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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    https://www.foreignaffairs.com/artic...primed-explode

    In this article that appeared in the magazine of the American Council on Foreign Relations you can read how president Piñera of Chile announced a 20 percent increase in the minimum pension, a higher minimum wage, and price cuts for medicines for the poor. Why did he not announce that along with the price increase for the public transport that sparked the revolt? Why did the writers of the article not question the idiocy of the FMI advisers of the country? Same as the idiocy of the advisors of French President Macron that did not foresee the impact of a taxincrease on petrol in the rural areas that sparked the Yellow Vest revolt. The harm is done now and their foolishness learned the populations not only how they operate like nasty scammers but much worse.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    The Stalinists and the Nazi's learned a few things from their concentration camps. If you control the water and food you can put just about anything in it to make the people comply and be docile.

    Now if you could only control the air. I know, let's make carbon dioxide a dangerous gas. And then lets tax the emissions of it. The Earth people aren't that stupid are they? Oh ya they'll believe anything we teach in schools and put out in the media. Co2 is a very dangerous gas and plants do not use it to make oxygen, and we must tax the countries arbitrarily for them producing it. Austerity and non production is the Only way to save the planet also.

    I am sure they'll buy it.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Some interesting observations from a cosmic perspective about the current chaos and the causes on Dark Journalist's 71st episode of the X Series, a Halloween special;

    ...Observations about the characteristics of souls passing through 4D, which is a chaotic realm, on the way to the 5th, which is less polarized.
    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    more one defeat of Socialist (big country) called by Foro de São Paulo:

    The government of El Salvador ordered the departure of Venezuelan diplomats appointed by the dictatorship of Nicolás Maduro.

    https://twitter.com/migracion_sv/sta...890688/photo/1

    ---edit---

    yes, the twit did disappear
    I saw It, with the image of presidential order

    El Salvador expels Venezuelan diplomats from the country -- In a statement, the government said President Nayib Bukele recognized opposition leader Juan Guaido as Venezuela’s interim president until free elections were held in the South American country. El Salvador will receive a new Venezuela diplomatic corps, named by Guaido, the government added.

    Venezuela expels El Salvador's diplomats -- Nicolas Maduro has ordered El Salvador's diplomats to leave the country in 48 hours in retaliation against San Salvador for expelling its officials a day earlier.
    Last edited by RogeRio; 9th November 2019 at 14:36.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    It must of been a good twit because it doesn't exist anymore. They (twitter) are very busy with their damage control.

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    Default Re: Was this electoral agenda bold or failed ?

    Quote Posted by rogparan (here)
    interestingly, the electoral agenda for follow-up at the last meeting of Foro de Sao Paulo, in Caracas (Venezuela) jul-2019, did not foresee a runoff in Bolivia presidential elections, where Evo Morales was surprised that didn't win in the first round, and even announced that there is a coup (with foreign powers).
    related to quoted post " Was this electoral agenda bold or failed ? " moved to this thread, the developments not being published in mainstream media are quite enlightening.

    ------

    Bolivia election audit chief makes surprise resignation

    The chief of the technical mission from the Organisation of American States (OAS), Mexican Arturo Espinosa, announced he is stepping down from the role just a day after beginning the review of the controversial poll.

    "I have decided to withdraw from the audit so as not to compromise its impartiality. I should have informed the OAS about previous public statements (declarations) about the electoral process in Bolivia," he wrote in a tweet.


    Auditing sees 'addicted process' in Bolivia election

    Panamanian audit firm Ethical Hacking, hired by Bolivia's Supreme Electoral Court a month before the October 20 elections, published a report with its findings on the process. “We cannot give faith in the integrity of the election results because the whole process is vitiated by nullity”

    According to the audit report, people with “special authorization” could enter the system, change the source code of the software and have access to the results while the calculation was taking place.

    ------

    Countries that use an electronic voting system run the risk of fraud, and spend a fortune on public money, to sustain technologies that make everyone foolish in choosing their political leaders

    -------

    Bolivian president Evo Morales resigns after election result dispute

    In a televised address, Bolivia’s president of nearly 14 years said he was stepping down for the “good of the country”. but added in an attack on opponents whom he had accused of a coup attempt: “Dark forces have destroyed democracy.”

    -------

    personal note -- the "political discourse" of Foro de São Paulo members don't change. Dilma Roussef even today goes on saying around the world that she suffered a coup in Brazil, despite the fact that she virtually broke the economy, and if she had not taken out of power, Brazil would have come to an sad end, as in Venezuela.

    -------

    Evo Morales Flies to Mexico but Vows to Return to Bolivia ‘With Force’ -- the former president of Bolivia who resigned under pressure from street protests and the military, flew to Mexico on Tuesday, but not before recording an audio message promising Bolivians, “I will return soon with force.”

    -- out of mainstream media, we can see evidences of who is the scammer --

    Evo Morales in Asuncion, near the Mexican plane that brought it, interestingly 2 Prosegur trucks carrying money ..

    Last edited by RogeRio; 12th November 2019 at 14:34. Reason: update

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    From https://nytimes.com/2019/11/08/opinion/contributors/latin-america-protest-repression.html

    Latin Americans Are Furious

    People are no longer remaining silent in the region, and continued government attempts at repression will only make matters worse.

