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Thread: The strangeness of the California Fires

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Quote Posted by James Newell (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by James Newell (here)
    MASSIVE EXPLOSION Strikes N. CA 50 miles wide!
    I'd like to better understand what we're being shown here. For instance:
    • How speeded up is this?
    • What's the time lapse between images?
    • What program is he using to generate the images?
    • Can this be examined retrospectively/historically?
    • If so, what's the link?
    An 'explosion' is something that happens in seconds. Something unusual may be happening, for sure, but there's almost certainly some hyperbole here. All clarifications are more than welcome.
    It is difficult to tell if there is any speed up of images, but if you look closely you can see the clouds moving at a standard rate of speed so from that it appears not doctored. I believe he got it by going through the weather data satellite at that time period. Which means anyone should be able to retrive that data and verify it.I will see if I can locate the weather satellite link.
    Here is another observation on this event. The first video footage shows a large object flying over the fire area and when it is directly above the fire, an explosion occurs. The second, astronomical observation video shows the paths of 2 comets crossing paths at the exact location of the explosion.


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  3. Link to Post #342
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Quote Posted by SunSea (here)
    The second, astronomical observation video shows the paths of 2 comets crossing paths at the exact location of the explosion.

    Do you mean meteors?

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Hi Delight, He calls them comets and they have names which I didn't catch. At some place in space, these two crossed paths and the intersection was above this explosion. Hmmm, sounds interesting. The programs he's using look real interesting. In one he can go frame to frame which allows you to see things not seen when looking at it as a whole. The astonomical one is also fascinating. Maybe someone can find those if they're interested.

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Hey SunSea,

    I think the first video that Igor Kostelac disects can also be seen, without pause, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nb2m8KKuwxk

    I suspect it's footage from the "Barham North" camera which is looking to the northwest at the Kincade fire about 20 miles or so away. A live stream of the camera can be found here: http://www.alertwildfire.org/northbay/

    If so, the footage doesn't actually zoom in (as Mr. Kostelac says it does around 8:10 in his video). He then comments that whatever is passing over the fire at 9:24pm (the "big ball", which looks to be causing the explosion), is moving at tremendous speed. I really don't think it's much faster than the jets moving by earlier. (I'd like to be proven wrong.)

    At 16:40 he displays the second video, showing the path of the comet NEOWISE (and McNaught) which he says passes over the fire at 9:36pm. Is he saying it's the same object that's passing over at 9:24pm from the first video?

    A couple of other things to note:

    (1) The Kincade fire is well north of the path between San Francisco and Sacramento. Actually, it's north of Atlas as well--closer go Geyersville as the CA Dept of forestry shows here: https://fire.ca.gov/incidents/. So, if NEOWISE is passing overhead, it's more like 9:32pm, not 9:36pm from what I can estimate.

    (2) The other note is about NEOWISE. Is it a comet (meteor) as he says, or is it NASA's "Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer " described here: https://www.seeker.com/neowise-is-ba...768165079.html

    IMO, there's a lot of things to question in his video.
    Last edited by Alecs; 30th October 2019 at 12:19.

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    This article is from April 2009... and may be something to consider here. It seems that PG&E (apparently beleaguered provider of electrical power in USA California) was looking into sourcing solar power from space. I don’t know if this deal ever came to fruition or went “dark” and off-the-books?

    Quote PG&E makes deal for space solar power
    Utility to buy orbit-generated electricity from Solaren in 2016, at no risk

    By Alan Boyle
    msnbc.com
    updated 4/13/2009 10:41:47 PM ET

    California's biggest energy utility announced a deal Monday to purchase 200 megawatts of electricity from a startup company that plans to beam the power down to Earth from outer space, beginning in 2016.

    San Francisco-based Pacific Gas & Electric said it was seeking approval from state regulators for an agreement to purchase power over a 15-year period from Solaren Corp., an 8-year-old company based in Manhattan Beach, Calif. The agreement was first reported in a posting to Next100, a Weblog produced by PG&E.

    Solaren would generate the power using solar panels in Earth orbit and convert it to radio-frequency transmissions that would be beamed down to a receiving station in Fresno, PG&E said. From there, the energy would be converted into electricity and fed into PG&E's power grid.

    PG&E is pledging to buy the power at an agreed-upon rate, comparable to the rate specified in other agreements for renewable-energy purchases, company spokesman Jonathan Marshall said. Neither PG&E nor Solaren would say what that rate was, due to the proprietary nature of the agreement. However, Marshall emphasized that PG&E would make no up-front investment in Solaren's venture.

    "We've been very careful not to bear risk in this," Marshall told msnbc.com.

    Solaren's chief executive officer, Gary Spirnak, said the project would be the first real-world application of space solar power, a technology that has been talked about for decades but never turned into reality.

    "While a system of this scale and exact configuration has not been built, the underlying technology is very mature and is based on communications satellite technology," he said in a Q&A posted by PG&E. A study drawn up for the Pentagon came to a similar conclusion in 2007. However, that study also said the cost of satellite-beamed power would likely be significantly higher than market rates, at least at first.

