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Thread: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

  1. Link to Post #121
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    From https://cuencahighlife.com/moreno-cl...rreas-blessing

    Moreno claims that Assange ran ‘espionage agency’ from embassy with Correa’s blessing
    18 April, 2019

    President Lenin Moreno claims that Julian Assange was operating an “international espionage and computer terrorism center” in Ecuador’s British embassy. In a Wednesday interview with the BBC, Moreno also insists that former president Rafael Correa had full knowledge of Assange’s covert activities and allowed them to continue.


    President Lenin Moreno

    President Lenin Moreno “During most of the previous administration, Julian Assange was able to conduct the work of WikiLeaks from the embassy with no interference and with full knowledge of officials,” Moreno said. “This was in clear violation of his agreement to observe behavior compatible with the will of the Ecuadorian government.”

    In another interview Wednesday, Moreno claimed that the press was emphasizing Assange’s disruptive behavior and poor hygiene as the reason for his expulsion from the embassy last week. “We made clear that this was only one of the reasons for our decision to end his asylum,” Moreno said. “The more important reasons were his interference in the affairs of other countries. From the beginning, he was warned against this and he ignored the warnings.”

    According to Moreno, Correa personally advised Assange to end his “illegal” work. “This happened in the case of his [Assange’s] support of the Catalonian rebellion as well as with interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.”

    Moreno disputed WikiLeaks’ claim that Assange was not in control of the group’s activity during his asylum. “This is not true and we have clear evidence that he continued to operate the organization and the previous government was complicit in allowing this to happen.”

    The president added that Ecuadorian government agencies have suffered 50 to 60 million internet hacking attempts since Assange left the embassy. “Obviously, WikiLeaks and its criminal supporters are hard at work to punish Ecuador for its decision. Fortunately, most of their attempts have not been successful.

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  3. Link to Post #122
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Moreno bears the appearance of a man who is trapped in his choices. Just my impression of the photograph of him (prior post).
    Interdimensional Civil Servant

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    THE DESTRUCTION OF JULIAN ASSANGE. Richard Dolan: The Big Picture.
    Richard Dolan
    Streamed live on Apr 13, 2019

    "Julian Assange is one of the most important journalists in history. The information that has been revealed via Wikileaks has become part of humanity's shared heritage of freedom of information. His organization's track record of accuracy has been impeccable, far more accurate than the dishonest legacy/corporate/mainstream/establishment media has ever been. For this reason, Assange has been in the crosshairs of the American national security state for a long time. Now it appears they have him. This is one more battle in the long war to roll back the freedom of information people have won since the creation of the Internet. "

    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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  7. Link to Post #124
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    You guys should check out what the Mueller report says about Assange and Wikileaks.

    Page 58, which is almost entirely redacted, says the following:

    Quote On October 7, 2016, four days after the Assange press conferece [REDACTED], the Washington Post published an Access Hollywood video that captured comments by candidate Trump some years earlier and that was expected to adversely affect the Campaign. Less than an hour after the video's publication, WikiLeaks released the first set of emails stolen by the GRU from the account of Clinton Campaign chairman John Podesta.
    Almost the entire rest of the page is redacted with "Harm to Ongoing Matter" cited as the reason for redaction. That means legal action is still being pursued in regards to Wikileaks' role in the 2016 election. And Mueller's report is alleging that Russia was the source of Podesta's emails.

    That means that, regardless of Trump, Mueller's investigation is targeting Wikileaks-related interference in the 2016 election as if it is equivalent to Russian interference, and accusing Wikileaks of releasing emails "stolen" by the Russian GRU.

    If and when Assange is extradited to the US, he may very well have additional charges filed against him from Mueller's investigation, and be forced to testify in a court of law in regards to this issue. The redactions and their explanation ("harm to ongoing matter") support this idea.


    Edit: I confused the DNC emails with Podesta's emails. Assange basically already told us that the DNC emails came from Seth Rich, but I'm not sure if a specific source for Podesta's emails was ever given.
    Last edited by A Voice from the Mountains; 19th April 2019 at 07:56.

  8. Link to Post #125
    Scotland Moderator Billy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Roger Waters from Pink Floyd says the world must focus on Julian Assange arrest.

    From a Going underground broadcast.

    When you express from a fearful heart in the now moment, You create a fearful future.
    When you express from a loving heart in the now moment, You create a loving future.

    Have no fear, Be aware and live your lives journey from a compassionate caring nurturing heart to manifest a compassionate caring nurturing future. Billyji


    Peace

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Quote Posted by Philippe (here)
    Whereas the analysis of the Hillary Clinton doubles was very impressive, I think it is better to conclude that it is Assange that was taken out of the Ecuadorian embassy. And like investigative journalist Jim Stone admit to "eating crow" ( I regulary learn new english expressions :-) ) for heralding since years that Assange is dead.
    Jim Stone is at it again saying Assange may have been abducted, drugged and brainwashed October 16/17 2016. And put back in the embassy. Where it is known that such evil techniques exist and can work depending on the mind of the victim , this theory seems farfetched again. If is apparently not true because Assange kept on reporting and voicing support for the Catalan independence fight. He should have abstained from interfering with that later cause knowing that diplomatic problems would erupt between Ecuador and Madrid if he did that from their embassy. A pity that Jim Stone goes directly to sensationalist conclusions lessening his credibility where he has such an impressive ability for technical analysis of events.

    To be complete here is a website that denies Assange called for the independence of Catalonia.
    https://defend.wikileaks.org/2019/03...and-wikileaks/

    FALSE STATEMENTS AND DEFAMATIONS CONCERNING JULIAN ASSANGE AND WIKILEAKS
    Last edited by Philippe; 22nd April 2019 at 06:17.

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal


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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Julian Assange put through 'hell' at embassy, says former diplomat
    Fidel Narvaez says Assange was "100% respectful" but claims he suffered from a government plot to force him out.

    By Lisa Holland, senior correspondent
    https://news.sky.com/story/julian-as...lomat-11698113

    Julian Assange was always respectful but went through "hell" in the Ecuadorian embassy as officials tried to "break him down", according to a former senior diplomat.

    Fidel Narvaez worked at the London embassy for six of the seven years the WikiLeaks figurehead lived there and says they became friends.

    Assange was evicted a few weeks ago after a change of government in Ecuador.

    Its new president, Lenin Moreno, publicly criticised the whistleblower and gave the impression the government ended his stay after growing tired of his alleged bad behaviour.

    Speaking to Sky News, Fidel Narvaez disputed claims that Assange had assaulted guards, didn't clean up after himself, didn't take care of his pet cat and even smeared human excrement on the walls of the embassy.

    He said: "Julian had a respectful relationship with staff, diplomats and administrative staff. I don't recall a single incident when he disrespected someone until I left in July 2018.

    "He was 100% respectful. Clean and tidy? What is clean and tidy? Did he put the dishes in the dishwasher? Probably not at weekends. Is that a crime?"

    Mr Narvaez worked at the embassy in Knightsbridge in central London between 2010 and 2018 as consul and first secretary.

    Assange went into the embassy in June 2012 and did not leave until he was carted away by British police a few weeks ago with the agreement of the authorities in Ecuador.

    Mr Narvaez said: "The last year was hell for Julian in that embassy.

    "I was there the first months of the last year and I witnessed when Julian was told that he would no longer be allowed to have internet or access to the phone and wouldn't be able to have visitors.

    "The strategy was very clear - break him down. The government didn't know how to end the asylum and face the catastrophic historical shame for doing that."

    Mr Narvaez shared some of the photographs he had taken inside the embassy when he worked there, including the small kitchen area that Assange shared.

    The embassy is comprised of a small set of rooms and Assange had his own bedroom and also access to a shared office and working space.

    Mr Narvaez said Assange did not go to Sweden to face a rape inquiry because he feared being arrested and extradited to the United States by Britain or Sweden for exposing US government secrets via his WikiLeaks organisation.

    He has denied the allegations made in Sweden.

    Mr Narvaez said: "I consider him my friend. He's provided a big service to all of us.

    "It doesn't matter if we like him or not. It doesn't matter if he puts the dishes in the dishwasher or looks after the cat well. I stand by Julian. I believe him."

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  16. Link to Post #129
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Yes, Julian Assange Is a Journalist — But That Shouldn't Matter
    https://mises.org/wire/yes-julian-as...houldnt-matter

    04/18/2019. by Ryan McMaken



    Julian Assange was arrested last week in London, and he awaits legal proceedings designs to extradite him to the United States to be tried on hacking charges. At least, those are the charges currently known. Experience suggests that US authorities are likely to add additional charges once they have Assange in the US.

    The US government has sought to prosecute Assange since at least 2010 when Wikileaks released video footage of US forces murdering civilians — including two Reuters reporters — during 2007 air strikes.

    Many additional leaks followed, which served to make Wikileaks and Assange the enemies of a diverse number of politicians, bureaucrats, and government intelligence agencies. Thus, his arrest has long appeared nearly inevitable.

    "Journalists" Against Assange

    Given Assange's role in exposing government lies, corruption, and abuse, one would think that most journalists — most of whom fancy themselves as warriors against government abuse — would call for his release.

    That's not what happened. Instead, many self-described journalists have claimed that Assange isn't a journalist at all.

