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    Avalon Member Antagenet's Avatar
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    Smile What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Combine global depression + mini ace age cooler temperatures and difficult worldwide growing conditions... now planting a garden is my number one goal. I want to be as food sufficient as possible. Are you stepping up your food production?

    What did you plant today?

    Today I planted...
    More basil and dill.
    yard long beans, moringa, spinach, okra
    and transplanted purslane and a passionfruit vine.

    Feel free to add photos of your plants,
    online seed companies that are selling seeds,
    and also gardening instructional videos!

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    United States Avalon Member bettye198's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I ran to the Mennonite nursery in town because they have non gmo vegetable plants and bought arugula, crookneck squash, tomatoes, cucumber, bell peppers, basil, thyme, swiss chard. Early in the crop season for Tennessee so this is what I could obtain. We are creating an indoor greenhouse in our sun room because nothing grows in the wild with critters around. Hoping this works. Also sprouting seeds and microgreens which you can get all your nutrients from.
    When you realize where you come from, you naturally become tolerant, disinterested, amused, kindhearted as a grandparent, dignified as a king. -- I Ching

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Cabbage, kale, and lemon balm.

    We have a short growing season where I live, and we live in a small house, so "milk jug greenhouses" were a game-changer for me when I learned about them. We can sow crops that like cool weather in the jugs, put them outside in April/May, and then transplant them into the garden in late May/early June. It saves a lot of space in the house and the tranplants are already hardened off because they grew outside.

    Cabbage, kale, cauliflower, Swiss chard, lettuce, summer savoury, parsley, cosmos, and pansies have all done well for me, started in milk jugs. (Some I start in April, some in early May). I have a feeling kohlrabi would do well, too.

    There are all sorts of videos online about how to make them. Here is just one:


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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    A range of cucurbits, eggplants, aliums, peas, beets, and turnips. Some head lettuce and broadcast lettuce. That is only because we are in Zone 5b and so our planting season is just starting.

    Several thousand seed blocks made. Several thousand seed blocks started!

    https://farmhack.org/tools

    and

    http://nofari.org/resources/farmer-r.../#.XnPYY2B7mpo

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Just started a NFT aquaponics system last week off my porch. Not raising fish to eat! We have goldfish and koi, which came with the house when we bought it, so we decided to add in some aquaponics off the little goldfish pond to make better use of it and give me a bit more growing room. Still tweaking it and making sure everything's where it needs to be, but got a fair amount of stuff started already, although a lot of it is herbs.

    I've got a fair amount of herbs already growing, and I just started some ginger today (in the ground, not the aquaponics). All of this is not really for food security. It's for herbs (and medicine!) But I figured it was close enough.
    The world is changed... I feel it in the water... I feel it in the earth... I smell it in the air...
    Much that once was is lost, for none now live who remember it.

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I've never seen this before! What a great idea!

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    Quote Posted by Nenuphar (here)
    Cabbage, kale, and lemon balm.

    We have a short growing season where I live, and we live in a small house, so "milk jug greenhouses" were a game-changer for me when I learned about them. We can sow crops that like cool weather in the jugs, put them outside in April/May, and then transplant them into the garden in late May/early June. It saves a lot of space in the house and the tranplants are already hardened off because they grew outside.

    Cabbage, kale, cauliflower, Swiss chard, lettuce, summer savoury, parsley, cosmos, and pansies have all done well for me, started in milk jugs. (Some I start in April, some in early May). I have a feeling kohlrabi would do well, too.

    There are all sorts of videos online about how to make them. Here is just one:

    Ive never seen this before! What a great idea!

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    A few weeks ago we planted: green lettuce, baby corn, spinach, lemon basil and spring onion, it still germinating, it is all indoor for now, next week we are going in the open field with sweet peppers and
    radishes, we still figuring out about the weather where we live, some say it is raining season, but I barely see any raining! ;D
    Have a nice day.
    --
    A chaos to the sense, a Kosmos to the reason.

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I started my plants early this year using an old bird bath 44 watt heating pad (meant to melt ice on a bird bath). I buried the heating pad in sand in a large plastic tub, and set my tray on top of the sand, and all the little seed pots in the tray. Then I put an old refrigerator glass shelf on top of the tub, and set 2 grow lights on the glass shelf, about 4 inches above the soil.

    The tray keeps about 1/2 inch of water in it, keeping the bottom of the seed pots wet, and I mist the seed soil with a spray bottle. The soil temp, which I check with a digital cooking thermometer, stays about 73 degrees in my garage.

    My seeds germinate extremely fast with this setup.

    My first batch was kale and spinach, which will go into the greenhouse, and can handle cool nights.

    I also like to start my corn in little pots, which does much better than starting it directly in the ground. I do plant some in the ground, but the starts always do much better, and I stagger the planting time of my corn (and other plants), so I get things continually becoming ripe through the late summer and fall. I do the corn starts about every week and a half, and about four times.

    With my fruit trees and grape vines, I have early, mid, and late varieties, so it's spread out through the summer and fall. Some of my grapes last out to November on the vine.

    Frozen grapes make an excellent snack food. I freeze them on a cookie tray, and then bag them up. If you don't spread them out on a cookie tray, they'll freeze in a big block.

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by bettye198 (here)
    I ran to the Mennonite nursery in town because they have non gmo vegetable plants and bought arugula, crookneck squash, tomatoes, cucumber, bell peppers, basil, thyme, swiss chard. Early in the crop season for Tennessee so this is what I could obtain. We are creating an indoor greenhouse in our sun room because nothing grows in the wild with critters around. Hoping this works. Also sprouting seeds and microgreens which you can get all your nutrients from.
    You might like the following YouTube videos from Old Alabama Gardener. I would imagine his climate and conditions would not be too far removed from yours? I drool with envy at his results...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7ApmJpuG4c

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsCJ...pvDHva-Y4RhAzt

    He even has a video about tackling the coronavirus!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yz4TYeHKemI

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    Avalon Member NewParadigmGuy's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Antagenet (here)
    Combine global depression + mini ace age cooler temperatures and difficult worldwide growing conditions... now planting a garden is my number one goal. I want to be as food sufficient as possible. Are you stepping up your food production?
    Absolutely! I have started 5 new beds this spring. Normally I do only one or two each year.

    Quote What did you plant today?

    Nothing yet this morning, but I have already planted 3 types of Kale, 5 types of Swiss Chard, Spinach, Various leaf lettuces (and several that make heads), Mustard Greens, Cabbages, Turnips (my "Survival Gardening" book says that Turnips provide the most nutrients per square foot of any vegetable - by far). Two perennials that are coming up now are Rhubarb and Asparagus.

    Spring comes late to my location in northern New England (especially this year!), but I have included a picture of the garden, along with a picture of the Rhubarb and some Lettuce coming up in one of my greenhouse cloches.


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    Last edited by NewParadigmGuy; 13th May 2020 at 12:50.
    We are humans becoming, help us to become!

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Gardening is wonderful for both body and mind. A simple analysis find the influence of gardening indicated that the physical activity in the pleasant state of gardening - as well as its ability to take you out into nature - promotes a sense of deep satisfaction of connection with nature and immediate benefits and rewards, growing your own fruit and fresh vegetables can save you money at the grocery store while encouraging a healthy diet at home.

    It also gives you total control over your personal food chain and immune system.

    Personally, I believe that there is no need for gardening advice, the mystery of gardening addresses history and civilizations over millennial epochs of time and...
    I think that any great gardener actually cultivates how much he wants to be that perfect connection between seed and soil in sources like light, water and natural fertilizer (the plant also eats supplements compared to what the soil offers) and good intention is important with which we carefully place the seed on the ground bed as if the explosion of life has already begun

    If you always manage to remember that the seed trusts your help, then the plant will reward you regardless of the weather conditions.

    Last year, after a terrible drought, it started to rain and the rain lasted 6 weeks, which affected the tomato culture, invaded by an extremely violent rain and huge amounts of water.
    We (the husband actually) took the water from the root of the tomatoes in a fantastic effort in which he carried away almost a ton of water.
    It's hard to explain but the tomatoes recovered, because we thought about saving their lives and not necessarily for the interest of the culture, instead, they exploded in fruit and gave us tomato juice, almost 70 liters for the winter .

    In fact, the relaxed attitude, and in favor of every blade of grass, for the benefit of every plant life so short (just to feed us) always redefines the idea of ​​being passionate about gardening.

    Gardening is magic, the connection with the earth is direct, the sky "pollinates" our good thoughts and our plants will feel the comfort and inspiration to grow, we just have to learn to grow with them

    I planted, I think, about 600 peppers and eggplants for an extremely wide variety of dishes and storage for the winter.



    I grow tomatoes with indeterminate growth that grow on stakes,
    I use tomatoes to boil tomato juice that I keep in glass bottles, I put cherry tomatoes in glass jars with tomato juice, baked peppers or cabbage and celery, or I freeze them in late fall.



    I grow cucumbers that have to climb on some branches that will take root until autumn and next year they will become trees that in a few years I will plant next to the property and on the hill behind the house (Paulownia tomentosa) so that the wild bees to have enough quality sweet food.





    I also grow green peas, onions, garlic, carrots, parsnips, parsley, celery, rosemary, oregano, potatoes, beans, zucchini, watermelon, melon, pumpkin for pie, spinach, dill, tarragon, radishes, cabbage, fruit trees. raspberries, strawberries, everything I need
    The elderberry bushes in my garden, the flowers reserve for me the pleasure of making a sweet refreshing drink from them full of vitamin C.



    Today a beautiful stork walks through my garden, she was satisfied until I took out the camera to photograph it ... it is said that the stork brings good luck, so from gardener to gardener, I send you a lot of luck and a lot of happiness in gardening!



    "We are humans becoming, help us to become!" Nature will always help us!
    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    Avalon Member NewParadigmGuy's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Wow! What a beautiful post, and a beautiful garden, too. I can imagine your bliss as you work on it. I have a few comments and questions...

    Quote Posted by Anka (here)
    Gardening is wonderful for both body and mind. A simple analysis find the influence of gardening indicated that the physical activity in the pleasant state of gardening - as well as its ability to take you out into nature - promotes a sense of deep satisfaction of connection with nature and immediate benefits and rewards, growing your own fruit and fresh vegetables can save you money at the grocery store while encouraging a healthy diet at home.
    Well said!

    Quote Personally, I believe that there is no need for gardening advice, the mystery of gardening addresses history and civilizations over millennial epochs of time and...I think that any great gardener actually cultivates how much he wants to be that perfect connection between seed and soil in sources like light, water and natural fertilizer (the plant also eats supplements compared to what the soil offers)
    Mother nature is certainly a great teacher. In fact, most days when I am in my garden I feel like I am in school!

    Quote good intention is important with which we carefully place the seed on the ground bed as if the explosion of life has already begun
    The same could be said about the seeds we are planting for the New Paradigm.

    Quote they exploded in fruit and gave us tomato juice, almost 70 liters for the winter.
    That's great! I love tomato juice, and I make a lot every year. Last year we had a great crop of tomatoes, and I made about 50 quarts of tomato juice. (1 Quart = .946 Liters). I also make stewed tomatoes and pasta sauce, and can them as well for future cooking projects.

    Quote In fact, the relaxed attitude, and in favor of every blade of grass, for the benefit of every plant life so short (just to feed us) always redefines the idea of being passionate about gardening.

    Gardening is magic, the connection with the earth is direct, the sky "pollinates" our good thoughts and our plants will feel the comfort and inspiration to grow, we just have to learn to grow with them
    Yes.

    Quote I planted, I think, about 600 peppers and eggplants for an extremely wide variety of dishes and storage for the winter.
    Wow!

    Quote I also grow green peas, onions, garlic, carrots, parsnips, parsley, celery, rosemary, oregano, potatoes, beans, zucchini, watermelon, melon, pumpkin for pie, spinach, dill, tarragon, radishes, cabbage, fruit trees. raspberries, strawberries, everything I need
    You're making me hungry...

    I grow every one of the plants on your list above, except tarragon and celery. But I did pick up some celery seed this year and will try it for the first time ever.

