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Thread: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

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    Australia Avalon Member Constance's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I have to admit something. I am very lazy when it comes to gardening. It all has to be effortless now when it comes to a veggie patch or (anything else in the garden for that matter) or I won't do it.

    I've planted more fruit trees and herbs than I can count now and I did it all with a cordless drill attachment. I bought an auger drill bit that attaches to the drill. It changed my life!

    It cuts through the hardest, rockiest soils like butter. I recently dug some fence posts with the auger bit too. I can't believe that I've had to resort to hiring jackhammers and giant augers in the past for fence posts when one tiny cordless drill auger could do the job.

    I do almost everything via the 'no till' method. Actually, most of the time I do even less that.

    Although, upon saying that, I've been experimenting with a Hugelkulture mound (which the rats have now tunnelled through and made a nice cozy home in) just because I'm curious about that method of gardening. I've planted a few seedlings in there just to see how they will perform and I will also plant some seeds directly into the soil too, to see what does better.

    I try to mimic nature as much as I can, wherever I can. I noticed that tomatoes will always self-seed if I leave them to rot in the ground.

    In my newish garden, I've thrown some (organic) tomatoes into an open compost heap on the ground, in a sunny spot, waiting for spring. What I have observed is that the lazier I am, the better things seem to grow

    I've grown avocadoes, and dates and all other kinds of things in an open compost heap, that were left in a shaded area. I don't worry if the heap gets a bit stinky or slimy because after a while, nature just seems to sort it all out.



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  3. Link to Post #62
    Australia Avalon Member Constance's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Sarah Rainsong (here)
    So I'm not really sure this is "food security," but I figure it's close enough...

    Historically, I have not been very good with growing vegetables, though I am trying a bit more this year. With Anca's suggestions, my (one!) tomato plant looks beautiful and is producing lovely red tomatoes! I have a cantaloupe vine that is looking very hopeful. Both of these are grown in pots on my porch, because I have limited sun where I live: a small (about 3/4 acre) lot in a subdivision.



    But I do pretty good with growing herbs. I have a huge line-up of herbs that I grow and use! Many of these I cultivate, but some grow wild in my yard and are simply welcomed and appreciated: rosemary, yarrow, oregano, thyme, mints (peppermint, spearmint, strawberry mint), dill, catnip, lemon balm (melissa), parsley, horehound, sage, stinging nettle, tulsi/holy basil, sweet basil, motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca), black cohosh, violet, turmeric, ginger, horseradish, mullein, St. John's wort (hypericum), chamomile, hibiscus, blue vervain (Verbena hastata), passionflower, echinacea, vibernum (cramp bark), pokeweed (yep! that stuff grandma said was poison is actually a very strong medicine!), sweetgum, usnea, mahonia (a berberine), heavenly bamboo/nandina (also a berberine), Japanese honeysuckle... that's all I can think of, but I may have missed some.

    I also recently started some (late!) seeds: valerian, marshmallow, anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum,), spilanthes, bee balm (monarda), sweet annie/sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua), mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), lemongrass, calendula, comfrey, and boneset. So far, only the calendula and sweet annie have sprouted.

    These are just a couple pics of my herb garden and labyrinth:





    I also have an NFT aquaponics set up on my porch being fed by the goldfish pond. It's been a learning process. My pond looks lovely, but the aquaponic plants are not doing as well as I'd hoped. The broccoli raab/rapini has done well as have the green onions and dill. I'm hopeful that some michihili cabbage (smaller version of napa) will do well. Leeks and garlic are okay-ish... they started off great but seems to have stalled. The spinach is not happy at all. I don't know if it's too hot for them or what. My lettuce--which is supposed to be the prime aquaponic plant--I have yet to get to sprout. I put 9 bare-root strawberry plants in the system (another plant that's supposed to do well in aquaponics) and all but one died, and the one that lives is still very small.

    I love the aquaponics (and my cute little pond is very soothing), but it's definitely got a learning curve.





    I have well over fifty different dried herbs and at least that many of different extracts (tinctures, oils, syrups).