    In the wake of his arrest, The Washington Post and USNews both dispatched columnists to define Assange as not-a-journalist. Not surprisingly, the right-wing media — e.g., National Review and Commentary — which reliably sides with the military establishment, has also denied Assange is a journalist.

    But why exactly is he not a journalist?

    According to Kathleen Parker, writing for The Washington Post: "He is not, after all, a journalist, despite his claiming to be, because he isn’t accountable to anyone. No filters, no standards."

    Parker goes on to claim that real journalists must subject their work huge corporate media outlets like The New York Times or The Washington Post, thus allowing editors at those organizations to then decide what information ought to be considered worthy of public disclosure.

    Writing for US News, Susan Milligan claims Assange is not a journalist because his motivations are not sufficiently pure. She claims Assange released certain information for the purposes of retribution or personal amusement.The fact that this information was also potentially significant in identifying government abuse and corruption is apparently irrelevant to Milligan. In her mind, "legitimate journalism" is defined by your feelings about the information being released.

    Not all journalists fallen victim to the fetish for making journalism a special protected class of approved experts.

    Demanding that Assange be afforded the usual protections afforded to journalism demanded by the establishment media, Glenn Greenwald has supported Assange, as has James Ball at The Atlantic.The editorial boards of some small American newspapers — being outside the DC-NewYork axis — have taken a more principled stand on exposing government crimes, declaring Assange to be a journalist, indeed. The Pittsburg Post-Gazette's editors write:

    Quote Mr. Assange’s critics dispute the notion that charging him is an attack on the First Amendment. They say Mr. Assange isn’t a journalist, just the curator of a website that puts secrets on display. One might argue about the craft of journalism. One might argue about the quality of journalism. But in terms of the exercise of First Amendment freedoms, revealing what is hidden is journalism. That makes Mr. Assange, apart from his personality or his politics, a journalist.
    An Arbitrary Standard

    Most of the "standards" the media establishment are using to redefine Assange as a non-journalist are purely arbitrary. Whether or not one gets the approval of someone at The Washington Post or some other "official" media outlet has exactly nothing to do with whether or not one is a journalist.

    [RELATED: "'Objective Journalism' Has Always Been a Myth" by Ryan McMaken]

    After all, the standards used by journalists today to define their exclusive group were invented less that a century ago. They were pushed by those who wanted to popularize the idea of "expert" journalists who could dictate to the general public as to what information was relevant to the public interest.

    In her column against Assange, Milligan defines journalism as "collecting information, checking the facts, getting the perspectives of the people affected by the information, and then putting all of it together in a way that puts the details in perspective." But she's just repeating quaint bromides they teach undergraduates in journalism school.

    Prior to the triumph of the Progressive myth of journalist "experts," the definition of journalism was far more broad, and far more flexible. Although today's J-school priesthood insists not just anyone can call himself a journalist, that certainly wasn't the case in the days when anti-slavery activists routinely set up their own newspapers to report on the realities of slavery in America.

    Yes, people like William Lloyd Garrison and Elijah P. Lovejoy were ideological anti-slavery activists. But they were also journalists. Virtually no one disputes this today, although pro-slavery activists at the time certainly denounced these newspapermen as mere agitators and Jacobins.

    Unfortunately for the slave drivers of the antebellum South, Kathleen Parker of The Washington Post wasn't around to demand that the first-hand testimonies of escaped slaves — a common feature in the abolitionist newspapers — be submitted first to the wise editors of The New York Times. Only then, it seems, could we know if anti-slavery information was in the "public interest." Given that the mainstream press of the period opposed abolitionism for the most part, we could expect that the slave narratives would have been deemed "irresponsible" and not up to the standards of "journalism."

    Thank goodness out modern-day gatekeepers weren't around then.

    Yes, Assange is Comparable to Daniel Ellsberg

    Although many establishment journalists are going to great pains to pave the way for Assange's prosecution, they face a problem: there is nearly universal agreement among journalists that Daniel Ellseberg is a hero.

    Ellsberg, of course, is the former RAND Corp. employee who stole government secrets from his employers and sought (successfully) to have them published in major news outlets. Today, these documents are known as The Pentagon Papers, and their release was a watershed moment in journalism and in the Vietnam War. The documents showed, among other things, that President Lyndon Johnson lied to both the puiblic and to Congress about US involvement in Vietnam. It was an embarrassment for the US government overall, and the military establishment. It helped hasten the end of the Vietnam War and helped to cast a pall of illegitimacy over the entire endeavor. At the time, the information was classified.

    Ellsberg was eventually prosecuted for theft and espionage. The case was dismissed.

    Ellsberg's reputation, however, means it becomes necessary for journalists to claim that Ellsberg and Assange are fundamentally different in some way.

