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    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
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    Default PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    Memorial Day Normalizes War & Satanic Human Sacrifice

    henrymakow.com
    May 27, 2019



    May 27 is Memorial Day in the US. Should military veterans be treated as heroes or dupes?

    Heroes would be appropriate if indeed they were defending their nation. But in the words of Marine General Smedley Butler, US soldiers are bully boys for Wall Street.

    Far from "defending freedom," the US Military is advancing the world government agenda of the central banking cartel and perpetuating a trillion dollar boondoggle.

    Gratuitous murder, maiming and mayhem serve as the Cabalist bankers' tribute to Satan. All wars are their wars against humanity whom they must enslave to protect their fraudulent credit monopoly and fulfil Cabalist prophecy.

    (See also-Bjerknes- History Follows Jewish Supremacist Blueprint.)

    Why are so many Americans willing to lay down their lives for such a dubious cause, yet none are willing to sacrifice to truly liberate the US from warmongering politicians who are prepping for new wars against Syria, Iran, Russia and China?

    The times they are a-changing. After posting a video of a young recruit talking to the camera about how service allows him to better himself "as a man and a warrior", the US Army tweeted, "How has serving impacted you?"

    Caitlin Johnstone compiled typical responses which conveyed the horror of war and stripped military service of its glamour.

    ------------------------------------------

    by Caitlin Johnstone

    (abridged by henrymakow.com)

    As of this writing, the post has over 9,600 responses. Most of them are heartbreaking.
    "My daughter was raped while in the army," said one responder.

    "They took her to the hospital where an all male staff tried to convince her to give the guy a break because it would ruin his life. She persisted. Wouldn't back down. Did a tour in Iraq. Now suffers from PTSD."

    "I've had the same nightmare almost every night for the past 15 years,"said another.
    Tweet after tweet after tweet, people used the opportunity that the Army had inadvertently given them to describe how they or their loved one had been chewed up and spit out by a war machine that never cared about them.

    This article exists solely to document a few of the things that have been posted in that space, partly to help spread public awareness and partly in case the thread gets deleted in the interests of "national security". Here's a sampling in no particular order:
    "Someone I loved joined right out of high school even though I begged him not to. Few months after his deployment ended, we reconnected. One night, he told me he loved me and then shot himself in the head. If you're gonna prey on kids for imperialism, at least treat their PTSD."
    ~
    "After I came back from overseas I couldn't go into large crowds without a few beers in me. I have nerve damage in my right ear that since I didn't want to look weak after I came back I lied to the VA rep. My dad was exposed to agent orange which destroyed his lungs, heart, liver and pancreas and eventually killing him five years ago. He was 49, exposed at a post not Vietnam, and will never meet my daughter my nephew. I still drink too much and I crowds are ok most days but I have to grocery shop at night and can't work days because there is to many ppl."
    ~


