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Thread: Turmoil in Venezuela

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    United States Avalon Member Joe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela



    Quote US to attack Venezuela

    Published on Aug 12, 2009

    A military agreement between the United States and Columbia has led to widespread concern in South America. Leaders want to know why the United States is trying to increase its military presence in the region. The Colombian government says that having more US troops in the country will help fight drug trafficking and combat terrorism. Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, however, ardently opposes these plans. He says that the military bases in Columbia will provoke conflict in Latin America. Venezuelan-American Attorney and Author Eva Golinger joins RT's Dina Gusovsky from Caracas via skype to discuss this matter.

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    Avalon Member guayabal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by Joe (here)
    Quote US to attack Venezuela

    Published on Aug 12, 2009

    A military agreement between the United States and Columbia has led to widespread concern in South America. Leaders want to know why the United States is trying to increase its military presence in the region. The Colombian government says that having more US troops in the country will help fight drug trafficking and combat terrorism. Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, however, ardently opposes these plans. He says that the military bases in Columbia will provoke conflict in Latin America. Venezuelan-American Attorney and Author Eva Golinger joins RT's Dina Gusovsky from Caracas via skype to discuss this matter.
    Eva Golinger spreading RT/Chavez propaganda. That's her job.

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  4. Link to Post #123
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    As a point of historical interest (and I will try and link this to an Iran specific thread) some commentators or viewers here may like to refresh their memories with a quick revisiting of the 1953 Iranian coup spearheaded by the CIA and the British: 'Operation Ajax'. Parallels with recent events in Venezuela are of course, unsurprisingly to many of us, startling (see document attached).

    Source: National Security Archive - https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB435/

    Attachment 39803
    “If a man does not keep pace with [fall into line with] his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.” - Thoreau

  5. Link to Post #124
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    US media distorts Venezuela's food crisis by blaming Socialism


    teleSUR
    Fri, 24 Feb 2017 19:03 UTC


    Supermarket shoppers in Caracas. © Reuters

    The facts are clear — Venezuela does have a food crisis, but mainstream U.S. media always blames the socialist government.

    Disgruntled customers, empty store shelves, long supermarket lines. These are the images that mainstream U.S. media typically feature in their coverage of Venezuela's ongoing food crisis.

    These images are usually accompanied by sarcastic headlines like Forbes' "Venezuela Discovers the Perfect Weight Loss Diet" and the Cato Institute's "Hunger Is in Retreat, But Not in Socialist Venezuela."

    U.S. media outlets publish stories blaming Venezuela's food crisis on the socialist government almost daily. Today isn't any different.

    A new study released by researchers from three Venezuelan universities reported that nearly 75 percent of the population lost an average of 19 pounds in 2016 for lack of food. The report, titled, "2016 Living Conditions Survey," added that about 32.5 percent of Venezuelans eat only once or twice a day, compared to 11.3 percent last year.

    Moreover, 93.3 percent told the researchers that their income was not enough to cover their food needs.

    The facts are clear — Venezuela does have a food crisis. Mainstream U.S. media, however, blames the socialist government that has radically improved the country's standard of living instead of right-wing U.S.-backed opposition forces intentionally sabotaging the economy.

    Since the early 2000s, supermarket owners affiliated with Venezuela's opposition have been purposefully hoarding food products so they can resell them at higher prices and make large profits. Food importing companies owned by the country's wealthy right-wing elite are also manipulating import figures to raise prices.

    In 2013, former Venezuelan Central Bank chief Edmee Betancourt reported that the country lost between US$15 and $20 billion dollars the previous year through such fraudulent import deals.

    It doesn't stop there.

    Last year, over 750 opposition-controlled offshore companies linked to the Panama Papers scandal were accused of purposely redirecting Venezuelan imports of raw food materials from the government to the private sector. Many of these companies sell their products to private companies in Colombia, which resell them to Venezuelans living close to Colombia.
    "Selling contraband is a serious problem. People here are taking large quantities of products meant for Venezuelans and selling them in Colombia," Valencia resident Francisco Luzon told Al Jazeera in a 2014 interview.
    Reuters admitted in 2014 that Venezuelan opposition members living in border states are shipping low-cost foodstuffs provided by the Venezuelan government into Colombia for profit.

    Overall, Venezuela's millionaire opposition are profiting handsomely from the country's food crisis while blaming it on the socialist government that's trying to eliminate it.


