+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 69

Thread: Food shortages soon?

  1. Link to Post #1
    Canada Avalon Member azproductions's Avatar
    Join Date
    12th April 2020
    Language
    English
    Age
    23
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 200 times in 19 posts

    Default Food shortages soon?

    I have sources telling me that due to the massive floods in China and the US farms closing my down due to “farmers getting COVID19” will lead to a food shortage in 2021. We get most of our food supply from China or the US. The news isn’t saying anything about the floods or the farms shutting down, they’re keeping it hush hush as long as possible so people panic once we do hit the food shortage (remember the toilet paper frenzy during the beginning of covid? - I think they want the same thing to happen)

    Anyone have thoughts or more information on this?

  2. The Following 32 Users Say Thank You to azproductions For This Post:

    Agape (11th August 2020), Alecs (14th August 2020), Arcturian108 (5th August 2020), Art (5th September 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), bennycog (6th August 2020), Bill Ryan (5th August 2020), Constance (5th August 2020), Deborah (ahamkara) (7th August 2020), Dumpster Diver (5th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Elainie (5th August 2020), fifi (15th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Gemma13 (23rd August 2020), Gwin Ru (6th August 2020), happyuk (8th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), Ioneo (5th August 2020), janette (5th August 2020), justntime2learn (6th August 2020), Kryztian (13th August 2020), Lunesoleil (3rd December 2020), palehorse (8th August 2020), pyrangello (11th August 2020), Sadieblue (6th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (5th August 2020), Star Tsar (5th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), toppy (5th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020), wondering (27th August 2020)

  3. Link to Post #2
    United States Avalon Member Arcturian108's Avatar
    Join Date
    9th August 2015
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mountains
    Language
    English
    Posts
    374
    Thanks
    4,068
    Thanked 2,516 times in 362 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    I feel it is so important that people learn to grow their own food, and start raising chickens if that is legal where you live. I live in a rural area, and people are starting to source food locally. That way there is more control over the food supply, away from the need for international transport. If you live in an urban area, start thinking about moving to the countryside. Meanwhile, high caloric foods like sweet potatoes and winter squash will keep well for many months over winter, and can be used next spring to grow more. Buy those items now, and store them safely. I heard from a Swiss friend that in Switzerland inspectors come to each house to make sure there is a 3-month's supply of food for the family to eat. I don't know if this rule is still in place, but that was his experience from the past.

  4. The Following 22 Users Say Thank You to Arcturian108 For This Post:

    Agape (11th August 2020), Alan (5th August 2020), Alecs (14th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), bennycog (6th August 2020), Bill Ryan (5th August 2020), Deborah (ahamkara) (1st September 2020), Dumpster Diver (5th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Gwin Ru (6th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (5th August 2020), Jill (6th August 2020), justntime2learn (6th August 2020), Lunesoleil (3rd December 2020), Sadieblue (6th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (5th August 2020), Soda (5th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020), wondering (27th August 2020)

  5. Link to Post #3
    Canada Avalon Member azproductions's Avatar
    Join Date
    12th April 2020
    Language
    English
    Age
    23
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 200 times in 19 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by Arcturian108 (here)
    I feel it is so important that people learn to grow their own food, and start raising chickens if that is legal where you live. I live in a rural area, and people are starting to source food locally. That way there is more control over the food supply, away from the need for international transport. If you live in an urban area, start thinking about moving to the countryside. Meanwhile, high caloric foods like sweet potatoes and winter squash will keep well for many months over winter, and can be used next spring to grow more. Buy those items now, and store them safely. I heard from a Swiss friend that in Switzerland inspectors come to each house to make sure there is a 3-month's supply of food for the family to eat. I don't know if this rule is still in place, but that was his experience from the past.
    Thank you 🙏

  6. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to azproductions For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (5th August 2020), Deborah (ahamkara) (1st September 2020), Dumpster Diver (5th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (5th August 2020), Sadieblue (6th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (5th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), wondering (27th August 2020)

  7. Link to Post #4
    Australia Avalon Member
    Join Date
    2nd December 2015
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    252
    Thanked 108 times in 14 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Everyone should have at least a 3 month supply of food and essentials, actually with the current events, it should be closer to 6-9 months. You also should have a “go bag” with 3 days of necessary stuff for each member of the family that is packed for a moments notice evacuation. Next, a scouted location that is away from the shore (especially the west coasts) and cities and is at least 2K ft in elevation or behind a mountain range that is 4K. A camper or RV that has extra fuel packed along with go bags is perhaps a next step.