    "The dad of my best friend when I was in high school had served in the army. He struggled with untreated PTSD & severe depression for 30 years, never told his family. Christmas eve of 2010, he went to their shed to grab the presents & shot himself in the head. That was the first funeral I attended where I was actually told the cause of death & the reasons surrounding it. I went home from the service, did some asking around, & found that most of the funerals I've attended before have been caused by untreated health issues from serving."
    ~
    "My dad was drafted into war and was exposed to agent orange. I was born w multiple physical/neurological disabilities that are linked back to that chemical. And my dad became an alcoholic with ptsd and a side of bipolar disorder."
    ~
    "i met this guy named Christian who served in iraq. he was cool, had his own place with a pole in the living room. always had lit parties. my best friend at the time started dating him so we spent a weekend at his crib. after a party, 6am, he took out his laptop. he started showing us some pics of his time in the army. pics with a bunch of dudes. smiling, laughing. it was cool. i was drunk and didn't care. he started showing us pics of some little kids. after a while, his eyes went completely ****ing dark. i was like man, dude's high af. he very calmly explained to us that all of those kids were dead 'but that's what war was. dead kids and nothing to show for it but a military discount'. christian killed himself 2 months later."
    ~
    "I didn't serve but my dad did. In Vietnam. It eventually killed him, slowly, over a couple of decades. When the doctors were trying to put in a pacemaker to maybe extend his life a couple of years, his organs were so ****ed from the Agent Orange, they disintegrated to the touch. He died when I was ten. He never saw me graduate high school. He never saw me get my first job or buy my first car. He wasn't there. But hey! Y'all finally paid out 30k after another vet took the VA to the Supreme Court, so. You know. It was cool for him."
    ~
    "Chronic pain with a 0% disability rating (despite medical discharge) so no benefits, and anger issues that I cope with by picking fistfights with strangers."
    ~
    "Many of my friends served. All are on heavy antidepressant/anxiety meds, can't make it through 4th of July or NYE, and have all dealt with heavy substance abuse problems before and after discharge. And that's on top of one crippled left hand, crushed vertebra, and GSWs."
    ~
    "Left my talented and young brother a broken and disabled man who barely leaves the house. Left my mother hypervigilant & terrified due to the amount of sexual assault & rape covered up and looked over by COs. Friend joined right out if HS, bullet left him paralyzed neck down."
    ~
    "My cousin went to war twice and came back with a drug addiction that killed him. My other cousin could never get paid on time and when he left they tried to withhold his pay."
    ~
    "It's given me a fractured spine, TBI, combat PTSD, burn pit exposure, and a broken body with no hope of getting better. Not even medically retired for a fractured spine. WTF."
    ~
    "Y'all killed my father by failing to provide proper treatments after multiple tours."
    ~


    "Everyone I know got free PTSD and chemical exposure and a long engagement in their efforts to have the US pay up for college tuition. Several lives ruined. No one came out better. Thank god my recruiter got a DUI on his way to get me or I would be dead or worse right now."
    ~
    "I have ptsd and still wake up crying at night. Also have a messed up leg that I probably will have to deal with the rest of my life. Depression. Anger issues."
    ~
    "My grandfather came back from Vietnam with severe PTSD, tried to drown it in alcohol, beat my father so badly and so often he still flinches when touched 50 years later. And I grew up with an emotionally scarred father with PTSD issues of his own because of it. Good times."
    ~
    "Hmmm. Let's see. I lost friends, have 38 inches of scars, PTSD and a janky arm and hand that don't work."
    ~
    "My best friend joined the Army straight out of high school because his family was poor & he wanted a college education. He served his time & then some. Just as he was ready to retire he was sent to Iraq. You guys sent him back in a box. It destroyed his children."
    ~
    "Well, my father got deployed to Iraq and came back a completely different person. Couldn't even work the same job he had been working 20 years before that because of his anxiety and PTSD. He had nightmares, got easily violent and has terrible depression. But the army just handed him pills, now he is 100% disabled and is on a **** ton of medication. He has nightmares every night, paces the house barely sleeping, checking every room just to make sure everyone's safe. He's had multiple friends commit suicide."
    ~
    "Father's a disabled Vietnam veteran who came home with severe PTSD and raging alcoholism. VA has continuously ignored him throughout the years and his medical needs and he receives very little compensation for all he's gone through. Thanks so much!!"
    ~
    "I was #USNavy, my husband was #USArmy, he served in Bosnia and Iraq and that nice, shy, funny guy was gone, replaced with a withdrawn, angry man...he committed suicide a few years later...when I'm thanked for my service, I just nod."
    ~


