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Thread: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    I looked up the nutritional values of the microgreens, babygreen and sprouts compared them to lettuces. Mature Lettuces are nigh on useless in comparison!

    Little nutritional powerhouses! Seems like an obvious choice and also one for people considering preparedness scenarios.

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/a...crogreens.aspx

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    Quote Posted by CurEus (here)
    I looked up the nutritional values of the microgreens, babygreen and sprouts compared them to lettuces. Mature Lettuces are nigh on useless in comparison!

    Little nutritional powerhouses! Seems like an obvious choice and also one for people considering preparedness scenarios.

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/a...crogreens.aspx
    Good article. Thanks, CurEus. I've saved it.

    Microgreens are power packed with nutrients and flavor. I’m on my 3rd batch. My plan is to grow baby greens using the same methods with micro-mats. Essentially the differences are time, size, less flavor and nutrients. It may appeal to those who prefer a traditional salad. Baby greens are more nutritionally dense than the mature plant.
    Begin tasting microgreens to mark the change in flavor as they mature, so you'll know when you like to harvest them. The great thing about lettuce microgreen (for example) is that you can let them grow to baby green stage, harvesting them anytime between.

    Days to Maturity: 14-16 days (21 days + for baby greens)


    Preparedness was another factor to learn about microgreens. I’ve stocked freeze dried kale, spinach, broccoli, and corn from Thrive.com.
    • certified
    • gluten-free
    • NO GMOs: no bioengineered ingredients
    • NO artificial colors or flavors
    • shelf life of 25 yrs. (unopened)
    What is the difference between freeze dried and air dried? (see post below)
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 19th January 2019 at 20:36.

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    What is the difference between freeze dried and air dried?


    (ignore advertisement)

    How different drying methods affect the quality of Kale Powder.

    If you’re thinking about using kale powder as a convenient way to add more leafy green vegetables into you diet there are a few important things to consider. Typically, kale will be dried in one of two ways: Air-dried or Freeze-dried, and each method has pros and cons.

    Air-dried

    Pros
    • The biggest pro of using an air-dried powder is the cost. Air-drying is a very low-cost way of drying kale and therefore the powder is much cheaper for you to purchase.
    Cons
    • The major con of air-dried powder is many of the nutrients are degraded. Put a leaf of kale on your counter for a few hours at room temperature and it will go limp and wilt. Put it in a dehydrator at a much higher temperature for a few hours and it will shrivel up like a raisin (in fact raisins are simply air-dried grapes which is why they look totally different). Shriveling happens when cell walls are degraded and break down. Water, and many soluble nutrients also leech out during the air-drying process.
    • Air-drying typically makes the taste of the powder more pungent. So if you use it in something like a green smoothie, it may be more difficult to mask over the taste.
    • Most air-dried vegetable powders are grown and dried in China where heavy metals are typically much higher in the soil than in the US.
    Freeze-dried

    Pros
    • The biggest pro of using a freeze-dried powder is the nutrient level. A Freeze-dried kale leaf looks just like a fresh kale leaf and nutritionally is as close as you can get.
    • Taste is very close to the taste of fresh kale, so if you are using it in something like a green smoothie, it is just as easy to flavor over as fresh kale.
    Cons
    • Freeze-drying is much more expensive than air-drying. Freeze-drying is a slow process that typically takes 2-3 days per batch.
    While Freeze-dried powder is much higher in quality, the cost is also much higher. If your looking for a low-cost option to add leafy greens into your diet, air-dried powder would be a great choice for you and there are many options…

    {snip}
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 19th January 2019 at 20:36.

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    Last edited by RunningDeer; 20th January 2019 at 06:43.

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    NATURE’S PROTECTORS: ANTIOXIDANTS
    Our body’s first and primary line of defense against free radical (oxidant) attacks are antioxidants, supplied in our diet. These natural substances neutralize free radicals by combining with them chemically to render them harmless. They go even further and are vital in nourishing, strengthening, and stimulating the immune system. Some antioxidants are vitamins, others are minerals or trace elements. Furthermore, others are enzymes and plant pigments. All of them, to one degree or another, can protect us from toxic chemical build-up and attack. Let’s take a closer look at the twelve most important ones, all of which occur abundantly in various sprouting seeds, beans, and grains.