    Nov. 8, 2019


    Demonstrators blocked a road with a bonfire during a protest against the government in Santiago, Chile, on Wednesday.

    There is a rage brewing in Latin America.

    Aware that they don’t live in real democracies, the people of Venezuela, Nicaragua and Bolivia are taking to the streets. In Chile, Ecuador and Haiti, citizens are angry about social inequality and the lack of economic opportunity.

    Meanwhile, Argentina’s government is turning back to the Peronist-Kirchnerian left, and Mexico’s drug-related violence continues to spiral out of control. Other countries in the region aren’t faring much better.

    Within this chaotic atmosphere in Latin America, there are three major aspects at play: Inequality, protests and social media, and authoritarian leanings.

    Inequality

    Latin America is still the most unequal region in the world; a huge gap continues to separate the wealthy and the poor. The sad lesson here is that while democracy is certainly necessary, it isn’t enough. From colonial times through today, Latin American economies have been set up for the benefit of the few. After decades of authoritarianism, many nations had hoped that, in addition to voting rights, economic welfare would be a reality for all. It was not to be.

    I recently heard a young Chilean protester say this: “The poor people of Chile took to the streets because they can’t take it anymore. Because they want water. Because the government took away the rivers and sold them to private landowners. Because they have us young people selling our lives on the streets to pay miserable fees. The people of Chile are finally awake, and they won’t fall asleep ever again.”

    The president, Sebastián Piñera, has expressed his regrets. “I’m aware that we showed a complete lack of vision, and so I apologize to my fellow citizens,” he said in a nationally televised broadcast. But before he apologized he sent the military into the streets, resulting in several deaths, and established a curfew, the first declared in Chile since the end of Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship.

    When someone apologizes after the tanks have been sent in and people have died, it doesn’t seem particularly sincere. “Sending the military to restore order is a high-risk and sensitive decision,” José Miguel Vivanco, the director of Human Rights Watch for the Americas, told me in an interview. Mr. Vivanco pointed to Argentina, Chile and other countries where the military class has been associated with brutal dictatorships.

    Something similar happened recently in Ecuador, where protests against the economic policies that President Lenín Moreno had put in place — after he had agreed to a controversial loan from the International Monetary Fund — were violently repressed. The United Nations received allegations of human rights abuses by the government’s security forces, and Ecuador’s ombudsman’s office reported that as many as 10 people had been killed and over 1,000 injured.

    “Bloody repression?” asked José Valencia, Ecuador’s minister of foreign affairs, when I interviewed him. “No, because the police didn’t cause those deaths; those were accidents during the protests. The police, as far as we know, behaved appropriately and proportionally, given the situation.”

    It’s hard to believe that all those deaths were accidental. Who gave the order to attack the protesters? Who fired the tear gas? And what about those in uniform who assaulted demonstrators with their truncheons? People who are simply complaining about the deplorable economic conditions in which they live don’t deserve such treatment.

    Protests and Social Media

    Nicolás Maduro, the Venezuelan dictator, has tried to take credit for the demonstrations occurring in other South American countries. “We are following the São Paulo Forum plan” he said recently, referring to a purported joint action agreed to by the group of left-wing Latin American parties and organizations.

    There is no evidence of any such coordinated action. But even if there were, it wouldn’t explain the one million people on the streets of Santiago, the Chilean capital, or the huge demonstrations in Haiti.

    Those demonstrations were possible only because democracy has created new spaces for protest, which in the past was not allowed, whether in Pinochet’s Chile or in Argentina, during the junta, or elsewhere.

    But today demonstrators aren’t afraid. Social media and mobile technology have made it easy to organize effective protests, allowing young people to overcome government censorship and control. Official communications are balanced by millions of videos, photographs and texts on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

    And once legitimacy and credibility are lost on social media, no government can rule.

    Authoritarian Leanings

    Latin America has never gotten over its attraction to authoritarianism. Ever since Simón Bolívar, who had become dictator of Peru, toyed with the idea of becoming president for life of the short-lived state of Gran Colombia, others have followed.

    Today, Latin America has its fair share of dictators. Both Mr. Maduro in Venezuela and the husband-and-wife duo of Daniel Ortega and Rosario Murillo in Nicaragua have rigged elections and committed human rights violations in order to hold on to power. Cuba has shown us how 60 years of repression can be normalized: Miguel Díaz-Canel was recently handpicked to succeed the dictator Raúl Castro, Fidel’s brother.

    In Bolivia, Evo Morales can’t seem to understand that “no” means no. In a 2016 referendum, the Bolivian people rejected a measure that would have allowed Mr. Morales to run for a fourth term. He has been in power for nearly 14 years, and yet still wants more. But the protests won’t stop. A strongman-style crackdown on the people has never been an effective model for solving Latin America’s problems.

    The time for staying quiet is over. Latin Americans are no longer keeping their dissatisfaction to themselves. What’s new about this recent wave of protests is that official censorship is out, while new digital technologies for sharing popular grievances and coming together in protest are in. Unfortunately, Latin American governments have always responded in the same way: with repression.

    But this tactic is no longer working. The protests in Ecuador may reignite at the slightest provocation. The honeymoon enjoyed by Mexico’s new president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, may soon end if drug-related killings continue, such as last week’s murders of U.S. families. Bolivians are fighting against five more years of a Morales presidency, while the dictators in Venezuela, Nicaragua and Cuba can’t even seem to control their message.