    "I'm permanently disabled because I trained through severe pain after being rejected from the clinic for 'malingering.' Turns out my pelvis was cracked and I ended up having to have hip surgery when I was 20 years old."
    ~
    "My brother went into the Army a fairly normal person, became a Ranger (Ft. Ord) & came out a sociopath. He spent the 1st 3 wks home in his room in the dark, only coming out at night when he thought we were asleep. He started doing crazy stuff. Haven't seen him since 1993."
    ~
    "Recently attended the funeral for a west point grad with a 4yr old and a 7yr old daughter because he blew his face off to escape his ptsd but thats nothing new."
    ~
    "I don't know anyone in my family who doesn't suffer from ptsd due to serving. One is signed off sick due to it & thinks violence is ok. Another (navy) turned into a psycho & thought domestic violence was the answer to his wife disobeying his orders."
    ~
    "My dad served during vietnam, but after losing close friends and witnessing the killing of innocents by the U.S., he refused to redeploy. He has suffered from PTSD ever since. The bravest thing he did in the army was refuse to fight any longer, and I'm so proud of him for that."
    ~
    "My best friend from high school was denied his mental health treatment and forced to return to a third tour in Iraq, despite having such deep trauma that he could barely function. He took a handful of sleeping pills and shot himself in the head two weeks before deploying."
    ~
    "Bad back, hips, and knees. Lack of trust, especially when coming forward about sexual harassment. Detachment, out of fear of losing friends. Missed birthdays, weddings, graduations, and funerals. I get a special license plate tho."
    ~
    "My son died 10 months ago. He did 3 overseas tours. He came back with severe mental illness."
    ~
    "I'm still in and I'm in constant pain and they recommended a spinal fusion when I was 19. Y'all also won't update my ERB so I can't use the education benefits I messed myself up for."
    ~
    "My dad served two tours in middle east and his personality changes have affected my family forever. VA 'counseling' has a session limit and doesn't send you to actual psychologists. Military service creates a mental health epidemic it is then woefully unequipped to deal with."
    ~


    "My best childhood friend lost his mind after his time in the marines and now he lives in a closet in his mons house and can barely hold a conversation with anyone. He only smokes weed and drinks cough syrup that he steals since he can't hold a job."
    ~
    "After coming back from Afghanistan.....Matter fact I don't even want to talk about it. Just know that my PTSD, bad back, headaches, chronic pain, knee pain, and other things wishes I would have NEVER signed that contract. It was NOT worth the pain I'll endure for the rest of life."
    ~
    "My cousin served and came back only to be diagnosed with schizophrenia and ptsd. There were nights that he would lock himself in the bathroom and stay in the corner because he saw bodies in the bathtub. While driving down the highway, he had another episode and drove himself into a cement barrier, engulfing his Jeep in flames and burning alive. My father served as well and would never once speak of what he witnessed and had to do. He said it's not something that any one person should ever be proud of."
    ~
    "I was sexually assaulted by a service member at 17 when I visited my sister on her base, then again at 18. My friend got hooked on k2 and died after the va turned him away for mental health help. Another friend serving was exploited sexually by her co and she was blamed for it."
    ~
    "I spent ten years in the military. I worked 15 hour days to make sure my troops were taken care of. In return for my hard work I was rewarded with three military members raping me. I was never promoted to a rank that made a difference. And I have an attempt at suicide. **** you!"
    ~
    "I actually didn't get around to serving because I was sexually assaulted by three of my classmates during a military academy prep program. They went to the academies and are still active duty officers. I flamed out of the program and have PTSD."
    ~
    "My father's successful military career taught him that he's allowed to use violence to make people do what he wants because America gave him that power."
    ~


    "While I was busy framing 'soldiers and families first' (lol) propaganda posters, my best friend went to 'Iraqistan' but he didn't come back. He returned alive, to be sure, but he was no longer the fun, carefree, upbeat person he'd previously been."
    ~
    "My husband is a paraplegic and can't control 3/4 of his body now. Me, I've got PTSD, an anxiety disorder, two messed up knees, depression, a bad back, tinnitus, and chronic insomnia. I wish both had never served."
    ~
    "This is one of the most heartbreaking threads I've ever read."
    ~
    "I am so sorry. The way we fail our service members hurts my heart. My grandfather served in the Korean War and had nightmares until his death at 91 years old. We must do better."
    ~
    "My Army story is that when I was in high school, recruiters were there ALL the time- at lunch, clubs, etc.- targeting the poor kids at school. I didn't understand it until now. You chew people who have nothing at home up and spit them out."
    ~
    "I was thinking about enlisting until I saw this thread. Hard pass."
    ~
    "I hope to god that the Army has enough guts to read these and realize how badly our servicepeople are being treated. Thank you and god bless you to all of you in this thread, and your loved ones who are suffering too."
    ~

    There are many, many more.

    * * *

    Caitlin Johnstone:
    "Everyone has my unconditional permission to republish or use any part of this work (or anything else I've written) in any way they like free of charge. My work is entirely reader-supported. The best way to get around the internet censors and make sure you see the stuff I publish is to subscribe to the mailing list for my website, which will get you an email notification for everything I publish. For more info on who I am, where I stand, and what I'm trying to do with this platform, click here.

    Related:
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

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    United States Avalon Member Valerie Villars's Avatar
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    Default Re: PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    Herve, thanks for this post. The realities these men and women face are heartbreaking and life changing. Damn the war machine. I mean that from the bottom of my heart.
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone when we are uncool." From the movie "Almost Famous""l "Let yourself stand cool and composed before a million universes." Walt Whitman

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    Default Re: PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    A few years ago the father of a friend of mine was diagnosed with PTSD related to his service in WWII. That diagnosis took almost seven decades to establish! They are a close, supportive family that spend a lot of time together, with children, grandchildren and now great grandchildren gathering together for birthdays, holidays and other events. The father was, for the most part, and ideal parent, but also had strange abusive episodes which made their relationships difficult. As hurtful as his strange behaviors were, the family realized that no one was suffering more that their father and they just learned to put up with it. No one realized that this was all related to trauma that was over half a century old.

    Perhaps he is lucky compared to some of the other stories told above, he did in many ways have a really good and happy life. However, he had to struggle for a really long, long time with PTSD and he is just one of millions.

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    United States Moderator James's Avatar
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    Default Re: PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    Quote Posted by Valerie Villars (here)
    Damn the war machine. I mean that from the bottom of my heart.
    Exactly so. I was thinking this morning of our archaic history, more particularly, the sociocultural aspect of war and what it has become today.

    In small groups we used to defend, or reclaim, what we felt to be ours, correct or otherwise, with full responsibility of whatever effect this would have. War, and the aftermath, were inescapable forces. A warrior would die by the hands and in the arms of another warrior.

    Today, we pilot drones with Xbox controllers from different hemispheres to level temples and apartment complexes. Young men and women with their boots on the ground deal with the psychological dilemmas of being something we were never meant to be - replaceable cogs in a war machine. This goes without mentioning the horrors of TBIs from percussive damage and the devastation of advancements in warfare technology.

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    Avalon Member Hym's Avatar
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    Default Re: PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    As much as i appreciate and respect the space given to me to write here, to listen, to learn, to view the state of my own being through the insights and honesty of others who also post here on Avalon............This subject deserves as many F.U.'s that I can write...and then more<<<<<<

    No eloquence. No insight. No descriptions needed when we as a species stand up against the tyranny of war and the war profiteers, whose influence and deceptions control so many billions of lives.

    In case some here have forgotten the depth of emotional trauma, remember that the very same injection of trauma into society covers almost all areas of the society, especially within the media and the thing that some call entertainment. Trauma is a tool of the engineers of social programming and it exists everywhere it is viewed.

    Where are the politicians, the so-called legislators, the whores of each "party" when we all know that instead of marching troops in front of sporting contests the monies should be put to showing the graphic horrors of war before each series of entertainment spectacles?

    Put the live testimonies of those raped by their own troops on the sound tracks to be broadcast on t.v. and in the stadium.
    Put the testimonies of those fellow soldiers who killed Pat Tillman, confessing that "they were just doing their duties".
    Put the survivors, the families, testimonies of their loved ones lives before they committed suicide to relieve the pains, the chemistry of addiction winning the real battles they fought,....