    Pro-vitamin A (Carotenes). is is by far one of the best antioxidants and immune system builders. e synthetic form of vitamin A is toxic to the body in large doses. When derived from carotenes (pro-vitamin A), it is completely nontoxic. Our body merely stores any excess in the liver and fatty tissue. Since this is where most toxic residues also get stored, pro-vitamin A can help keep fatty tissue from becoming rancid. Vitamin A is essential in the diet for healthy epithelial tissue. is tissue forms the skin and glands, such as the mammary glands, and the mucous membranes, which line the lungs and the digestive, urinary and intestinal tracts.

    Vitamin A deficiency has been linked with higher incidence of cancer in epithelial tissue, which accounts for well over half of all cancers. Optimum dietary levels of vitamin A are known to boost the immune system. Studies have found increased production of lymphocytes, phagocytes, T cells, B cells, and five classes of antibodies, including interferon and tumor necrosis factor. Vitamin A also helps protect the body from radiation, especially solar radiation effects on the skin.

    With rising levels of ultraviolet radiation falling on us due to a weakened ozone layer, this protection becomes doubly important. Unfortunately, however, according to several studies by the USDA and others, over 50% of all American diets are dangerously deficient in this vital vitamin and antioxidant. Pro-vitamin A rises dramatically when sprouting seeds that develop chlorophyll are exposed to a few hours of direct sunlight. Sunlight triggers the production of carotenes as well.


    Pro-vitamin B Complex. The B complex includes B-1 (thiamine), B-2 (riboflavin), B-3 (niacin), B-6 (pyridoxine), B-12 (cyanocobalamin), B-13 (orotic acid), B-15 (pangamic acid), B-17 (laetrile), folic acid, pantothenic acid, biotin, inositol, choline, and PABA. e B-vitamins aid in the metabolism of proteins and fats, boost energy and help the immune system produce antibodies. ey also help regulate the important elimination organs such as the liver and kidneys. One of the highest natural sources of B vitamins is sprouted grains.


    Vitamin C. is important vitamin directly neutralizes and detoxes over 50 known chemical toxins. For example, it keeps cancer-causing chemicals known as nitrosamines from forming from nitrates. Vitamin C also boosts the immune system. It increases the production of disease-fighting lymphocytes and the production of interferon. It increases iron assimilation and helps prevent anemia. Fresh-squeezed citrus juices are one good source, but some sprouts and sprout juices are even higher in vitamin C content.
    Vitamin E. is vitamin provides a host of antioxidant qualities. It prevents rancidity of fats in the bloodstream and elsewhere in the body, especially the skin. It also protects enzymes, hormones, and other antioxidants. Vitamin E boosts the oxygen-carrying capacity of red blood cells and helps oxygenate body tissues. It strengthens the immune system and assists production of T-cells, B-cells, and several antibodies. Cold-pressed wheat germ oil is one way to add it to your diet. However, sprouted wheat, alfalfa, or clover cost much less.




    Chlorophyll. Although it is neither a vitamin nor a mineral, chlorophyll is a potent antioxidant and blood puri er. Its molecular structure is identical to that of the heme molecule in red blood cells, except it has magnesium instead of iron at the center. Since our body converts chlorophyll to heme in producing new red blood cells, it is essential in the diet for a healthy, oxygen-rich blood supply. Chlorophyll is said to fight infections by retarding the growth of bacteria, especially odor-causing bacteria, making it not just a great detoxifier, but a natural deodorizer.

    The highest levels of chlorophyll—up to 70% of solids content—are found in cereal grasses such as wheatgrass a er they are juiced and strained. Wheat-grass juice provides many other important antioxidant vitamins, minerals and enzymes for quick assimilation into the bloodstream. Wheatgrass juice is also the best source for the antioxidant enzymes discussed below.Vitamins and chlorophyll remove free radicals directly. e following minerals and trace elements work in- directly by activating the antioxidant enzymes which will be converted later.




    Calcium. Calcium helps the kidneys eliminate toxins. It helps regulate blood pH and electrolyte balance. Calcium helps the body eliminate heavy metals, such as cadmium, lead, and mercury, and radioactive isotopes such as Strontium 90.


    Iron. is mineral, found in every cell in the body, is essential in the production of hemoglobins, the oxygen-carrying components in red blood cells. Iron also improves immune response by strengthening respiratory action and tissue oxygenation. It has been found to prevent absorption of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium.