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  6. Link to Post #125
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Veiled threat? Bolton photographed with '5,000 troops to Colombia' scribbled on notepad

    RT
    Tue, 29 Jan 2019 12:29 UTC


    © Reuters / Jim Young

    US national security adviser John Bolton seemed to be broadcasting big plans for the regime-change operation in Venezuela when he was photographed with a yellow legal pad on which he'd scrawled "5,000 troops to Colombia."

    Bolton clutched the notepad during Monday's White House press briefing, in which the administration announced sanctions against Venezuelan state-owned oil company PDVSA. The mustachioed warmonger opined on the "threats" to the US inherent in President Nicolas Maduro's closeness with Cuba and couldn't resist dragging Iran into the matter, vis-à-vis its "interest in Venezuela's uranium deposits." But sharp-eyed journalists zeroed in on the notepad immediately.

    Quote
    Ned Price‏Verified account @nedprice

    My eagle-eyed colleague spotted on Bolton’s notepad what sure looks like: “Afghanistan—>welcome the talks. 5,000 troops to Colombia”





    1:48 PM - 28 Jan 2019
    874 replies 5,604 retweets 7,691 likes
    Given Bolton's affection for war, many took the line at face value.

    Interestingly, Getty Images already had a stock photo of the notepad up for sale shortly after the press conference.

    It's not as if the Trump administration doesn't have a motive, some pointed out...


    ...while others suggested Colombia might not take too kindly to a visit from Uncle Sam.

    Asked about the notepad, a White House spokesperson reportedly told CBS, "As the president has said, all options are on the table."
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

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  7. Link to Post #126
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    If there were any proofs needed, the bankrolling of the self proclaimed interim president by the US bankers mafia should suffice... as in "Why wouldn't they bankroll Maduro if the latter weren't a thorn in their butts?":


    Daylight robbery! Washington gives opposition leader Guaido control over Venezuela's deposits in US bank

    RT
    Tue, 29 Jan 2019 15:02 UTC


    © Reuters/Marco Bello

    US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has authorized Venezuelan opposition leader and self-declared interim president, Juan Guaido, to take control of US-held assets belonging to the country's government.

    The certification, issued on Tuesday, applies to certain Venezuelan government and Central Bank property held by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or any other US insured banks.
    "This certification will help Venezuela's legitimate government safeguard those assets for the benefit of the Venezuelan people," State Department spokesman Robert Palladino said in a statement.
    Quote
    Maxim A. Suchkov‏ @MSuchkov_ALM

    #BREAKING : #US gives opposition leader @jguaido control over some #Venezuelan/n assets. Now this is a huge development in the domain of world politics, esp its "interference" aspect: strip assets from official gov using your influence to empower whoever else you like.

    5:49 AM - 29 Jan 2019
    8 replies 25 retweets 25 likes
    Opposition leader Juan Guaido swore himself in as Venezuela's interim president last Wednesday and was recognized as the country's legitimate leader by the United States shortly afterwards. President Nicolas Maduro denounced Guaido's claim as a "vile," Washington-sponsored coup attempt, and severed diplomatic relations with the US in response.

    Much of the Western world followed suit in recognizing Guaido and isolating Maduro. The Bank of England reportedly blocked Maduro from withdrawing $1.2 billion worth of gold stored in the UK late last week, and Secretary Pompeo announced that $20 million in humanitarian aid for Venezuela will be distributed through Guaido.

    US sanctions have effectively barred Maduro's government from borrowing on international markets and targeted anyone involved in gold sales from Venezuela. Venezuela's gold reserves are estimated at more than $8 billion, while the value of its assets in American banks is unclear.

    The Trump administration further ratcheted up its pressure campaign on Maduro by announcing sanctions against Venezuelan state-owned oil company PDVSA on Monday. The US Treasury Department seized $7 billion in PDVSA assets, and the sanctions will affect $11 billion worth of oil exports over the coming year.

    Venezuelan petroleum company Citgo will continue operating in the US, but its profits will go into a blocked account, only accessible to Guaido's government, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin explained.

    Mnuchin added that sanctions will only be lifted upon the "expeditious transfer of control to the interim president, or the subsequently democratically elected interim government."

    Maduro has denounced the sanctions as an attempt to "steal" Citgo from Venezuela, and said that PDVSA will take legal action.


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  8. Link to Post #127
    Avalon Member Carmody's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    .......1. Truth: President Nicolás Maduro is the legitimate president.