    If you live in the US West, think about becoming good friends with a Mormon family, or perhaps dabble in the religion (at least the survivalist tradition). Notice that “Mormon Land” is behind mountain ranges and has defensible borders. I think there is a reason for this.

  8. The Following 16 Users Say Thank You to Dumpster Diver For This Post:

    Arcturian108 (7th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (5th August 2020), East Sun (18th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), happyuk (6th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (5th August 2020), Justplain (5th August 2020), Lilybee8 (7th August 2020), Mike (5th August 2020), pueblo (5th August 2020), Sadieblue (6th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020)

  9. Link to Post #5
    United States Avalon Member Maknocktomb's Avatar
    Join Date
    22nd September 2011
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    71
    Thanks
    764
    Thanked 368 times in 67 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Most of the food in the U.S.A. is produced locally as America is a food exporter. The U.S. imports more food from Canada and Mexico than China.

    https://wits.worldbank.org/CountryPr...VL/Chart/top10

    https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-produc...ultural-trade/

    I found the below interesting article about southern China and the on going flooding.

    Bitcoin News: Flooding Threatens China's Bitcoin Miners, Chinese Billionaire Says 'Three Gorges Dam Collapse Imminent'.
    https://news.bitcoin.com/flooding-th...apse-imminent/
    Last edited by Maknocktomb; 6th August 2020 at 01:14.

  10. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Maknocktomb For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (6th August 2020), Dumpster Diver (6th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), Sadieblue (6th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (6th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020)

  11. Link to Post #6
    Canada Avalon Member azproductions's Avatar
    Join Date
    12th April 2020
    Language
    English
    Age
    23
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 200 times in 19 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Thank you!!

  12. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to azproductions For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (6th August 2020), Dumpster Diver (6th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), Sadieblue (7th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020)

  13. Link to Post #7
    United States Avalon Member
    Join Date
    24th August 2018
    Age
    73
    Posts
    179
    Thanks
    21,322
    Thanked 1,621 times in 176 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    I have always done gardening and home canning for myself and family.
    Now it seems that around here you can not find canning supplies in any stores, even Sam's Club
    is stating they are out of stock. I still have lots of canning jars, but cannot find the canning lids anywhere, used the last 10 lids I had yesterday canning peppers. I live in the South, so is it just a southern thing and everyone is canning more, I have never seen anything like this before.

  14. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to Sadieblue For This Post:

    Alekahn2 (6th August 2020), Arcturian108 (7th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (6th August 2020), earthdreamer (15th August 2020), edina (8th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), happyuk (6th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (6th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020)

  15. Link to Post #8
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    25,030
    Thanks
    102,556
    Thanked 317,446 times in 23,518 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    From Michael Snyder's Economic Collapse Blog:
    Food Prices Rise To Dangerous Levels As “A Second Wave Of Layoffs” Hits The U.S. Economy

    5 August, 2020

    You may have noticed that food prices have started to go up very aggressively. I repeatedly warned my readers that this is precisely what would happen, and more price increases are on the way.

    Fear of COVID-19 has sparked a tremendous amount of extra demand as Americans have feverishly stocked up their pantries, and at the same time the virus has made it very difficult for the major food companies to keep up. Over the past several months we have seen a large number of food production facilities close down temporarily, food supply chains have been thrown into a state of chaos, and grocery stores have found it increasingly difficult to keep their shelves full.

