and what the cost is," he said.

    The plan would have to be cleared by the Federal Aviation Administration as well as the Federal Communications Commission and federal and state safety officials, Boerman said.

    In the nearer term, PG&E's deal would have to be approved by the California Public Utilities Commission, Marshall said.

    He said the space-power agreement was part of PG&E's effort to forge long-term deals for renewable energy, including deals for terrestrial-based solar power. Marshall pointed out that space-based and terrestrial-based solar power generation were "really very different animals."

    Unlike ground-based solar arrays, space satellites could generate power 24 hours a day, unaffected by cloudy weather or Earth's day-night cycle. The capacity factor for a ground-based solar is typically less than 25 percent. In contrast, the capacity factor for a power-generating satellite is expected to be 97 percent, Marshall said.

    "The potential for generating much larger amounts of power in space for any given area of solar cells makes this a very promising opportunity," Marshall said.

    He said the agreement called for 800 gigawatt-hours of electricity to be provided during the first year of operation, and 1,700 gigawatt-hours for subsequent years. The larger figure is roughly equal to the annual consumption of 250,000 average homes.

    PG&E has 5.1 million electric customer accounts and 4.2 million natural-gas customer accounts in Northern and Central California.
    From: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/30198977/n.../#.XbvLoMpRWhC
    *I have loved the stars too dearly to be fearful of the night*

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    I love this Avalon family, THANK YOU ALL for caring so much. Do not worry about me or my family, we are all taken care of. Because of many of your posts? I was not only prepared for the situation, I was actually quite comfortable and I enjoyed the quiet relaxing time with my pups.. And I read few good books!

    Thank you especially with the advice for multi purpose things that people can stock up on. I was stunned to see how ill prepared the neighborhood was for such a situation. And in between, I am also fine tuning my own reserves. My power went off about 35 minutes after my last post. So thank you for adding those resources again... I knew I wouldn't have the time to... I MISS YOU GUYS!

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Is There Another Reason For The Power Outages In California…YOU BET THERE IS!
    Nov 3, 2019
    Lisa Haven

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    A repost from (here):

    Could there be another reason for electricity shutdowns in California?

    Richard Trzupek The Epoch Times
    Fri, 01 Nov 2019 00:00 UTC



    Wind turbines in California © David McNew/Getty Images

    According to the official, widely reported story, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) shut down substantial portions of its electric transmission system in northern California as a precautionary measure.

    Citing high wind speeds they described as "historic," the utility claims that if they didn't turn off the grid, wind-caused damage to their infrastructure could start more wildfires in the area.

    Perhaps that's true. Perhaps. This tale presumes that the folks who designed and maintain PG&E's transmission system are unaware of or ignored the need to design it to withstand severe weather events, and that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) allowed the utility to do so.

    Ignorance and incompetence happens, to be sure, but there's much about this story that doesn't smell right — and it's disappointing that most journalists and elected officials are apparently accepting it without question.

    Take, for example, this statement from a Fox News story about the Kincade Fires: "A PG&E meteorologist said it's 'likely that many trees will fall, branches will break,' which could damage utility infrastructure and start a fire."

    Did you ever notice how utilities cut wide swaths of trees away when transmission lines pass through forests? There's a reason for that: When trees fall and branches break the grid can still function.

    So, if badly designed and poorly maintained infrastructure is not the reason PG&E cut power to millions of Californians, what might have prompted them to do so? Could it be that PG&E's heavy reliance on renewable energy means they don't have the power to send when an "historic" weather event occurs?

    Wind Speed Limits
    The two most popular forms of renewable energy come with operating limitations. With solar power the constraint is obvious: the availability of sunlight. One does not generate solar power at night and energy generation drops off with increasing degrees of cloud cover during the day.

    The main operating constraint of wind power is, of course, wind speed. At the low end of the scale, you need about a 6 or 7 mph wind to get a turbine moving. This is called the "cut-in speed." To generate maximum power, about a 30 mph wind is typically required. But, if the wind speed is too high, the wind turbine will shut down. This is called the "cut-out speed," and it's about 55 mph for most modern wind turbines.

