+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: We saw the SpaceX String of 60 Satellites Pass Directly Overhead

  1. Link to Post #1
    United States Avalon Member rgray222's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th September 2010
    Posts
    1,088
    Thanks
    3,029
    Thanked 7,697 times in 986 posts

    Default We saw the SpaceX String of 60 Satellites Pass Directly Overhead

    I am in North Carolina this evening and at about 7pm we saw the SpaceX string of 60 well-illuminated satellites pass directly over our heads. Fortunately I had my binoculars within easy reach which made the sighting breathtaking. This was the second launch of 60 satellites. This video is from the first lauch in May. It gives you a fair idea of what we witnessed but it does not do it justice. Apparently these satellites will be visible for the next few nights. The article below is from space.com
    R




    How to Spot SpaceX's 60 New Starlink Satellites in the Night Sky

    SpaceX launched 60 new satellites into orbit today (Nov. 11). Weather permitting, you just might be able to see the spacecraft swarm soar overhead in your night sky tonight. Of course, you'll need to know where to look.

    The new Starlink satellites are the second batch to join SpaceX's growing broadband internet constellation in orbit. They follow the May launch of 60 other satellites that surprised observers with how bright they appeared in the night sky. The night after their launch, those first Starlink satellites appeared as a brilliant string of pearls in the night sky.

    "Due to the date and time of launch, conditions for visibility are not so good for Northwest Europe, where I am, nor indeed for the US, as they were in May." Netherlands-based satellite tracker Marco Langbroek, who captured video of the Starlink train in the sky, told Space.com in an email today. That's because the new Starlink satellites have only a few days of evening passes over Europe and the U.S. before shifting into daylight for the near future, he added.

    Still, Langbroek added: "Because they seem to aim for a lower operational orbital altitude (350 km) than the previous 60 did (those were inserted at 440 km, so already 100 km higher than what this new batch of 60 aims for, and eventually were brought to 550 km), I expect these new objects to stay relatively bright, i.e. naked eye objects."

    So, the new satellites launched today could be visible like their May counterparts for at least the next few nights. So, how to see them?

    The key for any satellite tracker is to know when and where to look. Fortunately, there are several websites that offer forecasts to help amateur observers identify which direction to look and when for any area.

    The tracking site Heavens-Above.com here already has a Starlink Launch 2 page ready. You can visit this Starlink page on the site to see the orbit of the new satellites. The direct link to the Starlink Launch 2 visible passes forecast is here, but don't forget to update the "location" tag in the upper right of the page to get your specific visibility forecast.

    The next site to try is N2Y0.com, which automatically picks up your coordinates from your browser to show when and where particular bright satellites (and yes, the International Space Station, too) will be visible.

    Another useful site is CalSky here. CalSky asks you to enter the satellite you're looking to spot (either by name or official number, if you know it). You can simply type "Starlink" and click "Go!" to find your personal forecast under "Sightings Opportunities" for each satellite.

    "For prospective observers, I would advise to see whether Calsky of Heavens-Above issue predictions for your location, and allow for several minutes uncertainty in the pass time," Langbroek said. "I expect them to be bright now they are still very low, but having binoculars handy would be a good idea. Make sure your eyes are dark adapted (i.e. spent some 125 minutes in the dark at least, avoiding lamplight)."

    The "train" view seen in May will likely only be visible over the next two nights, Langbroek said. So, you'll want to be sure to act fast. By the time the satellites are again visible at night, they'll be spread out in their final orbits and less of a sight, Langobroek added.

    SpaceX launched the new Starlink satellites into a preliminary orbit of 174 miles (280 kilometers), but each of the 60 satellites is equipped with an ion engine to slowly raise its orbit to an altitude of about 217 miles (350 km).

    Not everyone is as thrilled to see SpaceX's Starlink fleet in the night sky as Langbroek was in May, when he called the sight "spectacular."

    Astronomers have complained that the bright satellites could endanger scientific observations of the night sky, especially since SpaceX plans to launch at least 12,000 Starlink satellites for its megaconstellation and is eyeing adding another 30,000 satellites in the future. With other companies like Amazon, OneWeb and Telesat planning their own megaconstellations, even Langbroek has concerns.

    "I do have concerns about these mega-constellations in low earth orbit. One is
    what it will do to our night sky - on a clear summer night, there is always one
    or several satellite (s) visible almost at any given moment already," Langbroek said. "With so many to be added over a short time span of only a few years, it will drastically alter how we experience our night sky: the old character of the night sky will basically be lost."