    President Maduro was re-elected on May 20, 2018, in response to the opposition demanding an early election. The legitimacy of the election of Maduro is so evident that it must be assumed those who say he is illegitimate are either intentionally false or ignorant. The election was scheduled consistent with the Venezuelan Constitution and in consultation with opposition parties. When it became evident that the opposition could not win the election, they decided, under pressure from the United States, to boycott the election in order to undermine its legitimacy. The facts are 9,389,056 people voted, 46% of eligible voters. Sixteen parties participated in the election with six candidates competing for the presidency.

    The electoral process was observed by more than 150 election observers. This included 14 electoral commissions from eight countries among them the Council of Electoral Experts of Latin America; two technical electoral missions; and 18 journalists from different parts of the world, among others. According to the international observers, “the elections were very transparent and complied with international parameters and national legislation.”

    Venezuela has one of the best electoral systems in the world. Voter fraud is not possible as identification and fingerprints are required for each voter. Voting machines are audited before and immediately after the election. Venezuela does something no other country in the world does — a public, citizen’s audit of a random sample of 53% of voting machines that is televised. All 18 parties signed the audits.

    Maduro won by a wide margin, obtaining 6,248,864 votes, 67.84%; followed by Henri Falcón with 1,927,958, 20.93%; Javier Bertucci with 1,015,895, 10.82%; and Reinaldo Quijada, who obtained 36,246 votes, 0.39% of the total.

    This same voting system has been used in elections that Maduro’s party has lost in governor’s and legislative elections. Venezuela is a real democracy with transparent elections. The United States could learn a good deal about real democracy from Venezuela.
    Interdimensional Civil Servant

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    Venezuela Avalon Member perolator's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    teleSUR is a venezuelan-based 24-hour propaganda network aimed to spread the "socialism" cancer worldwide.
    It is extremely biased. It propels Bolivarian crap as the ultimate solution. Chavez is almost a God for them.

    Source

    Quote Telesur (stylised as teleSUR) is a Venezuela-based, multi-state funded, Latin American terrestrial and satellite television network headquartered in Caracas, Venezuela. It is sponsored primarily by the government of Venezuela,[2] but also with additional funding by the governments of Cuba, Nicaragua, Uruguay, and Bolivia.[3] It was launched in 2005, under the government of Hugo Chavez, with the aim of being "a Latin socialist answer to CNN".
    Source

    Millions of dollars are funneled to that network, instead of being used for food or medicines. Venezuela provides 70% funding. Hypocrisy at the fullest. Funding has increased because Argentina stopped financing and broadcasting it in 2016.

    Source

    Quote The facts are clear — Venezuela does have a food crisis. Mainstream U.S. media, however, blames the socialist government that has radically improved the country's standard of living instead of right-wing U.S.-backed opposition forces intentionally sabotaging the economy.
    Lies.

    There is no such thing as "right-wing" in Venezuela. Most of political parties, opposition or not, are leftist, or democratic socialist. Guaido's political party (Popular Will), and 3 of the major opposition parties including the once largest poitical party, Democratic Action (before the Bolivarian enchilada), are full members of the Socialist International.

    Source

    I can be quoting and debunking all the information, but there is no point doing it. Political mind control and NWO is fancier.

  10. Link to Post #129
    Venezuela Avalon Member perolator's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by Carmody (here)
    .......[I]1. Truth: President Nicolás Maduro is the legitimate president.

    President Maduro was re-elected on May 20, 2018 [snip]

    This same voting system has been used in elections that Maduro’s party has lost in governor’s and legislative elections. Venezuela is a real democracy with transparent elections. The United States could learn a good deal about real democracy from Venezuela.
    RIGGED ELECTIONS: VENEZUELA'S FAILED PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

    The Venezuelan Presidential election was held on May 20, 2018. According to the results announced by the electoral authority (the National Electoral Council), approximately six million voters decided to reelect Maduro, with a turnout of 46%, the lowest in the Venezuelan democratic history.


    This is an example of a contentious election. The majority of the Venezuelan political opposition decided not to participate, considering the illegitimacy of the presidential election. While several players in the international community, such as the Latin American countries gathered in the Lima Group, the United States, the European Union and the Human Rights Inter-American Commission, denounced the presidential election as rigged and fraudulent.

    On election day the main candidate from the opposition party declared that he would not recognize the electoral result. A similar statement has been made by 46 countries, as shown in the map below.