    First they lose the media, then they lose the streets. This discomfort and anger are an omen. Come what may, nothing will remain the same.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    From https://nytimes.com/2019/11/08/opinion/contributors/latin-america-protest-repression.html

    Latin Americans Are Furious

    People are no longer remaining silent in the region, and continued government attempts at repression will only make matters worse.

    Nov. 8, 2019


    Demonstrators blocked a road with a bonfire during a protest against the government in Santiago, Chile, on Wednesday.

    There is a rage brewing in Latin America.

    Aware that they don’t live in real democracies, the people of Venezuela, Nicaragua and Bolivia are taking to the streets. In Chile, Ecuador and Haiti, citizens are angry about social inequality and the lack of economic opportunity.

    Meanwhile, Argentina’s government is turning back to the Peronist-Kirchnerian left, and Mexico’s drug-related violence continues to spiral out of control. Other countries in the region aren’t faring much better.

    Within this chaotic atmosphere in Latin America, there are three major aspects at play: Inequality, protests and social media, and authoritarian leanings.

    Inequality

    Latin America is still the most unequal region in the world; a huge gap continues to separate the wealthy and the poor. The sad lesson here is that while democracy is certainly necessary, it isn’t enough. From colonial times through today, Latin American economies have been set up for the benefit of the few. After decades of authoritarianism, many nations had hoped that, in addition to voting rights, economic welfare would be a reality for all. It was not to be.

    I recently heard a young Chilean protester say this: “The poor people of Chile took to the streets because they can’t take it anymore. Because they want water. Because the government took away the rivers and sold them to private landowners. Because they have us young people selling our lives on the streets to pay miserable fees. The people of Chile are finally awake, and they won’t fall asleep ever again.”

    The president, Sebastián Piñera, has expressed his regrets. “I’m aware that we showed a complete lack of vision, and so I apologize to my fellow citizens,” he said in a nationally televised broadcast. But before he apologized he sent the military into the streets, resulting in several deaths, and established a curfew, the first declared in Chile since the end of Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship.

    When someone apologizes after the tanks have been sent in and people have died, it doesn’t seem particularly sincere. “Sending the military to restore order is a high-risk and sensitive decision,” José Miguel Vivanco, the director of Human Rights Watch for the Americas, told me in an interview. Mr. Vivanco pointed to Argentina, Chile and other countries where the military class has been associated with brutal dictatorships.

    Something similar happened recently in Ecuador, where protests against the economic policies that President Lenín Moreno had put in place — after he had agreed to a controversial loan from the International Monetary Fund — were violently repressed. The United Nations received allegations of human rights abuses by the government’s security forces, and Ecuador’s ombudsman’s office reported that as many as 10 people had been killed and over 1,000 injured.

    “Bloody repression?” asked José Valencia, Ecuador’s minister of foreign affairs, when I interviewed him. “No, because the police didn’t cause those deaths; those were accidents during the protests. The police, as far as we know, behaved appropriately and proportionally, given the situation.”

    It’s hard to believe that all those deaths were accidental. Who gave the order to attack the protesters? Who fired the tear gas? And what about those in uniform who assaulted demonstrators with their truncheons? People who are simply complaining about the deplorable economic conditions in which they live don’t deserve such treatment.

    Protests and Social Media

    Nicolás Maduro, the Venezuelan dictator, has tried to take credit for the demonstrations occurring in other South American countries. “We are following the São Paulo Forum plan” he said recently, referring to a purported joint action agreed to by the group of left-wing Latin American parties and organizations.

    There is no evidence of any such coordinated action. But even if there were, it wouldn’t explain the one million people on the streets of Santiago, the Chilean capital, or the huge demonstrations in Haiti.

    Those demonstrations were possible only because democracy has created new spaces for protest, which in the past was not allowed, whether in Pinochet’s Chile or in Argentina, during the junta, or elsewhere.

    But today demonstrators aren’t afraid. Social media and mobile technology have made it easy to organize effective protests, allowing young people to overcome government censorship and control. Official communications are balanced by millions of videos, photographs and texts on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

    And once legitimacy and credibility are lost on social media, no government can rule.

    Authoritarian Leanings

    Latin America has never gotten over its attraction to authoritarianism. Ever since Simón Bolívar, who had become dictator of Peru, toyed with the idea of becoming president for life of the short-lived state of Gran Colombia, others have followed.

    Today, Latin America has its fair share of dictators. Both Mr. Maduro in Venezuela and the husband-and-wife duo of Daniel Ortega and Rosario Murillo in Nicaragua have rigged elections and committed human rights violations in order to hold on to power. Cuba has shown us how 60 years of repression can be normalized: Miguel Díaz-Canel was recently handpicked to succeed the dictator Raúl Castro, Fidel’s brother.

    In Bolivia, Evo Morales can’t seem to understand that “no” means no. In a 2016 referendum, the Bolivian people rejected a measure that would have allowed Mr. Morales to run for a fourth term. He has been in power for nearly 14 years, and yet still wants more. But the protests won’t stop. A strongman-style crackdown on the people has never been an effective model for solving Latin America’s problems.

    The time for staying quiet is over. Latin Americans are no longer keeping their dissatisfaction to themselves. What’s new about this recent wave of protests is that official censorship is out, while new digital technologies for sharing popular grievances and coming together in protest are in. Unfortunately, Latin American governments have always responded in the same way: with repression.