    Quote The elderberry bushes in my garden, the flowers reserve for me the pleasure of making a sweet refreshing drink from them full of vitamin C.
    I don't grow elderberries here, but I do harvest some wild ones nearby to make syrup for the winter. Your drink sounds interesting. Would you be willing to share the recipe?

    Quote "We are humans becoming, help us to become!" Nature will always help us!
    Help is always available, just for the asking.
    We are humans becoming, help us to become!

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I had my first harvest of the year today, a few spears of asparagus:

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    And more are on the way in the asparagus bed:

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    We are humans becoming, help us to become!

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Thanks for the question and while I was reading I found a seemingly irrelevant quote maybe, but which for me is related to what should define us in a new paradigm
    ‘We were all humans until
    race disconnected us,
    religion separated us,
    politics divided us and
    wealth classified us. ’
    However, it is a kind of pure innocence in what defines us as human beings, as well as the seeds that have the authentic capacity to create, to overcome, to endure the transformation that is greater than suffering.

    I often look at the night sky, the seeds are like the stars, when they explode in the so-called "death", they turn into a whole story of creation and life in a form like never before.
    It's about what completes their new plant life:
    To feel the dew of the morning, to give the fruit of life, to laugh in the way of obstacles and in the happiness of the earth, to be lost in the magnitude of the moon and to find themselves in the radiance of the sun, to dance in the impenetrable spirit of their childhood,
    to grow in dense judgment of inner and outer resilience, and because I am still talking about plants, to win the miracle of the simple act of being a plant, as the ethics of the genome guide it in the interdependent connection between Mother Nature, the richness of the earth and light, for the simple pleasure to become in the wisest way, so much here, a plant.

    Gardening is amazing in every way.



    The recipe for the soft drink is (I don't have the same recipe because I improvise quite a lot, for example I add mint from the garden that grows alone under an old walnut)
    but mostly I use for a large and old 8 liter glass jar,
    10 huge flowers, a sliced ​​lemon, a kilo of sugar or honey to your taste, lemon salt (8-10 grams), a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar (for fermentation) or some use a pinch of fresh yeast , and add a tablespoon of vitamin C powder or sometimes a vanilla stick or jasmine flowers or lilac or acacia flowers.
    Over all the ingredients add plain water and place the jar in sunlight, covered with something non-metallic.
    Mix three times a day in the jar with a wooden spoon and taste, if it has a little yeast and has a charming sweet and aromatic taste (on average after 3 days when after mixing, the flowers are placed at the base of the jar) then the lemonade is ready to place in lemonade carafes in the refrigerator.

    Cold lemonade goes very well with a sweet cheese cake, a pleasant summer breeze and especially a happy conversation with someone close.



    The lemonade stays in the fridge for a maximum of one week because it continues its fermentation, but if it is too much quantity, it can be shared with the neighbors.

    This year I will harvest, before the end of the season (wilting of the flowers) to freeze some flowers to see if in winter without sunlight (in the house) I can make lemonade.
    Some people also use fruits for jam, but I still don't know how to choose the right ones.
    I also made syrup 4 years ago (it helped a lot in the winter to cure cough)
    For visitors, elderberries flowers are good at:
    Hypertension, high cholesterol, ischemic heart disease, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, atherosclerosis, allergic asthma, chronic bronchitis, fermentation colitis, constipation, adjuvant against intestinal worms, colds and flu, detoxifying the body, magnesium deficiency, or to help the immune system.

    The fact that I live in the blessing of a garden is also fantastically related to the fact that I worked long enough as a chef to be able to choose the menu for the current day, so sometimes there are days when I cook more than gardening, and often to the question "What are we cooking today? " I get inspired by a walk in the garden.
    Every year I learn something new, although I have been practicing gardening for many years, and there were years when I learned from mistakes, every time I propose something new for next year, the plan changes depending on many factors (the planting place, seed variety, light conditions) so every time I have to plant, I have to take into account more ideas than the act itself, so yes it really is a school.

