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Thread: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    A semi-Brexit, with just England and Wales leaving the EU, is the solution

    When all solutions are bad, it’s time to reinvent the problem. Is it still possible to honour the initial Brexit referendum without crossing the EU’s red lines? Yes – through semi-Brexit.

    The UK is divided into four nations, two of which voted remain and two of which voted leave. The British government could honour those decisions and allow Scotland and Northern Ireland to remain in the EU as the successor state to the UK, while permitting England and Wales (if it still wants to) to exit.

    Semi-Brexit does not mean breaking up the UK. Rather the reverse: semi-Brexit may be the only way to hold the UK together. If the UK drags Scotland and Northern Ireland out of the EU, the chances of a UK breakup are much higher. But if Scotland and Northern Ireland remain, then England and Wales would have more flexibility to negotiate a better deal. Third states – that is, states outside the EU – cannot cherry-pick the bits of the EU that they want and reject those bits they don’t. But parts of EU member states that are otherwise outside the EU can.

    At least 35 countries and territories already have special deals with the EU that include, for example, free movement of goods into the EU without triggering the free movement of EU nationals back. Or deals that include something close to free trade without the jurisdiction of the European court of justice (ECJ). And on and on and on. The combinations of inside-EU privileges with extra-EU independence are very nearly endless. And they already exist.

    There’s just one catch: the territories that get to cherry-pick from the EU in these ways must remain constitutionally attached to a current EU member state. From “outermost regions” (nine of them) to “overseas territories” (25 of them) to bespoke agreements with the EU on the part of special regions (a half dozen or so), far-flung – and not so far-flung – territories have worked out special arrangements with the EU through their associated member state.

    One does not have to look far to see how. The Isle of Man has free trade with the EU for agricultural and manufactured products but is otherwise not bound by EU law. Guernsey has free trade in goods more generally, but no EU nationals have free movement rights into Guernsey. In fact, the array of models one could use for a bespoke deal for England and Wales is nearly endless. But getting these options requires part of the UK to stay in the EU.

    How would this be possible? The EU law questions are relatively easy while the heavy lifting, legally speaking, falls to UK constitutional law. The ECJ has just held that the UK can halt article 50 unilaterally. By doing that, the UK could put its negotiations with the EU on a different track.

    Of course, the EU wouldn’t tolerate an open-ended Brexit process wreaking havoc with long-term planning. The EU would have to know soon how to figure the UK into its parliamentary election cycle in 2019 and new budget cycle shortly after that. If, however, the UK were to announce that Scotland and Northern Ireland were staying in the EU while England and Wales exited, then the number of MEPs the new UK should elect in the new European parliament follows a formula. Ditto with the budget contribution. With these adjustments, the EU could go ahead and plan its future.

    Once the UK’s parameters in Europe were settled, the EU could begin negotiations with England and Wales over a new long-term relationship. The EU framework for special territories has no draconian deadlines – by contrast with the short deadlines of article 50.

    The harder transitional questions fall in UK constitutional law. The Westminster parliament would have to give the four nations the power to make international agreements in their own name so that each could remain a member of the EU (or not) separately. All subject areas covered by EU law would have to be devolved from Westminster to the four nations so that they could ensure harmonisation of their laws with EU law (or not).

    In the current UK constitution, however, the four nations are not equal: England would have to acquire its own parliament to receive the devolution. This idea has been well mooted already so plans are already available. In fact, the creation of an English parliament would bring self-government home even more dramatically than Brexiteers promised.

    Beyond that, there are questions about how to organise borders for whatever would not flow freely between the EU and the part of the UK that left. To control the flow of people, England and Wales could require residency and work permits for foreigners who live and work on its territory while the part of the UK that remained in the EU would allow free movement. UK corporations that wanted the benefits of EU status could reincorporate in Scotland while keeping their current offices in London – and charging a reasonable reincorporation tax would float Scotland’s budget again.

    In semi-Brexit, England and Wales might be able to negotiate free movement of exports under arrangements similar to those of the Channel Islands. If the EU were unwilling to go that far, however, arrangements for the movement of goods would, under this proposal, at least be displaced from the fraught international border between the UK and Ireland to the less-fraught borders between England and Wales and the rest of the UK. Without the pressing March deadline of article 50, these questions could be resolved in their own time. Perhaps Northern Ireland could even form a government by then.

    If England and Wales wanted one day to get back into the EU after semi-Brexit, re-entry would be easier than if the whole UK left. A single unanimous vote of the European council is sufficient for re-entry. In the process of re-entry, England and Wales would not lose all of their special agreements and opt-outs because the remaining UK would retain them.

    With semi-Brexit, the UK could honour the referendum and allow each part of the UK to get what it voted for. Semi-Brexit would also give the EU a graceful way to provide a better deal for England and Wales. Isn’t semi-Brexit, then, the least worst path forward?

    • Kim Lane Scheppele is the Laurance S Rockefeller professor of sociology and international affairs at Princeton University
    https://uk.yahoo.com/news/semi-brexi...090013312.html
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Kim Lane Scheppele is the Laurance S Rockefeller professor of sociology and international affairs at Princeton University


    Says it all .
    God help us. Fast .

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    Scotland Avalon Member greybeard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Quote Posted by ripple (here)
    Kim Lane Scheppele is the Laurance S Rockefeller professor of sociology and international affairs at Princeton University


    Says it all .
    God help us. Fast .
    Her "suggestion" is not going to happen., very clever but lacking ---not realistic!!!

    Chris
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Brexit news latest: MPs tell Theresa May 'Let us decide or we'll quit'

    Theresa May faces a mass walkout of ministers if she orders them to stop Parliament taking control over Brexit, the Evening Standard has learned.

    A number of Cabinet ministers have given private assurances to senior backbenchers that they will refuse to vote against a crucial amendment empowering the House of Commons to drive the agenda on Brexit.

    A bigger group of about 20 middle-ranking and junior ministers is threatening to resign if Chief Whip Julian Smith attempts to instruct them to oppose a crucial amendment.

    The extraordinary rebellion was revealed as the Government desperately tried to avoid defeat by announcing that voting on a Plan B promised by the Prime Minister is being unexpectedly postponed until January 29.
    Andrea Leadsom revealed the new date for the next Brexit vote in the Commons on Thursday (REUTERS)

    Furious MPs said the delay, announced by Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom, appeared to be another attempt to run down the clock towards Brexit Day on March 29.

    Mrs May will make a statement on her plans on Monday, as expected, but voting on her motion will not be allowed for another eight days.
    Brexiteers arrive at the cabinet office on January 17 (Getty Images)

    The delay will also apply to the amendment designed to put Parliament in the driving seat that is being put down by former ministers Nick Boles and Sir Oliver Letwin with a cross-party group of senior MPs, including Labour’s Hilary Benn and Yvette Cooper.

    In other developments:

    A poll revealed support for Remain has risen sharply amid the Brexit turmoil to 56 per cent, compared with 44 per cent for Leave.
    Former Labour prime minister Tony Blair criticised the party’s leader Jeremy Corbyn for refusing to take part in crisis Brexit talks with the Prime Minister unless she rejects no deal.
    The Prime Minister and Cabinet ministers were holding more talks with senior MPs to break the deadlock in Parliament.

    Mr Boles, one of the leaders of the rebellion, told the Standard: “A large single-digit-number of Cabinet ministers have told me they will not vote against the amendment.

    “A larger number of up to 20 ministers outside Cabinet say they will resign if they are whipped to vote against the amendment.”

    He added: “If anything this is gathering greater momentum across the House.”

    The effect of the amendment would be to temporarily suspend the Commons standing orders that give the Government control over the timetable of the House. That would allow cross-party groups to pass laws of their own if they can command a majority.

    Under the plan, a European Union Withdrawal Number 2 Bill would be voted on, which, if passed, would force the Government to delay the UK departure from the EU and seek a fresh soft-Brexit deal.

    The amendment and the Bill were boosted today after confirmation that Chancellor Philip Hammond told business leaders that he believed the backbench amendment would take the threat of a no-deal departure “off the table”.

    He also predicted support for the Bill, saying it would postpone Brexit.

    Writing in today’s Standard, Sir Oliver said the Bill would ensure that Parliament could kill off the “glistening unicorns”, including Boris Johnson’s call for a managed no deal, which the EU would reject.

    He also called on Mrs May to show more flexibility in her red lines in talks with opposition MPs.

    “If the Prime Minister sticks like glue to her ‘red lines’, I can guarantee that she will not get a majority,” he said.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    If the queen backs her, May can stick around until the deadline passes. Nothing will change without the signatures of the prime minister and the queen.

    My fingers are so crossed they are white.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Brexit news latest: Theresa May refuses to budge on no deal and issues official call-out for troops to help manage EU exit chaos
    Evening Standard Simon Johnson,Evening Standard Thu, 17 Jan 11:14 GMT

    Theresa May today rebuffed growing calls to rule out a no-deal Brexit by issuing a formal call-out notice for troops to help manage any chaos triggered by Britain crashing out of the EU.

    Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson told Parliament that 3,500 regular and reserve forces would be ready to be deployed across the country.

    They could swiftly bolster responses to any no-deal threats to the “welfare, health and security of UK citizens” and to the “economic stability of the UK”, the Ministry of Defence stressed. Military fuel tanker drivers, engineers, planners and logistics experts could be sent in to deal with any food, medicine and petrol shortage crises, as well as offering support in Whitehall and to town halls.

    Mr Willamson said: “We will have 3,500 service personnel held at readiness, including regulars and reserves, in order to support any government department on any contingencies they may need.”
    Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson (AP)

    In another development, it was claimed a group of ministers are threatening to resign if they are ordered to vote against moves to empower Parliament to take key decisions on Brexit.

    Tory MP Nick Boles said he had been assured by a “large single-digit number” of Cabinet ministers that they will not vote against the cross-party plan.

    As the military plans gathered pace:

    A new poll revealed support to Remain in the EU had risen sharply amid the Brexit turmoil to 56 per cent, compared with 44 per cent Leave.
    Tony Blair criticised Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn for refusing to take part in crisis Brexit talks with the Prime Minister unless she rejects no deal.
    Shadow international trade secretary Barry Gardiner insisted Mrs May had to “take away the gun that she has been trying to hold to Parliament’s head by saying ‘it’s either my deal or no deal’.”
    The Prime Minister and Cabinet ministers were holding more talks with senior MPs to break the deadlock in Parliament.

    Cabinet minister Liz Truss publicly rejected Britain staying in a customs union, despite Mrs May appearing to have softened her red line on this issue after her Brexit blueprint was crushed this week in the worst defeat suffered by a government.
    France triggered a contingency plan for a no-deal Brexit, including a £44 million fund for ports and airport.

    This morning Mr Williamson issued a call-out order for about 350 Army reservists to reinforce regular Army units, act as liaison officers and provide specialist skills.

    They are set to get call-up notices from February 10 to join the no-deal contingency operation. At the same time, thousands of regular forces are being identified ready for deployment.

    More than 20 Armed Forces officers are already working in Whitehall departments, including the Home Office and Department for Transport.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    I am mesmerized
    How can the PM be in so much denial?
    Chris
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Brexit latest: Nigel Farage tells Leave voters to 'face reality' and prepare for second referendum
    Evening Standard Evening Standard 14 hours ago


    Nigel Farage has urged Leave campaigners to prepare for a second referendum as the Brexit deadlock continues.

    The former Ukip leader spoke at a packed Leave Means Leave rally in London, telling Brexiteers they must “face reality in the face”.

    The MEP spoke alongside former Conservative leader Iain Duncan-Smith, MP Esther McVey and Hotelier Rocco Forte.

    Mr Farage said he believed "it is now quite possible that we will see an extension of Article 50".
    Nigel Farage at a Leave Means Leave rally at Central Hall in London (PA)

    "When I've talked in the past about being worried that they may force us into a second referendum.

    "I don't want it anymore than you do but I am saying to you we have to face reality in the face.

    "Don't think the other side aren't organised, don't think the other side aren't prepared, don't think they haven't raised the money, don't think they haven't got the teams in place, they have."

    The audience at the Leave Means Leave rally were fired up and heckling throughout the nights speeches.

    Mr Duncan-Smith said Britain's "greatness" lies in the post-Brexit future.

    He added: "I love this country dearly, I love it with all my heart.

    "I love people whether they're Remainers or Leavers, I don't care.

    "But I know one thing, this country's greatness lies ahead of it and we have an opportunity and a duty to deliver it.
    Theresa May is holding talks in an effort to break the deadlock on Brexit (Getty Images)

    "I pledge to you tonight, I will not sleep, I will not rest, I will not wake to find a Britain that is otherwise than independent and free once again."

    He branded the EU a "political project that we have never fully been told the truth about" and described anti-Brexit arguments as "a load of rubbish".

    Mr Duncan-Smith shared an anecdote from his time as work and pensions secretary during a visit to Berlin, when he said to German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, "just like the rest of you I've sat here for an hour and I've now lost the will to live".

    But afterwards he was told his joke had translated in French to him being "terminally ill" rather than "losing the will to live".

    And Ms McVey said she asked the cabinet to vote on Mrs May's deal before it was taken to the commons as she could not "put her name on it" and there were "dissenting voices" in the cabinet against it.

    She said the decision was down to the Prime Minister whether to have a vote but she was "shouted down and told we were not going to do it".

    Ms McVey said she and her fellow Brexit MPs "are fighting hard, fighting hard for you, and will not rest as a minority in parliament until you get what you voted for".
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    In a longer view ( but not very long ), it might not make a lot of difference which cabal of political blocks wins this debacle. If the "EU" keeps going the way it is, it will hit a brick wall and we won't need to be having this stupid argument about being in it or not. It just won't be there, to be a part of. Europe will find it's proper feet again and learn to get on with being Europe and respect people better.