    Note: Until May 25, 73 countries had made statements about the presidential election: 25 recognize the Elections; 46 don't recognize the election, and 2 have not a clear position

    The illegitimacy of the elections is reflected by low turnout. In 2013, Maduro was elected President with 80% participation – almost double the 2018 turnout, according to the result provided by the electoral authority.

    The violation of electoral integrity standards

    The 2018 presidential election is contentious due to the violation of basic standards of electoral integrity. Based on the Electoral Integrity Project’s The Year in Elections 2017, Mid-Year Update Report, Venezuela scores low on the Perceptions of Electoral Integrity Index at 45 (the index ranges from 0-100).

    During Hugo Chávez´s presidency (1999-2012) Venezuela conducted several elections creating the illusion of a strong democracy. But this was not the case. Chávez created a political regime based on a concentration of power that allowed him to co-opt the Supreme Tribunal and the National Electoral Council. An example of this was the 2004 recall referendum procedure that was manipulated by Chávez to assure his victory.

    Maduro was elected in 2013, in a contentious election. After that, electoral malpractices increased, particularly after the Supreme Tribunal decided to dismantle the Venezuelan Congress.

    Problems were aggravated when in January 2018 the illegitimate national Constituency Assembly decided to convene an early presidential election. The single-party assembly was installed in a clear violation of the Venezuelan Constitution. In any case, according to the Venezuelan Constitution, elections must be called with at least six months’ notice.

    The national constituency assembly decided to ban the participation of several opposition political parties, including “Mesa de la Unidad Democrática”, which is the coalition party that won the 2015 congressional election. In addition, several political leaders were banned, while others were prosecuted or are in exile. The right to participate in public affairs and to be elected was violated.

    The National Electoral Council’s Directors were appointed by the Supreme Tribunal, and not by the Venezuelan Congress, as established in the Constitution. This facilitated its politicization, as was demonstrated during the 2016 recall referendum against Maduro, which was blocked by the Council.

    The right to equal opportunities to vote and universal suffrage was violated due to several inconsistencies in the electoral register. This included issues for Venezuelans living abroad: only an estimated hundred thousand Venezuelans were able to comply with the electoral register, a basic requirement to vote.

    Freedom of opinion and expression has been violated, particularly, since the Constituent Assembly approved an “anti-hate law”, that established ill-defined crimes punished with prison up to twenty years. Criticizing the Government can be considered a hate crime and therefore a criminal offense.

    Corruption was also a problem in the election. Several critics stated that the Government used social programs to coerce voters, in violation of the Anti-Corruption Law. For instance, Henri Falcon (Maduro’s main opponent in the election) denounced that Maduro used the “fatherland card” –required to access medicine and food provided by the Government- to coerce voters.

    Standards of rule of law have also been violated. Since the installation of the Constituent Assembly, the Venezuelan Constitution was abolished. In addition, the Supreme Tribunal acts with a clear bias toward the Maduro regime. For instance, in December 2015 the Supreme Tribunal “suspended” three deputies of the opposition. More than two years later, the Supreme Tribunal has not issued a final decision.

    As a result, abstention could not be deemed as the cause of Maduro’s “victory”. On the contrary, abstention is the consequence of fraudulent actions that allowed Maduro’s reelection.

    What to expect now?

    Venezuela is facing its worst economic and social crisis with a complex humanitarian emergency combined with hyperinflation. Maduro´s regime has taken actions that exacerbate rather than lessen the economic crisis, for example, the recent expropriation of Kellogg’s facilities.

    The May election will not help to solve this crisis. On the contrary, as they are contentious elections, they could increase the Venezuelan predicament. As was concluded by the Electoral Integrity Project Director, Pippa Norris, “failure to observe international standards of electoral integrity will strengthen the risks of fatal electoral violence”. This risk, with consideration to the Venezuelan State fragility, could have catastrophic consequences.

    Source

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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by Hervé (here)
    If there were any proofs needed, the bankrolling of the self proclaimed interim president by the US bankers mafia should suffice... as in "Why wouldn't they bankroll Maduro if the latter weren't a thorn in their butts?"...
    [...]
    The same template/strategy has been used before:

    Western govts failed to learn the lesson of Iraq, which is why their Venezuela gambit will be another disaster

    Patrick Cockburn Independent
    Sat, 26 Jan 2019 17:01 UTC

    [...]

