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Thread: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

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    United States Avalon Member onawah's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

    Annapurna III – Unclimbed

    David Lama
    Published on Dec 21, 2017
    “Annapurna III – Unclimbed” is an award-winning 12-min documentary featuring the 2016 expedition to the Himalayas of Nepal led by David Lama together with Austrian alpinists Hansjörg Auer and Alex Blümel. Join the team in their feelings of fatigue, anxiety, exposure and ordeal during their 5 weeks attempting one of the world’s greatest, unsolved puzzles of alpinism: The unclimbed south-east ridge of Annapurna III."
    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    United States Avalon Member onawah's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

    Ed Viesturs: The Will to Climb | Nat Geo Live
    National Geographic
    Published on Jun 25, 2012

    "After surviving a terrifying avalanche, Ed Viesturs is the first American to summit all 14 of the world's highest mountains without supplemental oxygen."
    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    United States Avalon Member onawah's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

    Lunag Ri – David Lama & Conrad Anker walk the line
    David Lama
    Published on Jul 29, 2018
    ( It says in the comment section on the youtube page that Lama finally succeeded in reaching the summit, solo, a couple of months ago.)
    "Already in 2016, David Lama and Conrad Anker had set out to climb Lunag Ri, a stunningly beautiful, unclimbed peak of 6.907meters on the borderline between Nepal and Tibet. As things didn’t go as planned the duo has to retreat just shy of the summit but returns one year later, determined to bring the project to an end. Despite prime conditions and all the knowledge gathered during their last attempt, their endeavor is stopped rapidly with Anker ’s life dangling between life and death, leaving Lama with some tough decisions to make."

    Stream David Lama’s feature film “Cerro Torre-A Snowballs Chance in Hell” here https://www.redbull.tv/cerrotorre

    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

    A staggering photograph taken just a couple of weeks ago. Here's the article:


    Trail to Everest is littered with bodies. But no one will say who is actually responsible

    Neither the people stuck in 'traffic jam' at Mount Everest nor the travel firms bothered to look back and learn from the incidents of 2012.

    2 June, 2019

    Mount Everest is a great equaliser. It doesn’t care how deep your pockets are or which country you came from. One usually pays for a mistake with life here, as it happened recently during the “traffic jam’’ at the roof of the world. It was the second such mishap, if it can be called that, in the past seven years but in reality it was triggered by the same old deadly cocktail of unchecked greed, misplaced pride and lack of respect for the world’s highest peak.

    Eleven people from India, United States, Nepal and England died during a single fortnight in May 2019. It was obvious neither the commercial mountaineering companies nor the Nepal Government had bothered to learn the lesson from the equally brutal tragedy in the spring of 2012, when 12 people had perished in the same region, on the same route and almost in the same fashion.

    What is particularly galling is that neither the people stuck in the `traffic jam’ of 2019 nor the travel companies which brought them here bothered to look back and learn from the incidents of 2012 before arriving in Nepal. In this age of super-quick dissemination of information on digital highways, it turned out to be a deadly lapse. A few clicks of the mouse could have saved some lives.

    (article continues)

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    Ecuador Avalon Member Rosemarie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

    This thread reminded me of my love for READING about mountain climbing. I guess it came about in my teens hearing my parents friends climbing Cotopaxi here in Ecuador. I got myself all the books there were out there ( you had to go to bookstores , no amazon.com remember ? ) about all the mountains and the different climbing expeditions.

    Then one day in 1979 or 1980 I got a book called Everest by Reinhold Messner and read he had the first climb to Everest with Peter Habeler WITHOUT supplemental oxygen. I just kept that in the back of my mind.

    A couple of weeks later my father invited me to have lunch with some foreigners ( americans and europeans ) businessmen friends of his in Quito. They are all in their fifties ( old men I thought ) and I was fresh out of college and we are sitting in this long table. The talk I do not know why it changes to mountain climbing in Ecuador and I told them what I had just read and silence .... everybody thinking I am crazy, nobody believed me , my father was even mad thinking I had it wrong. I was insistent what I was saying was true. It was before internet when we can google it immediately . So we went home ( I was fuming) to Guayaquil and I went directly to my bookshelve to prove what I was saying was true. My father was contrite.

    Next year he went and climb Everest alone and without supplemental oxygen ( first person ever )
    Sorry if this is off topic. I just remember this story. You remember him Bill ?

    Edit:as always, spelling corrections.
    Last edited by Rosemarie; 5th June 2019 at 12:51.
    "Be kind for everybody is fighting a great battle" Plato

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  11. Link to Post #46
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

    Quote Posted by Rosemarie (here)
    This thread reminded me of my love for READING about mountain climbing. I guess it came about in my teens hearing my parents friends climbing Cotopaxi here in Ecuador. I got myself all the books there were out there ( you had to go to bookstores , no amazon.com remember ? ) about all the mountains and the different climbing expeditions.

