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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Hello, Everyone: an update here that might possibly be interesting. But caveat! This is NOT a scientific experiment. There are all kinds of flaws in it.

    Recap. When I started this thread, I had a few sharp pains in my knees that were new and a little alarming. So I
    1. Changed my diet to rigorously exclude grains, eggs, dairy and sugars (except fruit and honey).
    2. Took a tablespoon of turmeric and spirulina every day.
    3. Increased my MSM intake through supplements, and also started taking borax (see this separate Borax thread).
    Because of the recent hassles in Ecuador (see this thread), some of that changed because of my dwindling supplies. So that constituted an unplanned experiment (of sorts!).

    I ran out of turmeric and spirulina, and my diet lapsed a little (but not TOO much). But I continued with the borax and MSM, because I had plenty.

    My knees are still 100% fine now. I've been working them out quite hard, and they're strong again. I'm not at all concerned any more. And what SEEMS to have been the core critical factor, because of the unplanned 'elimination protocol', was
    • 2500 mg MSM daily.
    • About 700 mg Borax (1 large self-filled 00 capsule) daily.
    So I just report this out of interest. Do note, though that
    1. This is anecdotal!
    2. Diet is always important. So don't get cavalier and assume that supplements alone will do the work.
    3. Everyone's body is different — so do experiment personally.

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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Can Lowering Inflammation Help Major Depression?
    Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola
    December 26, 2019
    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/a..._rid=777426939

    "STORY AT-A-GLANCE
    New research data adds to mounting evidence that depression is linked to an inflammatory response
    Inflammation influences the quality of sleep, metabolism, stress response and the release of cytokines
    Antidepressant medications are associated with significant and dangerous side effects, including violence, aggression and suicide
    The senior population is especially vulnerable; the rate of antidepressant drug prescriptions for this group has doubled since 1990, increasing the risk of cognitive decline, dementia, osteoporosis, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease
    Effective nonpharmacological options for treatment include exercising, reducing sugar intake, and using light therapy for 30 minutes each day
    It is estimated that 7.1% of the adult population in the U.S. experienced at least one major depressive episode in 2017. The highest rates are among those ages 18 to 25 years. Many people believe depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. This is a theory that has been widely promoted by drug companies and psychiatrists, to the point it is now accepted as fact.

    However, this is just a theory and, worse, it's a theory that has been largely discredited. The idea spread quickly after it was proposed in the 1960s when it appeared antidepressant drugs altered brain chemicals. In the 1980s, Prozac (fluoxetine) was released by Eli Lilly and heavily promoted to balance brain chemicals and affect depression.

    Prozac had fewer side effects than some of the earlier antidepressants and soon became the poster child for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of antidepressants. However, while heavily prescribed, data repeatedly showed SSRIs worked no better than placebos for those experiencing mild to moderate depression.

    Although antidepressants don't effectively treat depression, they do double the risk of harm from suicide and violence in healthy adults and increase aggression in children and adolescents.

    Researchers also suggest major depression could be vastly overdiagnosed and overtreated with antidepressants. The majority who are prescribed these drugs end up staying on them long-term, which may compromise their health.

    More Studies Link Depression to Inflammation
    Researchers have found yet another link between inflammation and depression. In one study1 published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, researchers systematically reviewed the safety and effectiveness of anti-inflammatory agents in people suffering with major depression.

    The literature review included results from 30 randomized control trials with a 1,610 participants. In an overall analysis of 26 studies, the researchers found anti-inflammatory agents reduced depressive disorder when compared with placebo. They found no differences in quality of life analysis but did find gastrointestinal event differences between the treatment periods.

    A subanalysis of the data demonstrated an adjunctive treatment with antidepressants with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, statins, omega-3 FAs and minocycline significantly reduced depressive symptoms.2

    Results from another large metanalysis3 carried out by researchers from Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark revealed similar findings, showing anti-inflammatories may be effective in the treatment of depression. One researcher explains the study showed the combination of anti-inflammatory drugs along with antidepressants have beneficial effects.

    The results also showed the effect against depression was present when the anti-inflammatory medication was used alone, compared against a placebo. The scientists analyzed 36 international studies of participants who suffered from depression or who had symptoms of depression. One of the researchers, Dr. Ole Köhler-Forsberg, commented on the results of the study:4

    "This definitely bolsters our chances of being able to provide personalised treatment for individual patients in the longer term. Of course we always have to weigh the effects against the potential side-effects of the anti-inflammatory drugs.

    We still need to clarify which patients will benefit from the medicine and the size of the doses they will require. The findings are interesting, but patients should consult their doctor before initiating additional treatment."

    Yet in another recently published study in Molecular Psychiatry5 scientists found patients treated with immunotherapeutics for inflammatory disorders, who also presented with depression or depressive symptoms, experienced symptomatic relief. The team found the reduction in depressive symptoms was not associated with any treatment-related changes in their physical health.