    ... the US, UK and allied governments have learned nothing from their disastrous actions in the Middle East and North Africa over the past 20 years which opened the door to Isis. During this period, they repeatedly denounced dictatorial but powerful national leaders - Saddam Hussein, Muammar Al Gaddafi, Bashar al-Assad - as illegitimate and instead supported shadowy opposition figures with whom they were friendly as the true leaders of their countries.

    The result was invariably disastrous: in July 2011, to take but one example, the British government announced that it was recognising the rebel council in Libya as the sole governmental authority there. But the rebels turned out to have little real power other than that provided by Nato, making it inevitable that a post-Gaddafi Libya would collapse into criminalised anarchy.

    Fast forward to Venezuela this week when the US, along with the UK, Canada and a bevy of South American states, declared that the opposition leader Juan Guaido is the country's legitimate ruler, replacing President Maduro.

    The UK foreign secretary, Jeremy Hunt, said the hitherto little known Guaido was the right person to take the country forward, though there is no obvious reason to think so. On the contrary, we are seeing the same sort of crude imperial overreach producing failed states and chaos that brought calamity to Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and Yemen. The terrible lesson of the rise and fall of Isis has taught leaders in Washington and London very little.


    Full article: https://www.independent.co.uk/voices...-a8747091.html
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    United States Moderator Dennis Leahy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Reality check time.

    (I wish the narrator voice in the following video - Mike Prysner - was not called the trigger word, "Leftist" in the video title. This isn't a "leftist" speaking; it is the truth being spoken.)

    Note that the CIA/Google initially covers the youtube video with a WARNING! Watch out, my friends, you may be very upset if someone tell the truth! hahahahahahaha



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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    For an in-depth digging into the background of the self-proclaimed "interim president of Venezuela", read the following:
    The Making of Juan Guaidó: How The US Regime Change Laboratory Created Venezuela's Coup Leader

    Dan Cohen & Max Blumenthal
    Gray Zone
    Tue, 29 Jan 2019 16:41 UTC
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Gee Herve, are you being paid to endlessly copy and paste propaganda (or occasionally just a link)?

    Why are you so desperate to prove a point?

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  16. Link to Post #134
    United States Moderator Dennis Leahy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by 5th (here)
    Gee Herve, are you being paid to endlessly copy and paste propaganda (or occasionally just a link)?

    Why are you so desperate to prove a point?
    5th, (and perolator), would it be accurate to say that you are a member of the middle or upper class in Venezuela? (Yes, I remember you both said you are expats, but the question stands.) It seems like the only people echoing your stance are the 'old ruling class' or the 'wannabee ruling class' of Venezuela, and the imperialist/globalist/Deep State operatives... and those that have not taken any time to research.

    Mike Prysner's 'debunking' of (leftwing! ha! progressive! hahaha!) john oliver's political "comedy" routine propaganda piece absolutely shreds the bullsh!t narrative that the two of you are echoing. If you are sincere, and not just classist/racist reactionaries or Deep State mouthpieces, watch that video (from about 3/4 of a year ago.) Then, if Mike Prysner is wrong in his research, prove it. At this point, your agenda is HIGHLY suspect, as you echo the Globalist Deep State agenda.


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    Avalon Member guayabal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by Dennis Leahy (here)
    Mike Prysner's 'debunking' of (leftwing! ha! progressive! hahaha!) john oliver's political "comedy" routine propaganda piece absolutely shreds the bullsh!t narrative that the two of you are echoing. If you are sincere, and not just classist/racist reactionaries or Deep State mouthpieces, watch that video (from about 3/4 of a year ago.) Then, if Mike Prysner is wrong in his research, prove it. At this point, your agenda is HIGHLY suspect, as you echo the Globalist Deep State agenda.
    As a Colombian citizen I don't need to research a thing, day to day we see the poorest from Venezuela begging on the street. Are those the poor that Prysner claims are supporting the government? I think you are blind and can't accept real facts because they prove a failure in your ideology.

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  19. Link to Post #136
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by 5th (here)
    Gee Herve, are you being paid to endlessly copy and paste propaganda (or occasionally just a link)?

    Why are you so desperate to prove a point?
    None of the moderators, each of us with our own very differing, passionately well informed and researched views on an equally varied and interesting plethora of subject matter, are paid.

    Your point?
    “If a man does not keep pace with [fall into line with] his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.” - Thoreau

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    Canada Avalon Member DeDukshyn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by Tintin (here)
    Quote Posted by 5th (here)
    Gee Herve, are you being paid to endlessly copy and paste propaganda (or occasionally just a link)?