    Love all the herbs! You are a woman after my own heart

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    Australia Avalon Member Constance's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I'm cross posting this because it is such a good way to effortlessly make your own soil bacteria.

    Being strictly a plant eater, I won't be using cows milk when I experiment with this. I know in the video it said not to use soy or almond milk but my intuition tells me that instead, I could use coconut water kefir, powdered probiotics and just to add to it all, mycelium spores.

    I'll let you know how it all pans out.


    How to make soil bacteria for your veggie garden

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    Romania Avalon Member Anka's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Just some fog and fruit in the morning in my garden. Just for enjoy Nature.



    The pear tree on the left is very old. I let it grow as he wanted.



    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I have been planting Leeks and Kale and Cauliflowers plus more salad things in the gaps left by harvested plants in my polytunnel. I have to step carefully around between the beds as I have found tiny newts and frogs and toads all over. I water the polytunnel daily just for them and have set up little trays of water in some of the beds as it can get extremely hot in there and I wonder how they stand it on hot sauna days. There are very few slugs to be found as they undoubtedly provide a slimy nutritious meal to some of the inhabitants.
    Natural gardening with no dig beds (the lazy method) means I leave some plants to grow big and tall and flower and seed. This brings in the pollinators and allows the plants to reseed themselves. Garlic left in starts to multiply into smaller plants. Celery chopped back, once flowered starts new growth. A cabbage chopped off begins to grow new small cabbages and leaves from stalks left in the ground. Tomatoes dropped begin new plants and nasturtiums raise themselves randomly all over from their seeds dropped the previous year. A late frost stopped the courgettes but now they rampage across the beds like triffids producing giant yellow flowers and green fruits. The bees have found their way in and delight in their flowers. I delight in the strawberries that have been continuous this year and watch the many small insects busily nose diving into the flowers.
    I ponder sometimes on what would be in there if I left it to just grow for a year or more. Definitely a few weedy giants..but maybe also a complete feast of things growing because they wanted to, tangled and climbing amongst each other in a companionable and supportive way with wildlife and nature working perfectly together. For now though I am breakfasting on strawberries.

    Trisher

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    6 Crops to Plant in August for Late Summer Harvest 🌿🍅🥒
    1. cucumbers
    2. beans
    3. squash
    4. basil
    5. chard
    6. zinnias

    So apparently zinnias make this list because they are beneficial to pollinators late in the year. The petals are edible, though. Toss them in a salad to add a splash of color.


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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Hello gardeners!
    Slowly, autumn is approaching and the pantry must be filled with canned pickles and canned vegetables, for a winter rich in vitamins.
    As the vegetables are ready to be harvested in the garden, gradually, I try to preserve them in different ways, by freezing, preserving in jars or by drying.
    I have collected many tea plants to dry, so far (chamomile, mint, nettle, raspberry, linden, black elderberry flowers, lavender, lemon, horsetail, achillea, and more) and in winter no day it should pass without a cup of tea in the morning or in the evening depending on the specifics of the plant.
    I also gathered for dry and frozen at the same time, oregano leaves (you can make tea or add it to pizza or stews), lovage, green thyme and dried thyme (which I will need when preparing the barrels of sauerkraut), green dill (dried green, dried with seeds and frozen green) green dill together with sweet cheese cream, sour cream and a homemade mayonnaise go perfectly spread on toast and lime tea.
    I picked eggplants that I baked on the grill (they are tastier with wood smoke), cleaned, drained and chopped, I froze them in airtight bags in exactly the quantities I will need in winter (to prepare them in winter, add a small onion cut very very finely and mayonnaise with sour cream, salt and pepper).
    Eggplants can be preserved in a jar: Put a layer of finely chopped eggplant with salt and a thin layer of oil and eggplant again and close the top layer with oil and put the lid (boil the jars wrapped in a towel in a pan with water that does not cover them, on low heat for 15 minutes, for safe preservation).
    Hot peppers, of any kind, wash very well, cut the tails, choose one or more green leaves (celery, tarragon, thyme, lovage, basil) and place a layer on the bottom of the jar, place the hot peppers, put leaves in the middle, fill with hot peppers and close the surface with leaves, sprinkle a little salt and a little sugar and simply pour quality vinegar over, filling it, and put the lid.
    Vinegar in jars is not thrown away because it becomes extremely fragrant from the leaves over the winter and can be used in spring for green salads, in winter hot peppers are suitable for any very hot soup, (a few hot peppers kill any kind of fever)