    Immune Dysregulation May Trigger Allergic-Type Reaction
    There has been an increasing number of studies in which depression is reported to be linked to immune dysregulation and inflammation, mimicking an allergic reaction.6 Your body uses inflammation as a defense mechanism to an attack.

    A localized, infected wound demonstrates an isolated inflammatory response as it turns red and sore. Inflammation is also triggered by stress and physical trauma; inflammation in turn triggers depression. This is related to response to the release of cytokines, which are small protein cells the body uses to help with the response.

    This information may ultimately influence emotions and how you feel. By affecting the quality of your sleep, metabolism and stress responses, inflammation may create a biological environment triggering depressive symptoms.

    The findings from these studies have contributed to a mounting body of evidence that inflammation may be a biochemical route of mental health symptoms. Thus, it may provide another nonpharmacological route for treating those who suffer with depression. Köhler-Forsberg and colleagues are interested in a pharmacological response, and he points out:7

    "Some studies suggest that the choice of antidepressant can be decided by a blood sample that measures whether there is an inflammatory condition in the body. Other studies show that the same blood sample can be used as a guideline for whether a depressive patient can be treated with anti-inflammatory medicine that has a better effect when there is inflammation present at the same time as the depression.

    However, we need to verify these findings and examine which patients can benefit from this before it can be implemented in everyday clinical practice."

    Mental Health Screening May Overlook Contributing Factors
    Physicians commonly use mental health screening tests to determine how best to treat depressive symptoms. The use of these screening tests is only as good as the physician administering them to analyze the data and how you feel when you enter the doctor's office.

    In one 2013 study, an evaluation of 5,639 participants identified by their clinician as suffering with depression, researchers found only 38.4% met the DSM-4 criteria for a major depressive episode. In speaking to The New York Times, one of the researchers pointed out that not only are physicians prescribing more medications, but patients are demanding more as well.

    He points out Americans have become used to using drugs to address the stresses of daily life that may trigger short-term situational sadness. Mental health screening tests do not often consider vitamin deficiencies, lack of exercise, poor nutrition, lack of sleep or inflammation.

    Antidepressant Use Doubled in Seniors
    In the 2013 study evaluating participants who were prescribed antidepressants by their physician, a mere 14.3% of those over age 65 met the DSM-4 criteria for a major depressive episode. To investigate whether the number of antidepressant drugs prescribed to seniors had risen, another team of researchers looked at data from 1991 to 1993.

    They compared this against data gathered from studies occurring from 2008 to 2011. During the early period, 4.2% of adults were taking antidepressants. This number more than doubled to 10.7% during the later period. The rate of antidepressant use in older adults living in care homes in the English population cohort studies also rose, from 7.4% to 29.2%.

    A study published in 2017 reviewed data from 1990 to 2015 gathered from Australia, Canada, England and the U.S. In this report it was noted that the prevalence of disorders and symptoms had not decreased despite an increase in the prescription of antidepressants.

    In seniors, depression is associated with cognitive decline, dementia and poor medical outcomes. Those with depression also experience higher rates of suicide and mortality. Guidelines from the American Psychiatric Association suggest antidepressant medication with psychotherapy in the elderly. But, despite the increased risks with antidepressants, most seniors receive only medication.

    Treatment with antidepressant drugs in seniors increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes, which increases the risk of other comorbid health conditions including heart disease and stroke. The drugs are also linked to the development of thicker arteries and dementia.

    In addition, depending on the classification of drug, they are known to reduce several nutrients, including coenzyme Q10, vitamin B12, calcium and folate. Of concern in the elderly is the risk of osteoporosis and fractures associated with antidepressant medications.

    One 2015 study compared women treated with indigestion drugs against those treated with SSRIs and found a 76% increased rate of fracture in the first year in those taking antidepressants. When these risks are combined with the knowledge the drugs work no better than placebo for mild to moderate depression, seniors may experience greater risk than any benefit they receive.

    Consider Nonpharmacological Options to Reduce Depression
    Reducing the inflammatory response in your body is crucial as it is a root cause of many chronic conditions, including depression. In addition to strategies to reduce inflammation, there are other approaches with a history of improving symptoms.

    As you consider the following nonpharmacological suggestions, remember you don't have to do them all at once, and you can accomplish them no matter your age or current physical abilities. Begin the journey to better health taking small, permanent steps.

    •Exercise — Exercise normalizes your insulin and leptin sensitivity and has a significant effect on kynurenine, a neurotoxic stress chemical produced from the amino acid tryptophan; brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a growth factor regulating neuroplasticity and new growth of neurons and your endocannabinoid system, all of which

    •Nutrition — There are several nutritional factors that affect your mood and emotions, not the least of which is eating too much sugar. Excessive amounts of sugar disrupt your leptin and insulin sensitivity, affect dopamine levels and damage your mitochondria, all of which affect your mood.