    Why are you so desperate to prove a point?
    None of the moderators, each of us with our own very differing, passionately well informed and researched views on an equally varied and interesting plethora of subject matter, are paid.

    Your point?
    It was clearly an accusation that Herve is a shill for someone else's agenda.


    I haven't followed this thread closely, but waht I see in the last few pages are some people, doing research gathering broad points of information, evaluating and discussing those points, etc. And others saying things like "what'd you just copy and paste that?', "I don't need to do research because ... <insert whatever here>", "you must be a shill", etc (all paraphrased to protect users identities) ...

    My point is that many of these posts aren't helping the conversation along in any meaningful objective manner ... This thread seems a tough read due to this fact, but again just my opinion from trying to quickly get up to speed on the last few pages - take what value from that there is to find.

    Edit: There's nothing wrong with opposing views but like any good debate, constructive and well thought arguments with rationale support are required .
    When you are one step ahead of the crowd, you are a genius.
    Two steps ahead, and you are deemed a crackpot.

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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by DeDukshyn (here)
    Quote Posted by Tintin (here)
    Quote Posted by 5th (here)
    Gee Herve, are you being paid to endlessly copy and paste propaganda (or occasionally just a link)?

    Why are you so desperate to prove a point?
    None of the moderators, each of us with our own very differing, passionately well informed and researched views on an equally varied and interesting plethora of subject matter, are paid.

    Your point?
    It was clearly an accusation that Herve is a shill for someone else's agenda.


    I haven't followed this thread closely, but waht I see in the last few pages are some people, doing research gathering broad points of information, evaluating and discussing those points, etc. And others saying things like "what'd you just copy and paste that?', "I don't need to do research because ... <insert whatever here>", "you must be a shill", etc (all paraphrased to protect users identities) ...

    My point is that many of these posts aren't helping the conversation along in any meaningful objective manner ... This thread seems a tough read due to this fact, but again just my opinion from trying to quickly get up to speed on the last few pages - take what value from that there is to find.

    Edit: There's nothing wrong with opposing views but like any good debate, constructive and well thought arguments with rationale support are required .
    The toxicity of social media, and adoption of keyboard assassination techniques, as a weapon, has imbued a sense in some folk that it is acceptable to snark from behind a portcullis of assumed superiority.

    Yes, constructive and well thought out arguments with an intelligent, rationally positioned loci are our business here. Low snarky blows from behind the portcullis are somewhat frowned upon.

    of the OP please, everyone. (Hint: it isn't titled "Turmoil in Avalon")
    “If a man does not keep pace with [fall into line with] his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.” - Thoreau

  22. Link to Post #139
    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Here is another relevant article copied in full so that its pertinent data are archived here in case some silicon valley outfit decides to suppress it:


    "Crimes against humanity": Former UN rapporteur says US sanctions on Venezuela like a "medieval siege"

    Michael Selby-Green The Independent
    Sun, 27 Jan 2019 08:22 UTC


    'Modern-day economic sanctions and blockades are comparable with medieval sieges of towns'
    The first UN rapporteur to visit Venezuela for 21 years has told The Independent the US sanctions on the country are illegal and could amount to "crimes against humanity" under international law.

    Former special rapporteur Alfred de Zayas, who finished his term at the UN in March, has criticized the US for engaging in "economic warfare" against Venezuela which he said is hurting the economy and killing Venezuelans.

    The comments come amid worsening tensions in the country after the US and UK have backed Juan Guaido, who appointed himself "interim president" of Venezuela as hundreds of thousands marched to support him. European leaders are calling for "free and fair" elections. Russia and Turkey remain Nicolas Maduro's key supporters.

    Mr De Zayas, a former secretary of the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) and an expert in international law, spoke to The Independent following the presentation of his Venezuela report to the HRC in September. He said that since its presentation the report has been ignored by the UN and has not sparked the public debate he believes it deserves.

    "Sanctions kill," he told The Independent, adding that they fall most heavily on the poorest people in society, demonstrably cause death through food and medicine shortages, lead to violations of human rights and are aimed at coercing economic change in a "sister democracy".

    On his fact-finding mission to the country in late 2017, he found internal overdependence on oil, poor governance and corruption had hit the Venezuelan economy hard, but said "economic warfare" practised by the US, EU and Canada are significant factors in the economic crisis.

    In the report, Mr de Zayas recommended, among other actions, that the International Criminal Court investigate economic sanctions against Venezuela as possible crimes against humanity under Article 7 of the Rome Statute.