    "For prospective observers, I would advise to see whether Calsky of Heavens-Above issue predictions for your location, and allow for several minutes uncertainty in the pass time," Langbroek said. "I expect them to be bright now they are still very low, but having binoculars handy would be a good idea. Make sure your eyes are dark adapted (i.e. spent some 125 minutes in the dark at least, avoiding lamplight)."

    The "train" view seen in May will likely only be visible over the next two nights, Langbroek said. So, you'll want to be sure to act fast. By the time the satellites are again visible at night, they'll be spread out in their final orbits and less of a sight, Langobroek added.

    SpaceX launched the new Starlink satellites into a preliminary orbit of 174 miles (280 kilometers), but each of the 60 satellites is equipped with an ion engine to slowly raise its orbit to an altitude of about 217 miles (350 km).

    Not everyone is as thrilled to see SpaceX's Starlink fleet in the night sky as Langbroek was in May, when he called the sight "spectacular."

    Astronomers have complained that the bright satellites could endanger scientific observations of the night sky, especially since SpaceX plans to launch at least 12,000 Starlink satellites for its megaconstellation and is eyeing adding another 30,000 satellites in the future. With other companies like Amazon, OneWeb and Telesat planning their own megaconstellations, even Langbroek has concerns.

    "I do have concerns about these mega-constellations in low earth orbit. One is
    what it will do to our night sky - on a clear summer night, there is always one
    or several satellite (s) visible almost at any given moment already," Langbroek said. "With so many to be added over a short time span of only a few years, it will drastically alter how we experience our night sky: the old character of the night sky will basically be lost."

    Source: https://www.space.com/see-spacex-sta...night-sky.html

  2. The Following 19 Users Say Thank You to rgray222 For This Post:

    angelfire (12th November 2019), astridmari (12th November 2019), Axman (12th November 2019), earthdreamer (13th November 2019), enigma3 (12th November 2019), Franny (12th November 2019), GMB1961 (12th November 2019), JRS (15th November 2019), mountain_jim (13th November 2019), Sadieblue (12th November 2019), scanner (12th November 2019), Star Tsar (12th November 2019), sunflower (12th November 2019), sunwings (12th November 2019), thepainterdoug (13th November 2019), Tintin (12th November 2019), toppy (12th November 2019), william r sanford72 (13th November 2019), yelik (12th November 2019)

  3. Link to Post #2
    Avalon Member meeradas's Avatar
    Join Date
    29th November 2010
    Location
    శూన్య స్థలం
    Posts
    3,022
    Thanks
    32,272
    Thanked 21,784 times in 2,830 posts

    Default Re: We saw the SpaceX String of 60 Satellites Pass Directly Overhead

    A(n astro-)photographer's nightmare.

    And that's the least.

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to meeradas For This Post:

    rgray222 (12th November 2019), Star Tsar (12th November 2019), toppy (12th November 2019), william r sanford72 (13th November 2019)

  5. Link to Post #3
    Avalon Member Builder's Avatar
    Join Date
    3rd June 2015
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    244
    Thanks
    121
    Thanked 1,165 times in 227 posts

    Default Re: We saw the SpaceX String of 60 Satellites Pass Directly Overhead

    Quote Posted by meeradas (here)
    A(n astro-)photographer's nightmare.
    Future versions will be painted to not reflect the sun.
    To connect humankind with itself and the Cosmos!

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Builder For This Post:

    rgray222 (12th November 2019), Star Tsar (12th November 2019), william r sanford72 (13th November 2019)

  7. Link to Post #4
    United States Avalon Member thepainterdoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    27th November 2013
    Age
    66
    Posts
    787
    Thanks
    1,897
    Thanked 5,591 times in 739 posts

    Default Re: We saw the SpaceX String of 60 Satellites Pass Directly Overhead

    great capture

  8. Link to Post #5
    UK Avalon Member Sunny-side-up's Avatar
    Join Date
    4th April 2013
    Location
    Between here & there
    Age
    60
    Posts
    3,619
    Thanks
    39,110
    Thanked 16,347 times in 3,339 posts

    Default Re: We saw the SpaceX String of 60 Satellites Pass Directly Overhead

    Interesting for sure but?

    To me those so called satellite images moving across the night sky don't actually look real?
    In the vid the camera gets knocked and judders, so how can camera movement make the satellite images judder while the stars in the background stay still?
    I'm a simple easy going guy that is very upset/sad with the worlds hidden controllers!
    We need LEADERS who bat from the HEART!
    Rise up above them Dark evil doers, not within anger but with LOVE

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Sunny-side-up For This Post:

    rgray222 (13th November 2019)

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts