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    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    The Hiawatha Impact Crater

    Visualizations by Cindy Starr Released on November 14, 2018

    The series of visualizations below are derived from satellite imagery and radar sounding. They portray both the location and size of the 31-kilometer-wide impact crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier. They also portray the structure of the glacier ice that flows into and fills the crater.

    The Hiawatha impact crater was first suspected to exist in the summer of 2015, from examination of a compilation of Greenland's sub-ice topography radar measurements made by NASA over two decades. The visualizations of the subsurface shown below are derived from a spring 2016 airborne survey by Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute, using a new ultrawideband radar sounder developed by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets at The University of Kansas. Subsequent helicopter visits to the deglaciated terrain in front of Hiawatha Glacier by scientists from the Natural History Museum in Denmark recovered sediment samples from the main river that discharges water from beneath Hiawatha Glacier, through the northwestern rim breach. Laboratory examination revealed that these sediment samples contained shocked quartz and elevated platinum-group-element concentrations, both signs that the sediment records evidence of the impact of an iron asteroid more than one kilometer wide. The Hiawatha impact crater is potentially one of the youngest large impact craters on Earth.


    A still image showing the crater beneath the ice sheet partially removed. The radar data is shown on the facing removed surface. The flight lines from the survey of the area are shown in green.



    This image shows some of the radar data from the airborne survey of the Hiawatha crater displayed on opaque curtains [the slices of radar echos from which the whole structure and ice layering is interpolated].



    This image shows another view of some radar data from the airborne survey of the Hiawatha crater displayed on opaque curtains. A blue bar indicates the height of one kilometer. The blue arrow points to one of the central peaks.



    This image shows another view of some radar data from the airborne survey of the Hiawatha crater displayed on opaque curtains. Labels indicate layers in the ice sheet. The blue arrow points to one of the central peaks.


    A still image showing the distance across the Hiawatha crater



    A still image showing a comparison of the size between the Hiawatha crater and Paris, France. The region shown is limited by the Paris super-périphérique (A86) ring road around the city.




    A still image of the crater beneath the Hiawatha Glacier, outlined with a semi-transparent red cylinder. The central peaks of the crater are identified by blue arrows.


    A still image showing the Greenland Ice Sheet and the Hiawatha Glacier.



    A still image showing the ice sheet removed in the region around the Hiawatha Glacier. The bed topography under the ice clearly shows the Hiawatha crater.



    For the published paper of the various studies, see:

    A large impact crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland
    • Kurt H. Kjær1,*,
    • Nicolaj K. Larsen1,2,
    • Tobias Binder3,
    • Anders A. Bjørk1,4,5,
    • Olaf Eisen3,6,
    • Mark A. Fahnestock7,
    • Svend Funder1,
    • Adam A. Garde8,
    • Henning Haack9,10,
    • Veit Helm3,
    • Michael Houmark-Nielsen1,
    • Kristian K. Kjeldsen1,8,11,
    • Shfaqat A. Khan12,
    • Horst Machguth13,14,
    • Iain McDonald15,
    • Mathieu Morlighem4,
    • Jérémie Mouginot4,16,
    • John D. Paden17,
    • Tod E. Waight18,
    • Christian Weikusat3,
    • Eske Willerslev1,19,20 and
    • Joseph A. MacGregor21
    Science Advances 14 Nov 2018:
    Vol. 4, no. 11, eaar8173
    DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar8173

    Last edited by Hervé; 21st November 2018 at 13:49.
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    England Avalon Member Did You See Them's Avatar
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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quiet a good article in the Telegraph - that gives a good hat tip to Graham Hancock

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...0950bc-wiping/

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by Did You See Them (here)
    Quiet a good article in the Telegraph - that gives a good hat tip to Graham Hancock

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...0950bc-wiping/
    I had to disable add block to read the article but well worth it.
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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by Did You See Them (here)
    Quiet a good article in the Telegraph - that gives a good hat tip to Graham Hancock

    https://telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/04/21/ancient-stone-carvings-confirm-comet-struck-earth-10950bc-wiping
    Yes. Copied below. It doesn't mention the Greenland asteroid (the article date is April 2017), but does talk about Gobekli Tepe, and the interpretation by experts at Edinburgh University that the carvings on one of the stones depicts a comet impact.

    Ancient stone carvings confirm how comet struck Earth in 10,950BC, sparking the rise of civilisations



    The Vulture Stone from Gobekli Tepe (left) which recorded a devastating comet strike (right)

    Ancient stone carvings confirm that a comet struck the Earth around 11,000BC, a devastating event which wiped out woolly mammoths and sparked the rise of civilisations.

    Experts at the University of Edinburgh analysed mysterious symbols carved onto stone pillars at Gobekli Tepe in southern Turkey, to find out if they could be linked to constellations.

    The markings suggest that a swarm of comet fragments hit Earth at the exact same time that a mini-ice age struck, changing the entire course of human history.

    Scientists have speculated for decades that a comet could be behind the sudden fall in temperature during a period known as the Younger Dryas. But recently the theory appeared to have been debunked by new dating of meteor craters in North America where the comet is thought to have struck.

    However, when engineers studied animal carvings made on a pillar – known as the vulture stone – at Gobekli Tepe they discovered that the creatures were actually astronomical symbols which represented constellations and the comet.

    The idea had been originally put forward by author Graham Hancock in his book Magicians of the Gods.

    Using a computer programme to show where the constellations would have appeared above Turkey thousands of years ago, they were able to pinpoint the comet strike to 10,950BC, the exact time the Younger Dryas begins according to ice core data from Greenland.

    The Younger Dryas is viewed as a crucial period for humanity, as it roughly coincides with the emergence of agriculture and the first Neolithic civilisations.

    Before the strike, vast areas of wild wheat and barley had allowed nomadic hunters in the Middle East to establish permanent base camps. But the difficult climate conditions following the impact forced communities to come together and work out new ways of maintaining the crops, through watering and selective breeding. Thus farming began, allowing the rise of the first towns.

    Edinburgh researchers said the carvings appear to have remained important to the people of Gobekli Tepe for millennia, suggesting that the event and cold climate that followed likely had a very serious impact.

    Dr Martin Sweatman, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Engineering, who led the research, said: "I think this research, along with the recent finding of a widespread platinum anomaly across the North American continent virtually seal the case in favour of (a Younger Dryas comet impact).

    "Our work serves to reinforce that physical evidence. What is happening here is the process of paradigm change.

    "It appears Göbekli Tepe was, among other things, an observatory for monitoring the night sky.

    “One of its pillars seems to have served as a memorial to this devastating event – probably the worst day in history since the end of the ice age.”

    Gobekli Tepe, is thought to be the world's oldest temple site, which dates from around 9,000BC, predating Stonehenge by around 6,000 years.

    Researchers believe the images were intended as a record of the cataclysmic event, and that a further carving showing a headless man may indicate human disaster and extensive loss of life.

    Symbolism on the pillars also indicates that the long-term changes in Earth’s rotational axis was recorded at this time using an early form of writing, and that Gobekli Tepe was an observatory for meteors and comets.

    The finding also supports a theory that Earth is likely to experience periods when comet strikes are more likely, owing to the planet’s orbit intersecting orbiting rings of comet fragments in space.

    But despite the ancient age of the pillars, Dr Sweatman does not believe it is the earliest example of astronomy in the archaeological record.

    "Many paleolithic cave paintings and artefacts with similar animal symbols and other repeated symbols suggest astronomy could be very ancient indeed," he said.

    "If you consider that, according to astronomers, this giant comet probably arrived in the inner solar system some 20 to 30 thousand years ago, and it would have been a very visible and dominant feature of the night sky, it is hard to see how ancient people could have ignored this given the likely consequences."

    The research is published in Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry.

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    Exclamation Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Massive Impact Crater Beneath Greenland Could Explain Ice Age Climate Swing 12,800 years ago.

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cr.../#.XAexQHT7Q2x

    Clip from Joe Rogan Podcast with Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson talking about cataclysmic event 12,800 years ago.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQwHi3VxOww

    Younger dryas with Joe Rogan and Randall Carlson.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLnnaPNDHsc

    Please watch all of the Joe Rogan podcasts with Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson, very good information.