    Then one day in 1979 or 1980 I got a book called Everest by Reinhold Messner and read he had the first climb to Everest with Peter Habeler WITHOUT supplemental oxigen. I just kept that in the back of my mind.

    A couple of weeks later my father invited me to have lunch with some foreigners ( americans and europeans ) businessmen friends of his in Quito. They are all in their fifties ( old men I thought ) and I was fresh out of college and we are sitting in this long table. The talk I do not know why it changes to mountain climbing in Ecuador and I told them what I had just read and silence .... everybody thinking I am crazy, nobody believed me , my father was even mad thinking I had it wrong. I was insistent what I was saying was true. It was before internet when we can google it immediately . So we went home ( I was fuming) to Guayaquil and I went directly to my bookshelve to prove what I was saying was true. My father was contrite.

    Next year he went and climb Everest alone and without supplemental ocigen ( first person ever )
    Sorry if this is off topic. I just remember this story. You remember him Bill ?
    Yes, for sure. I followed all that very closely at the time. I was pretty sure Messner and Habeler could do it: they were the world's finest, and their physiology was exceptional. In the article below, though, Habeler's doubts (and fears) are well-described. It was Messner who powered them both through.

    Messner returning to repeat the oxygen-free ascent solo was astonishing. But he was the best mountaineer the world has ever known.

    That whole thing then became a little like Roger Bannister breaking the 4-minute mile. No-one thought it could be done: then he showed it could, and after the mental barrier of belief had fallen, many others were able to repeat the feat, which is now routine at the highest levels.

    The same with Everest. The number of oxygen-free ascents of Everest now stands at a little under 200. It has to be said, though, that some of those have used drugs of various kinds to aid them. (In mountaineering, there's no dope-testing as in the Olympics.)

    This article is very interesting:
    It's Still a Big Deal To Climb Everest Without Oxygen

    When Reinhold Messner and Peter Habeler trekked to Everest Base Camp in 1978, they were the only two people on Earth who believed they weren’t marching toward their own graves.

    Their goal was to reach the summit of Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen canisters, a feat that remains rare today but was, in 1978, actually considered scientifically impossible.

    Everest’s summit lies five miles above sea level at an altitude with effectively a third as much atmosphere due to lower air pressure. Doctors in the 1960s had studied the physiological demands of high-altitude climbing and determined that the atmosphere at Everest’s summit was so thin that it could only support a human at rest. They concluded that to even attempt such a feat would result in serious, irreversible brain damage (best case) or death.

    Try for one minute to imagine yourself in 1978 in Messner’s situation—or any situation in which a group of scientists is pleading with you to not do what you want to do because you’re going to die just as surely as a Newton’s apple will hit the ground.

    Messier and Habeler’s ascent of Everest in 1978 is the stuff of legends. At Camp 2, Habeler was heavily drugged up yet still couldn’t sleep. Fear poured from every inch of him—not to mention vomit and diarrhea from food poisoning courtesy of a tin of sardines. Habeler wanted to go down. Messner wanted to go up. Habeler was less worried about dying than returning home and being unable to recognize his family because his brain had been turned to porridge by the altitude, as all the doctors had warned.

    Upon reaching the South Col, Messner and two Sherpa guides were caught in a storm with 125-mile-per-hour winds. For two days, the trio was trapped here. When the storm broke, they retreated and picked up Habeler on the way down to Base Camp.

    Habeler was now totally convinced that the experts were right—climbing without oxygen is impossible. Messner, however, remained steadfast. After a few days recovering in Base Camp, he ultimately convinced Habeler to try again.

    During their second attempt, Messner and Habeler succeeded—barely.

    On their final day of climbing, they resorted to hand signals to communicate, so as not to waste any precious breath. They fell to their knees and lay in the snow like beaten dogs in an effort to catch their breaths. Habeler began hallucinating. Messner experienced a sensation of “bursting apart.” He later said that his mind was fully dead and only his soul was pushing him upward. With less than 80 vertical meters left to climb, they collapsed every ten feet and literally crawled to the highest point on Earth.

    Later, writing about that moment of reaching Everest’s summit, Messner gave the world this gift of poetry: “In my state of spiritual abstraction, I no longer belong to myself and to my eyesight. I am nothing more than a single narrow gasping lung, floating over the mists and summits.”

    Their ascent not only shook the climbing community but also the medical community, causing doctors to reevaluate what they thought they knew about the human body.

    (article continues)

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  13. Link to Post #47
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sherpas on Everest: the real mountaineers who make it all possible

    An opportunity to bump this (for me!) very interesting thread.

    This is a UK Channel 4 documentary, very well done, about the death of an ambitious but inexperienced young man and what sure looks like a mixture of bad luck, bad decisions, incompetence and gross mismanagement by the guiding company, called OTT.

    Unfortunately, this kind of Everest story has often been told, or claimed. I started out thinking this was just one more. I didn't know most of the names involved, so there wasn't that much immediate impetus to care. By the end of the film, I cared quite a lot. That's the hallmark of a good documentary.


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