    Many years ago I remember sitting in an Econ 101 class as a very young college student, and one of the things that I learned was that prices are going to rise when supply goes down and demand goes up. So it was inevitable that grocery store prices would become more painful, and the latest numbers that have been released by the BEA are definitely quite alarming
    According to data released last week by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, almost all kinds of food have seen an increase in its price since February. Beef and veal prices are up a staggering 20.2% since before the pandemic, while other staples like eggs (10.4%), poultry (8.6%) and pork (8.5%) have also seen significant increases.
    If prices keep going up like this, a lot of American families are going to have to start cutting beef out of their diets simply because they cannot afford it anymore.

    And of course these price increases are coming at a really bad time, because we are in the midst of a historic economic downturn. When an Oregon woman named Bella Flores recently took her monthly trip to the grocery store, she was shocked by how much prices have gone up
    Medford resident Bella Flores says she felt the shock when she recently went to the store to pick up her monthly items.
    “It kept going up, $50 and then $69, I’m like oh crap man it’s a lot,” she said.
    Actually, if I could get out of the grocery store with a bill of only 69 dollars I would be jumping for joy.

    These days, it seems like you can’t even get a full cart of groceries for under 200 dollars where I live.

    Sadly, more price increases are on the way. Demand is going to remain high, and many food companies will continue to operate at reduced levels. For example, just consider what the CEO of Tyson Foods recently had to say
    During a recent call with analysts discussing third-quarter financial results, Tyson (TSN) CEO Noel White said that some of the company’s facilities “continue to operate at decreased production levels.”
    With food prices already at such elevated levels, the Federal Reserve has decided that now is a perfect time to jack up inflation even more. The following comes from a CNBC article entitled “The Fed is expected to make a major commitment to ramping up inflation soon”
    In the next few months, the Federal Reserve will be solidifying a policy outline that would commit it to low rates for years as it pursues an agenda of higher inflation and a return to the full employment picture that vanished as the coronavirus pandemic hit.
    Recent statements from Fed officials and analysis from market veterans and economists point to a move to “average inflation” targeting in which inflation above the central bank’s usual 2% target would be tolerated and even desired.
    Isn’t that wonderful?

    You can almost always count on the Federal Reserve to do the wrong thing.

    Meanwhile, Fox Business is reporting that a “second wave of layoffs” has now hit the economy…
    A second wave of layoffs is hitting American workers during a surge in coronavirus cases nationwide, and a Congressional stalemate over stimulus relief, according to a new survey by Cornell University and RIWI.
    The researchers conducted the survey between July 23 and Aug. 1, and found that 31% of workers who had been placed back on payrolls after initially being laid off have now been laid off for a second time. Additionally, 26% of rehired workers say they’ve been told that they may be laid off again.
    Those numbers are absolutely staggering.

    We already knew that millions upon millions of the jobs that were originally lost are never coming back, and now we are learning that millions of the jobs that were actually regained are being lost again.

    So what this means is that at the exact same time that food prices are skyrocketing, countless Americans find themselves out of work and no longer have paychecks coming in.

    What a nightmare.

    And this may help to explain why the U.S. Census Bureau is finding that so many Americans are missing meals right now
    This week the US Census Bureau published results of a survey in which nearly 30 million out of 249 million respondents said they did not have enough to eat at some point in the week before July 21. It was the highest number of people reporting insufficient food since the Census started tracking that information in early May.
    During the first half of this year we witnessed lines at food banks that were up to two miles long, and we are likely to see similar scenes throughout the rest of 2020.

    But the good news is that the U.S. is still in better shape than much of the rest of the world. As I have detailed previously, giant armies of locusts have been devastating crops in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and now it is being reported that they have decided to invade Russia…
    Locust swarms have invaded Russia’s southern regions causing colossal damage to the local agriculture.
    According to regional authorities, the damage is estimated at over 13 million US dollars.
    A state of emergency has been declared in seven parts of the republic of Kalmykia, according to the Emergency Ministry.
    Meanwhile, “nearly one-third of China has been impacted by severe flooding”, and that is having a dramatic affect on crop production over there.

