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    Question CIA has secret program to detect genetic markers for psychic abilities.

    From Rosemary Ellen Guilley, a blog post from her Visionary Living blog of May 27, 2018


    UFO Underground No. 1: A Genetic Marker Has Been Identified That Predicts UFO Encounters and Psychic Ability

    For some time, the CIA has been running secret research programs concerning UFO sightings and contact, psychic ability and expanded human potential, with an eye to marrying manipulated psychic ability to technology – especially alien-engineered technology.

    These programs are highly compartmentalized with limited interaction among the units. Extensive genetic surveys have been done of people who have reported UFO sightings and contact. Reportedly, a genetic marker has been identified with empirical data that predicts a higher probability of certain individuals having these experiences – and having a more marked degree of psychic ability than most other persons.

    This marker will be studied and exploited for ways to enhance the UFO/psychic proclivity in future generations. Apparently, the government has no shortage of experiencers willing to participate in the research. High-profile experiencers who seek a lot of media publicity are, for the most part, avoided; experiencers who are “below the radar” are preferred. Many potential subjects come from various public surveys of experiencers.

    The US government continues to secretly research psychic applications, despite official announcements in the past that certain programs were terminated. For example, Stargate, the consolidation of various secret programs to investigate the use of psychic phenomena and skills in military and intelligence operations, was shut down and declassified in 1995, because “officially” the CIA found no useful applications, and some members of Congress were vocal about the government paying “psychics” and “witches” for dubious research.

    The psychic research merely went deeper underground and then ramped up after the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks in 2001.

    Some of the current research is being done at laboratories where MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is used while test subjects are engaged in remote viewing and other psychic tasks.

    The roots of these psychic programs go back to at least World War I. There was a lull after that war until World War II. When the modern UFO era commenced in the mid-20th century, interest in psychic applications was extended into that field as well. Alien craft captured by the government revealed a marked lack of instrumentation. The craft had power sources, but no obvious way to control them. In some cases, panels with depressions for hand prints suggested a form of mental control exerted by physical contact with the craft.

    Major aerospace companies were given secret contracts to investigate mental/psychic control of aircraft. In other research, military pilots were recruited for experiments. (While we haven’t yet achieved full mental control of aircraft, there are helmets, each unique to the physiology of a military pilot, that follow and respond to eye movements.)

    While the government was studying alien technology back in those early UFO-era days, the public was being fed a much different story. In 1952, the US Air Force initiated Project Blue Book as its third official investigation of UFO activity. (The previous two were Project Sign in 1947 and Project Grudge in 1949.)

    Project Blue Book examined sightings from 1947 to 1969. It ended in 1970 with the official conclusions that UFOs did not display technology beyond our own; they were not considered a national security threat; and there was no evidence that UFOs were of extraterrestrial origin.

    All three conclusions were contradicted by the secret study of alien craft that had either crashed or been shot down and captured. Advanced technology – yes. Security threat – yes, if the visitors are hostile. Extraterrestrial origin – possibly, but more likely interdimensional; certainly not from “here.”

    Despite official attempts to squelch the UFO phenomenon, UFO sightings and ET contact did not abate but increased. Debunking and disavowal did not work (though they are tactics still employed), so the next most effective tool was management of perceptions and information.

    Since then, the public has been exposed to increasing media on ETs, slowly acclimatizing us to the idea that Earth has been visited/could be visited by hostile or benevolent (but mostly hostile) ET forces. ETs and UFOs have permeated pop culture in art, music and advertising as well as films and television. It’s no accident – it’s by design.

    Apparently, the time has now come for the public to be let in on some of the bigger secrets. New disclosure drops have started, and more are coming (see UFO Underground #2).

    The experience-psychic ability connection

    The overlap between extraordinary experience and high innate psychic ability is well-known to many paranormal researchers. One follows the other. Experiences are not limited to UFOs but include other kinds of phenomena as well. The government, however, isn’t interested in ghosts or dogmen – just aliens and UFOs.

    The ability of the mind to exert a physical force on material objects (psychokinesis) has been documented in parapsychology since at least the 1930s, and programming objects or devices with intention has been demonstrated scientifically as well, such as in the work of physicist William Tiller. Thus, it comes as no surprise that government intelligence is interested in applications of psychic mind power.

    Genetic manipulation, especially covert, is another matter. Will we breed secret “super psychics” who will interface and work with aliens, control our own technology by thought – and perhaps even influence the thoughts of the public?

    UFOs and aliens aside, global social media and the internet have raised the ante on mind control in general. How the masses respond to news and information is carefully studied, and for many purposes, including advertising and consumer choices as well as political power and intelligence. For example, consider the current scandal over the now-defunct Cambridge Analytica Ltd., a British political consulting firm, and its use of the data of millions of Facebook users to target ads during political campaigns, including the U.S. presidential vote.

    Mass united consciousness can affect physical reality in powerful ways. Individuals need to be increasingly vigilant about how their thoughts and emotions are affected by information.

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    Default Re: CIA has secret program to detect genetic markers for psychic abilities.