    In contrast, Spirnak said Solaren's system would be "competitive both in terms of performance and cost with other sources of baseload power generation."

    Solaren's director for energy services, Cal Boerman, said he was confident his company would be able to deliver the power starting in mid-2016, as specified in the agreement. "There are huge penalties associated with not performing," he told msnbc.com. He said PG&E would be "our first client" but was not expected to be the only one.

    The biggest questions surrounding the deal have to do with whether Solaren has the wherewithal, the expertise and the regulatory support to get a space-based solar power system up and running in seven years. "Quite a few hurdles there to leap," Clark Lindsey of RLV and Space Transport News observed.

    In the Q&A, Spirnak said his company currently consists of about 10 engineers and scientists, and plans to employ more than 100 people a year from now. He said each member of the Solaren team had at least 20 years of experience in the aerospace industry, primarily with Hughes Aircraft Co. and the U.S. Air Force. Spirnak himself is a former Air Force spacecraft project engineer with experience at Boeing Satellite Systems as well.

    "The impetus for forming Solaren was the convergence of improved high-energy conversion devices, heavy-launch vehicle developments, and a revolutionary Solaren-patented SSP [space solar power] design that is a significant departure from past efforts and makes SSP not only technically but economically viable," Spirnak said.

    Boerman said Solaren's plan called for four or five heavy-lift launches that would put the elements of the power-generating facility in orbit. Those elements would dock automatically in space to create the satellite system. Boerman declined to describe the elements in detail but noted that each heavy-lift launch could put 25 tons of payload into orbit.

    "We've talked with United Launch Alliance, and gotten an idea of what's involved and what the cost is," he said.

    The plan would have to be cleared by the Federal Aviation Administration as well as the Federal Communications Commission and federal and state safety officials, Boerman said.

    In the nearer term, PG&E's deal would have to be approved by the California Public Utilities Commission, Marshall said.

    He said the space-power agreement was part of PG&E's effort to forge long-term deals for renewable energy, including deals for terrestrial-based solar power. Marshall pointed out that space-based and terrestrial-based solar power generation were "really very different animals."

    Unlike ground-based solar arrays, space satellites could generate power 24 hours a day, unaffected by cloudy weather or Earth's day-night cycle. The capacity factor for a ground-based solar is typically less than 25 percent. In contrast, the capacity factor for a power-generating satellite is expected to be 97 percent, Marshall said.

    "The potential for generating much larger amounts of power in space for any given area of solar cells makes this a very promising opportunity," Marshall said.

    He said the agreement called for 800 gigawatt-hours of electricity to be provided during the first year of operation, and 1,700 gigawatt-hours for subsequent years. The larger figure is roughly equal to the annual consumption of 250,000 average homes.

    PG&E has 5.1 million electric customer accounts and 4.2 million natural-gas customer accounts in Northern and Central California.
    From: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/30198977/n.../#.XbvLoMpRWhC
    *I have loved the stars too dearly to be fearful of the night*

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    I love this Avalon family, THANK YOU ALL for caring so much. Do not worry about me or my family, we are all taken care of. Because of many of your posts? I was not only prepared for the situation, I was actually quite comfortable and I enjoyed the quiet relaxing time with my pups.. And I read few good books!

    Thank you especially with the advice for multi purpose things that people can stock up on. I was stunned to see how ill prepared the neighborhood was for such a situation. And in between, I am also fine tuning my own reserves. My power went off about 35 minutes after my last post. So thank you for adding those resources again... I knew I wouldn't have the time to... I MISS YOU GUYS!

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    Is There Another Reason For The Power Outages In California…YOU BET THERE IS!
    Nov 3, 2019
    Lisa Haven

    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    A repost from (here):

    Could there be another reason for electricity shutdowns in California?

    Richard Trzupek The Epoch Times
    Fri, 01 Nov 2019 00:00 UTC



    Wind turbines in California © David McNew/Getty Images

    According to the official, widely reported story, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) shut down substantial portions of its electric transmission system in northern California as a precautionary measure.

    Citing high wind speeds they described as "historic," the utility claims that if they didn't turn off the grid, wind-caused damage to their infrastructure could start more wildfires in the area.

    Perhaps that's true. Perhaps. This tale presumes that the folks who designed and maintain PG&E's transmission system are unaware of or ignored the need to design it to withstand severe weather events, and that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) allowed the utility to do so.

    Ignorance and incompetence happens, to be sure, but there's much about this story that doesn't smell right — and it's disappointing that most journalists and elected officials are apparently accepting it without question.

    Take, for example, this statement from a Fox News story about the Kincade Fires: "A PG&E meteorologist said it's 'likely that many trees will fall, branches will break,' which could damage utility infrastructure and start a fire."

    Did you ever notice how utilities cut wide swaths of trees away when transmission lines pass through forests? There's a reason for that: When trees fall and branches break the grid can still function.

    So, if badly designed and poorly maintained infrastructure is not the reason PG&E cut power to millions of Californians, what might have prompted them to do so? Could it be that PG&E's heavy reliance on renewable energy means they don't have the power to send when an "historic" weather event occurs?

    Wind Speed Limits
    The two most popular forms of renewable energy come with operating limitations. With solar power the constraint is obvious: the availability of sunlight. One does not generate solar power at night and energy generation drops off with increasing degrees of cloud cover during the day.

    The main operating constraint of wind power is, of course, wind speed. At the low end of the scale, you need about a 6 or 7 mph wind to get a turbine moving. This is called the "cut-in speed." To generate maximum power, about a 30 mph wind is typically required. But, if the wind speed is too high, the wind turbine will shut down. This is called the "cut-out speed," and it's about 55 mph for most modern wind turbines.

    It may seem odd that wind turbines have a cut-out speed, but there's a very good reason for it. Each wind turbine rotor is connected to an electric generator housed in the turbine nacelle. The connection is made through a gearbox that is sized to turn the generator at the precise speed required to produce 60 Hertz AC power.

    The blades of the wind turbine are airfoils, just like the wings of an airplane. Adjusting the pitch (angle) of the blades allows the rotor to maintain constant speed, which in turn allows the generator to maintain the constant speed it needs to safely deliver power to the grid. However, there's a limit to blade pitch adjustment. When the wind is blowing so hard that pitch adjustment is no longer possible, the turbine shuts down. That's the cut-out speed.

    Now consider how California's power generation profile has changed. According to Energy Information Administration data, the state generated 74.3 percent of its electricity from traditional sources — fossil fuels and nuclear — in 2001. Hydroelectric, geothermal, and biomass-generated power accounted for most of the remaining 25.7 percent, with wind and solar providing only 1.98 percent of the total.

    By 2018, the state's renewable portfolio had jumped to 43.8 percent of total generation, with wind and solar now accounting for 17.9 percent of total generation. That's a lot of power to depend on from inherently unreliable sources. Thus, it would not be at all surprising to learn that PG&E didn't stop delivering power out of fear of starting fires, but because it knew it wouldn't have power to deliver once high winds shut down all those wind turbines.
    About the Author:
    Richard Trzupek is a chemist and environmental consultant as well as an analyst at The Heartland Institute. He is also the author of Regulators Gone Wild: How the EPA Is Ruining American Industry.
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

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    United States Avalon Member Ba-ba-Ra's Avatar
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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    I live in N.California. Our power was shut off 3 times in October - each time for 3 to 3-1/2 days.

    The first time we had no high winds, in fact we had no wind, calm as could be. In the meantime the Forest Service during the shut off began a control burn. What? - and the control burn got "out of control". Burned approx 3,500 acres, all in forest lands, so no houses or population were at risk of burning. BUT,the smoke throughout many parts of the county was terrible. Everyone in it's path (keep in mind smoke travels long distances) was having trouble breathing I don't remember how long it burned. At least 10 days.

    Think of all the timber that could have been harvested, now lost.

    Think of all the schools & business closures each time. Worse part, particularly for schools, they were never sure exactly when the power would be off. Should they notify parents school would be closed tomorrow or not. Sometimes it was a flip of the coin. Sometimes they had students come in & then mid-day power went off and they had to all be bused home half day.

    No traffic lights working; many lost food in fridge.

    Second shut -off again no wind, high or otherwise. PG&E explained it by saying that even though there was no wind in your area, you were probably on a grid where there was high wind in the mountains. I would have bought that explanation, except for the shut-offs were very checkerboard. One example: main road down the middle of our area had power, and yet all areas on either side of that road had none. Huh?? I guess the wind didn't go down that road.

    I'm not against them shutting down IF there is a real reason of fire danger. But lots of questions.

    I'm sure the reasons for what happened are multiple. Some listed in vids above. PG&E is in bankruptcy. Bailout?

    Definitely boosted generator sales. Denise//Dizi above talked about enjoying nature during shut-offs. Well, if you lived next door to someone with a generator (they sound like jet planes) you had to go for a long walk, which I did to find peace & quiet. I personally didn't have a problem. I have a propane free-standing fireplace, so heat & heating up food was available. I missed my computer, but enjoyed my books. Didn't have to shower as am retired. Keeping cell phone charged was a challenge, but I did it.

    We have some really good researchers here (I'm not one of them). It would be interesting to know how many control burns have gotten out of control through the years. I'm aware of at least 5 of them.

    Also, there was a thread here on PA were it was revealed that before the Paradise fire (which was the worse in Ca history) PG&E had bought a 200 Billion Dollar Catastrophe Bond. What? Was that verified?
    Blessed are the cracked, for they are the ones who let in the light!

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    Default Re: The strangeness of the California Fires

    The strangeness of the fires in California has become the lack of news coverage, This summer more than 80 people have died, more than 1200 homes have been lost and more than 250,000 acres have burned. Yes, there has been media coverage but given the scope, the size and the severity of these fires the coverage is almost nil.

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