    Even during the best of times, we struggle to feed everyone on the entire planet, and here in 2020 global food production has been hit by a whole host of major problems.

    I fully expect that global food supplies will increasingly become tighter, and that has very serious implications for the years ahead of us.

    Yes, food prices are already very high, but now is the time to stock up because they are only going to go higher.

    Unfortunately, there are millions upon millions of Americans that can’t afford to stock up because they have already lost their jobs and no longer have any income coming in.

  16. The Following 23 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    Agape (11th August 2020), Alan (6th August 2020), Alekahn2 (6th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Deborah (ahamkara) (7th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), fifi (15th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Gwin Ru (6th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), Lilybee8 (7th August 2020), onevoice (6th August 2020), palehorse (8th August 2020), pueblo (6th August 2020), Sadieblue (7th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (6th August 2020), Stephanie (7th August 2020), Sunny (9th August 2020), toppy (11th October 2020), Trisher (6th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020), Yoda (6th August 2020)

  17. Link to Post #9
    Romania Avalon Member EFO's Avatar
    Join Date
    13th May 2016
    Language
    Romanian
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,616
    Thanks
    10,541
    Thanked 9,853 times in 1,556 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    If some of you are still considering gardening for what remains from this and for next year,than have a look on this thread.

    On the other hand there still are other countries from which can be supplied if "someone" wanted like Egypt,Russia and Romania.

    So there still two options:working on your patch of land or on pots or raised beds...or waiting for governmental decision ... It's your choice until is too late...

    Even now in Northern hemisphere you can plant cucumbers,squash,tomatoes for pickling,dill and others...even peas if you are in warm areas...just pick a shovel...
    "Your planet is forbidden for an open visit - extremely aggressive social environment,despite almost perfect climatic conditions.Almost 4 billion violent deaths for the last 5000 years and about 15000 major military conflicts in the same period."

  18. The Following 16 Users Say Thank You to EFO For This Post:

    Agape (11th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (6th August 2020), Deborah (ahamkara) (7th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), justntime2learn (10th August 2020), Lilybee8 (7th August 2020), palehorse (8th August 2020), Ron Mauer Sr (8th August 2020), Sadieblue (7th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (6th August 2020), Stephanie (7th August 2020), toppy (11th October 2020), Trisher (6th August 2020)

  19. Link to Post #10
    UK Avalon Member
    Join Date
    26th June 2018
    Posts
    189
    Thanks
    829
    Thanked 1,273 times in 186 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by EFO (here)
    If some of you are still considering gardening for what remains from this and for next year,than have a look on this thread.

    On the other hand there still are other countries from which can be supplied if "someone" wanted like Egypt,Russia and Romania.

    So there still two options:working on your patch of land or on pots or raised beds...or waiting for governmental decision ... It's your choice until is too late...

    Even now in Northern hemisphere you can plant cucumbers,squash,tomatoes for pickling,dill and others...even peas if you are in warm areas...just pick a shovel...
    We are probably far better off growing our own rather than buying the chemically raised GMO produce. However for those without a garden then sprouted seeds on a window sill will provide huge amounts of vitamins and minerals. For those who are working on the vibrational side of things. Stand on the earth or grass with bare feet and simply ask for all the vitamins and minerals that your body needs.

    Trisher

  20. The Following 16 Users Say Thank You to Trisher For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (6th August 2020), Deborah (ahamkara) (7th August 2020), EFO (6th August 2020), Ewan (12th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), happyuk (10th August 2020), Harmony (6th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), justntime2learn (10th August 2020), onawah (10th August 2020), palehorse (8th August 2020), Ron Mauer Sr (8th August 2020), Sadieblue (7th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (6th August 2020), Stephanie (7th August 2020)

  21. Link to Post #11
    Wales Avalon Member
    Join Date
    8th October 2012
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Language
    English
    Age
    52
    Posts
    618
    Thanks
    3,262
    Thanked 3,492 times in 579 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    The solution is to dig for victory!