    But this tactic is no longer working. The protests in Ecuador may reignite at the slightest provocation. The honeymoon enjoyed by Mexico’s new president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, may soon end if drug-related killings continue, such as last week’s murders of U.S. families. Bolivians are fighting against five more years of a Morales presidency, while the dictators in Venezuela, Nicaragua and Cuba can’t even seem to control their message.

    First they lose the media, then they lose the streets. This discomfort and anger are an omen. Come what may, nothing will remain the same.
    I can't help but disagree with him, for the most part. Mostly because of the hypocrisy seen, from my point of view, when the author says "Evo Morales can’t seem to understand that “no” means no", and soon after "He has been in power for nearly 14 years, and yet still wants more" And yet Angela Merkel has been in power for 14 years as well and no word of her being in a dictatorship.

    You are only a dictator if you disagree with the US, or if you were put in that position by the US but later became disloyal. In very simple dumb terms, so it seems.
    Posting on the NY Times is not as hard as it seemed to be when i first learned about what real journalism was


    --

    Quote Aware that they don’t live in real democracies, the people of Venezuela, Nicaragua and Bolivia are taking to the streets. In Chile, Ecuador and Haiti, citizens are angry about social inequality and the lack of economic opportunity.
    Would all that happen if there weren't sanctions in place, dedicated to force people into this exact situation?

    Nicaragua is a country that was demolished by US, now it is mentioned here as a good example of what happens if you don't live in the US's flavor of democracy
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicara..._United_States

    I don't believe in Jorge Ramos because i have never seen him explore some of the reality of those countries beyond his point of view. Self confirmation bias, he is final in his approach to what's happening there and i find that bad if you are a journalist.

    He has obviously taken a side on what he's going to report, regardless of evidence that things may not be how he sees them
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...5ef_story.html
    --

    Hope this clarifies what i said above about Jorge Ramos

    In his interview with Maduro, this happened, and was posted as a way to "show" how Maduro is a criminal dictator

    Quote “Esta entrevista, te digo, no tiene ningún sentido ni para mí ni para ti, ¿oíste? Yo creo que es mejor suspenderla, ¿oíste? "Te agradezco todo, hasta luego”, le dice Nicolás Maduro a Ramos cuando este intenta mostrarle en su iPad un video captado días antes en las calles de Caracas, donde se ve a niños y a adultos alimentarse directamente de un camión de basura.
    In English

    Quote “This interview, I tell you, makes no sense to me or to you, did you hear? I think it is better to suspend it, did you hear? "I thank you all, see you later, ”Nicolás Maduro tells Ramos when he tries to show him on his iPad a video captured days before in the streets of Caracas, where children and adults are seen feeding directly from a garbage truck.
    From this page in Univision
    https://www.univision.com/noticias/a...nicolas-maduro

    However, is there a point where Jorge Ramos mentions or even considers that the reason those kids and adults are so desperate is due to the US imposed sanctions?

    If there were no sanctions introduced specifically to produce this situation, would Venezuela be as bad as it is right now?

    There was no mention of that at all, ever as far as i have read or listened so far in his interviews and articles

    So how is that not a biased provocation, when he must know how the US sanctions affect that country?

    Of course Maduro has made wrong choices that caused misery in Venezuela, but pretending that the US has not helped in a major way in that misery is wrong, and biased. Jorge Ramos has ignored the US major contribution and speaks from/about a reality that doesn't exist
    Last edited by Mashika; 10th November 2019 at 09:20. Reason: It's Ramos not Campos
    I don't need a reward system for what i do, i'm not a puppy :P

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    In 2011 I attended a conference where Alfredo Sfeir Younis gave a talk on a different kind of world politics where compassion and spirituality were at the forefront. It has been to date one of the most powerful, memorable and thought provoking speeches I've ever heard and well deserving of the very long standing ovation it received. Mr. Younis went on to run in the 2013 presidential election in Chile but unfortunately Chile was not ready for the ground breaking government he wanted to create. Of course, the indigenous and poor were his biggest supporters but unfortunately the rest of the country couldn't/wouldn't get on on board with such a change and he lost with a mere 3% of the vote. I was disappointed as I was so rooting for him believing that if he did get a majority vote how this would have a wonderful domino affect and eventually change how the rest of the world governed. Maybe a bit of naive, wishful thinking on my part. Anyway, he is still active in politics and hopefully there will come a time in the very near future where he will succeed in bringing in this kind of government. For those that are not familiar with him, here is a brief bio about him and if you google his name, there is quite a bit of info on him, including the Zambuling Institute in Washington:

    'Alfredo Sfeir Younis (born 1947) is a Chilean economist, spiritual leader and healer, presently President of the Zambuling Institute for Human Transformation, founded in 2005 in Washington, DC.

    Biography
    Before opening the Institute, Sfeir had a twenty-nine-year career at the World Bank where he was hired as the World Bank’s first environmental economist in 1976 and later was appointed Director of the World Bank Office in Geneva, Switzerland. He served as Special Representative to the United Nations and the World Trade Organization from 1996 to 1999. In both institutions Sfeir worked in the general fields of human rights, peace, and social justice; within this broader context he initiated and promoted policy in such areas as poverty eradication, international trade and finance, financing of development, gender and women's issues, trade and development, role of indigenous peoples, sustainable management of forestry and fisheries, water management and irrigation, desertification, biodiversity, culture and spirituality in sustainable development, and alternative medicine.