    Leaving the EU was only ever going to be the first step to getting rid of it, even as an uncomfortably near neighbour. It's not Europe that's the problem, it's the bunch of nazis running it. Project Europe is their idea, not ours or anyone else's from whichever member "state" . The people of Europe will still be Europeans long after we've cleared out the top layer of crooks.

    Clearing out those crooks, is the job at hand, however we do it. Brexit was a chosen, if rather Brit centric and selfish method, but there are more ways to skin a cat. A huge and quickly growing mass of Europeans want to get rid of Project Europe. If we are going to "remain" we should just get on with the job of putting an end to Project Europe, shoulder to shoulder with everyone else.

    Hey, instead of being the odd one out, there could be a massive common celebration all across the nations of Europe when we all, and together, become Project Europe free again. Now that is the kind of European unity I can relate to.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    'Nothing has changed': Corbyn accuses May of 'deep denial' after her refusal to compromise over Brexit
    Yahoo News UK Ross McGuinness,Yahoo News UK
    Monday January 21st



    Jeremy Corbyn has accused the Prime Minister of being ‘in denial’ over her Brexit strategy after she failed to outline a new approach towards the negotiations in a speech in Parliament.

    Parroting the phrase famously used by Theresa May, the Labour leader said that ‘nothing has changed’ since the PM’s historic defeat in the House of Commons last week.

    Mrs May addressed MPs to outline her latest approach to Brexit after MPs roundly rejected the agreement she negotiated with the EU by a margin of 230 votes.

    Pro and anti Brexit protesters demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament (Picture: PA)There was little indication of compromise, with the Prime Minister once again ruling out a second referendum and an extension to Article 50 but stopping short of announcing an alteration to her position.

    However she did announce that the £65 fee for EU citizens to secure the right to live in UK after Brexit will be scrapped after outcry from campaign groups.

    Mrs May promised talks with MPs from all parties, including the DUP, to hear their concerns about the Irish backstop arrangement in her deal.

    She said: “I will be talking further this week to colleagues, including in the DUP, to consider how we might meet our obligations to the people of Northern Ireland and Ireland in a way that can command the greatest possible support in the House.

    “And I will then take the conclusions of those discussions back to the EU.”

    Mr Corbyn branded her cross-party talks a ‘sham’.

    He said: “Every opposition party politician came out of those meetings with the same response.

    “Contrary to what the Prime Minister just said there was no flexibility, there were no negotiations – nothing had changed.”
    Jeremy Corbyn called the PM’s cross-party Brexit talks a ‘PR sham’.

    The idea of amending the backstop was shot down by the EU before it was even announced, as European leader dismissed her move as ‘party politics’.

    The EU’s Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said that the current deal, including the backstop, is ‘the best deal possible’.

    He also dismissed speculation that the UK could negotiate with Ireland alone to overcome the backstop issue.

    Pressed whether there was any scope for a bilateral deal between the UK and Ireland, he responded: “We are one team.”
    Last edited by greybeard; 21st January 2019 at 16:38.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Brexit: Theresa May seeks to bypass EU with Ireland treaty as No 10 labels MPs’ attempt to give parliament control ‘extremely concerning’

    Theresa May will launch a fresh bid to win support for her rejected Brexit deal by trying to bypass the European Union and secure a bilateral Brexit treaty with Ireland, according to reports.

    The move, which comes as No 10 expresses extreme concern at a backbench bid to give parliament control of Brexit, would see the UK try to convince Ireland to agree a plan for keeping the Northern Ireland border open after Britain leaves the EU.

    Officials are said to believe that such an agreement could remove the need for the controversial backstop part of Ms May’s Brexit deal, which is the leading cause of Tory and DUP opposition to the plan and the main reason it was overwhelmingly rejected by MPs last week.

    Ms May will update the Commons on Monday on how she plans to proceed after the crushing defeat.

    Under the new proposal being discussed by No 10, the Sunday Times reports, the UK would try to convince the Irish government to negotiate a treaty that would remove the need for the backstop, which Brussels insisted on as an insurance policy to ensure an open border is maintained even if the EU and UK cannot agree a trade deal.

    The arrangement would see the UK enter into a temporary customs union with the EU, and Northern Ireland agree to abide by European rules on goods until a subsequent deal was reached.

    A Downing Street source said talk of a bilateral agreement with Ireland was "not something we recognise".

