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    Exclamation Ground Zero in the WAR for the Soul of America

    Ground Zero in the WAR for the Soul of America:


    When Michael Bloomberg flooded Virginia state legislative contests with his anti-gun groups’ cash he got a quid pro quo from victorious Democrats: a near ban of AR-15s and a promise of more anti-gun laws. Now, to make room for all the felons who are predicted to be arrested by cops and the Virginia National Guard, whom the governor has been urged to deploy, Democrats are demanding more money for prison space and law enforcement.

    Taking guns and making you pay for it is the ultimate gut punch. Law Enforcement Today reports that a $250,000 increase in taxes would enforce these areas:
    • Allow the removal of firearms from persons who pose substantial risk to them or others- $50,000
    • Prohibit the sale, possession, transport of assault firearms, trigger activators and silencers- $50,000
    • Increase the penalty for allowing a child to access unsecured firearms – $50,000
    • Prohibit possession of firearms for persons subject to final orders of protection- $50,000
    • Require background checks for all firearms sales- $50,000
    Law Enforcement Today reports that the plethora of new gun-grabbing laws are purposely vague and will not sit well with cops and the public:
    “The laws that have already been passed, along with those which have been introduced for the next legislative session in Virginia would ban commonly owned semi-automatic firearms, such as the AR-15.
    Further, the ban would extend to common firearms parts, and would NOT grandfather current owners. So, if you live in Virginia and own an AR-15, once the legislation is signed by Northam, you would be required to surrender the weapon, or face arrest and incarceration.
    Law-abiding gun owners who are found in possession of an “assault firearm” could be convicted of a Class 6 felony, which is punishable by up to 5 years in prison.”
    But the AR-15 near-ban is only the beginning. There will be gun-buying rationing and limitations on ammo contained in the proposed laws.
    Dozens of townships and municipalities have declared themselves as Second Amendment Sanctuaries before the Democratic gun-grabbers go nuts, as promised, in the upcoming legislative session.
    Cam Edwards, of BearingArms, warns that there are a lot of phony stories about the proposed laws, so one should be armed with the facts.


    Still, he warns this could get ugly if Democrats once again use muscle to keep people from their constitutionally protected rights:


    Federal Gun Control in America: A Historic Guide to Major Federal Gun Control Laws and Acts

    For Americans, the crux of gun control laws has been how to disarm dangerous individuals without disarming the public at large. Ever-present in this quest is the question of how the perception of danger should impact guaranteed freedoms protected within the Bill of Rights.
    Not only is such a balancing act difficult as-is, but there are also two additional factors that make it even more challenging: America’s federal government is constitutionally bound by the Second Amendment, and politicians notoriously take advantage of tragedies to pass irrational laws when emotions are at their highest. As President Obama’s former Chief of Staff, Rahm Emanuel, once famously remarked:
    “You never want a serious crisis to go to waste. And what I mean by that is an opportunity to do things you think you could not do before.”
    This line of thought is not new to American politics. From the emancipation of enslaved Americans and the organized crime wave of the 1930s to the assassinations of prominent leaders in the 1960s and the attempted assassination of President Reagan in the 1980s, fear has proved a powerful catalyst for appeals about gun control.
    Below is an overview of the history behind major gun control laws in the federal government, capturing how we’ve gone from the Founding Fathers’ America of the New World to the United States of the 21st century.

    Second Amendment in America’s Bill of Rights: Ratified December 15, 1791

    Congress added the Bill of Rights to the Constitution of the United States specifically “to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers.” The Second Amendment is the foundational cornerstone of every American’s right to bear arms, stating:
    “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”
    The right to bear arms was second only to the first – the most vital freedoms of religion, speech, the press, the right to assemble and the right to petition government for redress of grievances. Meanwhile, conflicting views have left government and personal interest groups struggling to reconcile technological advances, isolated but significant violent anomalies and the constitutional mandate protecting the natural right to self defense and this most basic aspect of the Bill of Rights.

    First and Second Militia Acts of 1792: Passed May 2 and 8, 1792

    The U.S. Congress passed the Militia Acts of 1792 less than a year after the Second Amendment’s ratification. The first act’s purpose was “to provide for the National Defence, by establishing an Uniform Militia throughout the United States.” This measure established the need and command structure for a state-based militia. The second act defined conscription parameters for those militias, limiting armed service to “each and every free able-bodied white male citizen” 18 to 45.
    Colonial Gun Regulations

    Even today, the majority of firearms laws are state-based and vary considerably. While California, Connecticut and New Jersey have the most restrictive laws, Arizona, Vermont and Kentucky have some of the least stringent. For more than a century, the young United States relied primarily on “state” laws:
    • The earliest came from Virginia, the result of fear of attack by Native Americans. The 1619 law imposed a three-shilling fine on able-bodied men who failed to come armed to church on the Sabbath.
    • By 1640, slave codes in Virginia prohibited all “free Mulattos and Negroes” from bearing arms. In 1712, South Carolina enacted a similar law.
    • During this time in Virginia, gun laws for Native Americans were similar to those for white men – as they were not barred from possessing guns (unless they were gathering food on land held by white men). There were, however, prohibitions against providing “Indians” with weapons and ammunition. Native Americans could own weapons, but there were strict regulations on how they could obtain them.
    • Throughout the Antebellum South, Louisiana, Florida, Maryland, Georgia, North Carolina, Mississippi and even Delaware all passed multiple measures denying guns to people of color, requiring court-issued permits, and allowing search and seizure of weapons as well as punishment without trial.
    Militia Act of 1862: Passed July 17, 1862

    Often overlooked, the Militia Act of 1862 was highly significant because for the first time, a U.S. government in wartime need called upon “persons of African descent” for military or naval service. Granted, the soldiers were paid less than their white compatriots and were at first primarily laborers. However, the act guaranteed freedom for soldiers and their families in exchange for service. By late October, black Union regiments raised from Kansas, Louisiana and the South Carolina Sea Islands were in the field. President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, and in May of that year, the War Department established the Bureau of Colored Troops, which would represent nearly 185,000 soldiers during the Civil War.
    Fourteenth Amendment: Ratified July 9, 1868

    Even as 1863’s Emancipation Proclamation freed all slaves within the United States, racially biased gun control continued through Black Codes in states like Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama. Internationally, the Paris Anti-Slavery Conference of 1867 condemned the practices, highlighting that in “the States,” even “freedmen” were “forbidden to own or bear fire-arms, and thus were rendered defenceless against assault.” Congress abolished this discriminatory gun control with the most controversial of the three Reconstruction Amendments. While the Thirteenth abolished slavery and the 15th forbade racial discrimination in elections, the Fourteenth Amendment provided “to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Finally, the Fourteenth guaranteed all Americans, regardless of color or appearance, their Second Amendment right to bear arms.

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    Last edited by ExomatrixTV; 29th December 2019 at 22:10.
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