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Thread: Musings about Physics

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    Madagascar Avalon Member silvanelf's Avatar
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    Default Re: Musings about Physics



    Some food for thought:

    conspiracy of light

    Quote This website examines historical and modern experiments on the nature of space and light, and possible new interpretations based on an alternative approach to the scientific evidence at hand. Fred Hoyle once said "anytime you point a new telescope at the sky now you are only going to find what you already know is up there." Has modern physics become complacent? New science is where the real opportunities lie, so we're focusing on the holes in physics theory instead.
    • Paradoxes
    • Historical Papers
    • Theory
    • Experiments
    • Cosmology

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    Default Re: Musings about Physics

    Thanks for starting this thread, silvanelf. It is a very rich area for investigation, and fits perfectly with the aims of this forum.

    Brian
    A human being is a part of the whole, called by us "Universe," a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness.

    Albert E.

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    Madagascar Avalon Member silvanelf's Avatar
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    Default Re: Musings about Physics

    Faraday homopolar generator -- also known as unipolar generator

    It's not a free energy device, but there seems to be a clue towards free energy.




    Quote A homopolar generator is a DC electrical generator comprising an electrically conductive disc or cylinder rotating in a plane perpendicular to a uniform static magnetic field. A potential difference is created between the center of the disc and the rim (or ends of the cylinder) with an electrical polarity that depends on the direction of rotation and the orientation of the field. It is also known as a unipolar generator, acyclic generator, disk dynamo, or Faraday disc. The voltage is typically low, on the order of a few volts in the case of small demonstration models, but large research generators can produce hundreds of volts, and some systems have multiple generators in series to produce an even larger voltage. They are unusual in that they can source tremendous electric current, some more than a million amperes, because the homopolar generator can be made to have very low internal resistance. Also, the homopolar generator is unique in that no other rotary electric machine can produce DC without using rectifiers or commutators.

    -- snip --
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homopolar_generator


    Quote We know of no other place in physics where such a simple and accurate general principle requires for its real understanding an analysis in terms of two different phenomena. Usually such a beautiful generalization is found to stem from a single deep underlying principle. Nevertheless, in this case there does not appear to be any such profound implication. We have to understand the “rule” as the combined effects of two quite separate phenomena.
    http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/II_17.html

    see also: Reading Feynman


    Quote Its because one of the postulates of special relativity, that the laws of physics are not necessarily the same between non-inertial frames of reference. A rotating frame such as that of the magnet or the circular disk is not an inertial frame. When we do the experiment you describe in the OP, supplying current to the disc and watching the magnet rotating, an observer in the rotating frame of the magnet will see the disc rotating and hence he will measure voltage on the disc and everything will be fine. But an observer on the frame of the stationary disc will measure no induced voltage. Different non inertial frame of references, different results, absoletuly normal for SR.
    Reference https://www.physicsforums.com/thread....805357/page-2


    Quote Nikola Tesla, The Electrical Engineer, N.Y., Sept. 2, 1891.

    It is characteristic of fundamental discoveries, of great achievements of intellect, that they retain an undiminished power upon the imagination of the thinker. The memorable experiment of Faraday with a disc rotating between the two poles of a magnet, which has borne such magnificent fruit, has long passed into every-day experience; yet there are certain features about this embryo of the present dynamos and motors which even to-day appear to us striking, and are worthy of the most careful study.
    http://www.andrijar.com/teslahom/index.html


    Quote William J. Beaty: Untried Homopolar Generator Experiments

    In 1992-94 I messed around with homopolar generators, ("HPGs" or "N-machines",) tried a simple test, and drew some GIFs of possible devices. Check out the above links for these diagrams.

    Quote Bruce E. DePalma, free energy researcher"Tewari has investigated the co-rotating Faraday homopolar motor. He calls it the Space Power Motor or SPM. The increased torque available when rotating is mitigated by a "slippage" which increases with rotational speed. Over a certain speed range the product of the two effects can result in a superior machine."
    -- De Palma
    see: Tewari homepage

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    Default Re: Musings about Physics

    Stefan Marinov

    Quote Stefan Marinov was a Bulgarian physicist, researcher, writer and lecturer who promoted anti-relativistic theoretical viewpoints, and later in his life defended the ideas of perpetual motion and free energy. He committed suicide in Graz, Austria on July 15, 1997.
    more at link, including a list of articles written by S. Marinov;
    https://wiki.naturalphilosophy.org/i...Stefan_Marinov

    About his alleged suicide:
    Quote On July 15, 1997, Marinov fell to his death from a staircase at a library at the University of Graz. He was 66 years old and was survived by his son Marin Marinov, who at the time was a vice-Minister of Industry of Bulgaria.