    It may seem odd that wind turbines have a cut-out speed, but there's a very good reason for it. Each wind turbine rotor is connected to an electric generator housed in the turbine nacelle. The connection is made through a gearbox that is sized to turn the generator at the precise speed required to produce 60 Hertz AC power.

    The blades of the wind turbine are airfoils, just like the wings of an airplane. Adjusting the pitch (angle) of the blades allows the rotor to maintain constant speed, which in turn allows the generator to maintain the constant speed it needs to safely deliver power to the grid. However, there's a limit to blade pitch adjustment. When the wind is blowing so hard that pitch adjustment is no longer possible, the turbine shuts down. That's the cut-out speed.

    Now consider how California's power generation profile has changed. According to Energy Information Administration data, the state generated 74.3 percent of its electricity from traditional sources — fossil fuels and nuclear — in 2001. Hydroelectric, geothermal, and biomass-generated power accounted for most of the remaining 25.7 percent, with wind and solar providing only 1.98 percent of the total.

    By 2018, the state's renewable portfolio had jumped to 43.8 percent of total generation, with wind and solar now accounting for 17.9 percent of total generation. That's a lot of power to depend on from inherently unreliable sources. Thus, it would not be at all surprising to learn that PG&E didn't stop delivering power out of fear of starting fires, but because it knew it wouldn't have power to deliver once high winds shut down all those wind turbines.
    About the Author:
    Richard Trzupek is a chemist and environmental consultant as well as an analyst at The Heartland Institute. He is also the author of Regulators Gone Wild: How the EPA Is Ruining American Industry.
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  17. Link to Post #349
    United States Avalon Member Ba-ba-Ra's Avatar
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    I live in N.California. Our power was shut off 3 times in October - each time for 3 to 3-1/2 days.

    The first time we had no high winds, in fact we had no wind, calm as could be. In the meantime the Forest Service during the shut off began a control burn. What? - and the control burn got "out of control". Burned approx 3,500 acres, all in forest lands, so no houses or population were at risk of burning. BUT,the smoke throughout many parts of the county was terrible. Everyone in it's path (keep in mind smoke travels long distances) was having trouble breathing I don't remember how long it burned. At least 10 days.

    Think of all the timber that could have been harvested, now lost.

    Think of all the schools & business closures each time. Worse part, particularly for schools, they were never sure exactly when the power would be off. Should they notify parents school would be closed tomorrow or not. Sometimes it was a flip of the coin. Sometimes they had students come in & then mid-day power went off and they had to all be bused home half day.

    No traffic lights working; many lost food in fridge.

    Second shut -off again no wind, high or otherwise. PG&E explained it by saying that even though there was no wind in your area, you were probably on a grid where there was high wind in the mountains. I would have bought that explanation, except for the shut-offs were very checkerboard. One example: main road down the middle of our area had power, and yet all areas on either side of that road had none. Huh?? I guess the wind didn't go down that road.

    I'm not against them shutting down IF there is a real reason of fire danger. But lots of questions.

    I'm sure the reasons for what happened are multiple. Some listed in vids above. PG&E is in bankruptcy. Bailout?

    Definitely boosted generator sales. Denise//Dizi above talked about enjoying nature during shut-offs. Well, if you lived next door to someone with a generator (they sound like jet planes) you had to go for a long walk, which I did to find peace & quiet. I personally didn't have a problem. I have a propane free-standing fireplace, so heat & heating up food was available. I missed my computer, but enjoyed my books. Didn't have to shower as am retired. Keeping cell phone charged was a challenge, but I did it.

    We have some really good researchers here (I'm not one of them). It would be interesting to know how many control burns have gotten out of control through the years. I'm aware of at least 5 of them.

    Also, there was a thread here on PA were it was revealed that before the Paradise fire (which was the worse in Ca history) PG&E had bought a 200 Billion Dollar Catastrophe Bond. What? Was that verified?
    Blessed are the cracked, for they are the ones who let in the light!

