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Thread: Former Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi dies

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    Default Former Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi dies

    Human rights watch predicted it.

    That imprisoned president Morsi died in court.

    Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director with the Human Rights Watch, tweeted on Monday that Morsi's death was "terrible but entirely predictable" given the government "failure to allow him adequate medical care, much less family visits."

    Morsi since his overthrow appeared only in court, almost always in a soundproof cage. His family said the 67-year-old Morsi suffered from ill health due to harsh conditions, including years of solitary confinement.

    Censorship and not allowing one to have proper medical assistance takes it's toll once again:

    Mohammed Sudan, a leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood in London, says Morsi's death is the equivalent of "premeditated murder" saying that the former president, in jail since 2013, was banned from receiving medicine or visits and there was little information about his health condition.

    Sudan added that Morsi during his trial "has been placed behind glass cage. No one can hear him or know what is happening to him. He hasn't received any visits for a months or nearly a year. He complained before that he doesn't get his medicine."

    Quote The state TV says the 67-year-old Morsi was attending a session Monday in his trial on espionage charges when he blacked out and then died. His body was taken to a hospital, it said.
    Morsi, who hailed from Egypt's largest Islamist group, the now outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, was elected president in 2012 in the country's first free elections following the ouster the year before of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak. The military ousted Morsi in 2013 after massive protests and crushed the Brotherhood in a major crackdown, arresting Morsi and many others of the group's leaders.


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    Default Re: Former Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi dies

    From AP and NY Times -

    He was on trial on espionage charges when he fainted and died, Egyptian television said.

    Minutes before he collapsed, Mr. Morsi addressed the court from the glass cage that prisoners are kept in, warning that he could reveal “many secrets,” The Associated Press reported, citing judicial sources.

    The cause of death was not immediately released, but critics blamed Egyptian authorities for his death.

    Morsi's death was a somber milestone in Egypt’s ill-fated democratic transition after the Arab Spring in 2011.

    Mr. Morsi’s election was the apex of the Arab Spring uprising and also of the Muslim Brotherhood, a 90-year-old Islamist movement founded in Egypt.

    Inaugurated seven years ago this month, on June 30, 2012, Mr. Morsi became the first freely elected president in Arab history and the first Islamist to occupy that role.

    Many Egyptians hoped the election of Mr. Morsi would make a definitive break with Egypt’s long history of autocracy after decades of harsh and corrupt rule under President Hosni Mubarak.

    Mr. Mubarak was ousted in the 2011 uprising.

    Mr. Morsi’s rule was troubled from the start. He governed clumsily, grappled with a hostile military establishment, and in the summer of 2013 faced a giant popular protest in Tahrir Square, the crucible of the 2011 uprising.

    Egypt’s top generals dissolved the country’s first freely elected Parliament just days before Mr. Morsi’s election and claimed most legislative and budgetary powers for themselves.

    The protests in Tahrir Square provided the military with an excuse to oust him in 2013.

    His defense minister, Gen. Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, seized power on July 3, 2013, and was later elected president. Mr. el-Sisi still rules Egypt with an iron grip, and the country’s democratic hopes have been largely extinguished.


    After Mr. Morsi was ousted in 2013, he was convicted of various crimes in politicized trials held under the new military-backed government. He has remained in prison since then.

    Quote Last year, a panel of British politicians and lawyers reviewing his treatment concluded that Mr. Morsi received “inadequate medical care, particularly inadequate management of his diabetes and inadequate management of his liver disease.”

    The panel said the conditions fell below international standards and “would constitute cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment,” Crispin Blunt, a member of Parliament who led the panel, said in a statement on Monday.

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    Default Re: Former Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi dies

    Is the Brotherhood a new thing?

    In ancient Egyptian history's time span, probably, but in human time span with change afoot, it is established. Something to fear? Something to understand alliance and unity with?

    The new military government of Egypt outlawed the Muslim Brotherhood, calling it a terrorist group.

    A 90-year-old Islamist movement, the Brotherhood was founded in Egypt in 1928, and its ideas quickly spread to other Muslim-majority countries in the Arab world and beyond.

    In April, President Trump pushed to designate the Brotherhood as a terrorist organization under pressure from Mr. el-Sisi, a close ally.

    The Pentagon and State Department objected, saying the group does not meet the definition of a terrorist entity.

    Officials at those departments also said they feared that designating the Brotherhood as a terrorist group could complicate America’s relations with a host of allied countries in the Middle East with influential Brotherhood-affiliated political parties.

    Mr. Morsi’s son Ahmed mourned his father on Facebook, writing: “Father, we will meet again, with God.”

    Mr. Morsi grew up in a family of modest means in the Delta city of Sharqiya, Egypt. He earned a Ph.D. in material science from the University of Southern California and later taught at Zagazig Univsersity, near Sharqiya.

    Brief Background

    The Society of the Muslim Brothers, better known as the Muslim Brotherhood, is a transnational Sunni Islamist organization founded in Egypt by Islamic scholar and schoolteacher Hassan al-Banna in 1928.

    Sheikh Hassan Ahmed Abdel Rahman Muhammed al-Banna (Arabic: حسن أحمد عبد الرحمن محمد البنا‎; 14 October 1906 – 12 February 1949), known as Hassan al-Banna, was an Egyptian schoolteacher and imam, best known for founding the Muslim Brotherhood, one of the largest and most influential Islamic revivalist organizations.

    He called for Islamization of the state, the economy, and society.

    He declared that establishing a just society required development of institutions and progressive taxation, and elaborated an Islamic fiscal theory where zakat would be reserved for social expenditure in order to reduce inequality.

    He appealed to Egyptian and pan-Arab patriotism but rejected Arab nationalism and regarded all Muslims as members of a single nation-community.

    The Muslim Brotherhood advocated gradualist moral reform and had no plans for a violent takeover of power.

    He advocated self-initatied productive work aimed at bettering the conditions of the Islamic community.

    Al-Banna generally encouraged Egyptians to abandon Western customs; he argued that the state should enforce Islamic public morality through censorship and application of hudud corporal punishment.

    His thought generally was open to Western ideas and some of his writings quote European authors instead of Islamic sources.

    His son-in-law Said Ramadan emerged as a major leader of the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1950s.

    He was also heavily influenced by Sufism as a youth in Mahmudiyya. He attended weekly Hadra and was a member of the al-Hassafiyya Sufi order.

    By the late 1930s, the Muslim Brotherhood had established branches in every Egyptian province.

    A decade later, the organization had 500,000 active members and as many sympathizers in Egypt alone.

    Al-Banna endeavored to bring about reforms through institution-building, relentless activism at the grassroots level and a reliance on mass communication.

    By emphasizing concerns that appealed to a variety of constituencies, al-Banna was able to recruit from among a cross-section of Egyptian society—though modern-educated civil servants, office employees, and professionals remained dominant among the organization's activists and decision-makers. Al-Banna was also active in resisting British colonial rule in Egypt.

    Al-Banna warned his readers against the "widespread belief among many Muslims" that jihad of the heart was more important and demanding than jihad of the sword.

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