    Liam Fox, the international trade secretary, appeared to confirm the plan, however, telling the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show: “We have to compromise on the backstop. If we’re to get the agreement through, we absolutely have to do that. The question is how we find a way to do that.”

    Asked what such a compromise might involve, he said: “It’s getting an agreement with Ireland on an alternative mechanism to ensure that we don’t get friction across the Norther Ireland-Ireland border.”

    Mr Fox said both the UK and Irish government shared a desire to preserve an open border in Northern Ireland, adding: “The question is can we achieve what the Irish government wants and what we want by a different mechanism.”

    The government will “explore ways” to “find an alternative mechanism to ensure that we give the Irish government what they want, which is that we end up with no hard border”, he added.

    Dublin moved swiftly to pour cold water on the suggestion.

    Simon Coveney, the Irish foreign minister, wrote on Twitter: “As Brexit dominates news coverage, no surprise that some analysis today gets it wrong. I can reassure you the Irish government’s commitment to the entire [withdrawal agreement] is absolute – including the backstop to ensure, no matter what, an open border between Ireland + NI and the [Good Friday Agreement] are protected.”

    And an Irish government source told the Sunday Times that a bilateral treaty “doesn’t sound like something we would entertain”.

    Ms May’s chief of staff, Gavin Barwell, has reportedly told cabinet ministers that, if the plan fails, the prime minister could seek to secure more support for her deal by announcing she will step down in May.

    Ms May briefed her cabinet on her next steps during a conference call on Sunday afternoon.

    The latest twist comes as a cross-party group of backbenchers prepares to try to amend whatever plan Ms May puts forward in order to give parliament the right to seize control of Brexit.

    The proposal, led by former attorney general Dominic Grieve, would remove the government’s power to choose what parliament debates and instead prioritise any motion backed by 300 MPs from at least five parties – significantly less than a Commons majority.

    A separate plan being worked on by senior parliamentarians, including Labour’s Yvette Cooper and former Tory ministers Nick Boles and Nicky Morgan, would force the government to delay Brexit if a deal is not approved within weeks.

    A Downing Street spokesperson said: “The British public voted to leave the European Union and it is vital that elected politicians deliver upon that verdict.

    “Any attempt to remove the government’s power to meet the legal conditions of an orderly exit at this moment of historic significance is extremely concerning.”

    In a sign of growing concern among Eurosceptics that the amendments could lead to Brexit being delayed or reversed, leading Tory Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg, a vocal critic of Ms May’s deal, said it would be better to leave the EU on the terms of the prime minister’s plan than not leave at all.

    Writing in the Mail on Sunday, he called on the Conservatives to “come together in the national interest”. He added: “If I had to choose between no deal and Mrs May’s original accord, I would have no hesitation of opting for no-deal Brexit, but even Mrs May’s deal would be better than not leaving at all.

    “Even at this very late stage, I believe that with commitment and effort we can avoid such a choice.”
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Labour to press for a vote on a second referendum.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Brexit news latest: Jeremy Corbyn backs plans for vote to force second EU referendum
    Evening Standard Sean Morrison,Evening Standard Tue, 22 Jan 03:27 GMT

    Jeremy Corbyn has endorsed a plan for MPs to vote on whether a second Brexit referendum should be held.

    The Labour leader said he wants the Government to give MPs the final say in the Commons next week.

    If the majority back a referendum, Parliament could force Prime Minister Theresa May to hold a fresh public vote.

    Bowing to pressure from members of his party's MPs, Mr Corbyn said it is time Labour’s alternative plan took “centre stage”.

    He said: “Our amendment will allow MPs to vote on options to end this Brexit deadlock and prevent the chaos of a no deal.

    "It is time for Labour's alternative plan to take centre stage, while keeping all options on the table, including the option of a public vote."

    His remarks came as Mrs May claimed a second referendum could “damage social cohesion”.

    “There has not yet been enough recognition of the way that a second referendum could damage social cohesion by undermining faith in our democracy,” she said.

    An amendment to the Mrs May’s Brexit motion calls for a vote on backing Labour's plan for a customs union with the EU, and whether to legislate "to hold a public vote on a deal or a proposition" supported by a Commons majority.

    It came Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd was believed to have urged Downing Street to allow Tory MPs a free vote on moves aimed at preventing a no deal, amid fears that dozens of ministers could otherwise resign.

    Meanwhile, the Daily Telegraph reported that Tory HQ has been effectively put on a snap general election "war footing" due to the Brexit situation in Parliament.