    Onions, I harvested about 60 kg, too much for two people, even for a year, because in the spring we will grow green onions that are sweeter and fresher… usually extra onions, we donate it, and usually all that is left is "donated" in minerals back to the earth.
    The potatoes are well in the ground, although it has rained quite a lot this year, the potatoes keep their freshness there in the ground, better than in the cellar, so they will probably stay a few more weeks depending on how much it will rain, we will get help from some neighbors who have a tractor to extract them from the ground.

    We gradually gathered green tomatoes to preserve in a jar, they are excellent pickles in winter, full of vitamin C and tasty when cold.
    For a jar of 12 l capacity we need 4 kg of green tomatoes, 2-3 horseradish roots, 4 carrots, 5 strands of celery leaves, 2 horseradish leaves, a red beet (give a red shade to tomatoes), 3 hot peppers (tomatoes become spicy), black peppercorns, coriander and mustard seeds, 2 bay leaves or whatever spices you like or find (seeds).



    The recipe (for a 12 l jar we need about 5 l of salt water) depends on the type of salt (it should be coarse and without potassium iodate) and in principle (without anti-caking agents or without additives), put a spoon and a third in a liter of water, mix until the salt dissolves and add the juice over the jar already filled with vegetables.
    Pickles can be put in juice boiled with vinegar in jars (but for this another process is needed), also, green tomatoes can be put in plastic barrels (plastic buckets with airtight lids) but dill flower is added dry, with seeds, and more horseradish, (plastic does not preserve the same as glass, it tastes different in pickles)



    I gathered tomatoes from the garden, and I made broth, I managed to boil tomato broth and preserve almost 24 liters in bottles, but (I only picked a first round of ripe tomatoes) as the tomatoes will continue to ripen. , I will boil another 24 liters of tomato broth, and if the autumn is long enough (which it seems), I should normally be able to make some liters again. In winter, tomato broth with honey is a fantastic source of vitamin C, cold drinks in winter and hot tea in summer are cool.



    Boiling(0:09)





    If you have little space near the house, even if it is near alleys, it is worth cultivating a little… onion is the easiest to grow, tomato, pepper and eggplant plants grow like ordinary flowering plants, and are very "obedient" if you take care of them just like flowers, they even like to grow together with flowers.
    Try to grow a pepper plant next to a flower, or a tomato plant next to a medicinal plant or an eggplant plant near the root of a bush, you will be amazed by the difference in taste of the vegetable, between those bought and a plant grown by you!

    The earth has always heralded our future, Nature will still help us, trust the blue sky, the fresh water that still feeds us and the plants, enjoy the pleasure of taking care of a plant and it will reward you!

    In the green spirit and the sunlight that touches us under the same rays, the earth and the air bless your plants and your health!
    Anca
    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    This is another great video by Chris Martenson, interviewing Joel Salatin "the most famous farmer in America." Great views on food supply issues, health, and farming.


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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    I made sauerkraut in barrels.
    To the salt water I added black peppercorns, horseradish roots and leaves and dried dill flower.





    I picked corn and boiled, after boiling, I cut the cooked corn kernels with a knife and store them in vacuum bags in the freezer. It is added to food in winter.

    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    Romania Avalon Member Anka's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    The outdoor gardening season is almost over, but it continues in the greenhouses. Winters are getting milder here, so for autumn, we can already plant spinach, lettuce, leeks, celery, parsley, onions, carrots and depending on how heated the greenhouse is in winter, almost anything.
    For open field cultivation, it is best to plow in the fall, but in the current climatic conditions, in which the soil does not freeze well enough and instead of a lot of snow as it was 15 years ago (and minus 22 degrees Celsius) , we have a lot of rain and too hot temperatures. In October at 5 degrees Celsius we can plant garlic and onions for next spring.

    In autumn, there are usually enough apples to make compote and vinegar.



