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Thread: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

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    United States Avalon Member rgray222's Avatar
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    Default Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Is it still magic if you know how it’s done? Is it still an illusion if computers are hiding the work? Marco Tempest plays around with that idea as two dozen drones buzz and fly all around him, seemingly controlled by his every move. Magic or not, it’s just cool to see 24 drones work together as part of a larger machine.



    Quote Tempest writes:
    Working with Daito Manabe, Motoi Ishibashi and their team at Rhizomatiks Research in Tokyo, the goal is to create an intimate and artistic interaction between man and machine.

    Learn more about the project here.

    Source

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by rgray222 (here)
    Is it still magic if you know how it’s done? Is it still an illusion if computers are hiding the work?
    Ah, but does the creator of the technology know how it works an ALL levels?
    I still have eyes to see what the world would have me see but that doesn't mean I believe. - Sara

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    .
    Pretty scary, actually.

    This is an example of rather fearsome new technology being disguised as lightweight entertainment. In military hands, this same ability to link drones in an inter-communicating swarm can do a lot of VERY nasty things to human beings.

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    .
    Pretty scary, actually.

    This is an example of rather fearsome new technology being disguised as lightweight entertainment. In military hands, this same ability to link drones in an inter-communicating swarm can do a lot of VERY nasty things to human beings.
    And imagine how bad it will be for human beings when A.I. controls swarms of very advanced drones in the future.
    "Earth is currently restricted today for normal development of timeline progress. With us telling you everything would change everything."

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Repost from here:

    Slowly dripping into the public domain...

    Tiny Helicopter Piloted By Human Thoughts
    Elizabeth Palermo, TechNewsDaily Contributor
    Date: 04 June 2013 Time: 07:03 PM ET


    CREDIT: University of Minnesota


    You may have had remote controlled airplanes growing up, but they probably weren't as cool as the quadcopter. This tiny helicopter looks a lot like a toy, but it's really a high-tech robot controlled exclusively by human thought.

    Developed by a team of researchers at the University of Minnesota, the four-blade helicopter, or quadcopter, can be quickly and accurately controlled for a sustained amount of time using the electrical impulses associated with a subject's thoughts.

    The team used a noninvasive technique known as electroencephalography (EEG) to record the electrical brain activity of five different subjects. Each subject was fitted with a cap equipped with 64 electrodes, which sent signals to the quadcopter over a WiFi network.


    The subjects were positioned in front of a screen that relayed images of the quadcopter's flight through an on-board camera, allowing them to see the course the way a pilot would. The plane, which was driven with a pre-set forward moving velocity, was then controlled by the subject's thoughts.

    By imagining that they were using their right hand, left hand and both hands together, subjects controlled the flight path of the plane. If they imagined raising their left hand, for example, the plane turned left. If they imagined raising their hands together, the plane lifted higher in the air.

    Once they got the hang of it, subjects were able to fly the quadcopter through foam rings scattered around the indoor course.

    "Our study shows that for the first time, humans are able to control the flight of flying robots using just their thoughts, sensed from noninvasive brain waves," said Bin He, lead scientist behind the study and a professor with the University of Minnesota's College of Science and Engineering.

    He and his fellow researchers plan on using the study to further their understanding of how a brain-computer interface (BCI) can help assist, augment or repair cognitive or sensory-motor functions in those suffering from paralysis or other disabilities.

    "Our next goal is to control robotic arms using noninvasive brain wave signals," said He. "With the eventual goal of developing brain-computer interfaces that aid patients with disabilities or neurodegenerative disorders."

    The University of Minnesota team isn't the only group of researchers making breakthroughs in the field of brain-controlled avionics. Scientists at the University of Essex in the U.K. are also working with researchers at NASA to create a BCI that can be used aboard a spacecraft simulator. The team hopes to one day use the interface to assist fatigued astronauts during space travel.

    And last year, researchers at Zhejiang University in China were able to control a hovering drone using a commercial EEG headset, setting the stage for more advanced uses of this noninvasive brain technology in the future.

    This story was provided by TechNewsDaily, a sister site to LiveScience. Email asklizzyp@gmail.com or follow her @techEpalermo. Follow us @TechNewsDaily, on Facebook or on Google+.

    ============================================

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Russian Military Reveals Rocket Launching, Flamethrowing Tank Killer Drone

    Russia17:30 12.02.2016
    (updated 18:06 12.02.2016)


    © Photo: United Instrument Manufacturing Corporation

    The Russian military has unveiled an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) which can carry anti-tank rocket launchers and flamethrowers; it can also fly on reconnaissance missions, transport cargo and coordinate artillery fire on the battlefield.

    The drone was developed by the United Instrument Manufacturing Corporation (UIMC), a subsidiary of the civil and military technology firm Russian Technologies State Corporation (Rostec). "The drone determines the coordinates of a location using GLONASS satellite signals and can correct artillery fire. The combat multicopter is able to find enemy objects such as tanks and armored vehicles and destroy them with rockets," UIMC explained.

    Quote "It is capable of carrying out reconnaissance and monitoring, patrolling closed and open spaces, transporting cargo, preparing cartographic material and also conducting military operations," UIMC general director Sergey Skokov told RIA Novosti.
    "The human role in the management of the robots has been minimized. The squadron of drones is capable of working autonomously, as each machine independently fulfils its function and precisely follows a specified route," Skokov said.


    UIMC presented its new invention on Wednesday at a military technology conference held at the 'Patriot' military exhibition center outside Moscow, devoted to the 'Robot Automation of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.' The conference was the first of its kind in Russia, and attracted more than 500 representatives of Russian firms working in the defense technology industry.

    "The aim of the conference is the development of practical recommendations for the robot automation of the armed forces," explained Aleksandr Mironov, head of scientific research at the Russian Ministry of Defense. Mironov told RIA Novosti that conference participants discussed regulatory and technical-organizational issues regarding the development of Russian robotics, such as greater cooperation between agencies to exchange knowledge and experience in the creation and implementation of robotic systems.

    "The number of exhibitors, the large number of about 500 conference participants and their interest in solving assignments, demonstrate that the problems of robot automation will be solved and that new recommendations and pathways are being developed," Mironov told RIA Novosti.

    Related:
    Robot Warfare: New Russian Battlestation Can Control 10 Drones at Once
    Robotroops: Russia to Roll Out Robot Fighting Force by 2025
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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Exactly Bill , I look for advances in science and technology concerning Hench's prophecies where robotic killing machines gain AI and the military loses control of them... Then enter the human\pig clones created by the military...
    Raiding the Matrix One Mind at a Time ...

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by rgray222 (here)
    Source
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    Last edited by WhiteLove; 13th February 2016 at 11:07.

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Imagine the uses for swarm-tech -- what do you think? A few years back I was reading about a DARPA program. DARPA was looking to tap the smartphone application development community with experience in creating “adaptive applications.” Current sensor systems, like those being developed for DARPA’s Adaptable Sensor System (ADAPT) program, were increasingly complex; they offered advances in capabilities far beyond their current use. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), for example, have become indispensable intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms on today’s battlefield. Well, it seems they've been quite successful with that program. Recently, a swarm of Perdix micro-drones were test-dropped from a pair of F/A-18 Super Hornets.

    "DARPA’s OFFensive Swarm-Enabled Tactics (OFFSET) program “seeks to develop and demonstrate 100+ operationally relevant swarm tactics that could be used by groups of unmanned air and/or ground systems numbering more than 100 robots.” Right now, humans still control all unmanned aerial and ground vehicles (UAVs and UGVs) through computer programs, but DARPA wants to find a way for the drones to act in unison by enhancing the human-swarm interface so that hundreds or thousands can be controlled on the battlefield at the same time. This technology should ultimately enable the military to interact with drone swarm through augmented and virtual reality interfaces, voice gestures, and touch commands."

    http://reillytop10.com/2016/12/14/swarm-warfare/

    Controlling UAV swarms -- the idea was to create an app that allows a swarm of small deployed UAVs to be controlled as a single unit (a hive so to speak) without having to individually control each vehicle. William Roper of the Department of Defense explained in a statement:

    "Perdix are not pre-programmed synchronized individuals, they are a collective organism, sharing one distributed brain for decision-making and adapting to each other like swarms in nature. Because every Perdix communicates and collaborates with every other Perdix, the swarm has no leader and can gracefully adapt to drones entering or exiting the team."

    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/6...its-own-moves/

    https://www.defense.gov/News/News-Re...-demonstration





    Full text from DARPA in 2011:

    "DARPA Seeks Smartphone App Developers for ADAPT Program

    December 05, 2011

    Commercial software models sought for ISR applications

    Current sensor systems, like those being developed for DARPA’s Adaptable Sensor System (ADAPT) program, are increasingly complex; they offer advances in capabilities far beyond their current use. One significant limiting factor in our ability to leverage all of these advances is the lack of sophisticated, adaptive applications. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), for example, have become indispensible intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms on today’s battlefield. How much more effective could they be if an app were created that allowed a swarm of small deployed UAVs to be controlled as a single unit (a hive so to speak) without having to individually control each vehicle?

    “DARPA is looking to tap the smartphone application development community with experience in application creation,” said Mark Rich, DARPA program manager. From novel approaches to networked connectivity, accelerometer use, user interfaces and others, DARPA hopes to revolutionize sensors built on smartphone-like technology. Rich believes this can be accomplished by adding commercial smartphone application developers to the innovation process to deliver deployed distributed sensor systems for warfighters.

    According to Rich, “The rapid advancement and sophisticated capabilities in today's smartphone technology provide opportunities to revolutionize the way sensor systems are developed and used. The integrated processing, storage, communications, navigation and orientation functions built into smartphone hardware and software can be leveraged to create far more powerful distributed sensor devices than we use today.”

    One potential scenario for an ADAPT network, according to Rich, could include perimeter security sensors hidden at a deployed airfield, underground, or sensors onboard small UAVs flying in a swarm networked together. These networks of sensors would share data and be programmed to provide user interface in various ways, such as via video to a tablet held by a sentry on foot.

    DARPA’s ADAPT program seeks to leverage commercial smartphone development approaches to design, build, manufacture and test a common hardware and software architecture that could run a variety of low-cost intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance sensor applications. ADAPT core hardware and some core software, with Android-like functionality, is currently under development.

    The main difference between ADAPT sensors and commercial smartphones is that the sensors won’t include an embedded user interface, such as touch screen, phone, camera or battery. ADAPT sensors may be buried, onboard a UAV, or may be used in a small robot. ISR apps can use the internal sensors, (e.g., accelerometer, gyro or magnetometer), external sensors (e.g., cameras, receivers or chemical detectors) or internal and/or external radios to allow sensor devices to work together. Power requirements (battery), type of interface and hardware packaging are all dependent on the ISR mission.

    Rich explained, “We’re actively looking for commercial app developers to address specific sensor challenges including collecting, organizing, storing and sharing video information (e.g., YouTube for distributed video); sharing information over communications interfaces (e.g., Skype for unattended sensors); developing and implementing rich user interfaces to display and understand what happens in a sensor array (e.g., Google maps with automatic tracking); novel uses of smartphone capabilities to rapidly develop and deploy sensor networks (e.g., using the accelerometer to detect trucks driving by an unattended sensor).

    The ADAPT program leverages the success of the commercial Original Design Manufacturer (ODM) development model. Today, the process for delivering new ISR sensor applications to warfighters takes between three and eight years. By applying the ODM model, ADAPT should deliver new ISR sensor applications within a year from design, meeting emerging critical needs in the field. The end vision for ADAPT is warfighter access to a library of ever-expanding ISR apps that run on a common hardware model using a common operating system – just like smart phones and apps in the commercial market today."
    Last edited by boolacalaca; 31st January 2017 at 13:10. Reason: Adding more

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by boolacalaca (here)
    "Perdix are not pre-programmed synchronized individuals, they are a collective organism, sharing one distributed brain for decision-making and adapting to each other like swarms in nature. Because every Perdix communicates and collaborates with every other Perdix, the swarm has no leader and can gracefully adapt to drones entering or exiting the team."
    Sounds neat! What could possibly go wrong?

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Everyone in modern towns/city's have mobiles, I guess these drones could target mobiles? release and let them hunt you down, pop.

    Whole communities/towns cities could be swarmed and naturalised 0.o

    Reminds me of the film 'Dune' and the little assassin needle drone.
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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by Daozen (here)
    Quote Posted by boolacalaca (here)
    "Perdix are not pre-programmed synchronized individuals, they are a collective organism, sharing one distributed brain for decision-making and adapting to each other like swarms in nature. Because every Perdix communicates and collaborates with every other Perdix, the swarm has no leader and can gracefully adapt to drones entering or exiting the team."
    Sounds neat! What could possibly go wrong?
    Exactly --- and if SWARM tech can control 100+ airborne drones, it could also control a bunch else -- makes me think of the spider-drones deployed in the movie Minority Report.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	spider drones.jpg
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ID:	34909

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    I'm reading a brilliant futuristic scifi novel written in 2010 called The Dervish House by Ian McDonald which features this kind of tech (also the Djinn). See:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dervish_House
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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    One day (soon - think NK ) you could envision a country releasing hundreds of thousand of mini explosive drones over a country and all the "kids" back home controling them in to targets - no one to shoot back against !

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by Did You See Them (here)
    One day (soon - think NK ) you could envision a country releasing hundreds of thousand of mini explosive drones over a country and all the "kids" back home controling them in to targets - no one to shoot back against !
    The scenario you suggest is frightening and becoming more possible. But also, an incoming swarm needn't be controlled by anyone on the ground -- the hive mind shared by the incoming 100,000 swarm could have pre-programmed mission objectives -- say hit these 10,000 targets -- and if a few drones get taken out, the rest of the swarm automatically adjusts to a new targeting profile to achieve a successful attack. If the "kids" were guiding them into the targets, their communication to the drones could be detected and blocked by electronic countermeasures. The beauty or danger of the swarm hive mind is that such communication is no longer necessary - they think for themselves and can decide the best way to react. And don't think DARPA hasn't thought about this -- here's a section from their Aug 11, 2016 RFI to come up with a defense against such an attack:

    "Request for Information (RFI) - Mobile Force Protection
    Solicitation Number: DARPA-SN-16-58
    Agency: Other Defense Agencies
    Office: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
    Location: Contracts Management Office


    Solicitation Number:
    DARPA-SN-16-58
    Notice Type:
    Special Notice
    Synopsis:
    Added: Aug 11, 2016 3:52 pm
    This Request for Information, DARPA-SN-16-58, from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Tactical Technology Office (TTO) seeks ideas, methodologies, and approaches solely for information and planning purposes. DARPA is interested in identifying novel, flexible, mobile layered defense systems and component technologies that could be leveraged to improve force protection against a variety of sUAS threats and tactics, could be fielded within the next three to four years, and are structured to rapidly evolve with threat and tactic advancements."

    https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportun...=core&_cview=0
    Last edited by boolacalaca; 31st January 2017 at 16:16. Reason: correct text

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by boolacalaca (here)
    Quote Posted by Did You See Them (here)
    One day (soon - think NK ) you could envision a country releasing hundreds of thousand of mini explosive drones over a country and all the "kids" back home controling them in to targets - no one to shoot back against !
    The scenario you suggest is frightening and becoming more possible. But also, an incoming swarm needn't be controlled by anyone on the ground -- the hive mind shared by the incoming 100,000 swarm could have pre-programmed mission objectives -- say hit these 10,000 targets -- and if a few drones get taken out, the rest of the swarm automatically adjusts to a new targeting profile to achieve a successful attack. If the "kids" were guiding them into the targets, their communication to the drones could be detected and blocked by electronic countermeasures. The beauty or danger of the swarm hive mind is that such communication is no longer necessary - they think for themselves and can decide the best way to react. And don't think DARPA hasn't thought about this -- here's a section from their Aug 11, 2016 RFI to come up with a defense against such an attack:

    "Request for Information (RFI) - Mobile Force Protection
    Solicitation Number: DARPA-SN-16-58
    Agency: Other Defense Agencies
    Office: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
    Location: Contracts Management Office