    In a break from usual parliamentary rules, MPs will be able to amend the so-called "neutral motion" tabled by the Prime Minister on Brexit, with votes due to take place on amendments chosen by Speaker John Bercow on January 29.
    MPs are expected to table a number of amendments to Theresa May's Brexit 'next steps' motion (PA)

    A cross-party group of MPs, including Labour's Yvette Cooper and Tory former minister Nick Boles, is seeking to give time for a Bill to suspend the Article 50 withdrawal process if there is no new deal with Brussels by the end of February.

    Labour's Hilary Benn has tabled an amendment to the Government motion calling for a range of indicative votes on various Brexit options.

    He tweeted: "Just tabled an amendment for next week's Brexit debate calling for the House of Commons to hold a series of indicative votes on a way forward."

    And Tory former attorney general Dominic Grieve is looking to allow a motion by a minority of 300 MPs - from at least five parties and including 10 Tories - to be debated in order to allow for indicative votes on where to go next.

    In a sign of Labour divisions on the issue of a second Brexit referendum, shadow housing minister Melanie Onn said she could not support such a move.

    The Great Grimsby MP tweeted: "This may mean that I am required to step down from my front bench housing role if it is a whipped vote."

    However, Chuka Umunna, a prominent supporter of a People's Vote called for a firmer stance.

    He tweeted: "There is always a flurry of excitement when the frontbench acknowledges the obvious - that a People's Vote may be the only way forward (it is) - but that is not the position adopted by those running the show. Supporting "options" is not a credible or sustainable policy."

    Presenting her "Plan B" to the Commons on Monday, Mrs May said she would conduct further talks on the controversial Irish border backstop proposals, and promised to give Parliament "a proper say" in negotiations on the future relationship between the UK and EU.

    But the PM refused to rule out a no-deal Brexit, and insisted there was no majority in the House of Commons for a so-called People's Vote.

    Mrs May announced she was scrapping a £65 fee for EU nationals wanting to remain in the UK after Brexit, promised to guarantee workers' rights and environmental safeguards.

    Irish foreign minister Simon Coveney said Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier had assured him the EU remains "firmly supportive" of the Withdrawal Agreement in full, including its guarantees of no hard border in Ireland.
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  22. Link to Post #54
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    People are acting like this isn't a monarchy.

    If the Queen wants out of the EU, we are leaving, and that's that.

    She has the power to dissolve parliament and the power to ask a parliamentarian to form a government, or not to. She can completely ignore parliament if she likes, and at the end of the day, it is her own signature that is required above all others.

    Instead if guessing who's got the heaviest clout in parliament, people should spend a bit of time trying to work out what Queen Elizabeth II wants. That's what we will get, and nothing else (short of an assassination).

    My hunch, for what it's worth, she wants out. An island Switzerland would be a very good future for the Sax/Windsor family.
    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Brexit news latest: 'Up to 40 ministers to resign from government' if Theresa May bans Tory MPs from voting against no deal
    Evening Standard James Morris,Evening Standard Tue, 22 Jan 07:34 GMT



    Up to 40 government ministers have reportedly told No10 they will resign if they are banned from voting against a no deal Brexit.

    It is understood the internal movement against no deal is being led by work and pensions secretary Amber Rudd, who is said to have urged Downing Street to allow Tory MPs a free vote.

    And the Daily Telegraph reported at least four other Cabinet ministers delivered further “stark” warnings to Prime Minister Theresa May over no deal.

    It comes after business secretary Richard Harrington strongly hinted he would resign if an “absolute disaster” of a no deal divorce happened.
    Amber Rudd is said to have urged Downing Street to permit a free vote on the option to block a no deal Brexit

    This morning, Iain Duncan Smith, who voted against Mrs May's deal, told Today: "As you would if you were in business or any sort of project you are doing, you always get the expert and they do the negotiations.

    "What we now need is absolutely, 100%, daily political leadership under the Prime Minister, reporting back.

    "And alongside that individual you have already sitting in the trade department probably the world's expert on trade arrangements and I would like to see that individual in."

    Asked what this meant for Olly Robbins, Theresa May's chief Europe adviser, Mr Duncan Smith added: "I have no particular problem if Olly Robbins is still there et cetera, my point is that they would support that process.

    "But what you need is a very strong focused team now, and politically led, that's my personal view."

    The Times reported a government source as insisting blocking no deal would aid her negotiating prospects with EU leaders: “If done properly this could help the prime minister go to Brussels in a stronger position.”

    Tory HQ has effectively been put on a snap general election "war footing" due to the Brexit impasse in Parliament, according to the Telegraph.

    Meanwhile, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn gave his strongest backing yet to the possibility of a second referendum – something Mrs May remains strongly against.

    He said: "Our amendment [to Mrs May’s Brexit motion] will allow MPs to vote on options to end this Brexit deadlock and prevent the chaos of a no deal.