    Cornus mas -The fruit is an oblong red drupe 2 cm long and 1.5 cm in diameter, containing a single seed.
    They have a sweet-sour, astringent taste, a bit like cherries and a diuretic effect. These fruits are also appreciated for their antiscorbutic, astringent, disinfectant, tonic, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and healing effect. The amount of vitamin C in these fruits exceeds that of lemons or rosehips.

    A good remedy for indigestion, headaches, normalizes the enzymatic activity of the pancreas, helps in the treatment of intestinal parasites, liver diseases, enteritis, enterocolitis, gastrointestinal diseases in general.

    They can be made into compote, syrup, or jam, or just dried for tea.

    Peanuts, I share them with, mother squirrels that are faster than me "we" gathered them for the winter,
    and anyway I don't get to pick them on the top branches of the tree, so I'll probably taste less peanut butter this year

    After harvesting vegetables from the garden, field flowers always sprout for a second time/ year, and every year I let the grass and flowers grow together, so billions of seeds fall to the ground and bless my garden the second year.
    The autumn garden offers me the harvest and flowers that still attract bees, a pleasant atmosphere for the heart of any gardener. Roses are beautiful in autumn.
    In all seasons of the globe, I wish success to all gardeners, and more health for all people!

    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    This is a totally wonderful new video from Chris Martenson. He's been "The Covid guy" the last 8 or 9 months, but his life really is about teaching, excellence, every kind of personal prosperity, what he calls "resilience", and here, in this video, his take on integrity — which for him means the willingness to let go of fixed ideas and learn new things.

    And in this video, that's all about gardening. It's only 9 mins long, but you may be impressed.




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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    This belongs in every gardening thread.

    God bless the Fae
    God bless Me

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    This is a totally wonderful new video from Chris Martenson. He's been "The Covid guy" the last 8 or 9 months, but his life really is about teaching, excellence, every kind of personal prosperity, what he calls "resilience", and here, in this video, his take on integrity — which for him means the willingness to let go of fixed ideas and learn new things.

    And in this video, that's all about gardening. It's only 9 mins long, but you may be impressed.



    Viktor Schauberger - Bio Plough
    (1:28 min.)
    "Your planet is forbidden for an open visit - extremely aggressive social environment,despite almost perfect climatic conditions.Almost 4 billion violent deaths for the last 5000 years and about 15000 major military conflicts in the same period."

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    In addition to well-received advice on getting a good crop of potatoes, Old Alabama Gardener has been good enough to answer a few of my questions concerning the proper storage of potatoes once harvested; something it seems I have been doing wrong for some years.

    In a nutshell: don't wash them and let them dry before bagging and storing somewhere cool and dark

    He has summarised his answers in one of his most recent YouTube videos shown here:


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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    This is a totally wonderful new video from Chris Martenson. He's been "The Covid guy" the last 8 or 9 months, but his life really is about teaching, excellence, every kind of personal prosperity, what he calls "resilience", and here, in this video, his take on integrity — which for him means the willingness to let go of fixed ideas and learn new things.

    And in this video, that's all about gardening. It's only 9 mins long, but you may be impressed.




    It's really about integrity when it comes to gardening.
    When we moved to the country, many years ago, we didn't know much about agriculture, although we tried to do university studies and parallel courses for a year, even before we moved, the reality on the spot was different. .

    But we started with courage and strength and from the first year we cultivated two large vegetable gardens and 2 hectares of corn because we had bought purebred pigs for breeding, turkeys for meat and chickens for eggs.

    The veterinarian in the area was an unprepared person, so we had to vaccinate our own pigs and cut their fangs and attend the birth, something that also results in a lot of responsibility and care and love, as well as gardening.
    When it comes to learning on a farm (and it is a continuous learning experience) we receive the best re-education "in the field" in the face of the situation, where there is no time for anything other than the best solution.
    Responsibility for plants involves many forms of rehabilitation, different forms of responsibility and altruism are mixed with devotion and passion in a way that plants feel, and when we feel that plants feel our care, a fantastic connection is made, which we can't forget.
    When we moved here, the neighbors were almost outraged that we started growing plants that they never grew and they always came to the fence to tell us "this will not grow! It is too early to plant that!" .. but in the end, they followed us and they also grew vegetables like ours ...
    All I can say is that it is entirely worth the effort to grow your own vegetables. So is planting an orchard of fruit trees.

    For me, this autumn was quite rich in fruits and vegetables and for many years I say that sometimes we fail to cope with autumn with everything that is harvested and processed or preserved for a winter full of vitamins, it seems to be a greater effort. than garden maintenance work all year round, because it is concentrated in just a few weeks, and fruits and vegetables "do not wait"
    I've been "running" for a week to preserve everything I find in the garden, it looks like a marathon, but it's really worth the effort for every gram of health and vitamins our body requires.

    It was hard for the "community" in which we moved to accept two young people with a lot of education to become farmers (it was not easy for us to adapt either but we tried, it was really cool to leave the office and all the career possibilities , against all odds) but even though we expected to come here and learn from this community how to do things, in time, with goodwill and kindness we managed to teach them how to do effective gardening, and I'm proud of it because somehow they re-educated themselves for their own needs.

    Gardening is a whole suite of learning and re-education factors, it is about goodwill, promise, dedication, passion, compassion, resilience, adaptation, readaptation, exercise of competence and choices, love of Nature and environment, performance, timing, inventiveness, intuition and much more in connections that are also made with everyday life in our existence.

    But in the beginning it's really about trying. I think all people deserve a more natural and vitamin-rich food and I (impersonally) want all people to be healthier.

    If we approach resilience at any time, and these are times for new choices and change, then gardening, if we want, can be within our reach, as it has always been, even with climate change, we still manage.
    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    Australia Moderator Harmony's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    The weather is slowly warming up, but still chilly and windy some days. The spring flowers have been wonderful and the grass is quite green even after the frosts.


    With the worries of weather being unpredictable and a short growing season here, a greenhouse hopefully might help.


    Here is a picture of a work in progress greenhouse built from recycled materials. The size was calculated to work with the already used sizes of materials and the roof slant to match the land contours. Materials: treated pine timber, polycarbonate sheeting and some old roofing iron holding the raised bed soil. With the frost mostly gone, it should provide enough shelter hopefully for newly planted raspberry canes and some small lettuce and english spinich so far. Finishing the project will continue a bit at a time.


    I have started some of the other beds with onions, radishes, snow and sugar snap peas. So fingers crossed for some decent weather.


    I see Anka getting ready for her garden to rest after a busy year of growing, harvest and preserving. And a happy autumn to all the northern hemisphere gardeners and a vibrant spring for the southern hemisphere growers.


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    Romania Avalon Member Anka's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    In Romania, we have a long and sunny autumn.
    We have been gardening for many years for pleasure but also for a healthy diet. Autumn involves enough processing and preservation of vegetables, which we use during the winter but also until the fruiting of the plants next year.
    I still have peppers in the garden, so I still have to water the garden, my husband picks apples, and there is still work to be done, needing to plant spinach, garlic and onions for next spring.



    We store the potatoes in winter (after they have been cleaned and dried) in large wooden crates with lids, in which we put thick cardboard and cover them with warm blankets. There were years when we buried them in the garden, at 1.5 m deep in the ground (at 45th parallel north ), at least the one we use next year for sowing, it is worth it because it maintains its moisture.
    At the end of process, the surface at that place of the earth will be covered in hay and dry corn plant and some foil. But because we have enough storage space, we keep them in crates until spring.

    We keep the carrots in crates with sand and onions, garlic, beets or pumpkin for pies (which are sweetened only after the first frost that falls on them and are even more resistant over the winter) we keep them in lightly wrapped crates.
    Cabbage, leeks, parsley, celery leaves, cauliflower, radishes can remain unprotected in slight frost.
    Once upon a time, when the snow was healthy,
    we just remove the snow from the parsley a little and take frozen but extremely green and sweet parsley leaves in the middle of winter.

    I made a lot of apple cider vinegar, cider, sweet nectar with apple pulp and apple juice without pulp. You can also store grated apples in vacuum bags in the freezer (for cakes in winter), in winter only cinnamon, vanilla and sugar are added and are delicious for a cake.
    Apple compote is good with cloves and apple jam with a slice of toast and butter along with hot tea, warms any start of the day.



    Apple cider vinegar is a preparation obtained by fermenting apple juice or apple cider, in which yeast cultures are added. Unlike apple juice or cider, vinegar has far fewer calories and less sugar. Instead, it contains a significant amount of probiotics and enzymes beneficial to health.

    The dried beans, I store them in closed plastic bottles kept only 3 days in the freezer, and then they keep very well for even two years.
    You can make bean stew in jars: Finely chop onions and peppers, throw in hot oil, add boiled bean puree, pepper, spices that you like (I like basil), mix and put in jars with airtight lid. The bean puree from the jars is eaten cold spread on slices of bread, with salami.


    You can make any kind of stew in jars, including eggplant. I collect them all fall, freeze them and prepare them and put them in jars right in the middle of winter.
    Here is a recipe:http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...=1#post1324704

    Baked peppers (cleaned and chopped) can be put in vacuum bags in the freezer, for Christmas, thaw slowly in the cold, add a sauce made of 5 teaspoons of sugar, 5 teaspoons of vinegar, a pinch of salt, crushed garlic, oil and 200 ml of water. Baked pepper salad in the middle of winter is a vital supply of vitamins.



    Beets, clean well with a brush, boil whole with peel (we have an outdoor stove), after it cools, peel, cut into slices with a chopper (eg 10 kg of beets), throw in 4 l of water, 15 tablespoons of sugar and 1 kg of vinegar, boil for 10-15 minutes and place in jars with airtight lids.


    Gardening can have a special effect on the development of various skills and the promotion of a healthy body for "children" of all ages



    Healthy eating is one of the basic benefits of this occupation.

    Gardening encourages family togetherness, engages all the senses of this wonderful concept to improve cognitive skills, work training and dexterity, positive emotions, stress reduction in the impact of sunlight, sweet taste, fragrant smell, bright colors, gardening involves patience and responsibility together with the waiting game.



    Help the little ones to enter the adventure of the idea of ​​"little gardener", it can be helpful, in the open air and in the sunbathing, our children can play and grow up healthy , also participating in educational games in "gardening for children " , they might like vegetables more in this way

    We want our children's health more than anything in this world, a healthy future generation should only mean joy and fun!
    My intention is above all, for the health of children around the world

    "Mr. Eggplant, say" Hi little gardener !!! "

    For all gardeners, I wish you good luck!
    Love,
    Anca
    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    United States Moderator Sue (Ayt)'s Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Thank you all so much for sharing some of your garden skills here. What a beautiful thread!
    Each year, I am trying to learn and grow just a little bit more.

    This year was a disappointment for me, however, due to the dry summer, but mostly due to the squirrels.
    Last year, I had a wonderful crop of tomatoes, but this year, we had so many squirrels, and they robbed every single one of my tomatoes!
    It was so disappointing.
    At least they left the peppers alone, so I did wind up with a lot of peppers.

    It was a battle all summer long, and sadly, I lost the war.
    My question for all the gardeners is this - Is there anything I can do to prevent the squirrels from doing this again next summer?
    "We're all bozos on this bus"

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    United States Avalon Member Strat's Avatar
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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Sue (Ayt) (here)
    My question for all the gardeners is this - Is there anything I can do to prevent the squirrels from doing this again next summer?
    A friend of mine had the same problem and his solution was to build cages around the tomatoes with chicken wire.
    That's life, and I can't deny it
    Many times I thought of cuttin' out but my heart won't buy it

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    Default Re: What did you plant today? Garden and Farming for FOOD SECURITY.

    Quote Posted by Strat (here)
    Quote Posted by Sue (Ayt) (here)
    My question for all the gardeners is this - Is there anything I can do to prevent the squirrels from doing this again next summer?
    A friend of mine had the same problem and his solution was to build cages around the tomatoes with chicken wire.
    A lot of hassle can be avoided by having a dog roaming about.
    If you trust your government
    You don't know history

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