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    Administrator Cara's Avatar
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    Default Optogenetics — controlling living tissue with light

    Coming soon to a human near you?

    Quote Scientists Implant Fake Memories Into Birds To Teach Them New Songs À La ‘Inception’
    Zebra finches typically learn to sing a song from their parents through imitation, but a new study shows they can learn a song without ever hearing it.

    Natasha Ishak


    Scientists performed memory inception on zebra finches, implanting fake memories into their brains.

    To learn how our bodies work, scientists often turn to study animals with similar physiological traits as humans. Scientists use zebra finch birds, for example, to understand the mechanisms of human speech because the species’ vocal development is quite similar to ours.

    Which makes a recent study all the more interesting. A team of neuroscientists recently performed a real-life memory inception on zebra finches, implanting fake memories of melodies that the birds had never heard before.

    According to Science Alert, scientists used optogenetics — a method of controlling living tissue with light — to activate certain neuron circuits in the birds’ brains.

    As researchers pulsed the light tool in a certain rhythm while targeting certain neurons, they were able to encode “memories” in the birds’ brains. The time certain neurons were kept active corresponded to the lengths of the notes in the songs that the birds were later able to recall.


    Zebra finch parents tell their eggs that it’s hot outside.

    Zebra finches typically learn to sing a song from their fathers and other adults. In fact, some research has even shown that unhatched baby finches can still process messages sent by their parents from outside the egg.

    In this study, however, the light tool assumed the role of parental figure, guiding the bird in memorizing a song without it ever hearing it.

    The study is the first of its kind to confirm brain regions that encode “behavioral-goal” memories, which guides creatures — like humans — to mimic a certain speech or behavior.

    “We’re not teaching the bird everything it needs to know – just the duration of syllables in its song,” neuroscientist Todd Roberts from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre said in a press statement. “The two brain regions we tested in this study represent just one piece of the puzzle.”

    The study also discovered that if communication between two brain regions — called HVC (high vocal center) and NIf (nucleus interfacialis) — were cut off after the bird had learned a song through memory, the bird could still sing it.


    A zebra finch courtship song.

    But if that communication channel between two regions was cut before the bird had the chance to form memories of the song, the zebra finch could never learn it, no matter how many times it heard the song afterward.

    The study was published in the journal Science. It focused only on the duration of a given syllable — not on its pitch. And it may be a while before we’ll be able to make similar discoveries in the human brain.

    “The human brain and the pathways associated with speech and language are immensely more complicated than the songbird’s circuitry,” Roberts said. “But our research is providing strong clues of where to look for more insight on neurodevelopmental disorders.”

    So, for now, if you want to memorize every Beatles song ever written, you’re going to have to do it the old fashioned way and listen to them over and over again.

    Eventually, the goal is to figure out how vocal learning and language development happens in the human brain, and possibly even find work-arounds for people with autism or one of many other neurological conditions that affect speech.
    From: https://allthatsinteresting.com/bird...I_LlLf4Hgc3eIQ
    *I have loved the stars too dearly to be fearful of the night*

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    Default Re: Optogenetics — controlling living tissue with light

    I had never heard the term optogenetics before, Cara. Thanks for bringing it to my awareness.

    Here is a youtube by Amazing Polly casting it in a quite sinister light:
    "We're all bozos on this bus"

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    Administrator Cara's Avatar
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    Default Re: Optogenetics — controlling living tissue with light

    Quote Posted by Ayt (here)
    I had never heard the term optogenetics before, Cara. Thanks for bringing it to my awareness.
    You’re welcome Ayt.

    For anyone interested in this topic, there’s a whole page of studies on this topic of optogenetics on ScienceDirect - https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics...e/optogenetics. Some of the studies suggest a broader research programme of “designer genomes” intended for humans, with light and light-senstive proteins being the mechanism to use. Others seem to be more about behaviour modification.

    Stanford University appears to have an optogenetics laboratory: https://web.stanford.edu/group/dlab/optogenetics/. The lab is named after Karl Deisseroth, who defines optogenetics as:
    Quote Optogenetics is a technology that allows targeted, fast control of precisely defined events in biological systems as complex as freely moving mammals. By delivering optical control at the speed (millisecond-scale) and with the precision (cell type–specific) required for biological processing, optogenetic approaches have opened new landscapes for the study of biology, both in health and disease.
    From: https://www.nature.com/articles/nmeth.f.324

    So it seems the intent is control at the biological level.
    *I have loved the stars too dearly to be fearful of the night*

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    Default Re: Optogenetics — controlling living tissue with light

    Quote Posted by Cara (here)
    Quote Posted by Ayt (here)
    I had never heard the term optogenetics before, Cara. Thanks for bringing it to my awareness.
    You’re welcome Ayt.

    For anyone interested in this topic, there’s a whole page of studies on this topic of optogenetics on ScienceDirect - https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics...e/optogenetics. Some of the studies suggest a broader research programme of “designer genomes” intended for humans, with light and light-senstive proteins being the mechanism to use. Others seem to be more about behaviour modification.

    Stanford University appears to have an optogenetics laboratory: https://web.stanford.edu/group/dlab/optogenetics/. The lab is named after Karl Deisseroth, who defines optogenetics as:
    Quote Optogenetics is a technology that allows targeted, fast control of precisely defined events in biological systems as complex as freely moving mammals. By delivering optical control at the speed (millisecond-scale) and with the precision (cell type–specific) required for biological processing, optogenetic approaches have opened new landscapes for the study of biology, both in health and disease.
    From: https://www.nature.com/articles/nmeth.f.324

    So it seems the intent is control at the biological level.
    The use of pulsed light to alter biology and install information into a persons genetics and memories?

    Makes me wonder about the various temple complexes around the world, like Newgrange in Ireland, that are built to focus the light of the Sun every Winter Solstice and Venus every 8 years.
    Quote This is the basic 8-year cycle of Venus. It repeats itself very closely every 8 years, and exactly every 40 years. A new cycle started in the year AD1, and also in AD2001. There are four possible occasions throughout its 8-year cycle where Venus rises before the sun during the winter solstice. On only one of those occasions does Venus pass across the aperture of the Newgrange lightbox, at the point of its cycle where she is at her brightest. On this morning, exactly 24 minutes before sunlight enters the chamber, light from the sun bounces off the surface of the planet Venus and enters the chambers at Newgrange as a collimated beam through the lightbox. For about 15 minutes the chamber is brightly illuminated by the cold, steely light of a full Venus, the third brightest object in the sky. As the ghostly light of Venus moves off the slot, the warm golden light of the sun fills the chamber before it also moves on and the chamber returns to darkness. On all other occasions Venus rises too far north for its light to enter the carefully designed lightbox.
    Winter Solstice at Newgrange

    Dark retreats before
    the calculated caress
    of sun's brightness.

    Winter’s hand pulls back
    from a small ancient chamber;
    light intensifies.

    For a few minutes,
    brilliance scatters kisses
    before light recedes.

    The night must return,
    and we can draw light into
    dark times if we try.

    The acoustics in Newgrange are also supposed to be remarkable. Could a combination of acoustics and astral light create optogenetic effects? Curious to ponder when the book Uriels Machine describe them as resurrection chambers.

    What spiritual insights, gnosis and wisdom are they resurrecting into their genetics?

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    Default Re: Optogenetics — controlling living tissue with light

    https://www.unwindingwithlasers.com/#!



    We use one of these for pain and healing. It works quite well. Not exactly what you've described in the original post, but still a device using light for change.
    The quantum field responds not to what we want; but to who we are being. Dr. Joe Dispenza

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