    "It is time for Labour's alternative plan to take centre stage, while keeping all options on the table, including the option of a public vote."

    However, Labour's amendment was carefully worded and did not explicitly say the party would officially support a second referendum.

    His remarks came as Mrs May claimed a second referendum could “damage social cohesion”.

    “There has not yet been enough recognition of the way that a second referendum could damage social cohesion by undermining faith in our democracy,” she said.
    Jeremy Corbyn branded Mrs May's attempts at cross-party talks as 'phoney' (EPA)

    Last night Mrs May announced she was scrapping a £65 fee for EU nationals wanting to remain in the UK after Brexit, promised to guarantee workers' rights and environmental safeguards.

    Irish foreign minister Simon Coveney said Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier had assured him the EU remains "firmly supportive" of the Withdrawal Agreement in full, including its guarantees of no hard border in Ireland.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Fear mongering in the extreme says chris
    "The original "News" that I was going to post disappeared.
    This is an older and milder version."

    Martial law plans being drawn up in the event of a no-deal Brexit


    Plans are being drawn up to impose martial law across Britain in the event of a no-deal Brexit , it has emerged.

    The move has been described by sources as the civil service "prepping" for all possibilities.

    The revelation came as further Government splits emerged over whether Britain should quit the EU without an agreement as Defence Minister Tobias Ellwood broke ranks and insisted a no-deal scenario must be ruled out.

    Health Secretary Matt Hancock confirmed the government was drawing up plans to impose martial law and curfews in a no deal Brexit.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    "Ef up the eu deal and just get the hell out".



    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Brexit: Guy Verhofstadt says Conservatives and Labour have put politics ahead of country
    The Independent Joe Watts,The Independent Sat, 26 Jan 17:35 GMT

    The European Parliament’s Brexit spokesman has said that both big British parties have put political interests ahead of the national good.

    Guy Verhofstadt said that in his Belgian homeland a “majority” committee would have been formed to break the Brexit impasse.

    It comes after Theresa May was criticised for not being prepared to compromise on her ‘red lines’ in recent cross-party talks, while Jeremy Corbyn came under attack for refusing to take part in the talks at all.

    On Tuesday parliament will vote on whether to adopt any of the alternative approaches to Brexit that have been put forward by groups of cross-party MPs.

    But it in an interview with L’Echo newspaper, Mr Verhofstadt said: “The question is whether an agreement can be settled between the two major parties, Labour and the Conservatives.

    “Still, this situation is the result of British politics. Elsewhere, in Belgium for example, a joint majority opposition committee would have set itself up to make a decision in the country’s interest.

    “At the moment, it seems that the interest of British parties is more important than that of their country. That said, last Monday, Theresa May partially opened the door, for the first time, during her speech to the British parliament. Jeremy Corbyn too.”

    In a statement after winning her vote of confidence last week, Ms May said she would begin talks with leaders in both politics and wider society in a bid to find a Brexit compromise.

    But she was criticised for going into the talks maintaining the principles with which she entered the broader Brexit negotiations, including staying out of a customs union and scrapping freedom of movement.

    Mr Corbyn said he would not take part at all until Ms May ruled out the prospect of a no-deal Brexit, something she has refused to do since taking office.

    Proposals likely to be put to a vote on Tuesday include one that would extend Article 50 and one to give parliament power over the commons schedule instead of the executive, while another aiming for a second referendum was dropped due to a lack of support.

    There appeared to be hope for Ms May to receive backing from rebels and her DUP partners in government under an amendment tabled by Sir Graham Brady that would approve the deal she has negotiated with Brussels as long as the Irish backstop was replaced.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Re surfaced.


    Brexit news latest: Whitehall officials look at prospect of imposing martial law in event of 'no-deal'
    Evening Standard Hatty Collier,Evening Standard Sunday 27th


    Brexit planners are looking at the possibility of imposing martial law in Britain in the event of a “no-deal”, it has emerged.

    Legislation which gives ministers the powers to impose curfews and travel bans, confiscate property and deploy the armed forces is being examined by Whitehall officials, the Sunday Times reports.

    Powers available under the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 could be used to stop civil disobedience after Britain leaves the EU, according to the newspaper.

    A source was quoted as saying: “The over-riding them in all the no-deal planning is civil disobedience and the fear that it will lead to death in the event of food and medical shortages.”

    The move has been described by sources as the civil service "prepping" for all possibilities.
    Under pressure on Brexit: Theresa May (PA)

    The revelation came as further Government splits emerged over whether Britain should quit the EU without an agreement as Defence Minister Tobias Ellwood broke ranks and insisted a no deal scenario must be ruled out.

    A Downing Street spokesperson said: "Respecting the referendum decision means leaving the EU.

    "The PM has said that there will be disruption in the event of no deal, but as a responsible Government we are taking the appropriate steps to minimise this disruption and ensure the country is prepared."

    In other measures the Government sought to extend working hours for MPs in order to get Brexit legislation through the Commons before the scheduled EU withdrawal date of March 29.

    Responding to news the Government was looking at the possibility of a martial law scenario, Labour MP and Best for Britain campaign supporter, David Lammy said: "This is a full-blown crisis.

    "The Government is recklessly drawing up plans for a colossal act of self-harm.

    "Through continuing on the path to Brexit, despite having achieved no consensus on a deal in Parliament, the Government is preparing to declare war on itself.

    "The idea that the Government has any mandate for this catastrophic scenario is ludicrous.
    Defence minister Tobias Ellwood (AFP/Getty Images)

    "The Leave campaign promised a stable new trading relationship with the EU after Brexit, not total isolation and soldiers in our airports."

    Despite Prime Minister Theresa May refusing to take the prospect of a no deal off the table, Mr Ellwood wrote in the Sunday Times: "It is now time to rule out the very possibility of no deal.

    "It is wrong for Government and business to invest any more time and money in a no deal outcome which will make us poorer, weaker and smaller in the eyes of the world."

    Also writing in the Sunday Times, Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom branded bids by some backbench MPs to kill no deal as an option via a series of Commons amendments on Tuesday as a "thinly veiled attempt to stop Brexit".

    In a bid to try and ensure Brexit legislation gets through the Commons and Lords in time for the planned March exit, Parliament's February recess is to be cancelled, and MPs will be made to start earlier and finish later on sitting days.

    The move comes after the Commons Leader suggested that leaving the EU might need to be delayed by "a couple of weeks" in order to get all the legislation through.

    Reports that the Number 10 chief of staff Gavin Barwell had criticised the role of the Prime Minister's husband Philip May in Brexit discussions were dismissed as "utter bunkum" by a Downing street spokesperson.
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    Default Re: Theresa May's Brexit deal faces vote in Parliament.

    Second Brexit Referendum Would 'Fail The Public', Labour's Angela Rayner Says
    HuffPost UK Arj Singh,HuffPost UK Jan 27th



    British people do not want a second EU referendum or a delay to Brexit, senior Labour frontbencher Angela Rayner has said.

    The shadow education secretary said politicians will have “failed the public” if they ask voters to give their views on EU membership again.

    Her comments will concern campaigners for a so-called People’s Vote who say they need Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s backing to make it a reality.

    Corbyn has so far been reluctant to support a second referendum but is facing pressure from some of his own MPs and party members to do so.

    Rayner also revealed she would vote to stay in the EU if there was a second poll but described a narrow victory for Remain as the “the worst case scenario”, adding: “what are we going to have then, a best of three?”

    Appearing on Ridge on Sunday on Sky News, she went on: “I think if we end up with a second referendum then us as politicians have failed the public. We have failed to be able to do our job.

    “I would see that as a really difficult situation for us all to be in.

    “I don’t think people want to see a delay to Article 50, I don’t think people want to see us in a second referendum.

    “They want to see parliamentarians working together to carry out what happened in the result of the referendum to get the best possible deal we can for Britain moving forward and the only way we can do that next week is by Theresa May actually genuinely working across Parliament and looking at her red lines and seeing how she can build that consensus.

    “I still think that can happen.”

    Labour has yet to reveal if it will support Yvette Cooper’s Brexit amendment, which would empower MPs to extend Article 50 and delay EU withdrawal if Theresa May cannot get a deal approved in the Commons by the end of next month.
    Labour's Yvette Cooper wants MPs to have the power to delay Brexit to avoid no deal

    Rayner’s comments on Article 50 may concern those supporting the move, but she suggested the party was still open to backing it in a vote on Tuesday.

    “Labour will do whatever it takes to avoid a no-deal Brexit, so if that’s the only option we have it’s something we will seriously consider,” the shadow education secretary said.

    “We will do whatever it takes, through parliament, to stop that no-deal scenario from happening. If that means backing an amendment, then we will do that.”

    Cooper meanwhile made clear it would be up to MPs to decide how long any delay to Article 50 should be, in what appeared to be an attempt to win backing from the Labour leadership which is concerned over a lengthy prolongation of the withdrawal process.

    She told BBC One’s Andrew Marr Show: “It’s deliberately amenable when the motion comes forward at the end of February if the government hasn’t sorted it out by then then it would be up for parliament to decide how long’s needed.”
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