    The US sanctions are illegal under international law because they were not endorsed by the UN Security Council, Mr de Zayas, an expert on international law and a former senior lawyer with the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, said.
    "Modern-day economic sanctions and blockades are comparable with medieval sieges of towns.

    "Twenty-first century sanctions attempt to bring not just a town, but sovereign countries to their knees," Mr de Zayas said in his report.
    The US Treasury has not responded to a request for comment on Mr de Zayas's allegations of the effects of the sanctions programme.

    US sanctions prohibit dealing in currencies issued by the Venezuelan government. They also target individuals, and stop US-based companies or people from buying and selling new debt issued by PDVSA or the government.

    The US has previously defended its sanctions on Venezuela, with a senior US official saying in 2018: "The fact is that the greatest sanction on Venezuelan oil and oil production is called Nicolas Maduro, and PDVSA's inefficiencies," referring to the state-run oil body, Petroleos de Venezuela, SA.

    Mr De Zayas's findings are based on his late-2017 mission to the country and interviews with 12 Venezuelan government minsters, opposition politicians, 35 NGOs working in the country, academics, church officials, activists, chambers of commerce and regional UN agencies.

    The US imposed new sanctions against Venezuela on 9 March 2015, when President Barack Obama issued executive order 13692, declaring the country a threat to national security.

    The sanctions have since intensified under Donald Trump, who has also threatened military invasion and discussed a coup.

    After backing Mr Guaido on 23 January, Mr Trump said, "I will continue to use the full weight of United States economic and diplomatic power to press for the restoration of Venezuelan democracy."

    Venezuela has also described US sanctions as illegal. In 2018, foreign minister Jorge Arreaza said they were "madness, barbaric, and in absolute contradiction to international law".

    Since 2015 around 1.9 million people have fled the country and on 23 October 2018 inflation reached 60,324 per cent, while the civilian death toll is unknown.

    Despite being the first UN official to visit and report from Venezuela in 21 years, Mr de Zayas said his research into the causes of the country's economic crisis has so far largely been ignored by the UN and the media, and caused little debate within the Human Rights Council.

    He believes his report has been ignored because it goes against the popular narrative that Venezuela needs regime change.
    "When I come and I say the emigration is partly attributable to the economic war waged against Venezuela and is partly attributable to the sanctions, people don't like to hear that. They just want the simple narrative that socialism failed and it failed the Venezuelan people," Mr de Zayas told The Independent.

    "When I came back [the UN and media were] not interested. Because I am not singing the song I'm supposed to sing so I don't exist ... And my report, as I said, was formally presented but there has been no debate on the report. It has been filed away."
    The then UN high commissioner, Zeid Raad Al Hussein, reportedly refused to meet Mr de Zayas after the visit, and the Venezuela desk of the UN Human Rights Council also declined to help with his work after his return despite being obliged to do so, Mr de Zayas claimed.

    He told The Independent the office gave him the "cold shoulder" because they were worried his report, which is now published, would be too independent.
    "They are only interested in a rapporteur who is going to ... do grandstanding, is going to condemn the government and ask for regime change. And I went there to listen. I went there to find out what's actually going on," Mr de Zayas said.
    A spokesperson for the office of the UN high commissioner said:
    "The 56 Special Procedures - of which Alfred de Zayas was one - are independent, as well as very numerous, and so it is not a practice for the high commissioner to meet with them individually to discuss their reports. It would be physically impossible for him ... to do so."
    The spokesperson said the actions of the Venezuela desk are more "complicated" than Mr de Zayas described, adding, "calling for regime change is not our business".

    Ivan Briscoe, Latin America and Caribbean programme director for Crisis Group, an international NGO, told The Independent that Venezuela is a polarising subject, dividing those who support the socialist government and those who want to see a more US-aligned business friendly regime replace it.

    Briscoe is critical of Mr de Zayas's report because it highlights US economic warfare but in his view neglects to mention the impact of a difficult business environment in the country which he believes is a symptom of "Chavismo" and the socialist governments' failures.

    He said even if the sanctions are lifted, the country could not recover under current government policies, adding that Mr de Zayas's report is the result of a "lawyer trying to understand the nature of supply and demand, and it didn't quite work".

    But, speaking before the news of Guaido's coup attempt, Briscoe acknowledged rising tensions and the likely presence of US personnel operating covertly in the country.

    "Yes, something is going on. Yes there is talk of a military intervention. Which would be a very bad idea. But the fact of the matter is that the plan has been conceived in the context of the humanitarian crisis," he said.