    For his part, Ellsberg himself sees no difference. In an April 11 interview, Ellsberg denounces the arrest of Assange, and clearly considers Assange's actions to be comparable to his own.

    The primary difference it seems, is that the methods of disseminating information as much different in today's world than was the case in 1971 when Ellsberg released the Pentagon Papers. The distinction between Ellsberg and Assange appears to be merely one of technology.

    The American State's Attack on Real Journalism

    But why is so much ink being spilled on whether or not Assange a journalist? Yes, some of it is just the usual narcissism we've come to expect from reporters. Journalists regard themselves as an exclusive club, and they like to excommunicate those whom they suspect of moving in on their territory.

    But the stakes are higher than that.

    If Assange is a journalist, then his arrest and prosecution is an attack on what investigative journalists do everyday.

    While there have been some attempts in the media to define Assange's investigative methods as substantially different form journalism in general, no real distinctions are clear. Much of the rhetoric surrounding claims of Assange's criminality stem from the assertion that he asked Chelsea Manning to give him more government information.

    Yet, this behavior is common to journalists everywhere.

    Ellsberg, for instance, states "if that's a crime, then journalism is a crime," noting he had been asked on numerous occasions by numerous journalists to provide them with more information. He adds "unauthorized disclosures of this kind are the life's blood of a republic."

    Do Journalists Have Special Rights?

    At the heart of the matter, we find an additional problem: the idea that journalists enjoy special rights that ordinary people don't. Consequently, if Assange is a journalist, then he gets special legal privileges in whistleblowing and releasing sensitive government documents. If he's not a journalist, he's then presumably open to prosecution.

    The authors of the First Amendment, though, did not envision any such distinction. In the late eighteenth century — as in the days of the antebellum abolitionist press — newspapermen were simply people who set up a printing press and sold newspapers. If you could convince someone to buy your papers, you were a journalist.

    Governments hated this, of course. The ease with which journalists could print nearly any opinion or revelation was why John Adams wanted the Alien and Sedition Acts — to shut journalists up.

    But the freedom of speech was so ingrained in the American mind by that point that there was little the federal government could do about them. After all, the First Amendment says simply that Congress shall make no law "abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press..." It doesn't say anything about these freedoms being restricted only to people who are deemed journalists by The Washington Post. Had the authors of the Bill of Rights wanted this to be the case, they could have said so.

    Today, things are quite different. Lawmakers, courts, and their accomplices have managed to define down who is a journalist in order to protect the government from embarrassment.

    Establishment journalists have been happy to play along, claiming special privileges for themselves while demanding those outside their circle of friends be sent to federal prison.

    Ryan McMaken (@ryanmcmaken) is a senior editor at the Mises Institute. Send him your article submissions for Mises Wire and The Austrian, but read article guidelines first. Ryan has degrees in economics and political science from the University of Colorado, and was the economist for the Colorado Division of Housing from 2009 to 2014. He is the author of Commie Cowboys: The Bourgeoisie and the Nation-State in the Western Genre.

    Notable comments:

    Quote ...The apathy of the average American is almost as disgusting as the U.S. government’s extradition efforts. Last week when this story broke, I was reviewing reader’s comments on a WSJ message board. I would say 9 out of 10 comments were extremely negative towards Julian Assange. Your comment stating that the freedom of speech was so ingrained in the American mind by that point that there was little the federal government could do about them really highlights how far the American citizen has regressed. American citizen’s abandoning the 1st Amendment used to be unfathomable. I believe Statolatry brought this about and the worst is yet to come. When I was younger, I used to think the Fascism that was practiced in Nazi Germany would never come to America. I sure don't think that way anymore.
    Quote Yes, hubris can be lethal in a world that has abandoned Natural Law and embraced man-made arbitrary law. The extradition action is clearly an attempt to punish Julian Assange for publishing information that the government did not want published. The government is attempting to use a single failed attempt at cracking a password as their Trojan Horse. Chelsea Manning gave Julian Assange a scrambled portion of a password that would allow her to log into a computer in a way that would hide her identity from the government. Julian’s only alleged illegal act was trying to unscramble a portion of that password. In a sense the government has already won this battle. We’re sitting here debating the interpretation of their arbitrary law which is an impossible task. The government wants and needs arbitrary law so they won’t be held accountable for their nefarious acts. There’s no public outrage regarding the contents of the information Julian Assange shared. There’s no public outrage at the government’s attempted encroachment upon the 1st Amendment. I often ask myself how did us Americans get to this sad, pathetic place. The culprit is Statolatry. Statolatry breeds Statists and Statists are more concerned with their tribal identity than their Liberty.

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Quote Posted by Kryztian (here)
    Tweet from WikiLeaks (April 24) -

    Quote We confirm Julian Assange has access to his lawyers, is now speaking with them regularly and will have an in person visit in the coming days.
    Tweet.

    Stefania Maurizi from La Repubblica has interviewed the UN Special Rapporteur on Privacy, Professor Joe Cannataci, who met with Assange in prison: UN Special Rapporteur on Privacy meets Assange in prison: "I will act on the videos of Assange’s meetings in the embassy" (April 25).
    Never give up on your silly, silly dreams.

    You mustn't be afraid to dream a little BIGGER, darling.

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Julian Assange’s dad on Good Morning Britain -

    Never give up on your silly, silly dreams.

    You mustn't be afraid to dream a little BIGGER, darling.

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Yanis Varoufakis on Julian Assange, Militarization, European Politics & Social Movements
    acTVism Munich
    Published on Apr 27, 2019

    "In this exclusive interview with bestselling author, former finance minister of Greece and the co-founder of the Democracy in Europe Movement 2025, Yanis Varoufakis, we talk about the case of Julian Assange. Furthermore we examine why there isn’t significant grassroots mobilization against militarization as compared to other movements around Europe and despite the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists citing it as a “extraordinary threat” to humanity . Lastly we talk about whether consumers or producers should be held account when it comes to climate change and also why people should participate in the upcoming European election."

    To read the full interview: https://bit.ly/2ZB4Zvb

    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    WikiLeaks' Julian Assange sentenced to 50 weeks' jail over bail breach


    Julian Assange gestures from the window of a prison van as he is driven out of Southwark Crown Court in London on May 1, 2019.

    Quote:
    "Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has been sentenced to 50 weeks' jail for absconding while on bail, when he fled to the Ecuadorian embassy in London in 2012...

    During sentencing remarks, Judge Deborah Taylor said she had taken into consideration "the seriousness of the failure to surrender, the level of culpability and the harm caused".

    She called the harm "exceptional in seriousness", saying it put the offence outside the range of "even the highest category".

    "By entering the embassy, you deliberately put yourself out of reach, whilst remaining in the UK," she said.

    "You remained there for nearly seven years, exploiting your privileged position to flout the law and advertise internationally your disdain for the law of this country."

    She said it had cost taxpayers 16 million pounds ($25.5 million) to ensure that Assange was arrested when he left the embassy.

    In a press conference, one of Assange's lawyers said "only two weeks short of a maximum sentence is an outrage".

    Assange faces extradition hearing

    On Thursday, Assange will again appear in court by video link as the US attempts to extradite him.

    Assange is charged with conspiring with former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to gain access to classified databases.

    In 2010, WikiLeaks released hundreds of thousands of US military reports about the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and US diplomatic communications.

    The US Justice Department described it as "one of the largest compromises of classified information in the history of the United States".

    Assange faces up to five years in US prison if convicted. Assange's lawyers said they would fight the extradition attempt.

    "What is at stake there will be a question of life and death for Assange … and for major journalistic principles," one of his lawyers said in a press conference, adding that the "focus of [their] energy" would now move to fight the extradition request..."


    Link: https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/austr...id=mailsignout
    Last edited by BMJ; 1st May 2019 at 14:03.
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    So his extradition hearing will be tomorrow, at least what I have seen reported.

    So, if the US does this and trump doesnt pardon we now know absolutely for sure, beyond a shadow of a doubt that Trump is not fighting the good fight.

    Ill bet Assange will end up in Guantanamo Bay, which Trumps expansion and sending more people already told me beyond a shadow of a doubt that he is not fighting the good fight. ( If you support Guantanamo Bay staying open you belong in it)

    So trump people have a hard moment to face coming up here. This whole pathetic trump is fighting the deep state is about to be shown as the hollow nonsense it is.

    Assange is actually and has a great track record of fighting for transparency and accountability in government. Without him we would be in the dark about many atrocities of Bush and Other presidents.

    Trump has done literally nothing, in fact has helped, the Large scale agenda that whoever is running things is doing. We are still doing the plan that General laid out about the 7 countries in five years.

    Trump is moving against the very targets PNAC laid out. Currently, Right now we are doing this regime change **** in Venezuela and you are all letting trump take a pass on it like the Dems did with Libya.

    If you cared about Benghazi and were up in arms about that then and you are not up in arms about Venezuela then take a long hard look into the mirror. . .

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    The Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity give their measured estimation of the case of Julian Assange and the future of whistle blowers and true journalism. The do mention a presidential pardon, after tortuous months in jail and court. I hope that pardon (ironically for doing real 1st Amendment protected journalism) is the case rather than wishful thinking.

    At this time, all things considered, it does not look so good for Assange, whistle blowers and journalism. With the removal of the Smith-Mundt Act and legalization of propaganda, true journalism may have a doubtful future.

    I DO hope I'm wrong, and that Q is trustworthy and the Q decoders are correct that Trump will step up and do the right thing.

    VIPS: Extradition of Julian Assange Threatens Us All
    April 30, 2019

    Retaliation against Julian Assange over the past decade plus replicates a pattern of ruthless political retaliation against whistleblowers, in particular those who reveal truths hidden by illegal secrecy, VIPS says.

    DATE: April 30, 2019

    MEMORANDUM FOR: The governments and people of the United Kingdom and the United States

    FROM: Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS)

    SUBJECT: Extradition of Julian Assange Threatens Us All

    On April 11, London police forcibly removed WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange from the embassy of Ecuador after that country’s president, Lenin Moreno, abruptly revoked his predecessor’s grant of asylum. The United States government immediately requested Assange’s extradition for prosecution under a charge of “conspiracy to commit computer intrusion” under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

    Former U.S. Government officials promptly appeared in popular media offering soothing assurances that Assange’s arrest threatens neither constitutional rights nor the practice of journalism, and major newspapers like The New York Times and The Washington Post fell into line.

    Not So Fast

    Others found reason for concern in the details of the indictment. Carie DeCel, a staff attorney for the Knight First Amendment Institute, noted that the indictment goes beyond simply stating the computer intrusion charge and “includes many more allegations that reach more broadly into typical journalistic practices, including communication with a source, encouraging a source to share information, and protecting a source.”

    In an analysis of the indictment’s implications, the Project on Government Oversight (POGO) observed that it includes an allegation that “Assange and Manning took measures to conceal Manning as the source of the disclosure…including by removing usernames from the disclosed information and deleting chat logs between Assange and Manning,” and that they “used a special folder on a cloud drop box of WikiLeaks to transmit classified records.”

    “These are not only legitimate but professionally advised journalistic practices for source protection,” notes POGO. It is worth noting that Manning had Top Secret clearance and did not need Assange’s assistance to gain access to databases, but only to hide her identity.

    The indictment’s implied threat thus reaches beyond Assange and even beyond journalists. The threat to journalists and others does not vanish if they subsequently avoid practices identified in the government’s indictment. The NSA’s big bag of past communications offers abundant material from which to spin an indictment years later, and even circumstantial evidence can produce a conviction. Moreover, the secret landscape—a recent and arbitrary development—continually expands, making ever more of government off limits to public view.

    When politician and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo labeled WikiLeaks a “non-state hostile intelligence service,” he was describing the oft-stated duty of newspapers, “to comfort the afflicted, and to afflict the comfortable.”

    The Devil in the Big Picture

    One can look so closely at the indictment details that one misses the big picture and with it vital truths. Standing back for a broader view, a long-running campaign of harassment by U.S. authorities and former officials focused on WikiLeaks’ publication of embarrassing secrets becomes visible. The Project on Government Oversight observes:

    “Even if the motives for Assange’s indictment are entirely legitimate, the litany of high-ranking government officials who called for Assange to be prosecuted for publishing classified documents have likely already irreparably harmed the freedom of the press. It will be virtually impossible to fully disentangle the government’s desire to prosecute Assange for his publishing activities from the government’s current prosecution of him, and as a result there will to some degree be an unavoidable chilling effect stemming from his prosecution.”

    Standing back still further, a crowd of similar cases comes into view: other truth tellers subjected to similar persecution. These are not journalists but another specie of truth teller — national security whistleblowerswho have warned for years that this day would come.

    A Pattern of Reprisal

    Opinions of Julian Assange’s character and methods vary wildly but what is relevant to First Amendment freedoms is how the U.S. government perceives him. The big picture reveals that Assange, a publisher of whistleblower disclosures, is viewed the same way as whistleblowers: unwelcome lights shining on official wrongdoing who must be dimmed, deflected and shut off. What government bodies are doing to Assange they routinely have done to whistleblowers— Thomas Drake, Jeffrey Sterling, John Kiriakou, Thomas Tamm, William Binney, Daniel Ellsberg, Chelsea Manning and others—who disclosed for public benefit information the government finds politically troublesome.

