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Thread: The Rosetta spacecraft. Digitally enhanced real-footage landing on comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67p).

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    Default The Rosetta spacecraft. Digitally enhanced real-footage landing on comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67p).




    2017 Esa released over 400000 images from Rosettas comet mission.
    Based on these material Motion Designer Christian Stangl and Composer Wolfgang Stangl worked together to create this shortfilm.

    The sequences are digitally enhanced real-footage from the probe.

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    Default Re: The Rosetta spacecraft. Digitally enhanced real-footage landing on comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67p).

    [quote]: "They Found Complex Organic Molecules ... The Building-blocks of Life" [unquote] ... Would be cool if they added pictures of those molecules too in this very impressive video I watched in 0.5 speed

    Organic molecules make up half of Comet 67P

    The Rosetta spacecraft collected more than 35,000 dust grains from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko to help determine its chemical composition.


    Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is seen here in a mosaic of four images taken by Rosetta’s navigation camera (NAVCAM). Using the COSIMA instrument onboard Rosetta, researchers analyzed the dust coming from Comet 67P, finding that organic molecules make up nearly half of the icy body.
    ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

    In 2014, after a ten-year journey, the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft finally reached its destination: Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. For the next two years, Rosetta orbited the rubber-ducky-shaped comet, all the while gathering invaluable data on the icy body.

    Today, in a study published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the Rosetta team added onto the space probe’s already impressive legacy, finding that organic molecules make up about half of the dust emitted by Comet 67P. “Rosetta's comet thus belongs to the most carbon-rich bodies we know in the solar system,” said co-author Oliver Stenzel in a press release.

    When a comet approaches the Sun, the frozen gases trapped beneath its surface quickly evaporate in a process called outgassing. This often dislodges tiny dust grains from the surface of the comet, which can then be carried into space by the escaping gas.


    Rosetta captured this surface image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s (left) during its 17-month dance with the comet. As a comet approaches the Sun, gases frozen beneath its surface evaporate, dragging small dust particles into space. Some of these dust grains (right) from Comet 67P were captured and analyzed using Rosetta’s COSIMA instrument.

    ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS team (left); ESA/Rosetta/MPS for COSIMA team (right)

    Over the course of Rosetta’s two-year mission, the COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser (COSIMA) instrument collected and analyzed more than 35,000 escaping dust grains outgassed by Comet 67P. The largest grains had diameters of about 1 millimeter (0.04 inches), while the smallest had a diameter of only 0.01 millimeters (0.0004 inches).

    Martin Hilchenbach, the principal investigator of the COSIMA team, said, “Our analyses show that the composition of all these grains is very similar.” This finding led the team to conclude that the comet’s dust is likely made of the same ingredients as the comet’s nucleus.

    According to the study, organic molecules (which are carbon-based molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids) account for 45 percent of the total mass of all the collected dust. The team found the remaining 55 percent of the dust is in the form of inorganic minerals — mostly silicates.


    The graph on the left shows a breakdown of the chemical elements found in dust from Comet 67P. The graph on the right shows the average mass distribution of both organic and mineral substances found in the dust.
    ESA/Rosetta/MPS for COSIMA Team

    The researchers also found that nearly all of the minerals were completely absent of water. “Of course, [Comet 67P] contains water like any other comet,” said Hilchenbach. “But because comets have spent most of their time at the icy rim of the solar system, it has almost always been frozen and [the water] could not react with the minerals.”

    The research may also have implications for the origins of life here on Earth.

    A previous paper by the COSIMA team showed that the carbon found in Comet 67P mainly comes in the form of large, organic macromolecules. When combining this with today’s findings, it seems that complex organic molecules make up a significant chunk of Comet 67P. Therefore, if comets were responsible for seeding the early Earth with organic matter (as many researchers suggest), then these seeds may have already been somewhat complex by the time they reached Earth.

    Source

    First-Ever Discovery: Complex Organic Molecules Found on Rosetta’s Comet

    Molecules that form the basis of our biology have been found by Rosetta.

    One Last Find

    Over the past few months, the ESA’s Rosetta orbiter has been feeding us valuable data on comets: where they come from, what they’re made of, how they work, and so on. But its time is nearly at an end, with a kamikaze dive towards the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko scheduled for later this month.

    But just before it dies, it has one more surprise up its sleeve.

    The scientists behind Rosetta report that the probe has found complex, solid organic matter in the dust particles of the comet, the kind we’ve never expected to find. Previous missions could not collect these solid organic molecules, since these missions were merely flybys. Ultimately, they crafts moved too fast, disrupting the particles too much for a proper characterization.

    More solid evidence

    But Rosetta has the ability to lower its speed so that such information can be gathered. By slowing down, it was able to collect 27,000 dust particles, enough for its COSIMA mass spectrometer to get a proper reading.

    What it found was nearly 200 particles of note, which are being studied to determine their organic structure. In a paper published in Nature, the scientists present seven representative particles, particularly two named Kenneth and Juliette.



    Nature“Our analysis reveals carbon in a far more complex form than expected,” remarked Hervé Cottin, one of the authors of the paper, in a statement. It is so complex, we can’t give it a proper formula or a name!”

    These results are more extraordinary given that previous results from the Philae Lander and Rosetta itself saw only light, gaseous organic molecules, very different from the ones detected by this study.

    “These particles have remained pristine and untouched for billions of years…” says senior author Martin Hilchenbach, in the same statement. “The results add to the growing picture that Comet 67P/C-G contains some of the most primitive material from our Solar System’s early history.”

    Source

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    Default Re: The Rosetta spacecraft. Digitally enhanced real-footage landing on comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67p).



    Rosetta Reveals Cracked Comet Covered With Dust and Spewing Pits




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