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Thread: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

  1. Link to Post #1241
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    A mathematical note, simply an extrapolation from the graph.



    The number of confirmed cases outside of China is doubling every 1.5 days. If that rate of increase continues, by the end of this week the number will reach 100,000 — unless something remarkable happens in terms of containment in several key countries.

    Of course, the world may well run out of test kits first, with clinical assessment taking their place. It seems intuitively barely believable that this steep rate of increase could continue. But if it does, and real numbers are somehow counted, I'll leave someone else to work out how many cases there'd be by the end of March. (It's easy to do, but I really don't want to write the number down!)
    A further note, before I close down for the evening, also bumping this post.

    After writing it, I realized of course there was more: at a very early stage in this skyrocketing graph — not yet, but soon — all hospitals and health services would be overwhelmed, not only because of the numbers of patients needing intensive care, but also because the healthcare workers would also be sick. That's when the mortality rate would also climb.

    I confess — and I'm just sharing this 100% honestly: only now, for the first time, do I start to fear what could happen. That rocketing graph has to stop — but it's really quite hard to see how it will.

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  3. Link to Post #1242
    Australia Avalon Member BMJ's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    [QUOTE=ExomatrixTV;1338554]Willem Felderhof
    Quote :
    Quote “In The Shadow Of The Moon”(2019). Besides ridiculous over the top anti-white propaganda (the future of the humanity is threatened by white nationalists and affiliated militias), the rampant predictive programming in this movie is truly remarkable with regard to today's reality. To secure the future of humanity all members of white nationalist movements and patriotic affiliates who uphold and defend the Constitution need to be exterminated because they are planning a civil war. And guess what, the killing takes the form of a fatal virus injection the effects of which can be remotely triggered through time by electronic warfare technology. I recorded the following scene where the remote extermination method is tested on pigs. After the successful remote bio/electronic killing of the pigs the guy even says: “I think we may have a winner here. With the pairing of the CORONA-isotopes we can eventually be triggering disillusion from a future point in time.” Later in the movie it is explained that the virus is fed by anger and spread through fear. I did not see anything about this one on the internet but maybe I missed it. Watch 3 min video: [unquote]

    https://www.facebook.com/10001434357...1933433628102/
    And the plot thickens.

    From Saving Hope TV Show Season 1 Episode 11 The Law of Contagion Original Air Date: 8/30/2012!!

    From Dean Kootnz "The Eyes of Darkness"

    From wikipedia.
    "A novel coronavirus, to be named COVID-19, in late 2019 was discovered within humans in Wuhan, China. Parallels were drawn between COVID-19 and the novel's 'Wuhan-400' bioweapon.[3][4] Several notable differences were identified between the real virus and the fictional bioweapon. Separately the bioweapon of the first edition of the novel was named 'Gorki-400', but the novel's laboratory was relocated and bioweapon renamed following the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991.[3][4]"

    Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Eyes_of_Darkness



    Last edited by BMJ; 2nd March 2020 at 02:05.
    In hoc signo vinces / In this sign thou shalt conquer

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  5. Link to Post #1243
    Australia Avalon Member TigaHawk's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by twin fig (here)
    Hi everyone. I rarely post on the forums and have been following this thread with fascination. I am in Australia and have just read this article...

    https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/he...46a6d17aa0ea98

    In it Queensland Chief Health Officer Jeanette Young goes on to say this about a woman who has the virus after travelling from Iran...

    The woman returned to Australia from Iran on February 24.

    “I’ve got no concerns about the people who were on the plane with that lady who returned from Iran because she was thoroughly well and she only developed full symptoms at 3pm on Thursday,” she said.

    If the quote is correctly reported, it flies in the face of what we know of the virus.

    She also stated “I expect we will see an outbreak of the epidemic in Queensland,”

    I guess if this is how the Queensland government approaches it, she may well be right.

    I feel like I am watching a Monty Python sketch.

    I work for a section of the QLD government and queried if i'd be able to work from home with my manager today as my job is capable of doing all work from home.


    Was told with the most unconcerned look on their face they only just started talking about it in upper management and have no feedback to give yet.


    If **** does hit the fan, we have a massive backlog on hard tokens and no infrastructure to make the switch quickly to soft tokens for the foreseeable future for one half of us. The other half has been on soft tokens for some time for all positions that dont require active use of a phone. There has been a need for this since the 2011 floods and there has been 0 effort to put in this capability even tho Telstra has everything required for us to have this setup.


    Personally i'd much prefer to work from home for the next few months just to be away form the chaos, people, and air conditioning which spreads every cold / flu around the office so EVERYONE gets it. Huge open plan office, you can hear people from the other end.


    So they're not taking this very seriously at all.



    Tho i guess that's nothing new. Our government has always been look at what i say, not what i do.

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by Conaire (here)
    From where did you source this information?

    All the data that I can gather at this moment is that the patient is a high school student, from Dublin, that travelled from Ireland to Italy and back again.

    Patient confidentiality has restricted the media from reporting on any of the more personal details. However, it has been reported that he only became ill after returning from Italy.

    I know a relative of someone who sat next to him on the plane
    we have subcontracted the business of healing people to Companies who profit from sickness.

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    First case reported in the small market town 5km from me...

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Dr. Campbell talks about the coronavirus and Africa:

    Quote «Now I don’t want to be overly pessimistic because a common external enemy can be a great unifying force. I just so hope that’s the case.»
    I couldn’t agree more!


    Global isolation and containment

    Last edited by Sophocles; 4th March 2020 at 19:01.

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  13. Link to Post #1247
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    From 7:17 in his latest video, Dr John Campbell highlights a new paper in The Lancet focusing on the problems faced by Africa.


    Not much has been said about this yet in the first world media, but the situation is very dangerous.

    That's because of a combo of poor healthcare systems, lack of money and facilities, lack of organization, many connections with China, and (importantly) a bunch of pre-existing immunosuppressive conditions in large numbers of people such as malaria, HIV, and even tuberculosis, the latter not at all a disease of the past. It doesn't paint a comforting picture.

    Like myself, quite a few reading this may have spent time in Africa, and it's self-evident how near-impossible a large new outbreak would be to contain. There's a passionate video posted here from a South African commentator raising the alarm, greatly concerned about his very beautiful but chaotic country. That might be worth listening to again.

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  15. Link to Post #1248
    UK Moderator/Librarian/Administrator Tintin's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by Franny (here)
    He's right, this is pretty interesting. Joseph Farrell posted this yesterday and includes a link to an Air Force document we might want to have in the library.
    Thanks

    Yes, a good idea - here it is, in a standalone folder:

    Link: http://avalonlibrary.net/Biotechnolo...5d_a556597.pdf



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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Nicely done timeline comparing with the H1N1 outbreak. I believe the next pandemic, after COVID-19, will hit way harder. It seems to me their 'plan' looks delayed, probably a trial since 5G has not yet been fully deployed worldwide. Time to seriously prepare this body and mind for the next round.


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  19. Link to Post #1250
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Africa.
    New cases have just been reported in Tunisia and Senegal.

    A CNN article of an hour ago:

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by Tenzin (here)
    Nicely done timeline comparing with the H1N1 outbreak. I believe the next pandemic, after COVID-19, will hit way harder. It seems to me their 'plan' looks delayed, probably a trial since 5G has not yet been fully deployed worldwide. Time to seriously prepare this body and mind for the next round.

    Great analysis in this video and really scary to see how majorly underreported the H1N1 virus was in the USA by government, WHO, CDC. And now here we are again......!!!!!!!!

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    [ at a very early stage in this skyrocketing graph — not yet, but soon — all hospitals and health services would be overwhelmed, not only because of the numbers of patients needing intensive care, but also because the healthcare workers would also be sick. That's when the mortality rate would also climb.

    I confess — and I'm just sharing this 100% honestly: only now, for the first time, do I start to fear what could happen. That rocketing graph has to stop — but it's really quite hard to see how it will.
    People are beginning to communicate the need for social isolation in other places such as Italy that all over 65 stay home for a couple of weeks. I read that France introduced an emergency and then that an unpopular pension reform did not need a parliamentary vote. So many dominoes falling at once. I am also concerned that hospitals will quickly be no help if one is in need. So Expecting that staying home is the very best plan so as to avoid car wrecks, other situations.

    My town/work are normal as usual with NO MENTION of even extra hand washing. As of Friday, the employees I spoke to at the desk (about 5-6) did not even know about the virus other than it is a cold/flu and that it probably came form eating wild animals and exists somewhere else where those far away are affected.

    Quote UC Berkeley Coronavirus Email (CS189)
    Local Report
    Instructor Jonathan Shewchuk posted a new Note. Your instructor selected to notify everyone in real time of this post, bypassing user email preferences.


    THE NOVEL CORONAVIRUS

    We still do not know whether the novel coronavirus will be merely a tempest in a teacup or a serious disruption to our lives, but we should prepare for the worst and hope for the best. We do know for sure that there are now multiple cases of COVID-19 in the San Fransisco Bay Area, including some that got it from "community transmission"; that is, they did not travel from another country nor has the disease been traced to somebody who did. We have reasons to suspect that it has been circulating for longer than most people realize, and some of us may already have it.

    SARS-CoV-2 is highly contagious, much moreso than a regular flu. In many patients, the virus seems to have a relatively quiet period of 2-4 weeks before pneumonia symptoms develop. (It's a bit complicated and uncertain; see the information attached below for some speculation.) One Bay Area COVID-19 patient checked into NorthBay VacaValley Hospital in Vacaville on Feb. 15, implying that community transmission was probably already occurring in the Bay Area at the beginning of February. There is also evidence that it was already spreading in the Seattle area in mid-January. Which means that there is a possibility that some of you already have it and don't know it. There's also a small possibility that I might have it; I've had a mild cough for the last week and a half.

    Given our uncertainty of the danger, I think it's better to risk overreacting than to risk underreacting. COVID-19 has a Case Fatality Rate estimated at 2-3.5%. An estimated 20% of cases require hospitalization (allegedly 50% in Italy), with a mean hospital stay of 10 days, usually with pneumonia symptoms. And although the virus is deadliest among the old and sick, some young, healthy people have died. Your odds of survival are very high, but if you have a severe case, it might be the worst experience of your life. Many patients need to be intubated and kept on ventilators. Moreover, if there are too many cases at once, then like in Wuhan, there won't be enough ventilators.

    I do not think that the campus response has been adequate. I expect the virus to spread particularly quickly on campus because of our large population and our many large meetings, and it is distinctly possible that it is already spreading. I don't think campus authorities are acting in a manner commensurate with the long latency of the disease, or the fact that by the time the first severe case happens on campus, there will already be thousands of others on campus who also carry the virus.

    I have both a hopeful message and a warning: small changes in behavior, if adopted by everybody on campus, could make the difference between a semester of minor inconveniences and a semester of cancelled classes and people you know suffering.

    For these reasons, I cannot in good conscience recommend attending classes in person when videos are available. I have sent a request to the Course Capture Department asking them to minimize the delay between lectures and posting the videos. If you do wish to continue attending class, I would recommend spacing yourself out from other students.

    Unfortunately, it is getting hard to find face masks and rubber gloves, but if you can get some, I recommend wearing them whenever you leave your home. (If you don't mind looking silly, add goggles, as it is reputed the virus can infect the eye.) Some authorities have been telling the public not to buy masks. I would strongly advise you to ignore that message (the product of a bureaucracy that sees us as nothing more than interchangeable resources). Also, remember that masks are not only to protect you, but also to protect other people if you have the virus. (Most people who have it will not initially realize they have it.)

    Even more important is to avoid public meetings insofar as it is reasaonbly possible (stay home), to wash your hands frequently (alcohol alone doesn't suffice because it doesn't cut through oil; use a soap/surfactant and optionally add alcohol), and to avoid touching your face, mouth, eyes, nose, ears, etc. at all times. (One of the nice things about masks and gloves is that they remind you this.)

    Lastly, I would like to solicit experiences from those of you who have used conferencing software that might meet our needs for online office hours and online discussion sections. The ideal conferencing software would include a choice of audio or video for up to at least 30 people, and some sort of shared whiteboard that mutliple people can draw/type on. People have suggested the following platforms, but I haven't yet tested any of them: Zoom, Google Hangouts, Twitch, and BrainCert's Virtual Classroom. Does anybody have enough experience with one of these platforms, or another platform, to say if it's suitable?

    Thank you, Jonathan Shewhuk
    So what if 2% die especially if old people?


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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    The following basic advice appears very useful, much I had not heard before:

    IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT - CORONAVIRUS
    Last evening dining out with friends, one of their uncles, who's graduated with a master's degree and who worked in Shenzhen Hospital (Guangdong Province, China) sent him the following notes on Coronavirus for guidance:
    1. If you have a runny nose and sputum, you have a common cold
    2. Coronavirus pneumonia is a dry cough with no runny nose.
    3. This new virus is not heat-resistant and will be killed by a temperature of just 26/27 degrees. It hates the Sun.
    4. If someone sneezes with it, it takes about 10 feet before it drops to the ground and is no longer airborne.
    5. If it drops on a metal surface it will live for at least 12 hours - so if you come into contact with any metal surface - wash your hands as soon as you can with a bacterial soap.
    6. On fabric it can survive for 6-12 hours. normal laundry detergent will kill it.
    7. Drinking warm water is effective for all viruses. Try not to drink liquids with ice.
    8. Wash your hands frequently as the virus can only live on your hands for 5-10 minutes, but - a lot can happen during that time - you can rub your eyes, pick your nose unwittingly and so on.
    9. You should also gargle as a prevention. A simple solution of salt in warm water will suffice.
    10. Can't emphasise enough - drink plenty of water!
    THE SYMPTOMS
    1. It will first infect the throat, so you'll have a sore throat lasting 3/4 days
    2. The virus then blends into a nasal fluid that enters the trachea and then the lungs, causing pneumonia. This takes about 5/6 days further.
    3. With the pneumonia comes high fever and difficulty in breathing.
    4. The nasal congestion is not like the normal kind. You feel like you're drowning. It's imperative you then seek immediate attention.
    SPREAD THE WORD - PLEASE SHARE.
    we have subcontracted the business of healing people to Companies who profit from sickness.

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Stefan Molyneux, on 28 Feb, talking with Steven Mosher. But Steven Mosher steals the show, with a staggering, damning indictment of China's horrific record against its own people. It's quite an eye-opener, really worth listening to. Mosher knows China VERY well.


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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Gov. Greg Abbott demands CDC improve protocols after release of San Antonio patient who tested "weakly positive" for coronavirus
    The San Antonio patient is back in quarantine, and local health officials are working to identify who they came into contact with.

    BY SAMI SPARBER MARCH 2, 2020


    Gov. Greg Abbott demanded that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention halt the scheduled Monday release of a group of patients being quarantined at Lackland Air Force Base, noting that a day earlier the federal agency released a person who was later found to have a “weakly positive” test result for the new coronavirus.

    “What happened in San Antonio and what the CDC did is completely unacceptable,” Abbott said at a press conference Monday morning. “It appears to be a case of negligence with regard to allowing this person who had the coronavirus to leave the Texas Center for Infectious Diseases and go back into the general population.”

    Lackland Air Force base is one of four military bases where the federal government has been sending patients who were possibly exposed to the virus in Wuhan, China and a cruise ship in Japan. More than 120 evacuees from the cruise ship were scheduled to leave Lackland on Monday after undergoing the quarantine, according to the San Antonio-Express News.

    Abbott’s office is demanding that people not be allowed to leave quarantine at Lackland “until the CDC can guarantee that they have no trace of coronavirus and pose no threat to the expansion of the coronavirus anywhere in the country.” The CDC did not immediately return a request for comment.
    "Incompetence",mixed messages and gaslighting a populace into mass insanity is orchestrated by operatives (the corporate producers of poisons). The operatives wait in place, biding time, insinuating themselves deeply into apparent mundane benignity of all is "OK". People move unaware through the day Until..... until the plan is deployed.

    Suddenly the fight flight or freeze mechanism explodes. We don't know who is friend and who is foe. We don't know what is up and down. We become unable to mount any resistance.

    WHO are WE? The body singular and plural. The thwarting of the immune system and the resultant storm. As above.....So below.... As within.....So without.

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    7 confirmed cases in Finland so far, 150 suspected. As I previously said, absolutely nothing's being done here to prevent this from spreading further so guess we're all about to get this stupid virus. But then again, what can you do if there are no symptoms for 1-30+ days. I guess it's simply nothing, because it's almost impossible to predict. I do however think that you really should was your hands right now, with soap and bit longer than usual when coming home from public places etc.

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Dr. Matt McCarthy, a staff physician at New York-Presbyterian:

    Quote “I’m here to tell you, right now, at one of the busiest hospitals in the country, I don’t have [a rapid diagnostic test] at my finger tips.” “I still have to make my case, plead to test people. This is not good. We know that there are 88 cases in the United States. There are going to be hundreds by middle of week. There’s going to be thousands by next week. And this is a testing issue.”

    “In New York State, the person who tested positive is only the 32nd test we’ve done in this state,” he said. “That is a national scandal. [...] They’re testing 10,000 a day in some countries and we can’t get this off the ground,” McCarthy said. “I’m a practitioner on the firing line, and I don’t have the tools to properly care for patients today.”
    Source


    Here he is on video:

    NYC ER doctor: I have to 'plead to test people' for coronavirus


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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Quote Posted by Sophocles (here)
    Dr. Matt McCarthy, a staff physician at New York-Presbyterian:

    Quote “I’m here to tell you, right now, at one of the busiest hospitals in the country, I don’t have [a rapid diagnostic test] at my finger tips.” “I still have to make my case, plead to test people. This is not good. We know that there are 88 cases in the United States. There are going to be hundreds by middle of week. There’s going to be thousands by next week. And this is a testing issue.”

    “In New York State, the person who tested positive is only the 32nd test we’ve done in this state,” he said. “That is a national scandal. [...] They’re testing 10,000 a day in some countries and we can’t get this off the ground,” McCarthy said. “I’m a practitioner on the firing line, and I don’t have the tools to properly care for patients today.”
    Source


    Here he is on video:

    NYC ER doctor: I have to 'plead to test people' for coronavirus

    Something has to be done. So how about those FEMA-camps?

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Is this the wolf? The cascade effects of scores of people who could use advanced health care, for which we have VERY LITTLE real capacity will lead down a dark road. But it could also lead to real reform. NO HEALTH CARE SHOULD EVER BE FOR PROFIT.

    Witnessing a system which is Helpless to cure and save will be existential crisis for us all.

    Quote Coping with the Coronavirus Requires Freeing Healthcare Providers
    By Conor Norris February 28, 2020


    As the coronavirus continues to spread across the world and threaten public health, its emergence is inspiring some to rethink the American healthcare system.

    In mid-December, an unknown virus began spreading in Wuhan, China. Soon after, Chinese officials alerted the World Health Organization about the virus, shortly before it began spreading across the world. As of February 27, there have been 82,777 cases confirmed and 2,814 deaths worldwide, and 60 cases in the United States. On February 28th, the World Health Organization upgraded its global risk assessment for the potential spread and impact of the novel coronavirus from “high” to “very high.”

    As experts grapple with assessments of the severity of the virus, and continue to gather more information about it, there is little doubt it may pose a serious test of our already government-dominated healthcare system’s ability to respond to crises.

    Because of the threat posed by this potential epidemic, some are portraying this as decisive evidence that Medicare-for-All is essential to combat it. Agree or disagree with that assessment, coronavirus has the potential to expose the serious problems with the US healthcare system. While we should not design policy or institutions solely based on rare, cataclysmic events, institutions should be robust enough to fare well in those situations.

    Unfortunately, many believe the US may not be able pass that test.

    While the best in the world, healthcare in the US is expensive, and we spend more than any other country. As of 2018 with Obamacare, 27.9 million Americans did not have health insurance, which can make paying for healthcare difficult. Even for those with insurance, the average deductible for a single earner is $1,655, double the average of $826 just a decade ago. Deductibles for coverage on the Obamacare exchanges are more than $4,000. If that didn’t make purchasing healthcare services difficult enough and as Independent Institute Senior Fellow John Goodman shows in his award-winning book, Priceless: Curing the Healthcare Crisis, government regulations have created a system of opaque pricing—so it’s nearly impossible to know prices before a treatment and compare between facilities. If patients receive treatment at a facility out of their insurance network, they face stiff charges and surprise billings weeks and months after the fact.

    Furthermore, government needlessly limits the supply of healthcare with certificate-of-need laws, which prevent healthcare providers from offering new services. Occupational licensing poses barriers to entry for professionals, reducing the number of professionals across the range of medical disciplines and increasing prices. Compounding these problems, scope-of-practice laws limit the procedures those licensed professionals can do, further restricting access.

    Most of these problems were explained well in a recent Washington Post op-ed by Helaine Olen, “Coronavirus Makes the Case for Medicare-for-All.” Getting tested for the coronavirus is expensive, and the unknown price makes people worry and wait to get tested. The expense often causes them to delay care. During the outbreak of a highly contagious virus, this can be deadly, as she points out.

    Can Medicare-for-All solve such healthcare issues? At first glance it might appear so, adding coverage for everyone and limiting out of pocket expenses should make it easy to get care.

    But there are problems with Medicare-for-All. Some of the methods of cost savings for Medicare-for-All would shrink the number of hospitals and the number of healthcare professionals, reducing access and creating long waits for care. It would also be far more centrally planned than our current, imperfect system. Central government planning suffers from an inability to move resources to their highest valued uses. Nobel Laureate economist Friedrich Hayek called it the knowledge problem because without price signals, central planners do not have the requisite knowledge of the best use of resources.

    Bureaucracies, like a government healthcare system, struggle to respond to rare events. For example, FEMA struggles with hurricane response and getting resources to the affected areas. However, they may be better at snow removal in Minnesota, where it not infrequent, but a common and predictable occurrence.

    Private businesses are nimbler and able to react before storms. When forecasts cause people to buy more supplies before a storm, the firms run low on stock. As this elevated demand causes shortages, they have to raise prices. But this price increase encourages more resources to be shipped into the area, which alleviates the shortage and meets the suddenly elevated demand. Firms don’t need to know the accuracy of storm forecasts or even that a storm is coming, the profit motive guides them.

    So how does all of this help us with the coronavirus?

    There is an alternative to Medicare-for-All and our current system: more transparency and actual competition. True reform requires liberating doctors and patients by allowing them to interact in innovative ways to help meet the unique individual medical needs of an epidemic crisis. For example, by eliminating insurance providers from the payment process, Walmart’s new clinics offer simple tests at drastically lower prices, with CVS already planning to follow. By advertising and competing on price, firms have an incentive to reduce costs and sell at a lower price. Whether it’s footballs or healthcare doesn’t matter.

    We can remove the certificate-of-need laws to allow more hospitals to open and expand access for patients. We can reduce the barriers-to-entry of occupational licensing where it is unnecessary, to increase the number of healthcare providers. We can expand healthcare professionals’ scope of practice to allow them to practice to the full extent of their training and serve even more patients. These simple changes, combined with transparency and competition on price, will stop the astronomical bills from out-of-network treatment and the all-too-common surprise billing that make patients delay care in the first place.

    By allowing an actual market to function, we can reduce costs and expand access to care, all the while making healthcare more able to respond to sudden events. I lament the fact that few people can afford the $1,400 coronavirus test. But rather than implementing Medicare-for-All, we should take simple and practical measures that free patients, doctors, caregivers, employers, employees from the perverse restrictions that raise the cost of healthcare, reduce its quality, and make care less accessible for those in urgent need.

    Mrs. Olen is right that viruses do not care about deductibles, co-pays, and network provider, but neither does the Walmart clinic. Our current system may be costly, but it doesn’t have to be if we break the cycle of government interference.

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    Default Re: The Wuhan Coronavirus [Covid-19, the Honey Badger virus]

    Whatever the origin, cytokine storm and pneumonia are deadly. I have faith in building our immunity and supplements of C and other herbs, spices and vitamins as we are learning.

    Quote Trump Halts CDC Fearmongering. But Why Are Antibiotics & Not Anti-Virals Quelling The COVID-19 Coronavirus? Is It Really A Virus?
    By Bill Sardi

    March 2, 2020

    Based on an exclusive interview with Lawrence Broxmeyer MD

    BULLET POINT SUMMARY

    COVID-19 Coronavirus is as much an ecological disaster as it is a medical one. Initially it appears to be a unique experience centered in Wuhan, China. It emanates from an environment of incinerated pig waste, airborne particles, and low vitamin D blood levels in winter, and weakened immune systems, particularly among smokers, drinkers and the elderly.
    It is believed both the Spanish flu of 1918 and the COVID-19 coronavirus began as zoonotic (animal to human) infections. Not from bats as first reported in the Wuhan COVID-19 outbreak, but rather from pigs, and pig waste.
    The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic began in the midst of an infectious pig slaughter of undiscovered cause, a few hundred miles from Camp Funston, what is Fort Riley today. Similarly, the outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak began in the Wuhan, China area in the wake of a massive kill-off of pigs who were dying from African Swine Flu.
    Viral outbreaks arise in winter, but so does tuberculosis.
    Some types of mycobacteria do not have cell walls and can mimic the appearance of a virus under the microscope.
    Antibiotics cannot be used for viruses. If a virus, then why aren’t antiviral drugs working but antibiotics are?
    COVID-19 coronavirus may just be a “passenger virus,” not the primary microbial organism that kills by filling the lower lungs with fluid.
    Both the current Wuhan COVID-19 coronavirus and tubercular mycobacteria do not tend to infect or cause serious disease in young children roughly 5-12 years of age.
    Fear of the COVID-19 coronavirus may be misplaced. More people are killed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (1.7 million) in a year than the few who have been infected (~80,000) or have died (less than 2000) of the COVID-19 coronavirus.
    It is projected that the “COVID-19 Coronavirus” will peak worldwide in March and then return in a second but lesser peak in September, in accordance with Yang’s Wuhan study from 2004 to 2013, describing the annual TB surges in Wuhan, China.
    Saying the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus is inevitable, a CDC (Centers for Disease Control) official advised Americans “brace themselves” and prepare to shut down public schools, avoid going to church, and self-quarantine their families. These onerous measures are for a virus that has infected just 53 Americans (Feb. 25), mostly among people who traveled recently to China.

    Recognizing the possibility that some officials within the CDC are potential handmaidens to the drug and vaccine industry that would benefit from such scare tactics, President Trump decided to issue all governmental statements about COVID-19 from The White House.

    After all, the CDC seemed to be about ready to bring down the entire U.S. economy and shutter small businesses that would never recover from even a short quarantine.

    Doomsday virus?

    Irresponsible and implausible predictions that COVID-19 coronavirus could produce symptomatic viral infection in 60% of the world’s population with 45 million deaths ̶ fueled by sensationalized news reports, were purely unfounded and certainly premature. Perhaps the only thing that could be considered beneficial about these dire prognostications was when one quick-thinking woman in China used the fear of the virus in a positive way, and feigned she was infected to foil a rapist.

    In the beginning of the outbreak, you could have pulled from a widely-known advertising limerick used in Las Vegas: “Whatever coronavirus starts in China, stays in China.” Now we know that this is not quite the case. Airplanes facilitate its geographical spread, but person-to-person transmission remains static. Immune status may be a controlling factor in person-to-person transmission.

    Maybe just a passenger virus

    But what is the sense in panicking the world over a coronavirus that is 3 times less deadly than the SARS outbreak of 2003 (9.5% vs. 3.4%). And mind you, it has still not been proved that the COVID-19 coronavirus is anything more than a non-symptomatic, non-pathogenic “passenger virus,” being picked up diagnostically but not the primary underlying cause responsible for the Pandemic/Epidemic itself.

    In fact, there is direct and indirect evidence that COVID-19 is NOT from a virus at all. The SARS coronavirus, often compared with the new COVID-19 coronavirus, was present only in about half of the SARS cases and antivirals such as ribavirin and oseltamivir (Tamiflu) were not working in SARS culture plates, nor were they very effective in clinics or hospitals either. That passenger viruses do exist has been abundantly documented, as when the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus Type 1) was mistakenly attributed to being causal for AIDS. And so, the question which never went away looms: are the coronaviruses merely traveler viruses from a yet to be determined primary stealth cause?

    Using bacteriocidals instead of antivirals

    One recent US news headline said: “Scientists claim antibiotics already on the market could treat coronavirus – despite warnings from CDC and World Health Organization that antibiotics do nothing against viruses and overusing them fuels resistant microbes.

    Fact of the matter is that antiviral medicines were not found to provide benefit in either the SARS or MERS strains of coronavirus either, which broke out in 2002 and 2012, respectively. Yet this habit of administering antivirals was stubbornly clung to in the treatment of the 138 Coronavirus-infected patients hospitalized in Wuhan, China described in Wang, et al’s recently published JAMA study.

    On the other hand, all of these 138 patients, and most of the 99 patients in Chen et al’s current Lancet study received at least one antibiotic, some of which have significant anti-mycobacterial as well as antibacterial activity. (Mycobacteria are small rod-shaped bacteria, some varieties which have no cell wall and are difficult to distinguish from viruses; mycobacteria cause leprosy and tuberculosis, the latter usually emanating as lower respiratory tract infection that can mimic classic pneumonia, as observed in the SARS and COVID-19 coronavirus cases.)

    Antibiotics have no effect against viruses. And although it is claimed that antibiotics are and were simply being used to quell “secondary” bacterial infections in the new pandemic, the fact is that antibiotics have proved universally to be of great help worldwide to the vast majority of novel coronavirus COVID-19 victims, with or without secondary infections.

    Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it

    While “experts” have been telling us to wash our hands, have they really been doing the factual research needed to compare COVID-19 to say the Great Pandemic of 1918? Dr. Lawrence Broxmeyer MD, whose writings were previously published in the highly ranked The Journal of Infectious Diseases, doesn’t seem to think so. And his views, as expressed in an upcoming publication, aren’t alone.

    During the SARS coronavirus outbreak, Wong et al, writing in the Journal of the Chinese Medical Association warned: “Preoccupied with the diagnosis of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory syndrome) in a SARS outbreak, doctors tend to overlook other endemic diseases, such as tuberculosis.”

    Perhaps Wong’s warning should be listened to. The present and ongoing COVID-19- pandemic, did not occur in a vacuum. By December of 2018, Liu et al., in a large multi-center study, proclaimed tuberculosis to be an epidemic throughout China, which still simmers on in a country with the second largest burden of that disease in the world ̶ a disease which also often begins with flu-like symptoms, and a disease whose bacilli are laden with RNA bacterial viruses called mycobacteriophages.

    It was a non-virus in 1918 too

    Demographers at UC Berkeley (Noymer and Garenne, Population Development Review 2000) claim tuberculosis was behind the many deaths in the 1918 Great Influenza Pandemic was specifically based upon the well-known concept that the secondary bacterial infections that cropped up in 1918 were common in TB-infected lungs.

    And in Hiroshi Nishiura’s study (2012) not only was TB shown to be associated with influenza death, but there was no influenza death among controls without TB. Investigator Nishiura later concluded: “Should a highly fatal influenza pandemic occur in the future, testing the role of TB in characterizing the risk of death would be extremely useful in minimizing the disaster…”

    But was Nishiura being listened to and learned from? Apparently not. Fast forward, Wuhan, China (2019-2020):

    The chronological timetable of the present Wuhan “viral” pandemic suggests nothing “new” or “novel”. The coronavirus outbreak started in December 2019, first identified in Wuhan, after 41 people presented with pneumonia of no clear cause. The Wuhan winter is from December to February. Yang’s Wuhan study from 2004 to 2013, described the annual TB surge in Wuhan as being fueled by increased transmission in the winter, peaking in March, with a second smaller peak in September. Among the conditions Yang attributed to the increased transmission of TB in the winter was indoor crowding, subsequent vitamin D deficiency, and even air pollution.

    The increasingly severe air pollution in Wuhan, powered by the influx of foreign companies and the increased use of incineration for waste disposal, resulted in a visible haze so thick that it reduced peripheral vision as far back as June of 2012 ̶ a haze with inhalable particulate matter, highest in the winter, which according to Yang, was of a particulate size able to harbor Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related mycobacteria. Why is this important?

    Pigs

    Wuhan’s economy was on fire. With it came a greatly increased demand for poultry and swine, two staples of the Chinese diet, along with the expansion of farms to raise them and the inevitable tons of waste that this brought. Even as far back as 2015, there were five major waste incineration plants in Wuhan, with many more scheduled to be built.

    That was just the beginning. By July, 2018, fourteen large pig breeding farms in Wuhan, with a combined annual pig production of 1.5 million pigs pooled investments with the intent to slaughter 2 million pigs per year. China alone accounted for more than half of the world’s pig population. That is until another purported virus (African swine fever) spread throughout China which had no cure and a near zero survival rate for infected pigs, and which, by August 2019 virtually wiped out 40% of China’s entire pig population, including those in Wuhan.

    Essentially one-quarter of the world’s pigs died in one year, and just before the latest coronavirus outbreak. China then did what it had to do and began to cull thousands of pigs to control the outbreak they claimed to be caused by the African swine fever outbreak in 2018.

    But how many dead animals, including those in Wuhan were buried and how many incinerated are open questions. Burning pigs and pig excrement was a sure recipe for visible haze.

    The Chinese government soon came up with incentive programs for livestock farmers to sell their manure to use as fertilizer, which was only marginally successful.

    During a study from 1953 to 1968 (Tubercle 1970) in the UK, an astonishing 81% of pigs were found to harbor Mycobacterium avium, or fowl tuberculosis. As reported by some workers, M. avium isolates from swine represent a major threat to human beings. The similarity pre-programmed (IS1245 RFLP) patterns of the human and porcine isolates indicates close genetic relatedness, suggesting that M. avium or fowl tuberculosis is transmitted between pigs and humans.

    Fort Funston 1918, Kansas USA

    Similar events occurred at Fort Funston in Kansas circa 1918, thought by many to be the birthplace of the onset of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918.

    It was only with industrial development that the US tuberculosis epidemic traveled to the Midwest and Kansas, the very American Midwest where the 1918-flu pandemic of unknown origin hit, in rural Haskell county, Kansas, in the midst of an infectious pig slaughter of undiscovered cause, a few hundred miles from Camp Funston, today Fort Riley.

    It had to be more than a coincidence that by the autumn of 1918 thousands of Midwest pigs died, seemingly from the same flu-like illness and in the same Haskell County location in which the worst human pandemic in history, which would kill between 50 and 100 million people, was about to begin.

    US Inspector and veterinarian J.S. Koen, for lack of another term, and with no evidence other than a hunch, quickly called this unknown disease in pigs “swine influenza,” even as it killed pig after pig.

    Pigs were dying in 1918 and in 2019-20

    That thousands of pigs died in the Autumn of 1918 was problematic in that bird or fowl TB, also called Avian tuberculosis or Mycobacterium avium, routinely infects birds as well as hogs and sometimes cattle –but could, under the right conditions, also infect man. So, pigs had involuntarily become the living laboratory thru which three of the main types of tuberculosis (human, cow and fowl) could mutate through the genetic exchange by their viral mycobacteriophages, much in the same fashion as has been attributed to the influenza and coronavirus. (A bacteriophage is a virus that parasitizes a bacterium by infecting it and reproducing inside it.) But, in so far as 1918 was concerned, the stage was set for disaster.

    Airborne TB

    Unknown at the time, but pertinent since Kansas lies squarely in America’s “dustbowl,’’ were the results of a previous European experiment wherein guinea pigs exposed to organisms like Avian tuberculosis got little or no lung disease. However, when these mycobacteria were placed in dust aerosols with particulate matter, guinea pigs came down with progressive, fatal lung disease, not unlike what was occurring in the pandemic of 1918 as well as a prominent factor in the present Wuhan air pollution with its particulate matter haze.

    Burning animal waste

    Ft. Riley, Kansas was a sprawling establishment housing 26,000 men and encompassing an entire camp, Camp Funston. Within that camp, thousands of horses, hogs, mules and chickens produced in excess of a stifling nine tons of manure each month. And the accepted method for its disposal was to burn it, even against driving wind.

    State Veterinarian W.J. Butler would report at the 28th Meeting of the United States Live Stock Sanitary Association: “I consider contaminated manure and stagnant water the most important factors in the spread and propagation of tuberculosis.” Wang’s recent JAMA study suggested that Coronavirus may spread fastest on cruise ships and in hospitals where workers re-use gear contaminated with feces to try to conserve supplies.

    And so, on Saturday, the 9th of March, 1918, a month which just happened to coincide with the annual peak surge for tuberculosis in Wuhan, China, a threatening black sky forecast the coming of a major dust storm. When this storm combined with the ashes of over 9 tons of burning manure, a stinking, stinging yellow haze resulted.

    The sun was said to have gone black in Kansas that day in 1918. Two days later, on March 11th, company cook Albert Gitchell reported to the Funston infirmary saying he had “a bad cold” with flu-like symptoms. Among his symptoms were a headache, a sore throat, muscle aches, chills and fever. He also reported cleaning pig pens on March 4th, one week before feeling sick. Gitchell would never recover from this, his last illness. And by noon of March 4th, one hundred men joined him at the Army infirmary he had walked into. Within a month one-thousand men were sick and approximately 50 dead. Camp Funston was having a deadly epidemic.

    These deaths were highly unusual, but nothing like what would return in the fall, when the disease would come back with a vengeance, seeming to gain strength through human passage. Camp Funston in March, Camp Devens in September (a month that coincides with the second annual TB peak surge in Wuhan), then across the country and the world, leaving an estimated 50-100 million dead globally, at least 600,000 to a million of them American, in the span of less than a year –the most destructive plague that mankind had ever witnessed.

    Implications of mistaking a mycobacterial disease for a viral disease

    What are the implications of mistaking a mycobacterial disease for a viral disease? While an anxiety-filled world is losing sleep over a “coronavirus” that has resulted in the deaths of less than 2000 people, a mycobacterium called tuberculosis is encircling the planet that is killing 1.7 million people a year, and is once again, the single largest cause of infectious death on the globe. And that does not even include morbidity and mortality coming from its closely related Mycobacterium avium or fowl tuberculosis, for which, although there is treatment, we have yet to develop ideal drugs to treat.

    Moreover, the preferred form of both of these pathogens, once inside the body, is their tiny, hard to diagnose viral-like cell-wall-deficient (CWD) mycobacterial forms, which require special stains and special culture media, unavailable at most diagnostic centers. This leaves a situation, in which Mycobacterium avium and its cell-wall-deficient forms, highly implicated here in the present pandemic, are being picked up, according to Mattman, only 16% of the time through traditional methods.

    If we are not looking or unable to look diagnostically for the underlying Wuhan pathogen, then how can we truly treat it effectively?

    In 1933 researchers claimed they had first discovered human influenza “virus.” So, what was the flu virus of 1918?

    Historically, in 1892 the flu was originally named Mycobacterium influenzae because it resembled tuberculosis. In the lab, both of these pathogenic organisms stain similarly on a lab slide. Staining is one method of identifying types of bacteria. Also, it was eventually found that Mycobacterium influenzae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis have similar genetic profiles.

    What about reports of re-infection from coronavirus?

    Physicians on the ground in China report this COVID-19 coronavirus may produce a re-infection that is more lethal than the first. Yet tuberculosis is reported to have such a high rate of reinfection that even after triple antibiotic treatment the reinfection rate is higher than the rate of new tuberculosis.

    TB: The great masquerader

    “Wuhan Pneumonia.” The coronavirus outbreak started in December 2019, first identified in Wuhan after 41 people presented with pneumonia of no clear cause. Chan and colleagues have characterized the present Wuhan Coronavirus pandemic as at times progressing to an “atypical” pneumonia. Such references to atypical pneumonia were used by Rist in 1929, when he found in almost 50 per cent of 300 consecutive hospital pneumonia admissions were classified as “atypical” tubercular pneumonia.

    And Farber and Clarke reported 100 cases which were admitted to a general hospital for non-tuberculous pneumonia, which were found to be of a tubercular cause.

    The coronavirus kills by way of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). With ARDS, difficulty of breathing results from inflammation with subsequent flooding of the alveolar spaces through fluids gathering at these sites in the lungs, blocking the proper exchange of oxygen. The number of TB cases in which people in the Orient die of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been on the rise for some time. Professor Nanshan Chen (The Lancet, Jan 2020) cautiously suggested that the percentage of blood-borne tuberculosis as a potential cause of ARDS “might not be very low.”

    Roger et al, however favor suspecting tuberculosis in all cases of acute respiratory failure of unknown origin. ARDS caused by blood-borne TB is associated with just as high a fatality rate as ARDS caused by either SARS or the Wuhan coronavirus.

    Young children appear to be immune

    Yet perhaps one of the most puzzling features to virologists regarding the new coronavirus as with SARS and MERS (Mediterranean Respiratory Syndrome) is that compared with adults and teenagers, it seems to have a less aggressive clinical course in younger children; that is, puzzling until one reads bacteriologist René Dubos’s observation that tuberculosis is rarely severe between the ages of 5 and 12, the very age span spared by the 2019-nCOV coronavirus.

    Galloping tuberculosis

    As an explanation for the precipitous death in a matter of hours to a few days recorded in some with fatal coronavirus, there was the comparable acute blood-borne miliary form of virulent “galloping” tuberculosis (called “galloping consumption” during the 1890 and 1918 flu Pandemics, a disease which, according to McCall Anderson, then Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of Glasgow, could kill within hours to a few days even without influenza. Such galloping consumption also began with high fever and pneumonia in one or both lungs.

    Also, that bats came to the forefront, as a possible vehicle of the new novel coronavirus, is no surprise. Already associated with the outbreaks of the SARS and MERS coronavirus (Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome or MERS-CoV)- bats have been recognized as the natural reservoir for over 100 other viruses including MERS, Ebola virus, Marburg virus, Hendra virus, and Nipah virus, to name a few. But then again, according to three separate reports (Scott, Griffith and Hamerton), bats can also carry mycobacteria from the M. tuberculosis complex and its viral-like cell-wall-deficient forms.

    Clear evidence: vitamin C

    Most mammals internally secrete vitamin C from their liver and resist infection and death from TB. The mammals that don’t secrete vitamin C endogenously (humans, guinea pigs, fruit bats, primate monkeys) are vulnerable to TB and mortal pneumonia. Even Linus Pauling realized that TB was extraordinarily sensitive to killing by vitamin C. Guinea pig research led to the discovery of the tuberculosis bacterium, obviously because their liver doesn’t secrete vitamin C and makes them prone to TB infections.

    If wrong diagnosis, how can it be properly treated?

    If modern medicine doesn’t really know what is causing this disease, how can it effectively treat it? It has become an unspoken reality- – that sometimes the medical industry makes more money fostering a disease than curing it. Here is how modern medicine makes things worse.

    A retrospective analysis of a quarantine of elderly vacationers on an ocean liner shows the isolation actually ended up causing 619 coronavirus infections rather than the projected 70 if the quarantine was not mandated. Quarantines place infected individuals indoors, away from sunshine vitamin D which can be considered an anti-viral/anti-TB supplement.

    Regarding the Wuhan outbreak, Thomas M. File Jr., president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America was also concerned that the close proximity of a quarantine could expose people “to other infections that are even more easily spread than coronavirus, like tuberculosis, which is airborne, and bacterial infections that can spread among dense populations.” (New York Times, Feb 6, 2020)

    Certainly Dr. File remembered that in 1990, a new antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis outbreak took place in a large Miami municipal hospital. Soon similar outbreaks broke out in three New York City hospitals from which it spread to city prisons. Like the origin of SARS, the infection spread in a nosocomial manner (hospital origin) – from patient to patient and from patient to staff.

    As in Florida multi-drug-resistant strains made the New York TB cases almost impossible to treat and the majority of sufferers died, many within weeks. By 1992, resistant tuberculosis had appeared in seventeen US states, with mini-epidemics in Florida, Michigan, New York, California Texas, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania and was reported by not the American, but the international media, as out of control.

    Dr. Broxmeyer often refers to this quotation by Albert Einstein: “The important thing is not to stop questioning.” With that in mind, Dr. Broxmeyer asks one final question in regard to the COVID-19 coronavirus hysteria:

    “Are we to continue to let the coronavirus serve to as a tool to create political upheaval and a bonanza for drug and vaccine makers, or do we want to face reality, act in a constructive way, and have a discussion about a disease that most Chinese, including their scientists would prefer to avoid at all costs.”
    Quote [Correction issued on March 1st: The title of this article was originally "Vitamin C Protects Against Coronavirus." Our editors determined this was misleading, and have changed it to reflect a more factual title.]

    by Andrew W. Saul, Editor
    [Correction issued on March 1st: The title of this article was originally "Vitamin C Protects Against Coronavirus." Our editors determined this was misleading, and have changed it to reflect a more factual title.]

    by Andrew W. Saul, Editor

    (OMNS January 26, 2020) The coronavirus pandemic can be dramatically slowed, or stopped, with the immediate widespread use of high doses of vitamin C. Physicians have demonstrated the powerful antiviral action of vitamin C for decades. There has been a lack of media coverage of this effective and successful approach against viruses in general, and coronavirus in particular.

    It is very important to maximize the body's anti-oxidative capacity and natural immunity to prevent and minimize symptoms when a virus attacks the human body. The host environment is crucial. Preventing is obviously easier than treating severe illness. But treat serious illness seriously. Do not hesitate to seek medical attention. It is not an either-or choice. Vitamin C can be used right along with medicines when they are indicated.

    "I have not seen any flu yet that was not cured or markedly ameliorated by massive doses of vitamin C."

    (Robert F. Cathcart, MD)

    The physicians of the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service and the International Society for Orthomolecular Medicine urge a nutrient-based method to prevent or minimize symptoms for future viral infection. The following inexpensive supplemental levels are recommended for adults; for children reduce these in proportion to body weight:

    Vitamin C: 3,000 milligrams (or more) daily, in divided doses.

    Vitamin D3: 2,000 International Units daily. (Start with 5,000 IU/day for two weeks, then reduce to 2,000)

    Magnesium: 400 mg daily (in citrate, malate, chelate, or chloride form)

    Zinc: 20 mg daily

    Selenium: 100 mcg (micrograms) daily

    Vitamin C [1], Vitamin D [2], magnesium [3], zinc [4], and selenium [5] have been shown to strengthen the immune system against viruses.

    The basis for using high doses of vitamin C to prevent and combat virus-caused illness may be traced back to vitamin C's early success against polio, first reported in the late 1940s.[6] Many people are unaware, even surprised, to learn this. Further clinical evidence built up over the decades, leading to an anti-virus protocol published in 1980.[7]

    It is important to remember that preventing and treating respiratory infections with large amounts of vitamin C is well established. Those who believe that vitamin C generally has merit, but massive doses are ineffective or somehow harmful, will do well to read the original papers for themselves. To dismiss the work of these doctors simply because they had success so long ago sidesteps a more important question: Why has the benefit of their clinical experience not been presented to the public by responsible governmental authorities, especially in the face of a viral pandemic?

    References

    1. Vitamin C:

    Case HS (2018) Vitamin C questions answered. Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, https://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v14n12.shtml.

    Gonzalez MJ, Berdiel MJ, Duconge J (2018) High dose vitamin C and influenza: A case report. J Orthomol Med. June, 2018, 33(3). https://isom.ca/article/high-dose-vi...za-case-report.

    Gorton HC, Jarvis K (1999) The effectiveness of vitamin C in preventing and relieving the symptoms of virus-induced respiratory infections. J Manip Physiol Ther, 22:8, 530-533. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10543583

    Hemilä H (2017) Vitamin C and infections. Nutrients. 9(4). pii:E339. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28353648.

    Hickey S, Saul AW (2015) Vitamin C: The real story. Basic Health Pub. ISBN-13: 978-1591202233.

    Levy TE (2014) The clinical impact of vitamin C. Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, https://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v10n14.shtml

    OMNS (2007) Vitamin C: a highly effective treatment for colds. https://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v03n05.shtml.

    OMNS (2009) Vitamin C as an antiviral https://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v05n09.shtml.

    Taylor T (2017) Vitamin C material: where to start, what to watch. OMNS, https://www.orthomolecular.org/resou...s/v13n20.shtml.

    Yejin Kim, Hyemin Kim, Seyeon Bae et al. (2013) Vitamin C is an essential factor on the anti-viral immune responses through the production of interferon-α/β at the initial stage of influenza A virus (H3N2) infection. Immune Netw. 13:70-74. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23700397.

    2. Vitamin D:

    Cannell JJ, Vieth R, Umhau JC et al. (2006) Epidemic influenza and vitamin D. Epidemiol Infect. 134:1129-1140. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16959053.

    Cannell JJ, Zasloff M, Garland CF et al. (2008) On the epidemiology of influenza. Virol J. 5:29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16959053.

    Ginde AA, Mansbach JM, Camargo CA Jr. (2009) Association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and upper respiratory tract infection in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Arch Intern Med. 169:384-390. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19237723.

    Martineau AR, Jolliffe DA, Hooper RL et al. (2017) Vitamin D supplementation to prevent acute respiratory tract infections: systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. BMJ. 356:i6583. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28202713.

    Urashima M, Segawa T, Okazaki M et al. (2010) Randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation to prevent seasonal influenza A in schoolchildren. Am J Clin Nutr. 91:1255-60. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219962.

    von Essen MR, Kongsbak M, Schjerling P et al. (2010) Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells. Nat Immunol. 11:344-349. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20208539.

    3. Magnesium:

    Dean C (2017) Magnesium. OMNS, https://www.orthomolecular.org/resou...s/v13n22.shtml

    Dean C. (2017) The Magnesium Miracle. 2nd Ed., Ballantine Books. ISBN-13: 978-0399594441.

    Levy TE (2019) Magnesium: Reversing Disease. Medfox Pub. ISBN-13: 978-0998312408

    4. Zinc:

    Fraker PJ, King LE, Laakko T, Vollmer TL. (2000) The dynamic link between the integrity of the immune system and zinc status. J Nutr. 130:1399S-406S. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10801951.

    Liu MJ, Bao S, Gálvez-Peralta M, et al. (2013) ZIP8 regulates host defense through zinc-mediated inhibition of NF-кB. Cell Rep. 3:386-400. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23403290.

    Mocchegiani E, Muzzioli M. (2000) Therapeutic application of zinc in human immunodeficiency virus against opportunistic infections. J Nutr. 130:1424S-1431S. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10801955.

    Shankar AH, Prasad AS. (1998) Zinc and immune function: the biological basis of altered resistance to infection. Am J Clin Nutr. 68:447S-463S. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9701160.

    5. Selenium:

    Beck MA, Levander OA, Handy J. (2003) Selenium deficiency and viral infection. J Nutr. 133:1463S-1467S. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12730444.

    Hoffmann PR, Berry MJ. (2008) The influence of selenium on immune responses. Mol Nutr Food Res. 52:1273-1280. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18384097.

    Steinbrenner H, Al-Quraishy S, Dkhil MA et al. (2015) Dietary selenium in adjuvant therapy of viral and bacterial infections. Adv Nutr. 6:73-82. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25593145.

    6. Klenner FR. The treatment of poliomyelitis and other virus diseases with vitamin C. J South Med Surg 1949, 111:210-214. https://www.doctoryourself.com/klennerpaper.html.

    7. Cathcart RF. The method of determining proper doses of vitamin C for treatment of diseases by titrating to bowel tolerance. Australian Nurses J 1980, 9(4):9-13. https://www.doctoryourself.com/titration.html

    OrthomolecularNewsService
    Had enough of vitamin-bashing newspaper, magazine and TV reports? Then you might want to sign up for the ORTHOMOLECULAR MEDICINE NEWS SERVICE (OMNS). Like the Associated Press or Reuters, OMNS is a wire-service style news feed directed to members of the press, radio and TV news media. The difference is that OMNS tells it like it really is: vitamin therapy saves lives. Sign up for the email: https://orthomolecular.org/subscribe.html and also

    Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

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