    Nutrients such as omega-3 fats, magnesium, vitamin D and the B vitamins each influence your mood and brain health. You may experience the beneficial effects of boosting these nutrients to optimal levels in as little as two weeks.

    •Light therapy — Light therapy is an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder, and researchers8 find it is also effective against moderate to severe depression. Participants simply used a white light box for 30 minutes each day as soon as possible after waking up.

    •Mindful meditation or Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) — In a study9 of 30 moderately to severely depressed college students, the depressed students were given four 90-minute EFT sessions. Students who received EFT showed significantly less depression than the control group when evaluated three weeks later."

    - Sources and References
    1 Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, October 28, 2019; doi:10.1136/jnnp-2019-320912
    2, 6 Psychology Today, November 11, 2019
    3 Acta Psychiatry Scandinavia, May 2019;139(5):404
    4, 7 EurekAlert! April 8, 2019
    5 Molecular Psychiatry, 2019; doi:10.1038/s41380-019-0471-8
    8 JAMA Psychiatry November 18, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.2235 Interventions/Device Treatments
    9 Depression Research & Treatment, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/257172
    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    Scotland Avalon Member greybeard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    I use DMSO for neck and other pains.
    I relaxes the muscles it also lifts the mood.
    I put it on neat which causes a strong prickly sensation fro about ten minutes but it does the job better than anything else I have used.
    Chris

    Be kind to all life, including your own, no matter what!!

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    United States Avalon Member Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    in my early 20's i was working out like a lunatic, 6 days a week. overdoing it, big time. one day i was squatting and got this sharp pain in my left knee. i knew immediately i'd done something pretty bad. from that point on i revisited squats every now and then, but the pain always returned. it was a pain that lasted 20 years.

    fast forward to the present: i began taking grass fed beef heart capsules for this heart nonsense ive been dealing with, and one of the amazing side effects of it was a resolution to my left knee issue. i'm back to squatting now, with minimal discomfort. i really thought that would be impossible. i thought i was done working out legs, and that perhaps my future would involve a knee surgery of some sort. it's nothing short of a miracle.

    prior to this, i tried every joint supplement out there. you name it, i tried it: chondroitin, glucosamine, msm, hyalauronic acid, essential fatty acids, turmeric, etc etc etc.

    the beef heart is loaded with all those things, plus collagen..and a whole bunch of other stuff no one knows about or has discovered and labelled. it's really changed my life and i highly recommend it.

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    in my early 20's i was working out like a lunatic, 6 days a week. overdoing it, big time. one day i was squatting and got this sharp pain in my left knee. i knew immediately i'd done something pretty bad. from that point on i revisited squats every now and then, but the pain always returned. it was a pain that lasted 20 years.

    fast forward to the present: i began taking grass fed beef heart capsules for this heart nonsense ive been dealing with, and one of the amazing side effects of it was a resolution to my left knee issue. i'm back to squatting now, with minimal discomfort. i really thought that would be impossible. i thought i was done working out legs, and that perhaps my future would involve a knee surgery of some sort. it's nothing short of a miracle.

    prior to this, i tried every joint supplement out there. you name it, i tried it: chondroitin, glucosamine, msm, hyalauronic acid, essential fatty acids, turmeric, etc etc etc.

    the beef heart is loaded with all those things, plus collagen..and a whole bunch of other stuff no one knows about or has discovered and labelled. it's really changed my life and i highly recommend it.
    Thanks, Mike — well done, and so interesting.

    Can you tell us exactly which grass fed beef heart supplement you use?

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  11. Link to Post #126
    United States Avalon Member Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    in my early 20's i was working out like a lunatic, 6 days a week. overdoing it, big time. one day i was squatting and got this sharp pain in my left knee. i knew immediately i'd done something pretty bad. from that point on i revisited squats every now and then, but the pain always returned. it was a pain that lasted 20 years.

    fast forward to the present: i began taking grass fed beef heart capsules for this heart nonsense ive been dealing with, and one of the amazing side effects of it was a resolution to my left knee issue. i'm back to squatting now, with minimal discomfort. i really thought that would be impossible. i thought i was done working out legs, and that perhaps my future would involve a knee surgery of some sort. it's nothing short of a miracle.

    prior to this, i tried every joint supplement out there. you name it, i tried it: chondroitin, glucosamine, msm, hyalauronic acid, essential fatty acids, turmeric, etc etc etc.

    the beef heart is loaded with all those things, plus collagen..and a whole bunch of other stuff no one knows about or has discovered and labelled. it's really changed my life and i highly recommend it.
    Thanks, Mike — well done, and so interesting.