    Word has been received of the tragic, apparent suicide of new energy researcher, Stefan Marinov. The police explanation is that Dr. Stefan Marinov killed himself, on July 15, 1997, jumping from the University of Graz (Austria) Library building (Bibliotheque).
    https://wiki.naturalphilosophy.org/i...Stefan_Marinov


    Siberian Coliu -- a free energy device?





    There are some disagreements about the Siberian Coliu device:

    Quote In 1997 in the last issue 21 of Deutsche Physik, Marinov self-published experimental results that disprove that the Siberian Coliu, constructed by Marinov himself, is a perpetual motion machine, and where Marinov concluded that Ampere's law in electromagnetism is correct.
    http://everything.explained.today/Stefan_Marinov/

    Quote Demonstration of the Marinov Motor Principle

    Robert B. Driscoll

    Working models of the Marinov motor have been built and run by others. (1-3) This model will demonstrate, in this session, the motors principle.

    -- snip --

    (1) R. Angulo, O. Rodriquez, and G. Spavieri. Hadronic Journal 20 (1997) 621.
    (2) T. E. Phipps, Jr. Apeiron 5 (1998) 193, 209.
    (3) J. P. Wesley, Apeiron 5 (1998) 219.
    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...otor_Principle

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    Default Re: Musings about Physics

    Angular Momentum of Light -- Beth's experiment (1936)

    A famous experiment, which was nearly ignored for a long time ...

    Quote Mechanical Detection and Measurement of the Angular Momentum of Light
    Richard A. Beth
    Phys. Rev. 50, 115 – Published 15 July 1936

    The electromagnetic theory of the torque exerted by a beam of polarized light on a doubly refracting plate which alters its state of polarization is summarized. The same quantitative result is obtained by assigning an angular momentum of ℏ (−ℏ) to each quantum of left (right) circularly polarized light in a vacuum, and assuming the conservation of angular momentum holds at the face of the plate.

    -- snip --
    Abstract: https://journals.aps.org/pr/abstract...PhysRev.50.115
    Full paper (pdf): http://www.df.uba.ar/users/schmiegel...Rev.50.115.pdf


    An explanation of the experiment -- emphasis mine:

    Quote Does somebody understand the Beth experiment?

    -- snip --

    The description that you quote is correct. It is important to note that the quartz plate used in the original experiment is birefringent.
    More recent related work (from the Leiden quantum optics group) can be found in
    http://spie.org/Publications/Proceed...1117/12.584515
    or using microwaves:
    https://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/77/64/94/PDF/AES_Final.pdf

    The purpose of the experiment is to show that light contains spin angular momentum. If light indeed carries angular momentum it should be possible to transfer this to matter, which results in a torque. The transfer of angular momentum is done by the birefringent plate, because the polarization of the incoming and outgoing light is different. This difference corresponds to a change in the spin angular momentum of the photons. The change in angular momentum should generate a torque on the birefringent plate that could, in principle, be measured using a torsion balance.

    In practice this is very difficult to measure because you need to measure a small rotation of the birefringent plate. This is hard because you will need a very high sensitivity of the setup even if you have access to large optical powers. There are several systematic errors you need to deal with before drawing conclusions from the experiment.

    -- snip --
    https://www.researchgate.net/post/Do...eth_experiment


    Quote Measuring the Angular Momentum of Light

    What does the paper describe? The paper reports on a series of experiments looking for angular momentum in light. Angular momentum, as the name suggests, is related to the rotational motion of objects, and circularly polarized light is predicted to have angular momentum. The experiments in the paper looked for, and found, evidence of this angular momentum by measuring the twisting of a quartz plate when circularly polarized light was sent through it. The apparatus is shown at right.

    Back up a minute-- circular polarization? Yeah, circular polarization. Normally, when people talk about the polarization, they refer to the direction of the electric field associated with the classical light wave. The electric field oscillates up and down along some direction, changing its magnitude all the time.

    There's another way to make polarized light, though, which is to keep the magnitude of the electric field constant, and make the direction change all the time. In this case, the electric field starts out pointing up (say), then some time later points to the left, then down, then to the right, then up again. It completes one full revolution in the same time that it takes the light wave to complete an oscillation. There are two different circular polarization states, corresponding to the two different directions of rotation.

    And this is real? Absolutely. You can make circularly polarized light using properly cut calcite, or a variety of other materials. It's even got technological applications-- some 3-d projection systems use circular polarizers as the lenses of the glasses, because they look less dorky than colored filters, and don't require you to hold your head at a particualr angle to get the 3-d effect.
    https://scienceblogs.com/principles/...gular-momentum

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