    When a civilian, a mark, goes to any recruiting station they should be shown the truth, the real experiences, the pictures, the videos, the aftermath of engaging to be a pawn for the profiteers who rarely put their lives, their health, their sanity and their sobriety on the line.

    Show the lives and the deaths.

    Show the life-long disabilities endured until the end, combatants whose life-ending resignation of having lost the value of living will be carried with them when they look back. All for some G.Damned illusion of honor, or democracy, the removal of tyranny, or the protection of the innocent?

    Did You do enough to protect them before they entered the military? And, having recognized your own lack of understanding of the consequences of joining, even without condemnation or judgement, can you still walk forward with the living, the injured, the innocent and those who see themselves as guilty while keeping alive the memory of those who have passed for no real purpose?

    Do You, in the countries that engage in unjustified wars, ever listen to your own in the military, at least those who are not caught up in the lies of career stability and profit, or the rare and truly justified actions that insertions into the lives of others make?

    PTSD is a misdiagnosis, by the way, if we are being honest.
    It should be called PRESENT Traumatic Stress Disorder....IT IS NOT GONE & IT IS NOT POST.
    It lives until it dies or the soldier dies.


    What difference can you make NOW, with your support, your listening, your non-violent actions to remove the politics from the tools of the war machine?

    You only honor the warrior when you prevent war. Everything else is B.S.

    When you love the warriors you treat them with Honesty. You listen to their life experiences. You provide them with life time support, medical, emotional, and financial. Are any of you proud of how your soldiers, your marines, your OWN women and men are supported when you forgot to add your voice as wars were announced beforehand?
    And did I forget to say F.U........

    On this and many other days in my life I remember with great affection and gratitude my brother in law who put a gun, a .45 (1911), close to my head to convince me to not join, followed by telling me of his time as a Ranger. Uncensored, heartfelt, cold. From being a survivor to a sniper to a vet with deep regrets. He died, in the end when the VA refused to help him deal with his drinking and drug abuse.

    To the machine I say F.U.!

    To the rest of us I say wake the F Up!
    Last edited by Hym; 1st June 2019 at 23:32.

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    Default Re: PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    Hym, what a beautifully written piece.

    I have a story about a fiance' who served at the tail end of Vietnam, but everything pales in comparison to your beautifully written essay.

    May peace reign.
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone when we are uncool." From the movie "Almost Famous""l "Let yourself stand cool and composed before a million universes." Walt Whitman

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    Default Re: PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    The Best Way to Honor Fallen Soldiers Is to Stop Sending Troops to War
    While honoring the troops on Memorial Day is a heartfelt and respectful endeavor, we must do so by protecting those who have not yet sacrificed their lives.
    Monday, May 27, 2019
    https://fee.org/articles/the-best-wa...A2nyH5TDxFGGM4
    by Carey Wedler



    Every Memorial Day, Americans pay their respects to soldiers who have died while fighting for the US military. Though the good intentions and courage of those who enlist in the armed forces are admirable, the best way to honor those individuals on this holiday—and every day—is to stop sending them to war.

    This pro-peace sentiment is often conflated with disrespect for the troops: If you don’t support the government’s wars, you must not support the soldiers fighting in them. However, considering the great cost to human life inflicted by military conflicts—the immense suffering soldiers, their families, and civilians in battleground countries endure—scaling back the size and scope of military programs is not only the best way to respect the troops but also a necessary measure to preserve liberty and freedom.

    Militarism

    Though America was founded on the principles of limited government and skepticism of the state, popular political discourse and the politicians who perpetuate it too often fail to apply this wise distrust to militarism, which is an extension of government. Indeed, Memorial Day was established following the Civil War, where as many as 750,000 Americans died fighting each other on behalf of their splintered governments.