    Magnesium. is important mineral, a component of chlorophyll, has many protective functions in the body. It helps counteract aluminum toxicity, balances the properties of calcium, and aids in the utilization of many other antioxidants by the body. e RDA for magnesium is 350 milligrams, which is easily supplied by a diet which includes chlorophyll-rich sprouts.


    Potassium. is helps maintain normal mineral balance and effective mineral function. It helps detoxify the kidneys. It also prevents over-acidity by maintaining the acid-alkaline balance in the blood and tissues. Sprouted wheat and sunflower seeds are good sources of potassium.




    Selenium. is trace element is known to fortify and strengthen the immune system by boosting antibody production. It helps the body to attack free radicals, especially hydrocarbons and heavy metals such as lead and mercury.


    Zinc. is trace element is essential to the thymus gland in the production of virus-killing T-cells. Zinc is required in the production of nucleic acids, such as RNA and DNA, which also help protect against toxic attack. It is also important in the proper absorption and functions of several antioxidant vitamins, especially B-complex. Food processing destroys zinc, especially in the milling of whole grains into re ned our products.




    Antioxidant Enzymes. is is a group of metabolic catalysts used by the body specifically to rid itself of free radicals. These are the “activators” of the free radical disposal system. ey include two primary members, super-oxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT); and eight secondary members, including glutathione peroxidase (GP) and methionine reductase (MR). Each is known to neutralize or deactivate a certain kind of free radical. And where it takes one molecule of a vitamin to neutralize one free radical, a single molecule of one of these enzymes can get rid of thousands. SOD eradicates the super-oxides and oxides.

    GP takes care of the very dangerous lipid peroxides. MR eliminates the hydroxyls. CAT neutralizes the hydroxyls and assists the others in reducing all the free radicals to harmless end products that the body can then more easily expel. All are found in sprouts, especially in sprouted wheat. Your body’s ability to digest and absorb nutrients from the food you eat is totally dependent on enzymes. Digestion is an enzymatic process from beginning to end.
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 20th January 2019 at 07:29.

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    How to Pick a Sweet Watermelon (2 minutes)
    4 tips: color, sound, stem condition, and give to the skin of the watermelon. Watermelons do not ripen after they are picked so it is crucial to pick a watermelon that ripened on the vine. A ripe watermelon means it is sweet and filled with water.

    Daisy Creek Farms with Jag Singh


    What are the benefits of eating watermelon?

    Watermelon also contains citrulline, an amino acid that may increase nitric oxide levels in the body. Nitric oxide helps your blood vessels expand, which lowers blood pressure. Other vitamins and minerals in watermelon are also good for your heart. These include vitamins A, B6, C, magnesium and potassium.

    Is watermelon a Superfood?

    Superfood: Watermelon. Sweet and juicy, watermelon can do more than just refresh you on a hot summer day. This versatile fruit will help you get a dose of vitamins, antioxidants, and fiber.


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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    14 Healthiest Vegetables
    [article with links]

    Introduction:

    Vegetables are well-known for being good for your health. Most vegetables are low in calories but high in vitamins, minerals and fiber.

    However, some vegetables stand out from the rest with additional proven health benefits, such as the ability to fight inflammation or reduce the risk of disease.

    The Bottom Line:

    From providing essential vitamins and minerals to fighting disease, it's clear that including vegetables in your diet is crucial for good health.

    While the vegetables listed here have been extensively studied for their health benefits, there are plenty more vegetables that are also excellent for your health.

    Ensure that you're getting a good mix of vegetables in your diet to take advantage of their many diverse health benefits and get the most nutritional bang for your buck.






    1. Spinach

    This leafy green tops the chart as one of the healthiest vegetables, thanks to its impressive nutrient profile.

    One cup (30 grams) of raw spinach provides 56% of your daily vitamin A needs plus your entire daily vitamin K requirement — all for just 7 calories (1).

    Spinach also boasts a great deal of antioxidants, which can help reduce the risk of chronic disease.

    One study found that dark green leafy vegetables like spinach are high in beta-carotene and lutein, two types of antioxidants that have been associated with a decreased risk of cancer (2).

    In addition, a 2015 study found that spinach consumption may be beneficial for heart health, as it may lower blood pressure (3).




    2. Carrots

    Carrots are packed with vitamin A, providing 428% of the daily recommended value in just one cup (128 grams) (4).

    They contain beta-carotene, an antioxidant that gives carrots their vibrant orange color and could help in cancer prevention (5).

    In fact, one study revealed that for each serving of carrots per week, participants' risk of prostate cancer decreased by 5% (6).

    Another study showed that eating carrots may reduce the risk of lung cancer in smokers as well. Compared to those who ate carrots at least once a week, smokers who did not eat carrots had a three times greater risk of developing lung cancer (7).

    Carrots are also high in vitamin C, vitamin K and potassium (4).




    3. Broccoli

    Broccoli belongs to the cruciferous family of vegetables.

    It is rich in a sulfur-containing plant compound known as glucosinolate, as well as sulforaphane, a by-product of glucosinolate (8).

    Sulforaphane is significant in that it has been shown to have a protective effect against cancer.

    In one animal study, sulforaphane was able to reduce the size and number of breast cancer cells while also blocking tumor growth in mice (9).

    Eating broccoli may help prevent other types of chronic disease, too.

    A 2010 animal study found that consuming broccoli sprouts could protect the heart from disease-causing oxidative stress by significantly lowering levels of oxidants (10).

    In addition to its ability to prevent disease, broccoli is also loaded with nutrients.

    A cup (91 grams) of raw broccoli provides 116% of your daily vitamin K needs, 135% of the daily vitamin C requirement and a good amount of folate, manganese and potassium (11).




    4. Garlic

    Garlic has a long history of use as a medicinal plant, with roots tracing all the way back to ancient China and Egypt (12).

    The main active compound in garlic is allicin, a plant compound that is largely responsible for garlic's variety of health benefits (13).

    Several studies have shown that garlic can regulate blood sugar as well as promote heart health.

    In one animal study, diabetic rats were given either garlic oil or diallyl trisulfide, a component of garlic. Both garlic compounds caused a decrease in blood sugar and improved insulin sensitivity (14).

    Another study fed garlic to participants both with and without heart disease. Results showed that garlic was able to decrease total blood cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL cholesterol while increasing HDL cholesterol in both groups (15).

    Garlic may be useful in the prevention of cancer as well. One test-tube study demonstrated that allicin induced cell death in human liver cancer cells (16).

    However, further research is needed to better understand the potential anti-cancer effects of garlic.



    5. Brussels Sprouts

    Like broccoli, Brussels sprouts are a member of the cruciferous family of vegetables and contain the same health-promoting plant compounds.

    Brussels sprouts also contain kaempferol, an antioxidant that may be particularly effective in preventing damage to cells (17).

    One animal study found that kaempferol protected against free radicals, which cause oxidative damage to cells and can contribute to chronic disease (18).

    Brussels sprout consumption can help enhance detoxification as well.

    One study showed that eating Brussels sprouts led to a 15–30% increase in some of the specific enzymes that control detoxification, which could decrease the risk of colorectal cancer (19).

    Additionally, Brussels sprouts are very nutrient-dense. Each serving provides a good amount of many vitamins and minerals, including vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, manganese and potassium (20).



    6. Kale

    Like other leafy greens, kale is well-known for its health-promoting qualities, including its nutrient density and antioxidant content.

    A cup (67 grams) of raw kale contains plenty of B vitamins, potassium, calcium and copper.

    It also fulfills your entire daily requirement for vitamins A, C and K (21).

    Due to its high amount of antioxidants, kale may also be beneficial in promoting heart health.

    In a 2008 study, 32 men with high cholesterol drank 150 ml of kale juice daily for 12 weeks. By the end of the study, HDL cholesterol increased by 27%, LDL cholesterol decreased by 10% and antioxidant activity was increased (22).

    Another study showed that drinking kale juice can decrease blood pressure and may be beneficial in reducing both blood cholesterol and blood sugar (23).




    7. Green Peas

    Peas are considered a starchy vegetable. This means they have a higher amount of carbs and calories than non-starchy vegetables and may impact blood sugar levels when eaten in large amounts.

    Nevertheless, green peas are incredibly nutritious.

    One cup (160 grams) of cooked green peas contains 9 grams of fiber, 9 grams of protein and vitamins A, C and K, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate (24).

    Because they are high in fiber, peas support digestive health by enhancing the beneficial bacteria in your gut and promoting regular bowel movements (25).

    Moreover, peas are rich in saponins, a group of plant compounds known for their anti-cancer effects (26).

    Research shows that saponins may help fight cancer by reducing tumor growth and inducing cell death in cancer cells (27).

    [continued in the next post]
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 21st January 2019 at 17:44.

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    14 Healthiest Vegetables (continued)


    8. Swiss Chard

    Swiss chard is low in calories but high in many essential vitamins and minerals.

    One cup (36 grams) contains just 7 calories yet 1 gram of fiber, 1 gram of protein and lots of vitamins A, C and K, manganese and magnesium (28).

    Swiss chard is especially known for its potential to prevent damage caused by diabetes mellitus.

    In one animal study, chard extract was found to reverse the effects of diabetes by decreasing blood sugar levels and preventing cell damage from disease-causing free radicals (29).

    Other animal studies have shown that the antioxidant content of chard extract can protect the liver and kidneys from the negative effects of diabetes (30, 31).




    9. Ginger

    Ginger root is used as a spice in everything from vegetable dishes to desserts.

    Historically, ginger has also been used as a natural remedy for motion sickness (32).

    Several studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of ginger on nausea. In a review comprised of 12 studies and nearly 1,300 pregnant women, ginger significantly reduced nausea compared to a placebo (33).

    Ginger also contains potent anti-inflammatory properties, which can be helpful in treating inflammation-related disorders like arthritis, lupus or gout (34).

    In one study, participants with osteoarthritis who were treated with a concentrated ginger extract experienced reduced knee pain and relief from other symptoms (35).

    Further research suggests that ginger could aid in the treatment of diabetes as well.

    A 2015 study looked at the effects of ginger supplements on diabetes. After 12 weeks, ginger was found to be effective in decreasing blood sugar levels (36).



    10. Asparagus

    This spring vegetable is rich in several vitamins and minerals, making it an excellent addition to any diet.

    Just half a cup (90 grams) of asparagus provides one-third of your daily folate needs.

    This amount also provides plenty of selenium, vitamin K, thiamin and riboflavin (37).

    Getting enough folate from sources like asparagus can offer protection from disease and can prevent neural tube birth defects during pregnancy (38, 39).

    Some test-tube studies also show that asparagus may benefit the liver by supporting its metabolic function and protecting it against toxicity (40).



    11. Red Cabbage

    This vegetable belongs to the cruciferous family of vegetables and, much like its relatives, is brimming with antioxidants and health-promoting properties.

    One cup (89 grams) of raw red cabbage contains 2 grams of fiber as well as 85% of the daily vitamin C requirement (41).

    Red cabbage is also rich in anthocyanins, a group of plant compounds that contribute to its distinct color as well as a whole host of health benefits.

    In a 2012 animal study, rats were fed a diet designed to increase cholesterol levels and increase plaque buildup in the arteries. The rats were then given red cabbage extract.

    The study found that red cabbage extract was able to prevent increases in blood cholesterol levels and protect against damage to the heart and liver (42).

    These results were supported by another animal study in 2014 showing that red cabbage could reduce inflammation and prevent liver damage in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet (43).



    12. Sweet Potatoes

    Classified as a root vegetable, sweet potatoes stand out for their vibrant orange color, sweet taste and impressive health benefits.

    One medium sweet potato contains 4 grams of fiber, 2 grams of protein and a good amount of vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium and manganese (44).

    It's also high in a form of vitamin A called beta-carotene. In fact, one sweet potato fulfills 438% of your daily vitamin A needs (44).

    Beta-carotene consumption has been linked to a significant decrease in the risk of certain types of cancer, including lung and breast cancer (45, 46).

    Specific types of sweet potatoes may also contain additional benefits. For example, Caiapo is a type of white sweet potato that may have an anti-diabetic effect.

    In one study, people with diabetes were given 4 grams of Caiapo daily over 12 weeks, leading to a reduction in both blood sugar and blood cholesterol levels (47).



    13. Collard Greens

    Collard greens are a very nutrient-rich vegetable.

    One cup (190 grams) of cooked collard greens contains 5 grams of fiber, 4 grams of protein and 27% of your daily calcium needs (48).

    In fact, collard greens are one of the best plant sources of calcium available, along with other leafy greens, broccoli and soybeans.

    Adequate calcium intake from plant sources can promote bone health and has been shown to decrease the risk of osteoporosis (49).

    Collard greens are also high in antioxidants and could even reduce your risk of developing certain diseases.

    One study found that eating more than one serving of collard greens per week was associated with a 57% decreased risk of glaucoma, an eye condition that can lead to blindness (50).