    People have been ploughing this earth for tens of thousands of years. When they did it sensibly and rationally they preserved its fertility and productiveness. Whenever they did it rapaciously , it turned to desert.

    This is not just a modern phenomenon - Iraq, Eastern Turkey and North Persia were looked upon by archaeologists as gardens of Eden. Had the original stone age inhabitants been left alone they would still be farmed today.

    As evidenced by what is going on in China right now, with the deliberate flooding of rural farmland to save the backsides of a bunch of urbanites, city people conquer country people.

    Even in places such as cosy little England, the soil is going: cheap oil-based nitrogen fertilisers have replaced tried and trusted nitrogen-fixing legumes and good old manure. The artificial chemicals can replace the nitrogen lost by crop removal, what they cannot do is replace the topsoil needed to maintain healthy soil structure.

    Read John Steinbeck's 'The Grapes of Wrath' to see how the wretched settlers, who by not replacing organic matter into the soil, had managed to ruin a vast tract of country in one generation.
    Last edited by happyuk; 6th August 2020 at 20:55.

  22. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to happyuk For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (6th August 2020), Constance (13th August 2020), Deborah (ahamkara) (7th August 2020), EFO (7th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), Harmony (7th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), onawah (10th August 2020), palehorse (8th August 2020), Sadieblue (7th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (6th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020)

  23. Link to Post #12
    Thailand Avalon Member palehorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    13th April 2020
    Location
    Thailand
    Language
    English
    Age
    42
    Posts
    292
    Thanks
    2,324
    Thanked 1,532 times in 269 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by azproductions (here)
    I have sources telling me that due to the massive floods in China and the US farms closing my down due to “farmers getting COVID19” will lead to a food shortage in 2021. We get most of our food supply from China or the US. The news isn’t saying anything about the floods or the farms shutting down, they’re keeping it hush hush as long as possible so people panic once we do hit the food shortage (remember the toilet paper frenzy during the beginning of covid? - I think they want the same thing to happen)

    Anyone have thoughts or more information on this?
    When you say "We get most of our food supply from China or the US." who are we?
    I can say only for me, my family and people surrounding me, that we are not getting our food from any of those places. The fresh veggies I get is all from the local farms or from the local fresh market that buy from the local farmers to resell at a margin, the fresh meat and eggs also, It all comes from farms around my area, they do not even have a stamp on it, they are not a proper company per se..
    With the floods in China, I heard they are releasing water down the Mekong river and it affects other countries like Laos, Thailand (where I live) and Cambodia, the dams in Thailand are releasing water due to raining season + china issues but it will affect the local economies around those places, not the entire country, and it is not the first time it happen, they always been dealing with this sort of issues over here.

    My opinion is: It will not have a shortage of food where I am living, I am pretty sure about that, unless some nasty bug destroy all the crops in the country, but unlikely.

    Or maybe I am looking at the issue from the wrong angle, please let me know more if you have any concrete information.

    Thanks for the post by the way, it is always important to keep an eye on this sort of things.
    Last edited by palehorse; 7th August 2020 at 10:20.
    --
    A chaos to the sense, a Kosmos to the reason.

  24. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to palehorse For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (7th August 2020), EFO (7th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), Harmony (7th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), Lilybee8 (7th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (7th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), Trisher (7th August 2020)

  25. Link to Post #13
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    25,030
    Thanks
    102,556
    Thanked 317,446 times in 23,518 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by palehorse (here)
    Quote Posted by azproductions (here)
    I have sources telling me that due to the massive floods in China and the US farms closing my down due to “farmers getting COVID19” will lead to a food shortage in 2021. We get most of our food supply from China or the US. The news isn’t saying anything about the floods or the farms shutting down, they’re keeping it hush hush as long as possible so people panic once we do hit the food shortage (remember the toilet paper frenzy during the beginning of covid? - I think they want the same thing to happen)

    Anyone have thoughts or more information on this?
    When you say "We get most of our food supply from China or the US." who are we?
    azproductions is in Canada.