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    The strangeness of the fires in California has become the lack of news coverage, This summer more than 80 people have died, more than 1200 homes have been lost and more than 250,000 acres have burned. Yes, there has been media coverage but given the scope, the size and the severity of these fires the coverage is almost nil.

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Wildfires spark turmoil in California’s insurance market
    By Ken Sweet and Sarah Skidmore Sell THE ASSOCIATED PRESS |
    December 24, 2019
    https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/12/...urance-market/

    (Inevitably!) Thousands of homeowners lose coverage as companies pull back

    "NEW YORK — Kent Michitsch seemed to be running out of traditional options to insure the home he’s lived in for more than 30 years northeast of San Diego as California’s massive property insurance market reels from three consecutive years of destructive wildfires.

    Michitsch, 57, has received three non-renewal notices in three years, and says he feared getting a fourth one when his homeowners’ policy comes up for renewal the middle of next year if it wasn’t for California lawmakers’ recent intervention in the market.

    “It’s constant worry and frustration. You know you’re covered now, but I might have to look for a new policy next year yet again.” Michitsch says he’s never made a claim on his insurance and never had fire damage.

    Thousands of homeowners like Michitsch have lost their insurance policies in the last few years as insurers pull out of areas that are at risk of fire damage or stop insuring homes altogether. They’ve been forced to scramble to find coverage from regular insurance providers or to turn as a last resort to a government sanctioned plan that at the moment only provides fire coverage.

    State Farm, the largest insurer in the state, Allstate and other insurers declined to renew roughly 350,000 policies in areas at high risk for wildfires since 2015 the California Department of Insurance said back in August, and the department has gotten “record numbers” of requests this year from insurers to increase the rates they charge property owners. The data also show 33,000 policies were not renewed by insurers in zip codes affected by the major wildfires.

    While the insurance industry says the California property insurance market is resilient, state lawmakers and officials have had to scramble to keep the market from grinding to a halt from the unexpected additional risk.

    The California Legislature passed a law earlier this year giving the Department of Insurance emergency powers to keep policies in effect for those in fire-prone areas. This month California Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara put a one-year moratorium on non-renewals, in hopes that lawmakers, insurance companies and other stakeholders can reach a more substantial solution for the roughly 1 million homeowners in zip codes adjacent to previous wildfires.

    “This wildfire insurance crisis has been years in the making, but it is an emergency we must deal with now if we are going to keep the California dream of home ownership from becoming the California nightmare, as an increasing number of homeowners struggle to find coverage,” Lara said in a statement.

    The fires of 2017 and 2018 caused a combined $25.3 billion in damages according to the California Department of Insurance. That’s exponentially higher than the previous wildfires in 2015 and 2008, which caused $1.1 billion and $719 million in damages, respectively.

    The insurance industry has yet to release an estimate of damages from this year’s wildfire season, but the costs are expected to be high. The most significant wildfire this year was the Kincade Fire, which started October 23 and burned 78,000 acres in Sonoma County. It destroyed 374 buildings and damaged another 60, according to the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection.

    “The wildfires in California will likely make it more difficult for California homeowners to buy insurance,” said Stu Ryland, senior vice president of the Pacific Region at Sedgwick, an insurance claims management company. “Premiums are likely to go up, particularly in areas that are prone to wildfires and in some cases, it may be difficult for consumers to find an insurer willing to write their insurance.”

    While some insurers are pulling out and others are reconsidering how they price property insurance, it is still available in one form or another to every homeowner, according to the Insurance Information Institute.

    However, those not insurable by regular insurance providers are having to turn to what’s known as the California FAIR Plan, which is a government-sanctioned association of insurers who pool together to cover the highest risk properties. FAIR Plan insurance currently only covers $1.5 million in damages, although Lara has ordered that starting in April 2020 it will cover $3 million in damages. Currently the FAIR Plan only covers fire, not other forms of risk, but California regulators have announced that FAIR Plan insurers can start doing comprehensive coverage.

    Earlier this month, the California FAIR Plan Association sued to block those changes, arguing Lara’s order is illegal.

    Karl Susman, owner of Susman Insurance Agency in Los Angeles, says the average annual premium on a homeowner policy plus FAIR to cover fire now costs around $2,500 a year, three times higher than it was three years ago.

    “These wildfires are not sustainable for these companies. They aren’t going to go bankrupt but they are just going to stop writing policies,” he said.

    Susman said he worries that without a longer-term solution the California insurance market will repeat the experience after the 1994 California Northridge earthquake, which caused many insurance carriers to stop offering earthquake insurance. He’s already seen insurance companies limiting their risk to certain zip codes as well.

    “I haven’t seen anything like this in the 28 years I’ve been doing this,” he said.

    Fortunately, those who still do have insurance have been able to start rebuilding their lives after the fires.Maggie and Dan London of Santa Rosa lost their home in the massive and fatal Tubbs Fire of 2017. They worked quickly after the fire, filing a claim and reaching out to their contractor that same day. But it took them two years to rebuild and move back in.
    Like many who tried to rebuild after the fire, they ran into obstacles — higher costs for labor and materials and ongoing talks with their insurer. All the same, Dan London feels his insurance company has done a fair job. And while they bought their home in 1979, he has not seen a sharp jump in insurance costs over time. The cost to insure their new home is slightly more, but Dan felt it reflects the increased value of the property.

    “I was expecting something triple, but it’s not at all,” he said.

    "

    "
    Each breath a gift...
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Each breath a gift...
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    One solution re the hardy souls that are sticking it out in Cal is to research how to build underground homes. There are a few good books and videos on the subject. Do a search on it.
    I am considering doing one myself as a project on the side. They are wind proof, easy to heat and cool, pretty much fire resistant, and do well even under nuke scenarios. It appears they can be built much cheaper than an ordinary home also. see undergroundhousing.com

    And on another note, the fires in Australia, are much like the Cal ones. Complete with a lot of arsonists and even a few reports of laser beams from the sky. I hear the Chinese want to build a train line in that area that has burned.

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires


    PG&E Pleads Guilty to Involuntary Manslaughter for Sparking California’s Deadliest Fire


    https://humansarefree.com/2020/03/pg...iest-fire.html

    The fire was sparked when a tower more than 100 years old malfunctioned. The utility had failed to inspect it for nearly 20 years…

    Source: EcoWatch.com (excerpt)


    And what about the DEW attacks, the exploded smart meters and the apparent accident with Tesla transmission systems ?

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Quote Posted by Philippe (here)

    PG&E Pleads Guilty to Involuntary Manslaughter for Sparking California’s Deadliest Fire


    https://humansarefree.com/2020/03/pg...iest-fire.html

    The fire was sparked when a tower more than 100 years old malfunctioned. The utility had failed to inspect it for nearly 20 years…

    Source: EcoWatch.com (excerpt)


    And what about the DEW attacks, the exploded smart meters and the apparent accident with Tesla transmission systems ?
    Thank you, I didn't post it for just throwing my hands up in the air when I saw it. This was waiting to be announced when no one was looking, so Newscum 'announced' it right when the first peak of virus fear hit as if this 'agreement' had 'just' happened. LOL

    I knew all the public wrangling about PGE would end up this way and that one of the benefits of the fires was always intended to lead to this - the government takeover/consolidation of utilities. It's all over the US for different shady excuses, maybe many other countries too who are also at the globalist planning table.

    I only hope the genocidal fires have stopped in lieu of the invisible bioweapon tool for genocide now being used, if only because the insurance payments on all the houses and the cost of having a culprit to take the fall and be liable for lawsuits started to become too burdensome.

    Just one correction... the fire was sparked when the first detonation near the fire was ignited - there were many others. You can find lots of videos of the first explosion that created an instant humongous plume of dust that a 'malfunctioning tower' does not.

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Just one correction... the fire was sparked when the first detonation near the fire was ignited - there were many others. You can find lots of videos of the first explosion that created an instant humongous plume of dust that a 'malfunctioning tower' does not.

    What detonation. None was required. Occam's razor, Waves. What makes most sense to explain the fires? A crazy Rube Goldberg conspiracy contraption or just the simple mechanics of Utility company greed.

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Updates on California Wildfires, Evacuations [8/21 6 PM]
    19,860 views•Streamed live 3 hours ago 8/21/20
    NBC Bay Area
    25.9K subscribers
    "THIS IS A REPLAY OF AN EARLIER LIVE NEWS BROADCAST.
    ORIGINAL AIRDATE: AUG. 21, 2020 6 P.M.

    Our continuing coverage on the wildfires and ongoing evacuations in the Bay Area starts now. We'll also have more on this weekend's fire weather watch and why we may see more lightning and thunderstorms. http://nbcbay.com/KStuaTY

    PLEASE NOTE: During commercial breaks online you'll see one of our sky cameras instead. Program will resume at the conclusion of the commercial break."



    (Felton, the town in Santa Cruz County where I used to live, and Boulder Creek, a neighboring town that I visited often, have both been evacuated and are in imminent danger of fire. It's just as bad if not worse in other Bay Area counties.)
    Last edited by onawah; 22nd August 2020 at 05:09.
    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Wildfires ignited by nearly 12,000 lightning strikes over the past three days continue to spread havoc across a heat wave-baked California, with little relief in sight.

    “Just a day ago, I announced that we are struggling to address the needs of suppressing some 376 fires in this state,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said at a Friday news conference. “That number has grown to about 560 fires in the state of California.

    "Seven-hundred and seventy-one thousand acres has already been burned in the state of California, the equivalent to the size of the state of Rhode Island," the governor added. "We simply haven't seen anything like this in many, many years."

    Source: National Public Radio
    22 August 2020

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Northern/Bay Area CA/Select Areas Killshot scheduled for this Sunday-Tuesday.
    (My opinion/prediction. I will be more than happy to be wrong.)

    I'm now a recently former resident of the middle of these current Sonoma fires who set a target last Spring to get out of CA before August 'knowing' mass destruction was scheduled for the next 'fire season'. The house I left is currently under mandatory evacuation and I feel I can still read the writing on the wall.

    The signs to me read that the first round of destruction was to use weaponized/manufactured out of the blue for August 'dry lightening thunderstorms' to ignite 100's of fire starts widespread enough to be unmanageable by available manpower and that the 2nd strike/big killshot is scheduled to be detonated beginning this Sunday 11am with the so called 2nd 'Dry Lightening Thunderstorm'.

    I read the signs as this 'duplicate coming lightening storm' script began being distributed into the public mind two days ago to set the stage as the excuse umbrella to ignite another 100's of separates fires to make the whole mess exponentially more unmanageable, large and destructive without precedence in CA history.

    The CA 'fire season' - a term hardly used until a few years ago - barely starts in mid August and only if there was excessive heat all summer - an excuse that didn't happen this year - so they either planned all along or switched to this new 'Mass Dry Lightening Thunderstorm Method'. The so called season lasts thru early November and was barely hours old when they dropped this first gigantic weaponized bomb. There are 2 1/2 more months of 'fire season' to go.

    Added w/time change:
    Last edited by waves; 22nd August 2020 at 20:21.

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Weather weirding and it's consequences. Lightening strikes are the primary cause of out of control fires, during drought conditions. It's actually kind of simple. Up here in Canada we had a similar lightening storm along the Southern Coast and there were a few small fires but they were quickly extinguished because the weather has been much wetter. I don't think we are in a drought pattern, currently.

    Anyway, it is quite simple and if you want to lay blame somewhere you can blame Mother Nature, who is becoming more and more annoyed with human activity. And you can also blame utilities for maintenance failures and not acting proactively to get ahead of this problem. That goes straight back to a system that is designed to react rather than prevent. Corporations operate on a fiscal quarterly model that rewards CEO's and shareholders for bumping up profits through layoffs, deferred maintenance etc...

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