    Eugenia Russian, president of FUNDALATIN, one of the oldest human rights NGOs in Venezuela, founded in 1978 before the Chavez and Maduro governments and with special consultative status at the UN, spoke to The Independent on the significance of the sanctions.
    "In contact with the popular communities, we consider that one of the fundamental causes of the economic crisis in the country is the effect that the unilateral coercive sanctions that are applied in the economy, especially by the government of the United States," Ms Russian said.
    She said there may also be causes from internal errors, but said probably few countries in the world have suffered an "economic siege" like the one Venezuelans are living under.

    The sanctions are part of a US effort to overthrow the Venezuelan government and install a more business friendly regime, as was done in Chile in 1973 and elsewhere in the region, Mr de Zayas said.
    "I've seen that happen in the Human Rights Council, how the United States twists arms and convinces countries to vote the way they want them to vote, or there will be economic consequences, and these things are not reflected in the press," the former high-ranking UN official told The Independent.
    "What's at stake is the enormous, enormous natural resources of Venezuela. And I sense that if Venezuela had no natural resources no one would give a damn about Chavez or Maduro or anybody else there," Mr de Zayas added.
    Venezuela has the largest oil reserves in the world and an abundance of other natural resources including gold, bauxite and coltan. But under the Maduro government they're not easily accessible to US and transnational corporations.

    US oil companies had large investments in Venezuela in the early 20th century but were locked out after Venezuelans voted to nationalise the industry in 1973.
    "If you crush this government and you bring in a neoliberal government that is going to privatise everything and is going to sell out, a lot of transitional corporations stand to gain enormous profits and the United States is driven by the transnational corporations," the former UN special rapporteur told The Independent.

    "The business of the United States is business. And that's what the United States is interested in. And they can't [currently] do business with Venezuela."
    In his report, Mr de Zayas expressed concern that those calling the situation a "humanitarian crisis" are trying to justify regime change and that human rights are being "weaponised" to discredit the government and make violent overthrow more "palatable".

    The Maduro government is responsible for "the worst human rights crisis in the country's history," according to Amnesty.

    "Venezuela is going through one of the worst human rights crises in its history. The list of crimes under international law against the population is growing," Erika Guevara-Rosas, Amnesty's Americas director, said in late 2018.

    "It is alarming that, instead of applying efficient public policies to protect people and reduce levels of insecurity, the Venezuelan authorities are using the language of war to try to legitimise the use of excessive force by police and military officials and, in many cases, the use of lethal force with intent to kill."

    Mr De Zayas recommended dialogue between the international community and Venezuelans to make their government better, rather than squeezing the country with sanctions and backing coups. He proposed that Venezuela's abundant natural wealth can help it recover once sanctions are lifted.
    "The key to the solution of the crisis is dialogue and mediation... There is nothing more undemocratic than a coup d'état and nothing more corrosive to the rule of law and to international stability when foreign governments meddle in the internal affairs of other states," he told The Independent.

    "Only the Venezuelans have a right to decide, not the United States, not the United Kingdom ... We do not want a repetition of the Pinochet putsch in 1973 ... What is urgent is to help the Venezuelan people through international solidarity - genuine humanitarian aid and a lifting of the financial blockade so that Venezuela can buy and sell like any other country in the world - the problems can be solved with good faith and common sense."
    Mr De Zayas has since signed an open letter with Noam Chomsky and over 70 other academics and experts, condemning the US-backed coup attempt against the Venezuelan government.

    He called the recent developments "totally surreal".

    Ms Russian, speaking about the economic crisis, said:
    "It is insufficient to see only the errors or deficiencies that the government may have, without seeing the environment of international pressure under which this population lives."

    Related:
    ================================================== ===========

    Quote Venezuela has the largest oil reserves in the world and an abundance of other natural resources including gold, bauxite and coltan. But under the Maduro government they're not easily accessible to US and transnational corporations.
    So, yes, that's not very "business friendly" to the US and UK big oil and mining corporations, like Exxon, Shell, etc...
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

  23. Link to Post #140
    United States Moderator (on Sabbatical) Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Turmoil in Venezuela

    Quote Posted by 5th (here)
    Gee Herve, are you being paid to endlessly copy and paste propaganda (or occasionally just a link)?

    Why are you so desperate to prove a point?

    Herve, I've just been laid off. please tell your handlers I'm available for work too, ok?

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