  26. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), EFO (7th August 2020), Harmony (7th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), palehorse (7th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (7th August 2020), scotslad (7th August 2020), Yoda (7th August 2020)

  27. Link to Post #14
    Thailand Avalon Member palehorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    13th April 2020
    Location
    Thailand
    Language
    English
    Age
    42
    Posts
    292
    Thanks
    2,324
    Thanked 1,532 times in 269 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by palehorse (here)
    Quote Posted by azproductions (here)
    I have sources telling me that due to the massive floods in China and the US farms closing my down due to “farmers getting COVID19” will lead to a food shortage in 2021. We get most of our food supply from China or the US. The news isn’t saying anything about the floods or the farms shutting down, they’re keeping it hush hush as long as possible so people panic once we do hit the food shortage (remember the toilet paper frenzy during the beginning of covid? - I think they want the same thing to happen)

    Anyone have thoughts or more information on this?
    When you say "We get most of our food supply from China or the US." who are we?
    azproductions is in Canada.
    I understand if someone rely completely on industrialized products, in case of big city folks.
    --
    A chaos to the sense, a Kosmos to the reason.

  28. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to palehorse For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (8th August 2020), EFO (7th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), Harmony (7th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (7th August 2020), scotslad (7th August 2020)

  29. Link to Post #15
    United States Avalon Member lisalu's Avatar
    Join Date
    10th December 2011
    Age
    64
    Posts
    45
    Thanks
    4,063
    Thanked 335 times in 42 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Hello All,
    I live in Maine and have since early Spring have watched it become nearly impossible to buy chicks having to wait months to get them. Everyone here is growing a garden and raising chickens. I have always been an avid canner but limited to water bath canning, I've never owned a pressure canner and thought I'd better get one so I could can meat and low acid veggies, including beans. I started looking for one in early May. There were none to be found anywhere in the country. The manufacturers saying that they wouldn't have any available until November! I was lucky enough to find one on Ebay, and paid more than it was worth but I got it and have been putting up food since. I also have a dehydrator and have been putting that to work as well. There are several really good YouTube videos out there that will teach you how to do this properly. Freezers were also impossible to get. Even if you don't have a lot of money to dump into food preservation you can always just buy a little extra every week and put it up. Like buy an extra bag of onions and celery, chop it up and dehydrate it and put it away. Can or dehydrate those tomatoes that are coming in now. Just keep at it. There is a lot you can do now to prepare for hard times. If you have dogs or cats, by all means buy extra pet food every week. I have a few metal garbage cans that I store pet food in, it keeps it pretty safe from bugs and rodents. But now is the time to be prepping! And water is something to think about, A Berkey water filter is a must have. We just installed an old fashioned hand pump to a shallow well so now when we lose power we can still get water, that right there was such a relief to get done.

  30. The Following 17 Users Say Thank You to lisalu For This Post:

    Alekahn2 (11th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (8th August 2020), Delight (10th August 2020), earthdreamer (15th August 2020), edina (8th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), happyuk (8th August 2020), Harmony (8th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), Nenuphar (8th August 2020), palehorse (8th August 2020), pyrangello (11th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (8th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), Sunny (9th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020)

  31. Link to Post #16
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    25,030
    Thanks
    102,556
    Thanked 317,446 times in 23,518 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    More, this time from the Washington Post.
    For the unemployed, rising grocery prices strain budgets even more

    4 August, 2020

    The cost of groceries has been rising at the fastest pace in decades since the coronavirus pandemic seized the U.S. economy, leading to sticker shock for basic staples such as beef and eggs and forcing struggling households to rethink how to put enough food on the table.

    Long-standing supply chains for everyday grocery items have been upended as the pandemic sickened scores of workers, forced factory closures and punctured the carefully calibrated networks that brought food from farms to store shelves. Even while some of the sharpest price hikes have eased somewhat, the overall effects are being felt most acutely by the nearly 30 million Americans who saw their $600 enhanced unemployment benefit expire last Friday — exacerbating concerns that the recession’s long tail could worsen food insecurity for years to come.