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by bandix (here)
    Massive Impact Crater Beneath Greenland Could Explain Ice Age Climate Swing 12,800 years ago.
    [...]
    Hello bandix,

    I merged your recently posted thread with this pre-existing one.

    Welcome to Avalon, BTW
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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland


    Bright Insight

    Published on 11 Dec 2018

    NASA recently discovered of a massive, 19-mile (31km) wide crater, found hidden underneath Greenland’s Hiawatha Glacier.

    This crater is the result of an asteroid impact, from a nearly 1 mile-wide mountain of iron, weighing somewhere around, get this, 11-12 BILLION tons, and was traveling at approximately 12 MILES per second - which is equivalent to more than 43,000 miles per hour - when it slammed into the earth some 12,000 years ago – And…with the mind-boggling force of essentially a 700-megaton bomb.

    Without a doubt, THIS is the reason why there is so much mystery and why we know so little about lost Ancient human civilization
    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by norman (here)


    NASA recently discovered of a massive, 19-mile (31km) wide crater, found hidden underneath Greenland’s Hiawatha Glacier.

    This crater is the result of an asteroid impact, from a nearly 1 mile-wide mountain of iron, weighing somewhere around, get this, 11-12 BILLION tons, and was traveling at approximately 12 MILES per second - which is equivalent to more than 43,000 miles per hour - when it slammed into the earth some 12,000 years ago – And…with the mind-boggling force of essentially a 700-megaton bomb.

    Without a doubt, THIS is the reason why there is so much mystery and why we know so little about lost Ancient human civilization


    This excellent 29 minute summary of ALL the evidence and implications linked to this new discovery is the best one-stop-shop presentation I've yet heard. Highly recommended.

    (Don't misunderstand the video title: the 'TED' reference is about the suppression of Graham Hancock's TED presentation on the same subject.)

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    This excellent 29 minute summary of ALL the evidence and implications linked to this new discovery is the best one-stop-shop presentation I've yet heard. Highly recommended.
    I on the other hand do not recommend this video. He's selling, proselytizing, hyping, pushing buttons ... which is not the path I would choose to seek out more reliable understandings.

    I would agree that something catastrophic happened 11 or 12 thousand years ago. By the way, how many times did "Jimmy", the one speaking here and the creator of this Bright Insight Youtube channel, use the word "exactly" when referring to this roughly one thousand year period of time? I would not use the word "exact" when referring to that range of time.

    I would also agree that a new, very large, impact crater has apparently been discovered below the ice on Greenland.

    So something "real big" hit Greenland sometime in the last (what did he say?) 100,000 years, and something "blew up real good" here on planet earth, about 11 or 12 thousand years ago.

    However ... were these the same event?

    I gave up listening after only 20 of the 29 minutes of this video, but up to that point I did not hear any evidence that that Greenland impact was the particular event causing the catastrophes of 11 or 12 thousand years ago.

    It might be the same event ... good chance. I don't know yet.

    This video is not how I recommend that good research, science, investigation, analysis or discussion be conducted.

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by Paul (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    This excellent 29 minute summary of ALL the evidence and implications linked to this new discovery is the best one-stop-shop presentation I've yet heard. Highly recommended.
    I on the other hand do not recommend this video. He's selling, proselytizing, hyping, pushing buttons ... which is not the path I would choose to seek out more reliable understandings.

    I would agree that something catastrophic happened 11 or 12 thousand years ago. By the way, how many times did "Jimmy", the one speaking here and the creator of this Bright Insight Youtube channel, use the word "exactly" when referring to this roughly one thousand year period of time? I would not use the word "exact" when referring to that range of time.

    I would also agree that a new, very large, impact crater has apparently been discovered below the ice on Greenland.

    So something "real big" hit Greenland sometime in the last (what did he say?) 100,000 years, and something "blew up real good" here on planet earth, about 11 or 12 thousand years ago.

    However ... were these the same event?

    I gave up listening after only 20 of the 29 minutes of this video, but up to that point I did not hear any evidence that that Greenland impact was the particular event causing the catastrophes of 11 or 12 thousand years ago.

    It might be the same event ... good chance. I don't know yet.

    This video is not how I recommend that good research, science, investigation, analysis or discussion be conducted.
    Well, it's a hypothesis that the Hiawatha (Greenland) event was the direct cause of the cataclysm that growing evidence seems to show really happened. A clearly stated proposition to be proved. That alone is valuable.

    Now, there's a direct, challenging question to be answered. The value of this discovery is that mainstream science has to pay attention. Not ban Graham Hancock's TED talk for being 'pseudoscience'. Maybe it wasn't!

    The video, only to help inform an intelligent lay audience, connects dots that I think need to be connected. And some contend, as do Randall Carlson and Graham Hancock, the many dots are right there to be recognized for what they are, staring us all in the face.

    Some of them may be provisional connections. But I have to say, it all makes total 100% sense to me.

    The Science article concluded, which I copied here: (my added emphasis in bold)

    Still, Hiawatha's full story will come down to its age. Even an exposed impact crater can be a challenge for dating, which requires capturing the moment when the impact altered existing rocks—not the original age of the impactor or its target. Kjær's team has been trying. They fired lasers at the glassy spherules to release argon for dating, but the samples were too contaminated. The researchers are inspecting a blue crystal of the mineral apatite for lines left by the decay of uranium, but it's a long shot. The team also found traces of carbon in other samples, which might someday yield a date, Kjær says. But the ultimate answer may require drilling through the ice to the crater floor, to rock that melted in the impact, resetting its radioactive clock. With large enough samples, researchers should be able to pin down Hiawatha's age.

    Given the remote location, a drilling expedition to the hole at the top of the world would be costly. But an understanding of recent climate history—and what a giant impact can do to the planet—is at stake. “Somebody's got to go drill in there,” Keigwin says. “That's all there is to it.”

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    This is just speculation, but I recently read in the Wingmakers material that sites where huge explosions occurred thousands of years ago which would be considered to have been caused by meteors, were actually caused by weapons used by the Annunaki to destroy parts of Atlantean colonies that had not been destroyed by floods that the Annunaki also caused.
    Possibly, if such weapons were fired from space, observers on Earth at the time would have thought they were comets.
    And currently, TPTB would not want it known if the cause was weapons, so there could be an attempted skewing of the research.
    Last edited by onawah; 17th December 2018 at 21:21.
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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by onawah (here)
    This is just speculation, but I recently read in the Wingmakers material that sites where huge explosions occurred thousands of years ago which would be considered to have been caused by meteors, were actually caused by weapons used by the Annunaki to destroy parts of Atlantean colonies that had not been destroyed by floods that the Annunaki also caused.
    Possibly, if such weapons were fired from space, observers on Earth at the time would have thought they were comets.
    And currently, TPTB would not want it known if the cause was weapons, so there could be an attempted skewing of the research.

    To a very advanced race, dropping massive chunks of space rock that creates explosions bigger than millions of atom bombs pretty much adds up to the same thing as "weapons from space". It's only us in our ignorance who don't honour the natural order enough to make sure we don't polute the planet.


    We still don't know how thick the ice was, at the time, where the Greenland crater is. Some objects may never have hit the ground beneath the ice. Randal Carlson's findings in Western USA indicate there was another 'ground zero' over in that area. If the ice there was thick enough, there may not have to be a remaining crater for us to find.
    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    National Geographic reported on this in November, but I just heard about it, and didn't see any threads here yet.

    And I know Graham Hancock and others point to an impact near Montana, where the scablands were created, but judging by the debris field that scientists have identified, it seems very likely that there were multiple major impacts during this event, perhaps over the span of some years after the initial impact.

    Quote City-size impact crater found under Greenland ice

    The first large crater ever found under ice, the discovery could possibly be linked to a controversial extinction theory.

    Today, an international team of scientists describes what they say is a huge new impact crater that lies under northwestern Greenland’s Hiawatha Glacier. If confirmed, it would be the first impact crater on Earth discovered under ice, the team reports in the journal Science Advances. At an estimated 19 miles wide, it is larger than Washington, D.C., and would rank among the top 25 known craters in the world.

    “Until 2015, no one had paid much attention to this part of the planet,” says study coauthor Joseph MacGregor, a glaciologist with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. But that year, scientists began flying over the area with highly sensitive scanning instruments, such as lasers and radar, through NASA’s Operation IceBridge.