    He has received numerous awards from international organizations, including the Lifetime Ambassador of Peace (2001), Peace and Tolerance Award (2002), World Healer Award (2002), Messenger of Peace (2002), Peace, Mercy and Tolerance Award (2003), Supreme Advisor of the Buddhist Spiritual Forum Award, World Peace Mercy and Tolerance Award (2004), Diamond Peace Award (2005), and Peace Ambassador Award (2006).

    Sfeir was a candidate for the 2013 presidential election as the leader of the Green Ecologist Party, but lost the election with less than 3% of the total number of votes.'

    I would be interested to know if anyone has further information on him that they'd like to share. I'm definitely a fan and have been sporadically following him for some years now and he seems so ahead of his time.

    I thought this was a good thread to post this but I apologize if I'm off topic. If so, please delete or move this to a more appropriate place.
    Last edited by Jill; 11th November 2019 at 00:53.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Message for my Latin American friends (in the form of a song)

    The Saker
    November 18, 2019

    Dear friends,

    I have to admit that I am absolutely heartbroken at the news coming out of Latin America. Brazil, Venezuela, Cuba, Colombia, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Bolivia – everywhere the people are struggling against what has been known as “Yankee imperialism” for decades. The pendulum of history has swung back and forth many times in Latin America. I remember the civil war in Argentina just before the coup of 1976, I was still a kid, but I remember it all. Then the coup, the vicious and ugly “dirty war”, the disaster of the (just!) war for the Malvinas, then the years of “democracy”. Rivers of blood, and still the new era of freedom and peace everybody kept hoping for did not come. Now, four or five decades later, the people of Latin America are still dying and suffering under the yoke of a CIA-installed and CIA-controlled comprador class which would gladly sell their mothers and daughters to Uncle Shmuel for a few bucks.

    And yet.

    And yet 40 or 50 years are short when seen from the point of view of history, other struggles in history have lasted much longer. So, as a poignant reminder that we will never lose hope, nor will we ever accept oppression, here is a song by Pedro Aznar whose beautiful lyrics will be understood by everyone from Patagonia to Mexico’s northern border (including my Brazilian friends) and which beautifully expresses the hope common to all of us!

    Venceremos!


    The Saker


    PS: if somebody had the time to translate these lyrics into English, I would be most grateful.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Quote Posted by Hervé (here)
    Message for my Latin American friends (in the form of a song)

    (...)And yet.

    And yet 40 or 50 years are short when seen from the point of view of history, other struggles in history have lasted much longer. So, as a poignant reminder that we will never lose hope, nor will we ever accept oppression, here is a song by Pedro Aznar whose beautiful lyrics will be understood by everyone from Patagonia to Mexico’s northern border (including my Brazilian friends) and which beautifully expresses the hope common to all of us!

    Venceremos!


    The Saker


    PS: if somebody had the time to translate these lyrics into English, I would be most grateful.

    There's a translation to english in the oficial site of Pedro Aznar:

    "Hurricane

    The clear waters of day shining over the wheat fields
    Mornings of grape and wine remembering times of peace
    The taste of cold at dawn, the bread warmer than the sun
    I think of the cold that now inhabits my heart

    There is, in the eyes of the people, the same great sadness
    because the arms of steel stop us like dams

    But what they don't know, what they will never know
    is that here in our land, from the mountains to the sea,
    blows a light breeze that will become a hurricane
    Ah, but they don't know that one day it will be a hurricane

    Friend, keep your mind alive and alert to deceit
    that the right time, the precise moment, will come sooner or later
    May your little children know that it is a long and hard journey,
    that neither pain, wood or time can bend a wild heart"
    We are walking together.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Quote Posted by Inaiá (here)
    Quote Posted by Hervé (here)
    Message for my Latin American friends (in the form of a song)

    (...)And yet.

    And yet 40 or 50 years are short when seen from the point of view of history, other struggles in history have lasted much longer. So, as a poignant reminder that we will never lose hope, nor will we ever accept oppression, here is a song by Pedro Aznar whose beautiful lyrics will be understood by everyone from Patagonia to Mexico’s northern border (including my Brazilian friends) and which beautifully expresses the hope common to all of us!

    Venceremos!


    The Saker


    PS: if somebody had the time to translate these lyrics into English, I would be most grateful.

    There's a translation to english in the oficial site of Pedro Aznar (...)
    And here it is what seems to be the original version of the lyrics, in Portuguese, composed by Fogaça e Kledir Ramil:

    "Viração

    Nas águas claras do dia
    À sombra dos cereais
    Manhãs de trigo e de vinho
    Lembrando o passado e a paz
    O gosto e o frio da aurora
    O cheiro macio do pão
    E eu penso no frio que agora
    Habita meu coração

    Nos muros nos olhos do povo
    Habita a mesma tristeza
    Porque os braços de ferro
    Nos prendem como represa
    Mas o que eles não sabem
    Não sabem ainda não
    É que na minha terra
    Um palmo acima do chão
    Sopra uma brisa ligeira
    Que vai virar viração
    Ah mas eles não sabem
    Que vai virar viração