    Can you tell us exactly which grass fed beef heart supplement you use?

    you bet! the brand is called "ancestral supplements".

    they sell a product line of whole food beef organ capsules. i'm taking the grass fed beef heart.

    https://www.ancestralsupplements.com...SAAEgLI9vD_BwE


    it comes in a little pricey at $38, but i hope you don't let that stop you. if you take the recommended 6 capsules a day, it will last a month.

    i took 6 pills a day for perhaps 8 weeks, and currently i take 2 or 3. i think it's important to go through that "loading phase", but then you can taper off and still maintain results.

    the capsules are reasonably sized and easy to take with a little water. and it's a whole food product, so you don't need to take it with a meal or anything.
    Last edited by Mike; 27th December 2019 at 07:43.

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  13. Link to Post #127
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    in my early 20's i was working out like a lunatic, 6 days a week. overdoing it, big time. one day i was squatting and got this sharp pain in my left knee. i knew immediately i'd done something pretty bad. from that point on i revisited squats every now and then, but the pain always returned. it was a pain that lasted 20 years.

    fast forward to the present: i began taking grass fed beef heart capsules for this heart nonsense ive been dealing with, and one of the amazing side effects of it was a resolution to my left knee issue. i'm back to squatting now, with minimal discomfort. i really thought that would be impossible. i thought i was done working out legs, and that perhaps my future would involve a knee surgery of some sort. it's nothing short of a miracle.

    prior to this, i tried every joint supplement out there. you name it, i tried it: chondroitin, glucosamine, msm, hyalauronic acid, essential fatty acids, turmeric, etc etc etc.

    the beef heart is loaded with all those things, plus collagen..and a whole bunch of other stuff no one knows about or has discovered and labelled. it's really changed my life and i highly recommend it.
    Thanks, Mike — well done, and so interesting.

    Can you tell us exactly which grass fed beef heart supplement you use?

    you bet! the brand is called "ancestral supplements".

    they sell a product line of whole food beef organ capsules. i'm taking the grass fed beef heart.

    https://www.ancestralsupplements.com...SAAEgLI9vD_BwE

    it comes in a little pricey at $38, but i hope you don't let that stop you. if you take the recommended 6 capsules a day, it will last a month.

    i took 6 pills a day for perhaps 8 weeks, and currently i take 2 or 3. i think it's important to go through that "loading phase", but then you can taper off and still maintain results.

    the capsules are reasonably sized and easy to take with a little water. and it's a whole food product, so you don't need to take it with a meal or anything.
    Excellent.

    As I shared above, I'm not experiencing any more knee problems. On Christmas Day, I went for my far most strenuous hike of 2019, and my knees were just fine — which was actually rather astonishing. So I'm more than totally grateful. (I know you know what I mean by gratitude! )

    But I'm always on the lookout for more ways of optimizing, or preventing any further issues. I'm not 29 any more , so my self-appointed challenge is to ensure I can do this kind of thing for many years to come.

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    United States Avalon Member Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Bill that's great to hear!

    Those pics you post of your hikes are so beautiful and idyllic. It's wonderful that you're fit and able to tackle it all. I'm really envious of your back yard!

    the knees are so crucial. obvious, i know, but maybe worth saying anyway. once mobility is lost, all sorts of other things start going wrong (like weight gain etc) that are only solvable by the very thing that is lost: mobility. a vicious circle.

    i was quite worried about it, to be honest. my heart isn't in the best shape, and my great fear was being forced to go under anesthesia for a knee surgery and not waking up. it was a thought that plagued me daily.

    now i never think about it. whew, what a delight it is. it just reinforced my belief that there are natural solutions to almost every health challenge. you just have to stick with it and keep trying stuff without getting discouraged.

    i'm so pleased your knees feel strong, but it's always good to have a plan B and C should things change. or like you said, options to even further optimize things.

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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    I messed my knee up years ago so bad that it hurt every time I took a step.
    I still don't know exactly how I did it, but my knees were already challenged since my NDE in '72, after which I was kept in traction for months, with a pin through my leg just under the kneecap.
    That was supposed to prevent the socket and femur from fusing, but it didn't.
    The consequence being that my left leg was shorter than my right, so my right leg was constantly taking up the slack, and both knees were challenged.
    When I later inflicted further damage on my right knee somehow, I was also in dread of having to get medical care again, which so often seems to backfire (at least, in my case).
    I went to see a healer and he did some painful massage work on the cartilage in my knee, and then advised me that it wasn't going to get better unless I exercised it.
    He said the best way to do that was to go to the beach and walk on the sand.
    Fortunately, I lived in Santa Cruz, CA. at the time, so it was no problem finding a sandy beach to walk on.
    I really had my doubts that was going to work--it just seemed too easy.
    It hurt a lot, but walking on the soft sand really did the trick eventually.
    It was kind of like stomping on grapes to make wine, lots of bending of the knee, and presumably that was what toughened up the muscles and straightened out the ligaments.
    In any case, I never had to get knee surgery, and that was a blessing!
    Last edited by onawah; 27th December 2019 at 16:43.
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Working on a concrete floor everyday takes a beating on your body, I'm going to try those capsules , thanks for the lead.