    Like all IceBridge data, the scans were made public, and a group of Danish glaciologists noticed something interesting when they reviewed the material: A large, bowl-shaped depression was clearly visible in the bedrock under the ice.

    “Could that be an impact crater? they asked,” MacGregor says. “They all laughed. But then they said, Maybe it is.”

    As they looked closer, someone on the team also pointed out that a large meteorite in the collection at the Natural History Museum of Denmark—near where they parked their bicycles every day—had come from that same region of Greenland.

    “We asked ourselves, could the two be linked?” says lead author Kurt Kjær, a glacial geologist and curator at the Natural History Museum of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen.
    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/s...greenland-ice/


    This YouTube video covers it and throws in some additional information about mass extinctions and other events attributed to the same time period, around the end of the last ice age:




    Oops! Guess I didn't look around hard enough before posting this.

    Thanks to whatever mod moved it for me.
    Last edited by A Voice from the Mountains; 29th December 2018 at 07:14.

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    NASA finds possible second impact crater under Greenland ice

    Maria-José Viñas Phys.org
    Tue, 12 Feb 2019 10:26 UTC


    A NASA glaciologist has discovered a possible second impact crater buried under more than a mile of ice in northwest Greenland.m © NASA Goddard

    A NASA glaciologist has discovered a possible second impact crater buried under more than a mile of ice in northwest Greenland.

    This follows the finding, announced in November 2018, of a 19-mile-wide crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier - the first meteorite impact crater ever discovered under Earth's ice sheets. Though the newly found impact sites in northwest Greenland are only 114 miles apart, at present they do not appear to have formed at the same time.

    If the second crater, which has a width of over 22 miles, is ultimately confirmed as the result of a meteorite impact, it will be the 22nd largest impact crater found on Earth.

    "We've surveyed the Earth in many different ways, from land, air and space-it's exciting that discoveries like these are still possible," said Joe MacGregor, a glaciologist with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, who participated in both findings.

    Before the discovery of the Hiawatha impact crater, scientists generally assumed that most evidence of past impacts in Greenland and Antarctica would have been wiped away by unrelenting erosion by the overlying ice. Following the finding of that first crater, MacGregor checked topographic maps of the rock beneath Greenland's ice for signs of other craters. Using imagery of the ice surface from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, he soon noticed a circular pattern some 114 miles to the southeast of Hiawatha Glacier. The same circular pattern also showed up in ArcticDEM, a high-resolution digital elevation model of the entire Arctic derived from commercial satellite imagery.
    "I began asking myself 'Is this another impact crater? Do the underlying data support that idea?'," MacGregor said.

    "Helping identify one large impact crater beneath the ice was already very exciting, but now it looked like there could be two of them."
    MacGregor reported the discovery of this second possible crater in Geophysical Research Letters on Feb.11.

    To confirm his suspicion about the possible presence of a second impact crater, MacGregor studied the raw radar images that are used to map the topography of the bedrock beneath the ice, including those collected by NASA's Operation IceBridge. What he saw under the ice were several distinctive features of a complex impact crater: a flat, bowl-shaped depression in the bedrock that was surrounded by an elevated rim and centrally located peaks, which form when the crater floor equilibrates post-impact. Though the structure isn't as clearly circular as the Hiawatha crater, MacGregor estimated the second crater's diameter at 22.7 miles. Measurements from Operation IceBridge also revealed a negative gravity anomaly over the area, which is characteristic of impact craters.

    Just 114 miles from the newly-found Hiawatha impact crater under the ice of northwest Greenland, lies a possible second impact crater. The 22-mile wide feature would be the second crater found under an ice sheet, and if confirmed, would be the second crater found under an ice sheet, and if confirmed, would be the 22nd-largest crater on Earth. A NASA-led team discovered the feature using satellite data of the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet as well as radar measurements from NASA's airborne campaign Operation IceBridge. Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/ Jefferson Beck
    "The only other circular structure that might approach this size would be a collapsed volcanic caldera," MacGregor said.