    Amigo guarda tua mente
    Bem viva atenta e sem medo
    Que a hora certa e precisa
    Virá mais tarde ou mais cedo
    Ensina a teus filhos pequenos
    Que é dura e longa a viagem
    Que a dor, a madeira e o tempo
    Não dobram um coração selvagem

    Nos muros nos olhos do povo
    Habita a mesma tristeza
    Porque os braços de ferro
    Nos prendem como represa
    Mas o que eles não sabem
    Não sabem ainda não
    É que na minha terra
    Um palmo acima do chão
    Sopra uma brisa ligeira
    Que vai virar viração
    Ah mas eles não sabem
    Que vai virar viração."
    We are walking together.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    From https://cuencahighlife.com/conaie-we...just-beginning

    Conaie welcomes Colombian protests, says Andean ‘people’s uprising’ is just beginning
    22 Nov, 2019

    Ecuador’s Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities (Conaie) pledged its support to the national strike in Colombia that began Thursday. “We stand with our brothers and sisters of Colombia and are gratified to see that the fight for people’s rights has spread throughout the Andean region,” Conaie said in a Twitter statement.


    Protesters march through Bogota on Thursday.

    Hundreds of thousands of Colombian pensioners, students, teachers and union members, as well as members of the indigenous community, marched through the streets of the country’s major cities Thursday. Although protests began peacefully, violence erupted later in the day as police fired tear gas into crowds and vandalism was reported in Bogota, Cali and Medellin.

    Police vehicles and buses were reportedly burned in Bogota and Cali Thursday night.

    Conaie President Jaime Vargas said the fight for human rights is the same in Ecuador, Colombia, Chile and Bolivia.

    “This is a crusade against the abuses of rightwing, neo-liberal governments that have rejected the rights of labor, bowed to the wishes of the IMF and World Bank, sold off public assets and worked to defend the interests of the rich and powerful,” he said. “In Colombia, the fight is also against the massacre of hundreds of community leaders.

    Colombia is one of the most violent countries on earth and the government does nothing to stop it and, in many cases, encourages it.”

    Vargas said that protests and strikes will continue. “We have met with some success in Ecuador and Chile and understand that together we are powerful. This uprising will not end until true justice is achieved and the rights of the people are respected.”

    On Thursday night, Colombian President Iván Duque said he was listening to the demands of the protesters. “We are paying close attention and concede there is much work to be done to correct problems,” he said. “I am willing to talk to leaders of today’s events if it can be done in a peaceful atmosphere.”

    Duque warned, however, that vandalism and violence will not be tolerated and said he was granting extraordinary powers to local governments to combat it.

    In recent months, Duque’s public support has dropped dramatically as crime rates have risen in Colombia. An October poll showed his popularity at 23 percent.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    From https://cuencahighlife.com/protests-continue-to-paralyze-bolivia-colombia-and-chile-despite-government-concessions

    Protests continue to paralyze Bolivia, Colombia and Chile despite government concessions

    Mass protests, many of them violent, continue to rage in Bolivia, Chile and Colombia despite calls for elections and dialog. According to the United Nations, 58 people have died in the three countries since late October and more than 4,000 have been seriously injured.


    Protesters burn trash in a Valparaiso, Chile street on Tuesday.


    On Friday, Bolivia’s interim government accused former President Evo Morales of “terrorism and rebellion” for his alleged role in encouraging and planning violence in the country. Morales was removed from office in a military coup on November 11.

    Most of Bolivia’s largest cities have been paralyzed by demonstrations and road blocks, with the capital of La Paz, virtually isolated. The government said that fuel and food supplies could run out next week if roadways are not cleared. Although the country’s main international airport in El Alto remains open, most flights have been cancelled because of the blockages.

    Morales, who fled to Mexico under a grant of asylum, called the charges against him “laughable and absurd” and said that “the junta that received only four percent of the vote in the last election has no legitimacy.”

    The protests began following the October 20 national elections in which Morales appeared to have won another term as president by a narrow margin. Many questioned the vote count including the American Organization of American States, which said its review found “irregularities.”

    As of Friday night, the UN says 30 people have died in the Bolivian protests.

    The interim government says it will call new national elections within 90 days but has not set a date.

    Protests in Chile enter their fifth week despite the government’s concessions to roll back a public transportation fare hike and hold a referendum on a new constitution. Leaders of the protests say that larger issues are at the base of the unrest, particularly economic inequality and control of public resources by the country’s rich.


    Police fire tear gas at Medellin, Colombia protesters on Friday.

    On Thursday and Friday, large parts of Santiago remained isolated by road blocks and public transportation has been mostly disabled due to damage to buses and city’s subway system. A number of highways around the country have been blocked and the government warns of shortages of basic supplies, including food and gasoline.

    At least 24 have died in the Chilean protests while more than 2,000 have been injured. The government reports that 450 have been arrested for vandalism and terrorism.

    In Colombia, the latest country to be hit by mass protests, officials report four dead, including three police officers killed in an explosion, and hundreds injured in two days of protests. In addition to wealth inequality, protests are aimed at recent roll-backs of labor regulations, cutbacks in pensions, lack of employment for the country’s indigenous and poor population and the government’s inability to stop violence against rural community leaders. The country’s murder rate, second only to Venezuela’s in South America, is rising in major cities.

    On Friday, the mayor of Bogota imposed a nighttime curfew in hopes of reducing violence and vandalism. Cali’s mayor had ordered a curfew on Thursday and the municipal government in Medellin is considering doing the same. Several news media reported that the curfews in Bogota and Cali are being ignored.

    In a televised speech Friday, President Duque said a “national conversation” would take place regionally and include all social and political groups.

    “Starting next week, I will launch a national conversation to strengthen the current social policy agenda, working in a united way with medium- and long-term vision, which will allow us to close the social and economic gaps,” he said.

    South America’s wave of protests began in early October in Ecuador but ended 10 days later when the government agreed to drop its plan to eliminate subsidies for gasoline and diesel fuel.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    It appears from my viewpoint that the powers that control this planet are testing the waters. It is amazing that a few increases in gas prices and food makes the people react so violently. Conditions seem to be ripe due to dissatisfaction and ignorance.

    The commies and bankers (who seem to be the backers of these agitators) are experts at making the populace dissatisfied with their lot. So riots and revolutions occur and the systems go into breakdown and then the fun really begins.

    Few seem to know their history and the Russian revolution is a good example where once the Czar was taken down, approximately 50 million Russians and Ukrainians perished due to all sorts of unspeakable acts that were done. That was done under the glorious revolution excuse.

    It was planned, caused and delivered very methodically.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Well, this is an interesting speculative interpretation:



    Quote Jelle Prins

    @jelleprins
    ☀️ Tesla Solar Panels
    🔋 Huge batteries
    🛰 Satelites for internet
    🚘 Electric Cars
    🦠 With bio-defense mode
    🔫 and bullet-proof windows
    🚇 Underground tunnels@elonmusk is prepping for chaos 🌎

    🚀 to Mars if all is lost
    *I have loved the stars too dearly to be fearful of the night*

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Quote Posted by Cara, quoting Jelle Prins' tweet (here)
    to Mars if all is lost
    Also see this thread:
    ... evidence to support the idea that the elite may be planning to leave, or evacuate, the planet.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    ... evidence to support the idea that the elite may be planning to leave, or evacuate, the planet.
    I had never seen the "Dutch" interview, it is compelling stuff, well done on the compilation. 2012 was delayed, is the real date 2020?
    Last edited by Bill Ryan; 26th November 2019 at 21:10. Reason: fixed quote formatting

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    US to help ‘legitimate Latin American govts’ to PREVENT protests from ‘morphing into riots’ – Pompeo

    RT
    2 Dec, 2019 14:42
    Updated 1 hour ago
    Get short URL


    (L) © Reuters / Danilo Balderrama; (R) © Reuters / Francois Lenoir

    US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said that the US will help "legitimate governments" in Latin America in order to prevent protests from "morphing into riots.”

    Pompeo made the comments while delivering remarks at the University of Louisville on Monday.

    He declared that US policy in Latin America is based on “moral and strategic clarity,” meaning Washington “cannot tolerate” regimes it deems unsatisfactory in the region.

    Pompeo said that protests in Bolivia, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador reflect the "character of legitimate democratic governments and democratic expression" and that governments in the region should respect that.
    We’ll work with legitimate governments to prevent protests from morphing into riots and violence that don’t reflect the democratic will of the people.
    Pompeo added that the US will "continue to support countries trying to prevent Cuba and Venezuela from hijacking those protests." He also accused Russia of “malign” influence in Latin America and of “propping up” the democratically elected Venezuelan government of Nicolas Maduro.

    The eyebrow-raising comments come in wake of the November coup in Bolivia, which saw socialist President Evo Morales ousted while violent protests and attacks on politicians forced him to leave the country. Opposition leader Jeanine Anez has since declared herself an "interim president." The opposition-led protests began over alleged election irregularities.

    Pompeo’s distinctively frank comments are an admission of sorts that the US will encourage violent protests and regime change where it deems a government to be illegitimate, but will work to quash anti-government sentiment in countries it sees as obedient allies.

    While the US wholeheartedly supported the Bolivian coup, as well as coup attempts in Venezuela earlier this year, it has all but ignored anti-government protests in Chile, where it blames "malign" Russian and Chinese influence.

    In both Venezuela and Bolivia, Washington supports the unelected self-declared “interim presidents.”

    Pompeo concluded by saying there remains an "awful lot of work to do" in the region, referring to Latin America as the US's "back yard." He also warned against “predatory Chinese activities” in the region, which he claimed can lead countries to make deals that "seem attractive" but are "bad" for citizens.


    Related:
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

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    Default Re: The Turmoil/Chaos Pattern all over the Planet

    Hong Kong Police Arrest 4 Alleged Financiers Of The Protest Movement
    On Thursday, police in Hong Kong announced the arrests of several individuals whom they described as leaders of the Hong Kong protests movement. But these individuals (their identities have not been released) were not simply collared out in the street.
    Instead, police described the four as leaders of Spark Alliance, a mysterious organization that has been one of the main financiers of the protest movement, including by bailing protesters out of jail and helping to defray their legal fees.