    Celery seeds come out well in a bowl with a mixture of greasy soil and sand, just placed on the ground above and lightly mixed with the soil (they do not need to be covered with soil on top because they are too small and have no power to rise), In light humidity, at a temperature of at least 15 degrees Celsius should come out in less than a week, and the plants left for next spring, give abundant seed for future crops.
    My soil here is rich but very solid and calcareous and I can't grow celery for the root, but I use celery for the leaves with hot peppers put in jars with vinegar, or tomato broth with celery.
    Your soil there is fluffy and I think it will grow well there especially since you can grow asparagus (I tried here, but I can't)
    I'll put a picture of my jar of lemonade tomorrow morning and thanks NewParadigmGuy, again for the question and encouragement ...
    I hope I managed to say everything in English somewhat correctly, and if not, I accept any correction and I am ready to learn and adapt.

    Thanks also for this thread and forum

    Good luck in gardening, for everyone.
    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    United States Avalon Member wavydome's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Today I planted onions in our largely wild garden.


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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    How long take you to harvest from the day you plant them?

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by wavydome (here)
    Today I planted onions in our largely wild garden.

    Thanks! I hope more people will post garden pictures - this is so much fun! We'll be planting onions very soon.
    Last edited by NewParadigmGuy; 17th May 2020 at 01:48.
    We are humans becoming, help us to become!

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I am starting raised garden beds tomorrow. I have never done any gardening, so I am embarking on a new journey here!

    The one thing that I have forgotten - raspberries!! I have been focusing so much on planning for a vegetable garden that I almost forgot my favourite berry!

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Yetti (here)
    How long take you to harvest from the day you plant them?
    I'm almost a reluctant gardener and we should know better, but in past years we always got too busy with income-contracting to tend to watering or mulching, etc, yet it was all well worth it, as over the years the garlic plants have naturalized perennially, all by themselves! (Some of them seemed like onions but I doubt onions ever overwintered here in snow country). The picture shows purchased onion starters, planted extra-close for thinning out over the (short) summer.
    Last edited by wavydome; 28th May 2020 at 08:57. Reason: correction: ir was garlic not onion

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    Romania Avalon Member Anka's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Yetti (here)
    How long take you to harvest from the day you plant them?
    The onion culture is very easy, I cultivate it in rows, recommended for the temperate weather here, I plant it on March 10-20.
    Planting depth is 2-3 cm. Immediately after planting, the bulbs are covered with soil and the soil is well watered so that they take root.
    It is recommended to apply 1-2 manual plows per row and three manual or mechanical plows between rows for a substantial development of the bulb.
    It is important to note that irrigation is stopped 2-3 weeks before harvest so that the roots have time to mature in their essence (for efficient storage in a dry and cool place for a long time).
    Harvesting, under normal conditions, is done in July, but also in August or September, so on average it would be a maximum of 4 months until harvest, but if you plant more, then you have onions all year round (fresh green or in bulb shape)

    It is worth the effort to cultivate your own onion, apart from the fact that it is a real medicine, the onion you grow is less treated than the one you bought (sprinkled with different solutions for long preservation, anti-sprouting, against mice or worms, etc.).

    I use a complete cycle per year of onion cultivation that starts from sowing small seeds in a well-watered pot, I plant the thin plants in the ground to form small bulbs, which is preferable to the climate here (and winters now milder here) for those bulbs to be planted starting in the fall (October), but I also plant those bulbs in early spring, to have green onions (I use fresh bulbs and leaves full of vitamins in salads and food)
    In my opinion, it is worth the effort in general, as long as the plant makes a fantastic effort to grow under normal conditions.

    As recipes for onions there are many many uses

    onion rings



    eggplant salad, mayonnaise, sesame and onion


    red pepper, onion, sesame and tomato salad with olive oil and a little vitamin C that assimilates well with fresh vegetables and fruits



    Any soup (mushroom, beef, pepper) goes with onions and parsley and maybe a little sour cream from neighbors who raise cows.



    rice with lentils (Lens esculenta), onions and mushrooms



    Baked pie with sheep cheese, red onions and pleurotus mushrooms.



    Red onion jam, goes gracefully on steaks or schnitzel.





    I hope I helped, because I can write more about onions
    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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