    Solicitation Number:
    DARPA-SN-16-58
    Notice Type:
    Special Notice
    Synopsis:
    Added: Aug 11, 2016 3:52 pm
    This Request for Information, DARPA-SN-16-58, from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Tactical Technology Office (TTO) seeks ideas, methodologies, and approaches solely for information and planning purposes. DARPA is interested in identifying novel, flexible, mobile layered defense systems and component technologies that could be leveraged to improve force protection against a variety of sUAS threats and tactics, could be fielded within the next three to four years, and are structured to rapidly evolve with threat and tactic advancements."

    https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportun...=core&_cview=0
    That's why I mentioned 'Mobile Phones' as the target.
    If they wan't to bump you off and they have your phone number, they could just dial you up!
    and or have the mass of drones hunt one phone each on mass.
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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    I think we may want to project out a bit further something akin to Ender's Game where a young prodigy was able to overcome incredible odds to obliterate an entire species through his "remote controlled" drone army.

    Almost every household in the Western World with children has game consoles. They have spent most of their formative years combating "enemies" using real time strategies, cooperative multiplayer game play, and the ability to excel in difficult scenarios. . It would surprise me if there were no plans in the works beyond "drone strikes" to leverage this "talent" in times of conflict. All that would be needed are secure hardened connections and a software overlay/interface. I have heard of giant blimps in the works to deploy wifi and other battlenets over large areas. it really is just a matter of time.

    They could control combat drones: foot soldiers, air drones, mini tanks or a number of other weapons platforms. From their living rooms, before school, during lunch or before dinner....merrily racking up "kills" or mission completions. Toss in $100 per "head shot" or mission objective and there would be line ups to get online to "play". I've been gaming for 2 decades and although I am not as skilled as the younger generation ( namely I don't have 100hours/week or enough interest to play that often) I can attest to the dramatic increase in the "reality" of these simulations/games and total blood lust in the competitions. As things stand...Japan, Taiwan and S. Korea produce some of the most serious competitors with the Russia, Romania, UK, USA and AUS showing impressive gains in the last few years. Players range from 6 years old to 70.

    There are now boot camps and schools for advanced "twitch" training....something the military excels at, and no doubt is involved in.

    Participation is generally not limited to income as with consoles the hardware is the same for all users. Some clear benefits to those with fast internet connections, server lag, and screen response times but I'm certain the military could sort that out quickly enough.

    WW3 in the living room with Xbox or Playstation!

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    Ecuador Avalon Member boolacalaca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    Quote Posted by CurEus (here)
    I think we may want to project out a bit further something akin to Ender's Game where a young prodigy was able to overcome incredible odds to obliterate an entire species through his "remote controlled" drone army.

    WW3 in the living room with Xbox or Playstation!
    Yes, the possibilities just keep coming and get more elaborate all the time. WW3 in the living room indeed!
    Also, drone swarms controlled by private groups or pop-up mercenaries coordinated by social networks.
    First-person shooters in their living rooms each assigned to command one drone in the swarm
    could really make carnage out of any outdoor meeting, gathering, or demonstration.
    Don't like the demonstration going on downtown? The rival group could launch a sUAS swarm as a counter-measure.
    As Sunny-side-up said, this could also be plugged into people's GPS in their phones
    to track and take out a list of specified people simultaneously in various parts of a city -- targeted search and destroy.

    Of course, we seem to concentrate on the possible negative uses for this technology.
    It could also be used quite effectively for wilderness search and rescues,
    -- but somehow I don't think the bulk of the R&D money being spent developing this has much to do with the positives -- just a guess.
    Last edited by boolacalaca; 31st January 2017 at 21:19. Reason: revise text

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    The New Star Trek movies was heavily edited from theatrical release to home DVD.

    What I saw in the theatre was an "attack" on Earth and security forces were using their satellites to pull up real time information in everyone in the area. Name, Age, Species, DNA, Occupation, Address etc etc

    The DVD release was just scanning faces...perhaps all the additional data was considered to be too"creepy"...

    We're also hearing about "smart dust" which "tags" people so the need for cell phones to locate/track an individual may no longer be necessary.

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    Default Re: Drone swarms, A.I, and all the pros and cons

    would explain why even prepaid phones have to be registered ie name and address , someone accountable for it , they can't justify the unpaid bill angle like they used to , still nothing to stop user handing the phone over to another

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