    Police seized HK$70 million ($9 million) in bank deposits and personal insurance products from Spark, claiming that the group broke laws about money laundering.
    In a response posted to its FB group, Spark blasted the police, accusing them of deliberately trying to cut off one of the most important avenues of financing in the protest movement.
    On Thursday evening, police announced the arrests of four people connected with Spark Alliance for suspected money laundering, the first cases brought over financing the demonstrations after six months of protests against China’s tightening grip over Hong Kong. Authorities froze HK$70 million of bank deposits and personal insurance products linked to the fund, while also seizing HK$130,000 in cash.
    "The police attempted, through false statements, to distort the work of Spark Alliance as money laundering for malicious uses," the group said in a statement on Facebook. "Spark Alliance condemns this kind of defamatory action."
    The arrests and seizures, as Bloomberg explains, shed light on the innerworkings of the Hong Kong protest movement. Millions of Americans who have read the news reports about the protests have probably been left wondering how the protesters became so organized.
    Well, this is how: Since the beginning of the movement, wealthy working HKers have observed their duty to help those battling it out on the front lines in any way possible. Mostly, they do it through donations to groups that purport to help bail out protesters after they've been arrested, or groups that simply provide food and shelter for the demonstrators, many of whom are teenagers, or in their early 20s.
    This division of responsibilities is part of what's allowed the movement to continue on for as long as it has.
    But by cracking down on the money, HK police are essentially pulling the rug out from under Hong Kongers facing criminal charges for protest-related activities.
    Because Spark Alliance and another, more transparent, fund called the 612 Humanitarian Fund are responsible for financing the protest movement: According to BBG, the two funds account for 70% of the money raised by the protest movement.

    The impact of this crackdown is two-fold: not only will protesters counting on these funds to pay their legal fees be left out in the cold, but the renewed police scrutiny could deter some working Hong Kongers who have been supporting the movement with donations.
    The crackdown deals a major blow to demonstrators as they face ever-mounting legal bills, with more than 6,000 people arrested since June. Spark Alliance, one of the largest crowd-funding campaigns supporting the protests, plays a crucial behind-the-scenes role - often sending anonymous representatives to bail protesters out of jail in the middle of the night.
    The latest arrests risk deterring Hong Kong’s professional class from giving more cash, potentially curbing a substantial source of funds that have helped sustain the protests longer than anyone had expected. They also show the limits of the leaderless movement’s ability to manage tens of millions of dollars with little oversight outside of a formal financial system.
    Funds bankrolling the protests have collectively raised at least HK$254 million ($33 million) since June, with 70% coming from just two groups, Spark Alliance and the 612 Humanitarian Fund, according to a tally based on disclosures from the groups and an analysis of publicly available documents. That figure doesn’t reflect all the money raised related to the protests, only the funds Bloomberg News could verify.
    Before the arrests, most Hong Kongers didn't know the identities of anyone behind Spark Alliance. Its website and bank accounts (before they were shut down) all forwarded to a Pest Control company.
    But Spark proved its reliability early on by helping bail protesters out of jail. But the group has been under scrutiny even before the police got involved. Last month, HSBC shut down the group's account, saying they had detected activity that differed from the stated purpose of the account.
    “Spark is probably less transparent but people tend to believe them,” said Jason, a protester in his 30s who asked to be identified by his English name. He said he memorized the group’s phone number and called the group after he was arrested in August. Seven hours later, two lawyers helped arrange HK$4,000 in bail money.
    "Everyone knows the cost to fight for this movement and not everyone can afford lawyer fees," he said. “We need protection."
    Over the past few months he’s raised half a million dollars for Spark Alliance and other charities through the sale of Hong Kong-themed figurines, including a miniature Carrie Lam and a masked protester. Asked on Thursday night if he would still give the money to Spark Alliance, Jason said he wanted more information on the arrests.
    The shadowy nature of some of these organizations has helped the Chinese government portray the protests as having been financed by foreign powers like the US. Of course, these accusations aren't entirely without merit. Beijing threatened sanctions this month against the National Endowment for Democracy, a US-based group which donated $686,000 to various Hong Kong nonprofits in 2019.
    Meanwhile, the June 12 fund has already spent roughly a quarter of the money it has raised since June, mostly on legal expenses and bail.
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    For many of the thousands of protesters who have been arrested, the criminal penalties that they could face without adequate legal representation could land them in prison for years.

    Without having the support of knowing their bail will be paid in the event of an arrest, many demonstrators wouldn't be so eager to fight their way past police barricades and take other risks like that.
    But many members of the protest movement believe the 612 fund is too stodgy in how it operates. Most see organizations like Spark Alliance as being closer to the true ideals of the movement.
    The 612 fund has been chided in online forums for deploying only 24% of the money it raised while asking protesters to first apply for legal aid from the city. Other critics see the 612 fund as part of an older political establishment in Hong Kong that has failed the younger generation of democracy advocates, and they believe Spark Alliance is closer to protesters in the trenches.
    "The younger generation doesn’t trust in any institutions, not even those that advocate for democracy," said Patrick Poon, a researcher at Amnesty International in Hong Kong. "It’s an irrational decision to trust in a group believed to be closer to the people on the ground even if they don’t know who is behind the fund."
    Ng, a 612 fund trustee, said the group is supported by “members of the public that are incensed by what is being done by police and government."
    "The movement is ongoing and we are using the funds for the stated purpose of humanitarian aid," she said. "We don’t have any obligation to spend all the money immediately."
    Now that police have set their sights on Spark, we imagine a new group will need to come forward and take up the mantle of the protest movement, or risk allowing it to fizzle out.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitic...otest-movement

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