    If you read her blog, you will note that there is a very different writing style here than in her other articles, which indicates to me that she did not actually write this article. Through people like Dan Smith, she has connections to Ron Pandolfi who is definitely involved in Deep State UFO and psychic research, most likely for the CIA.

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    Default Re: CIA has secret program to detect genetic markers for psychic abilities.

    "The psychic research merely went deeper underground and then ramped up after the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks in 2001."

    As depicted in S2:E16 ("The Hunt") of the Dead Zone TV series (on the Roku Channel).

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    Default Re: CIA has secret program to detect genetic markers for psychic abilities.

    This sounds exactly like the type of work Dr. Hal Puthoff has been researching...see Michael Lee Hill aka Enki.

    Edit to add: Isn't he(Puthoff) ex-CIA? Oh that's right, there's no such thing as ex...

    "In the 1970s and '80s Puthoff directed a CIA/DIA-funded program at SRI International to investigate paranormal abilities, collaborating with Russell Targ in a study of the purported psychic abilities of Uri Geller, Ingo Swann, Pat Price, Joseph McMoneagle and others, as part of the Stargate Project. Both Puthoff and Targ became convinced Geller and Swann had genuine psychic powers.[7] However, Geller employed sleight of hand tricks.[8]"

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_E._Puthoff
    Last edited by we-R-one; 27th August 2018 at 22:34.

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    Default Re: CIA has secret program to detect genetic markers for psychic abilities.

    I Think they do have or may have the ability to maybe do this now if they can recognize which gene in the DNA strand contains the ESP gene.
    Which requires years of study. The human genome was only fully mapped until april 2003 which means they hadn't figured out what each gene did but had the map. Yes foresic used DNA but it only showed the uniqueness of the subject. not if they prone to criminal behavior or not. They may have have that now with' brain mapping' which is another field to look at.


    Markers were first used and studied on sea turtles in 96 since they are more primitive the mapping was easier

    Interesting conjecture
    Last edited by ichingcarpenter; 27th August 2018 at 23:20.

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    Default Re: CIA has secret program to detect genetic markers for psychic abilities.


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    Default Re: CIA has secret program to detect genetic markers for psychic abilities.

    Pentagon Warns Military Personnel Against At-Home DNA Tests

    The tests, from companies such as 23andMe and Ancestry, have become popular holiday gifts, but the military is warning service members of risks to their careers
    .
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/24/u...dna-tests.html

    By Heather Murphy and Mihir Zaveri

    Dec. 24, 2019

    In an internal memo, Pentagon leadership has urged military personnel not to take mail-in DNA tests, warning that they create security risks, are unreliable and could negatively affect service members’ careers.

    The letter, which was reported by Yahoo News, was sent on Friday. It does not name any particular DNA testing companies, but counsels broadly against buying ancestry and health tests promoted with military discounts and other military incentives.

    Cmdr. Sean Robertson, a Pentagon spokesman, confirmed that the memo had been sent.

    “We want to ensure all service members are aware of the risks of Direct to Consumer (DTC) genetic testing,” he told The New York Times over email.

    Over the past decade, millions of Americans have purchased DNA tests through companies such as 23andMe and Ancestry with the hopes of connecting with relatives, finding out more about their family origins and learning about how their DNA could affect their chances of developing certain health conditions. In recent years, the tests have become popular holiday gifts.

    Commander Robertson said that the tests might provide inaccurate results and have negative professional consequences. “The unintentional discovery of markers that may affect readiness could affect a service member’s career, and the information from DTC genetic testing may disclose this information,” he said.

    Genetic tests have more serious employment implications for members of the military than the average office worker, said Frederick Bieber, an associate professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School, who served as an Army Reserve officer at the DNA Identification Lab in Rockville, Md.

    The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act — known as GINA — prohibits discrimination by health insurers and employers based on the information that people carry in their genes. It does not apply to members of the military, however.

    “The military can make decisions about operational readiness,” Dr. Bieber said, whereas “in the civilian world there are prohibitions about it.”

    If a DNA test shows that someone has carrier status for sickle cell trait, for example, he said it could limit advancement in some aviation specialties.

    The memo was written by Joseph D. Kernan, the under secretary of defense for intelligence, and James N. Stewart, the assistant secretary of defense for manpower. They warn that the tests “could expose personal and genetic information, and potentially create unintended security consequences and increased risk to the joint force and mission.”

    The memo does not get into what specifically these risks might be, and Commander Robertson declined to elaborate.

    In a statement, a spokeswoman from 23andMe said that the company took great care to protect customers’ privacy.

    “Our FDA-authorized health reports have been tested to be over 99% accurate,” she said. “All of our testing is done in the U.S., and we do not share information with third parties without separate, explicit consent from our customers.”

    An Ancestry spokeswoman said that the company had not targeted military personnel with discounts. “Ancestry does not share customer DNA data with insurers, employers, or third-party marketers,” she added.

    The Pentagon does not advise against genetic testing altogether. But service members were encouraged to get genetic information “from a licensed professional rather than a consumer product,” Commander Robertson said.
    If seeds in the black earth can turn into such beautiful roses, what might not the heart of man become in its long journey toward the stars?
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