    Another study showed that a high intake of vegetables in the Brassica family, which includes collard greens, may decrease the risk of prostate cancer (51).




    14. Kohlrabi

    Also known as the turnip cabbage or German turnip, kohlrabi is a vegetable related to the cabbage that can be eaten raw or cooked.

    Raw kohlrabi is high in fiber, providing 5 grams in each cup (135 grams). It's also full of vitamin C, providing 140% of the daily value per cup (52).

    Studies have shown that the antioxidant content of kohlrabi makes it a powerful tool against inflammation and diabetes (53).

    In one animal study, kohlrabi extract was able to decrease blood sugar levels by 64% within just seven days of treatment (54).

    Though there are different types of kohlrabi available, studies show that red kohlrabi has nearly twice the amount of phenolic antioxidants and displays stronger anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory effects (53).

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    How to Grow Sprouts and Wheat Grass With
    “The Handy Pantry Sprout Garden” (7:46 minutes)

    SPROUT GARDEN - 3 TRAY STACKABLE SEED SPROUTER


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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    I just wanted to say thank you for the micro mats info. At home I normally grow my micro greens on soil but when on holiday as I am now I'm using kitchen paper!!! I am sure it is not healthy, so was pleased to see the mats info. I have now ordered some.
    Thank you for these great posts
    Lis

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    I wanted to share the concept of the biogenic food model and the value of eating sprouts and microgreens. Sprouts and microgreens are biogenic, they actually have the vitality and the nutrients to rejuvenate the body. I find this way of looking at food as very beneficial. My personal is experience is that it is an accurate assessment.



    http://eatinglightonline.com/the-biogenic-food-model/

    The Biogenic Food Model


    Newer and more complete nutritional models are available but have been slow to catch on. In general, what’s missing is a context with a larger view, that steps out of the box of measuring calories and various nutrients to one that is more concerned with helping us reaching our full physical, mental, and spiritual potentials.

    One such system was created in 1928 by Dr. Edmund Bordeaux Szekely. Dr. Szekely has been referred to as the father of the holistic health movement in the West. He is probably best known for starting The International Biogenic Society. To read more about Dr. Szekely, click here.

    Dr. Szekely created a simple system with four food categories. These classifications allow us to take advantage of subtle qualities inherent in food which are harder to measure but can be demonstrated to exist by the results achieved by those that eat them. They change the focus from measuring calories and various food constituents to the overall effect the foods have on our long-term health and well-being (Credit: International Biogenic Society).

    The four food categories:

    BIOGENIC foods have the highest life force rating. These foods are life renewing. They include germinated cereal seeds, nuts, and sprouted baby greens.

    BIOACTIVE foods are life sustaining- they include fresh organic fruits and vegetables. These foods contribute to the life force but not as powerfully as biogenic.

    BIOSTATIC foods are life slowing. They include lightly processed foods and raw foods which are no longer fresh. These foods will slowly erode the life force over time.

    BIOCIDIC foods undoubtedly subtract from the life force. These include all highly processed and cooked foods and all kinds of flesh foods, unless the flesh foods are freshly killed.

    An outspoken proponent of this system is Dr.Gabriel Cousens. Read his book Conscious Eating to gain insight into this system as well as other aspects of diet.

    This way of classifying foods may seem a little strange to us, simply because most of us are not used to it. People that have taken the time to explore this system and integrate the principles into their lifestyle will attest to it’s benefits (the author included). The changes that take place in body and mind (and general life experience) are profound.
    Last edited by peterpam; 11th February 2019 at 15:40.

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  23. Link to Post #32
    United States Avalon Greeter: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    Are micro mats (link?) used one time only?

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    Default Re: Growing Microgreens and Sprouts

    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)
    Are micro mats (link?) used one time only?
    Yes, Ron, it’s a one time use. No mess. No fuss.The links are in the OP, but I’ll add it here as well.
    Micro-Mats hydroponic growing pads - 5" x 5". Made from biodegradable and compostable wood fibers, these grow pads provide an excellent medium to grow wheatgrass, barley grass or microgreens without soil. Fits 5" x 5" trays.

    For my first order, I purchased the 96 pack and my second purchase was the 240 pack. I wanted to be sure it’s something I’d stick with before I invested a lot of $. The greens are easy to harvest with scissors because the micromats are floppy.
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 11th February 2019 at 18:43.

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