    According to one 2015 estimate by PBS, over 1.1 million Americans have died fighting in wars throughout US history. In recent decades, especially, these wars have been spurred by state corruption. As General and President Dwight D. Eisenhower cautioned when he left office in 1961, observing the build-up of the defense industry following World War II:
    Quote In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.
    Potential Ulterior Motives in Big Army Contracts

    In the subsequent years, an arms industry dependent upon government funds grew bigger and increasingly powerful, gobbling up taxpayer dollars in the form of deals with the Department of Defense. In September 2018 alone, Boeing received 20 contracts worth $13.7 billion. In November 2018, Lockheed Martin scored a nearly $23 billion contract for F-35 jets. As with all big government programs, inefficiency, waste, and corruption have plagued this state-subsidized industry.

    From the military paying $300,000 for coffee mugs or a projected $1.5 trillion over 55 years for Lockheed’s notoriously faulty F-35s, there are hardly any better examples of the perils of intrusive government than the current military establishment. In one instance, the Pentagon could not account for over $21 trillion dollars in “unsupported journal voucher adjustments,” a term that “refers to improperly documented accounting adjustments that are made when different financial ledgers do not match,” as the New York Times explains.

    Further, a 2018 analysis by Neta Crawford, a Boston University professor of political science, found that by the end of fiscal year 2019, the US government will have spent $4.9 trillion dollars on wars since 9/11. This is particularly tragic when considering that all of the economic investment and human energy and innovation that goes into waging wars and sowing destruction could be better and more productively applied to peaceful endeavors that increase prosperity.

    As former Congressman Ron Paul has said,

    Quote War is never economically beneficial except for those in position to profit from war expenditures.
    Unsurprisingly, following President Trump’s airstrikes in Syria in 2017, for example, defense stocks spiked. Any company that is dependent upon government handouts and favors for success is not fit for competition in a truly free market, and perpetuating this paradigm, which drives a manufactured demand for violent conflict, does a dishonor not only to our founding principles but also to the troops we are told have died for them.

    The consequences of America’s addiction to militarism and interventionism are not just economic. Troops are shipped overseas on multiple tours, experiencing trauma that often stays with them for a lifetime. The rate of veteran suicides remains staggeringly high. Though current death tolls from ongoing wars in the Middle East (6,900 troops had died fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan by the end of 2018) may seem small in comparison to the 58,220 American soldiers who died during the Vietnam War or the staggering figures from the Civil War, most Americans who profess to support the troops would likely agree that even one death is one too many. This is to say nothing of the soldiers injured, often permanently, in wars or the high numbers of civilian deaths and displacements in the countries plagued by intervention.

    Perpetually Looming War

    The urgency of this quite literal life-or-death situation is further highlighted by the US government’s continual saber-rattling. Whether some political leaders are hinting at the possibility of military intervention in Venezuela or the Pentagon is suggesting sending 120,000 additional troops to the Middle East over sensationalized fears about the Iranian threat, war is always looming—and so is potential lost life. Ultimately, though politicians assure us these wars are for our safety or the good of mankind, they serve to expand government power, costing us dearly in life and treasure.

    While honoring the troops on Memorial Day is a heartfelt and respectful endeavor, we must do so by protecting those who have not yet sacrificed their lives. And it seems they would appreciate our doing so: in the 2012 presidential election, Ron Paul—perhaps the most powerful voice for peace in a generation—received markedly more contributions from members of the military than any other candidate.

    Honoring the troops in this way also honors our most cherished principles. As Paul, who often criticizes the unconstitutionality of modern wars, warned lawmakers just two weeks after 9/11:

    Quote How many American troops are we prepared to lose? How much money are we prepared to spend? How many innocent civilians, in our nation and others, are we willing to see killed? How many American civilians will we jeopardize? How much of our civil liberties are we prepared to give up? How much prosperity will we sacrifice?

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    Default Re: PTSD Realities and Human Veterans of all Ideologies, Creeds, Colors and Origins

    ...


    An approach to healing PTSD, whether from this life or previous ones:



    Roger Woolger, an Oxford psychotherapist who developed the Deep Memory Process as a way to help people acknowledge and purge any past and current life trauma that may be negatively impacting them in this life.

    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

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