    "But the areas of known volcanic activity in Greenland are several hundred miles away. Also, a volcano should have a clear positive magnetic anomaly, and we don't see that at all."
    Although the newly found impact craters in northwest Greenland are only 114 miles apart, they do not appear to have been formed at the same time. From the same radar data and ice cores that had been collected nearby, MacGregor and his colleagues determined that the ice in the area was at least 79,000 years old. The layers of ice were smooth, suggesting the ice hadn't been strongly disturbed during that time. This meant that either the impact happened more than 79,000 years ago or-if it took place more recently-any impact-disturbed ice had long ago flowed out of the area and been replaced by ice from farther inland.

    The researchers then looked at rates of erosion: they calculated that a crater of that size would have initially been more half a mile deep between its rim and floor, which is an order of magnitude greater than its present depth. Taking into account a range of plausible erosion rates, they calculated that it would have taken anywhere between roughly a hundred thousand years and a hundred million years for the ice to erode the crater to its current shape-the faster the erosion rate, the younger the crater would be within the plausible range, and vice versa.
    "The ice layers above this second crater are unambiguously older than those above Hiawatha, and the second crater is about twice as eroded," MacGregor said.

    "If the two did form at the same time, then likely thicker ice above the second crater would have equilibrated with the crater much faster than for Hiawatha."
    To calculate the statistical likelihood that the two craters were created by unrelated impact events, MacGregor's team used recently published estimates that leverage lunar impact rates to better understand Earth's harder-to-detect impact record. By employing computer models that can track the production of large craters on Earth, they found that the abundance of said craters that should naturally form close to one another, without the need for a twin impact, was consistent with Earth's cratering record.
    "This does not rule out the possibility that the two new Greenland craters were made in a single event, such as the impact of a well separated binary asteroid, but we cannot make a case for it either," said William Bottke, a planetary scientist with the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, and co-author of both MacGregor's paper and the new lunar impact record study.
    Indeed, two pairs of unrelated but geographically close craters have already been found in Ukraine and Canada, but the ages of the craters in the pairs are different from one another.
    "The existence of a third pair of unrelated craters is modestly surprising but we don't consider it unlikely," MacGregor said.

    "On the whole, the evidence we've assembled indicates that this new structure is very likely an impact crater, but presently it looks unlikely to be a twin with Hiawatha."
    More information: Joseph A. MacGregor et al. A Possible Second Large Subglacial Impact Crater in Northwest Greenland, Geophysical Research Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1029/2018GL078126

    Journal reference: Geophysical Research Letters

    Provided by: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    You sure are through Herve as usual.
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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Was just going to post this update but see I've already been beaten to it.

    https://www.space.com/second-possibl...greenland.html

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Well, I just hope and pray we don't get hit again o.0

    If we where hit now, would we be able to survive in our present worlds condition?

    My above question is not taking into consideration the many DUMBS and such like around the globe.
    Also not to mention any passable settlements off planet, so I guess there could be a continuation.
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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by Sunny-side-up (here)
    Well, I just hope and pray we don't get hit again o.0

    If we where hit now, would we be able to survive in our present worlds condition?

    My above question is not taking into consideration the many DUMBS and such like around the globe.
    Also not to mention any passable settlements off planet, so I guess there could be a continuation.
    Personally I think we would be better off being hit now - destroying the power we have to do it to ourselves before we do - better a natural disaster than a man made one !

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    Quote Posted by Did You See Them (here)
    Quote Posted by Sunny-side-up (here)
    Well, I just hope and pray we don't get hit again o.0

    If we where hit now, would we be able to survive in our present worlds condition?

    My above question is not taking into consideration the many DUMBS and such like around the globe.
    Also not to mention any passable settlements off planet, so I guess there could be a continuation.
    Personally I think we would be better off being hit now - destroying the power we have to do it to ourselves before we do - better a natural disaster than a man made one !
    Good point but I for one wan't to see my grand children grow and have a life.

    Anyway there are a great deal of people here on this planet trying to change things, not all rotters.
    I'm a simple easy going guy that is very upset/sad with the worlds hidden controllers!
    We need LEADERS who bat from the HEART!
    Rise up above them Dark evil doers, not within anger but with LOVE

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    Default Re: Huge asteroid crater found under the ice in Greenland

    True

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