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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    The Great Diabetes Lie
    JANUARY 2, 2020
    https://anh-usa.org/the-great-diabetes-lie/

    (More hyperlinks in the article)

    "Many of us are told that the development of diabetes is a personal failure. New research shows us why this couldn’t be more wrong.
    Action Alert!

    Intriguing research into the diabetes epidemic has shed new light on the main drivers behind this disease. Conventional wisdom tells us that sugar consumption, lack of exercise, and obesity are behind the surge in diabetes. While these are contributing factors, new work in this area implicates environmental toxins as a far more important cause of diabetes, including chemicals like BPA and phthalates that are found in many everyday consumer goods. And while the evidence mounts demonstrating the toll these chemicals are taking on our health, the government is stubbornly refusing to do anything about it.

    Joseph Pizzorno, ND, demonstrates that the rise in sugar consumption predated the diabetes epidemic by four decades, casting doubt on the idea that sugar is a primary causal factor in diabetes. The increased incidence of obesity is another common culprit, but Pizzorno argues that obesity is caused by the same things as diabetes: persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Pizzorno demonstrates that the rise in production of synthetic organic chemicals is closely aligned with the prevalence of diabetes.

    Research has shown that, while obesity is linked with diabetes, the level of our exposure to toxins also has a dramatic impact. Obese people in the bottom 10% of toxin load do not have an increased risk of diabetes; 30% of lean people with a high toxin load will develop diabetes. These findings are a true testament to the havoc these chemicals are wreaking on the human body.

    Pizzorno and his colleagues have been working to estimate the percentage of disease that is caused by POPs (you can read about their methodology here https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4991654/). The results are stunning. According to their research, about 90% of diabetes cases could be attributed to the “massive increase in body load of toxins.” The worst chemicals are BPA (bisphenol A), arsenic, phthalates, PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons).

    How do POPs like BPA and arsenic cause diabetes? Arsenic, for example, decreases insulin production. BPA blocks insulin receptor sites and causes insulin resistance, which increases the risk of diabetes in addition to obesity.

    The next question is how to avoid these chemicals. We’re exposed to arsenic mostly through our food and water. Pizzorno writes that 13 million Americans use public water that exceeds Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limits for arsenic. Many water sources, both public and private, have not been tested. Dietary sources of arsenic include mushrooms, seafood, rice, and poultry.

    ANH has written extensively about BPA. It is a chemical used in the production of certain plastics and is used in many consumer goods, such as food and drink packaging, cash register receipts, water bottles, implanted medical devices, and many more. Researchers have found BPA in 90% of Americans tested.

    Although BPA is used widely in consumer goods, the FDA banned its use in baby bottles and infant formula packaging—though the agency said this wasn’t due to safety concerns, but because the chemical industry was simply no longer using BPA in its packaging for those products.

    Recent information, however, shows that the FDA’s conclusion that BPA is safe is based on testing that dramatically underestimates https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...381-X/fulltext the amount of BPA that we’re exposed to, throwing into question the federal government’s overall approach in determining the safe exposure level of all kinds of chemicals. Some experts estimate that safe levels of BPA are 20,000 times lower than the FDA’s limit.

    To set a safe human exposure level for a chemical, industry and government scientist start by exposing lab animals to high doses of a chemical, incrementally reducing the dose until no ill effects are detected. They then round the last number down to create a “safe” exposure limit. The problem is that we’re learning that endocrine disruptors like BPA can have negative effects at extremely low doses. A small change in hormone concentration—the equivalent of one drop of water in 20 Olympic-sized swimming pools—is enough to have an effect on the human endocrine system, which could impact growth, metabolism, sleep, and other important bodily functions.

    In fact, an investigation into the FDA’s treatment of BPA showed efforts to ignore evidence of harm, biased data interpretation, and sharp disagreements between FDA and health officials at the National Institutes of Health on the safety of BPA. https://www.ehn.org/how-much-bpa-in-...1#rebelltitem1 The reporting concluded that “US regulators may be operating at the fringes of scientific integrity, possibly with the intent to keep the current testing and regulatory regime intact and to avoid scrutiny.”

    Concern about the health risks of BPA led many companies to abandon the chemical and slap a “BPA-Free” sticker on their products, but as we’ve written previously, the alternatives are often close chemical relatives of BPA and are just as toxic. https://anh-usa.org/bpa-free-but-not-toxic-free/ ANH filed a Citizen’s Petition with the FDA to remove BPA from receipts, but the petition was denied.

    Laboratory tests can help determine what our body load of these different POPs. Pizzorno writes that the most important and easily available is the γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT), also known as GGTP.

    The best way to deal with these toxins is to avoid them as best we can. Other strategies for detoxification include increasing glutathione production, increasing dietary fiber, and toxin-specific interventions to prevent damage and facilitate detoxification. But avoidance is best; once in the body, these chemicals can be difficult to get rid of, as they store and accumulate in fat.

    Given this alarming evidence, it is time to take meaningful steps to protect Americans from these exposures. An easy and exceedingly obvious step would be to ban BPA, something the FDA has so far appeared unwilling to do. When given the choice between stemming the diabetes epidemic and protecting the profits of the chemical industry, which do we think government agencies will choose?

    To avoid BPA, remember that glass is best when it comes to food and drink containers, and cans are typically the worst—even those that say BPA-free!

    Action Alert! Write to the FDA and demand they ban BPA and adjust how they evaluate safe exposure limits for chemicals. Please send your message immediately." https://secure3.convio.net/aahf/site...Action&id=3449
    Last edited by onawah; 2nd January 2020 at 22:23.
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    I find it amazing that people still throw the term 'FDA approved' around like it means something, like it is a valid seal of approval and now you can rest assured the product/drug is safe. There may be some integrity at the lowest levels of this crime syndicate but anyone that is relying on them to examine unbiased research and to make decisions based on the best interest of the people is living in a pipe dream.

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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Medical Psychology
    https://drsircus.com/general/medical-psychology/
    Published on January 21, 2020

    "Medical Psychology, a field that ‘we will redefine, is typically seen as the application of psychological principles to the practice of medicine. However, in my new course Mindless Psychology, (coming soon) we are going to give equal air time to the application of Natural Allopathic Medicine to the practice of psychology and psychiatry. A comprehensive unified approach, rather than primarily drug-oriented one, is what is called for.

    Things are bad enough and many of us feel it so the last thing anyone needs today is to be hurt further by others who dump their trips on us. This goes for medicine as well psychology and therapists. We can end up in the wrong doctors or therapists office and not get what we need or worse, get what we don’t need which can hurt and even kill us.

    This course will lay out the foundations for proper medical care for mentally and emotionally compromised populations. Proper care starts with turning away from the pharmaceutical poison the patient paradigm to safe and effective natural medicines that can be concentrated just like they are in ICU and emergency departments. The new paradigm is safe, effective and does no harm.

    There are many strong answers that can be given to patients on their first visit and those answers are universal. Establishing general needs is not difficult for the heart but the mind will argue forever over the simplest things. The mind fills itself up with all kinds of trips, that can be laid on others, but the heart tends to easily alight on truth and hold onto it like a dog holding onto a bone.

    Medical psychology revolves around the idea that both the body and mind are one, indivisible structure. Continuing with this line of thought, all diseases whether of the mind or of the physical body must be treated as if they have both been effected.

    “Medical psychology has historically been defined as the branch of psychology concerned with the application of psychological principles to the practice of medicine. Medical psychology shares with the fields of health psychology and behavioral medicine an interest in the ways in which biological, psychological, and social factors interact to influence health Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine
    Quote Over the last 30 years increasing evidence has been found for
    the existence of complex links between the immune system,
    the central nervous system and the endocrine system on
    the one hand, and psychological phenomena…on the other.
    Van Gent, et al.
    In my many other published books I have redefined the practice of medicine. From ICU to home care, many are trying to escape from the mainstream pharmaceutical paradigm. In this volume we are going to reach escape velocity from the nasty drugs that psychiatrists are shoveling into mentally and emotionally compromised populations and replace them with concentrated nutritional medicines that are a thousands of times safer than pharmaceuticals.

    Twenty-seven drug regulatory agency warnings cite psychiatric drug side effects of mania, psychosis, violence and homicidal ideation; 1,531 cases of psychiatric drug induced homicide/homicidal ideation have been reported to the US FDA; 65 high profile cases of mass shootings/murder have been committed by individuals under the influence of these drugs, (and the numbers have been increasing dramatically) yet there has never been a federal investigation into the link between seemingly senseless acts of violence and the use of mind-altering psychotropic drugs.

    Personally I have no compassion for psychiatrists who will not look at safer alternatives. And now we have some clinical psychologists jumping on the pharmaceutical gravy train instead of using their intelligence to determine what their patients actually need, which are substances like magnesium, that help reset inflammation and stress while calming the entire nervous system.

    Magnesium The Unseen Key
    Quote Magnesium deficiency causes serotonin-deficiency
    with possible resultant aberrant behaviors,
    including depression suicide or irrational violence.
    Paul Mason
    The Magnesium Librarian
    And instead of pharmaceutical poisons, that drive mentally compromised individuals over the cliff into violence, suicide and even mass shootings, this book prescribes very strong natural medicines, many of which are used in the finest emergency rooms and intensive care centers, not only for physical problems but emotional and mental problems as well.

    Even a mild deficiency of magnesium can cause increased
    sensitivity to noise, nervousness, irritability, mental depression,
    confusion, twitching, trembling, apprehension, and insomnia.

    It is clear though that magnesium deficiency or imbalance plays a role in the symptoms of mood disorders. Observational and experimental studies have shown an association between magnesium and aggression[1],[2],[3],[4],[5] anxiety[6],[7],[8] ADHD[9],[10],[11],[12] bipolar disorder[13],[14] depression[15],[16],[17],[18] and schizophrenia [19],[20],[21],[22]. Patients who had made suicide attempts (by using either violent or nonviolent means) had significantly lower mean CSF magnesium level irrespective of the diagnosis.[23]

    New research data adds to mounting evidence that depression is linked to an inflammatory response. Inflammation influences the quality of sleep, metabolism, stress response and the release of cytokines. Magnesium medicine is perfect for bringing down inflammation.

    When magnesium levels become dramatically deficient we see symptoms
    such as convulsions, gross muscular tremor, atheloid movements,
    muscular weakness, vertigo, auditory hyperacusis, aggressiveness,
    excessive irritability, hallucinations, confusion, and semicomma.

    Though I started this book leaning into the spiritual and psychological side of myself and my work I cannot forget the medical side and how in the beginning of any work with a patient certain points have to be addressed. That should be as clear as a patient stopping breathing in ICU. Everything is off the table then and 100 percent of attention goes to re-initiating respiration. Breathing actually is a good place to start in every patients journey. ICU should teach us that, however we do not need to be in ICU to pay attention to our breath and how we breathe.

    The faster you breathe the
    less oxygen your cells get.

    If we are breathing too fast and shallow we are going to have problems. Mental, emotional and physical problems. Whatever other interventions we might want to make nothing will really reverse the negative effects of too fast breathing. We can only slow it down to change or reverse the negative effects on our minds, emotions and bodies. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists who prescribe dangerous drugs without paying attention to something as basic as breathing are dangerous.

    Bicarbonates can compensate, in part, for too fast breathing, by replenishing the carbon dioxide that is being blow off too rapidly. Eventually we will need to see that CO2 (bicarbonate turns to CO2) is a medicine that can also be employed in psychiatric disorders.

    The entire field of psychology, psychiatry and all branches of medicine should have received the message already that magnesium deficiency is at the root of a broad range of mental, emotional and physical disorders. Again it does not matter what any professional will do in terms of other treatments nothing stands in for magnesium medicine. A therapist can work for years with a patient but if that patient remains magnesium deficient they are not going to get better.

    If magnesium is severely deficient, the brain is particularly affected. Clouded thinking, confusion, disorientation, marked depression and even the terrifying hallucinations of delirium are largely brought on by a lack of this nutrient and remedied when magnesium is administered. It is truly frightening to see that the vast majority of people are magnesium deficient, and often severely so.

    Magnesium chloride is a nutritional medicine/supplement that doctors sometimes use when they are really desperate to save someone’s life in an emergency room or intensive care unit, but today people all over the world are simply splashing it on their bodies for transdermal absorption. Kind of like splashing on aftershave lotion, it stings a bit for some people but gets absorbed in through the skin quickly.

    It really is astonishing that psychologists and psychiatrists remain mostly ignorant about magnesium as are cardiologists who let millions of patients die from cardiac arrest without lifting a finger to promote magnesium medicine.

    Because magnesium is involved in so many processes in the body, once a deficiency develops, that deficiency can spiral out of control. A low magnesium level causes metabolic functions to decrease, causing further stress on the body, reducing the body’s ability to absorb and retain magnesium. A marginal deficiency can easily be transformed into a more significant problem when stressful events trigger additional magnesium loss. In the extreme situations, stressful events trigger sudden drops of serum magnesium, leading to cardiac arrest. Magnesium is considered the “anti-stress” mineral. It is a natural tranquilizer that functions to relax skeletal muscles as well as the smooth muscles of blood vessels and the gastrointestinal tract.

    Magnesium offers a powerful way to treat depression; it helps us to better deal with stress because large amounts of magnesium are lost when a person is under stress. Anxiety and panic attacks are addressed by magnesium by keeping adrenal stress hormones under control so it really helps in dealing with stressful emergencies."

    REFERENCES ▲
    [1] Izenwasser SE et al. Stimulant-like effects of magnesium on aggression in mice. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 25(6):1195-9, 1986.

    [2] Henrotte JG. Type A behavior and magnesium metabolism. Magnesium 5:201-10, 1986.

    [3] Bennett CPW, McEwen LM, McEwen HC, Rose EL. The Shipley Project: treating food allergy to prevent criminal behaviour in community settings. J Nutr Environ Med 8:77-83, 1998.

    [4] Kirow GK, Birch NJ, Steadman P, Ramsey RG. Plasma magnesium levels in a population of psychiatric patients: correlation with symptoms. Neuropsychobiology 30(2-3):73-8, 1994.

    [5] Kantak KM. Magnesium deficiency alters aggressive behavior and catecholamine function. Behav Neurosci 102(2):304-11, 1988

    [6] Buist RA. Anxiety neurosis: The lactate connection. Int Clin Nutr Rev 5:1-4, 1985.

    [7] Seelig MS, Berger AR, Spieholz N. Latent tetany and anxiety, marginal Mg deficit, and normocalcemia. Dis Nerv Syst 36:461-5, 1975.

    [8] Durlach J, Durlach V, Bac P, et al. Magnesium and therapeutics. Magnes Res 7(3/4):313-28, 1994.

    [9] Durlach J. Clinical aspects of chronic magnesium deficiency, in MS Seelig, Ed. Magnesium in Health and Disease. New York, Spectrum Publications, 1980.

    [10] Kozielec T, Starobrat-Hermelin B. Assessment of magnesium levels in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Magnes Res 10(2):143-8, 1997.

    [11] Kozielec T, Starobrat-Hermelin B. Assessment of magnesium levels in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Magnes Res 10(2):143-8, 1997.

    [12] Starobrat-Hermelin B, Kozielec T. The effects of magnesium physiological supplementation on hyperactivity in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Positive response to magnesium oral loading test. Magnes Res 10(2):149-56, 1997.

    [13] George MS, Rosenstein D, Rubinow DR, et al. CSF magnesium in affective disorder: lack of correlation with clinical course of treatment. Psychiatry Res 51(2):139-46, 1994.

    [14] Kirov GK, Birch NJ, Steadman P, Ramsey RG. Plasma magnesium levels in a population of psychiatric patients: correlations with symptoms. Neuropsychobiology 1994;30(2-3):73-8, 1994.

    [15] Linder J et al. Calcium and magnesium concentrations in affective disorder: Difference between plasma and serum in relation to symptoms. Acta Psychiatr Scand 80:527-37, 1989

    [16] Frazer A et al. Plasma and erythrocyte electrolytes in affective disorders. J Affect Disord 5(2):103-13, 1983.

    [17] Bjorum N. Electrolytes in blood in endogenous depression. Acta Psychiatr Scand 48:59-68, 1972.

    [18] Cade JFJA. A significant elevation of plasma magnesium levels in schizophrenia and depressive states. Med J Aust 1:195-6, 1964.

    [19] Levine J, Rapoport A, Mashiah M, Dolev E. Serum and cerebrospinal levels of calcium and magnesium in acute versus remitted schizophrenic patients. Neuropsychobiology 33(4):169-72, 1996.

    [20] Kanofsky JD et al. Is iatrogenic hypomagnesemia common in schizophrenia? Abstract. J Am Coll Nutr 10(5):537, 1991.

    [21] Kirov GK, Tsachev KN. Magnesium, schizophrenia and manic-depressive disease. Neuropsychobiology 23(2):79-81, 1990.

    [22] Chhatre SM et al. Serum magnesium levels in schizophrenia. Ind J Med Sci 39(11):259-61, 1985.

    [23] Banki CM, Vojnik M, Papp Z, Balla KZ, Arato M. Cerebrospinal fluid magnesium and calcium related to amine metabolites, diagnosis, and suicide attempts. Biol Psychiatry. 1985 Feb;20(2):163-71.
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    Default Re: Joints, inflammation, and all that stuff

    Gosh so many good responses! Inflammation occurs when the body cannot expel the toxins be it in the cell or in a disrupting situation at the wall of the cell. Toxins remain the roadblock to health as well as what can get into the cell that is worthy. Since we test nutritionally, when I am in joint crisis meaning when every joint is screaming, it is usually the kidneys that are not draining adequately. So kidney formulas are primary. Then we look at liver and elimination. How many of you go into an inflammatory crisis after eating high salt? I certainly do. Especially home cooked ham which is off my list. I agree with sugars as they are also a roadblock to health but not fruit. I agree with Bill going for fruit and some raw honey. When you are all inflammed, make muesli. Just chop fruit, some nuts, sunflower seeds, coconut, and juices of the orange. I will also eat goat yogurt from Trader Joes because it digests in 20 min not like cow yogurt that may take hours. I also agree with Tumeric in moderate doses. Black pepper must accompany Indian spices. I buy Vadham which is beyond good from the Indian gardens and has a revered following. Go on line and check it out. They have Ashwaghanda Tumeric powder which I add to my protein smoothies and their teas are exceptional. Overall, my recommendation is always to find a practitioner who can nutritionally test for Systemic Formulas (out of Utah). They carry the anti viral, anti fungal anti bacterial formulas we have used for decades and work at eliminating the toxins. In every case, back to drainage kidneys and liver must be attended. Peace!
    When you realize where you come from, you naturally become tolerant, disinterested, amused, kindhearted as a grandparent, dignified as a king. -- I Ching

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