    Once the government develops animus toward a truth teller, it fishes indefinitely until it finds some means to retaliate—some pretext to punish that individual. A pattern of retaliation against high-profile national security whistleblowers includes the following tactics:

    relentless campaigns of character assassination and misinformation about facts of the case;

    hostile, lengthy government investigations, often for minor, never proven or circumstantial offenses;

    terrorization of the whistleblower and associates with threats (see here and here), solitary confinement and armed home invasions for non-violent, alleged offenses;

    pre-trial declarations of guilt from influential officials, such as Barack Obama’s declaration (as the military’s Commander-in-Chief) that Army Private Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning “broke the law” — potentially influencing the Army court that heard her case.

    a Balkanized judicial process that restricts most such cases to onejudicial venue cherry-picked by prosecutors for speedy deference to government, a venue sealed off from public scrutiny and, some say, justice;

    prosecution under the Espionage Act, a “vague” and “draconian” law, similar in those respects to the CFAA;

    continuing persecution—isolation, marginalization, blacklisting, and more—after time has been served (see here and here) or after charges are dropped.
    Reportedly, British and U.S. intelligence are interrogating Assange, possibly employing torture tactics, without access to legal counsel at a prison reserved for terrorists. U.S. officials apparently charged Assange as “a terrorist” in order to dodge the problem of the statute of limitations for conspiracy or computer intrusion by extending (via the Patriot Act and/or other terrorism laws) the normal statute of limitations from 5 to 8 years.

    Not for Insiders

    Even if charges against a whistleblower are later dropped, governments still win because the tactics used damage the truth teller professionally, financially, socially and psychologically, and foreseeably chill other whistleblowers.

    Importantly, virtually all of the retaliatory actions described above are carried out or instigated by the elite political establishment—current and former political appointees and elected officials. Equally important is the fact that tactics used against whistleblowers are rarely if ever applied to political insiders who fail to protect classified information. Even actual spies who give or sell secrets directly to foreign governments have fared better than some well-meaning whistleblowers. In contrast to whistleblowers, political insiders who mistreat government secrets are publicly praised by the establishment, face lesser charges (if any), are treated with dignity by investigators, receive presidential pardons and move on to prestigious and lucrative positions.

    The Takeaway

    Retaliation against Julian Assange over the past decade plus replicates a pattern of ruthless political retaliationagainst whistleblowers, in particular those who reveal truths hidden by illegal secrecy. U.S. law prohibits classifying information “in order to conceal inefficiency, violations of law, or administrative error; to prevent embarrassmentto a person, organization, or agency.”

    Whether U.S. authorities successfully prosecute Assange, accept a desperate plea deal or keep him tied up with endless litigation, they will succeed in sending the same chilling message to all journalists that they send to potential whistleblowers: Do not embarrass us or we’ll punish you—somehow, someday, however long it takes. In that respect, one could say damage to journalism already has been done but the battle is not over.

    This extension of a whistleblower reprisal regime onto a publisher of disclosures poses an existential threat to all journalists and to the right of all people to speak and hear important truths. The U.S. indictment of Julian Assange tests our ability to perceive a direct threat to free speech, and tests our will to oppose that threat.Without freedom of press and the right and willingness to publish, whistleblowers even disclosing issues of grave, life and death public safety, will be like a tree falling in the forest with no one to hear.

    The great American writer Henry David Thoreau wrote, “It takes two to speak the truth–one to speak and one to hear.” Today, it takes three to speak the truth–one to speak, one to hear, and one to defend the first two in court. If the U.S. Government has its way, there will be no defense, no truth.

    For the Steering Groups of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity and Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence:

    William Binney, former Technical Director, World Geopolitical & Military Analysis, NSA; co-founder, SIGINT Automation Research Center (ret.)

    Richard H. Black, Senator of Virginia, 13th District; Colonel US Army (ret.); Former Chief, Criminal Law Division, Office of the Judge Advocate General, the Pentagon (associate VIPS)

    Marshall Carter-Tripp, Foreign Service Officer & former Division Director in the State Department Bureau of Intelligence and Research (ret.)

    Thomas Drake, former Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service and NSA whistleblower

    Bogdan Dzakovic, former Team Leader of Federal Air Marshals and Red Team, FAA Security (ret.) (associate VIPS)

    Philip Giraldi, CIA, Operations Officer (ret.)

    Mike Gravel, former Adjutant, top secret control officer, Communications Intelligence Service; special agent of the Counter Intelligence Corps and former United States Senator

    Katherine Gun, former linguist and Iraq War whistleblower in UK’s GCHQ (affiliate VIPS)

    Matthew Hoh, former Capt., USMC, Iraq; former Foreign Service Officer, Afghanistan (associate VIPS)

    James George Jatras, former U.S. diplomat and former foreign policy adviser to Senate leadership (Associate VIPS)

    Michael S. Kearns, Captain, USAF (ret.); ex-Master SERE Instructor for Strategic Reconnaissance Operations (NSA/DIA) and Special Mission Units (JSOC)

    John Kiriakou, former CIA Counterterrorism Officer and former Senior Investigator, Senate Foreign Relations Committee

    Karen Kwiatkowski, former Lt. Col., US Air Force (ret.), at Office of Secretary of Defense watching the manufacture of lies on Iraq, 2001-2003

    Clement J. Laniewski, LTC, U.S. Army (ret.) (associate VIPS)

    Linda Lewis, WMD preparedness policy analyst, USDA (ret.) (associate VIPS)

    Edward Loomis, NSA Cryptologic Computer Scientist (ret.)

    Annie Machon, former intelligence officer in the UK’s MI5 domestic security service (affiliate VIPS)

    Ray McGovern, former US Army infantry/intelligence officer & CIA presidential briefer (ret.)

    Craig Murray, former British diplomat and Ambassador to Uzbekistan, human rights activist and historian (affiliate VIPS)

    Elizabeth Murray, former Deputy National Intelligence Officer for the Near East & CIA political analyst (ret.)

    Todd E. Pierce, MAJ, US Army Judge Advocate (ret.)

    Coleen Rowley, FBI Special Agent and former Minneapolis Division Legal Counsel (ret.)

    Peter Van Buren, U.S. Department of State, Foreign Service Officer (ret.) (associate VIPS)

    J. Kirk Wiebe, former Senior Analyst, SIGINT Automation Research Center, NSA (ret.)

    Larry Wilkerson, Colonel, U.S. Army (ret.), former Chief of Staff for Secretary of State; Distinguished Visiting Professor, College of William and Mary

    Sarah Wilton, Commander, U.S. Naval Reserve (ret.) and Defense Intelligence Agency (ret.)

    Robert Wing, former U.S. Department of State Foreign Service Officer (Associate VIPS)

    Ann Wright, U.S. Army Reserve Colonel (ret) and former U.S. Diplomat who resigned in 2003 in opposition to the Iraq War

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Latest from London...

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    The name of the US soldier who retrieved the horribly wounded children from the van, which had arrived only to retrieve the dead bodies, is Ethan McCord. This is his eye witness testimony (duration 17:21) -



    This is Julian Assange.

    He created the most significant innovation to how journalism is done of our lifetime.

    He's in a high security jail cell in the UK facing U.S. extradition because he exposed U.S. war crimes in Iraq.

    Everything else is propaganda.


    Defend Assange Campaign




    DEFEND WIKILEAKS
    Never give up on your silly, silly dreams.

    You mustn't be afraid to dream a little BIGGER, darling.

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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    I am going to stick out my neck and give a different point of view.

    For Julian we know that being locked in the Ecuadorian Embassy for the last 7 years or so has taken a toll on him mentally and physically.

    Maybe Ecuadorian government were paid to release him via the IMF loan.

    And maybe the issue was forced by the USA.

    But maybe also this was all done for his own sake to save him from his deteriorating situation, and put him in the care of the USA.

    Remember that POTUS Trump has said in the past he likes or even loves Wikileaks.

    And now POTUS Trump is distancing himself from Julian because of the legal preceding to ensure impartiality. Which is understandable.

    Furthermore Assange is charged with conspiring with former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to gain access to classified databases, now I really do not how strong the government case is in relation to this charge but remember POTUS Trump has the ability to pardon Julian if he is convicted.

    I am going to wait and see how Julian's situation develops considering we have a total new sheriff in town with POTUS Trump.

    I gladly say I am wrong if that's case, but I think there is going to be a positive outcome to this situation for Julian and he maybe found guilt but pardoned and venerated as a hero by the USA.
    Last edited by BMJ; 22nd October 2019 at 11:23.
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Key points:
    - Anderson said Assange did not deserve to be in a prison for violent offenders
    - The US actor has supported Assange for several years, visiting him in the Ecuadorian embassy
    - Assange is due again in court on May 30 over US extradition proceedings

    Pamela Anderson visits Julian Assange in London prison

    Quote:
    "Former Baywatch star Anderson visited Assange at Belmarsh Prison in southeast London on Tuesday morning, saying the 47-year-old had been unable to get out of his cell and that it was "very difficult" to see him.

    "He does not deserve to be in a supermax prison, he has never committed a violent act," she told media outside the prison.

    "He is an innocent person."

    Anderson, 51, said Assange had no access to information and had been "cut off from everybody", including his own children."

    Link: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-...rison/11089550

    Late note. The question has to be if lawyers and family cannot gain access to Julian how did Pamela Anderson?
    Last edited by BMJ; 11th May 2019 at 16:08.
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    Default Re: Julian Assange arrested after Ecuador tears up asylum deal

    Bradley/Chelsea Manning has been released, For now....

    I for one will join in with anyone, I don't care what color you are as long as you want to change this miserable condition that exists on this Earth - Malcolm X / Tsar Of The Star

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