    Earlier in the pandemic, the shock to the food system collided with staggering layoffs and an economy forced into lockdown. Cars filled parking lots to wait at drive-through pantries. From the beginning of March through the end of June, food banks across the country distributed more than 1.9 billion meals, according to Feeding America. In March alone, food banks gave out 20 percent more food than in an average month.

    Sean Valadez, 35, of the greater Los Angeles area, came home from Costco in mid-March with a $600 receipt, hoping his grocery haul would feed his family for up to 45 days after he lost work in the music and live entertainment industry. When he went back to the store 40 days later, Valadez was stunned by the rise in prices for ground beef, chicken, salmon and eggs. The grocery bill was an eye-popping $1,000, not including the alcohol he also purchased.

    Valadez said he didn’t remove anything from his cart “because it was shameful.” He swiped his credit card, went home to his partner, and told her they would have to make a serious change. Their unemployment benefits just wouldn’t cover such high grocery bills.

    “I left the United States to be able to afford groceries,” said Valadez, who brought his family to stay with his mother-in-law in Mexico, although he maintains his California home. “Food prices are what’s keeping us here.”

    Overall inflation has not been a pressing concern since the recession touched down in February. Last week, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell said consumer prices have been kept in check due to weak demand, especially in sectors such as travel and hospitality that have been most affected by the pandemic. But food prices are the exception.

    “For some goods, including food, supply constraints have led to notably higher prices, adding to the burden for those struggling with lost income,” Powell noted.

    Indeed, nearly every category of food become more expensive at some point since February, according to data released Friday by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Beef and veal prices saw the steepest spike (20.2 percent), followed by eggs (10.4 percent), poultry (8.6 percent) and pork (8.5 percent).

    Compared with this time last year, prices for beef and veal are up 25.1 percent. Eggs are up 12.1 percent, and pork is up 11.8 percent from a year earlier, according to seasonally adjusted BEA data.

    For many staples, the price hikes were most severe earlier in the spring and summer when ruptured supply chains clashed with a surge in consumer demand. Some categories, including eggs, have seen prices fall back down as the supply strain wore off and shoppers stopped hoarding so much. Milk prices have actually dipped below pre-pandemic levels.

    Some price spikes were most acute earlier in the pandemic due to supply chain shocks and consumer demand. But the overall rise in food prices still lingers.

    Regardless, the grocery system was strapped by a common theme: Supply chains are hard-wired and can’t quickly bend around a global pandemic. Plus, the labor, transportation and warehousing networks that keep restaurant or school kitchens stocked aren’t the same networks that prop up supermarkets.

    “These supply chains are not as fungible as people think,” said Jayson Lusk, head of the department of agricultural economics at Purdue University. “You have a farmer who has a relationship with a supplier that has a relationship with a restaurant, and when those restaurants decide not to open, it’s really practical things like, ‘Who do I call?’ I don’t have those contacts and relationships.'”

    Take meat: In April and May, widespread coronavirus outbreaks sickened thousands of workers at beef and pork processing plants. Factories were forced to scale back production or close altogether, straining the supply chain and triggering short-term shortages as shoppers rushed to stock up.

    Stress-baking and hoarding caused a retail egg shortage early in the pandemic. But the egg supply chain was also thrown out of whack when there simply weren’t enough cardboard or foam cartons to package eggs for retail sale, Lusk said. Eggs also tend to go to restaurants in powdered or liquid form, unlike the whole eggs sought out by grocery stores.

    The milk supply chain was also pinched by basic packaging issues, Lusk said. Cafeterias and schools shut down, creating little need for small paper milk cartons as hordes of consumers rushed to stock up by the gallon.

    “The supply was not able to move to where the demand was, and that’s a big part of why you saw prices getting pulled up,” Lusk said.

    While some of the supply chain shocks are getting better, overall food price increases linger. For the nearly 30 million Americans who just lost $600 in enhanced weekly federal benefits, there can be less money than ever to cover the basics.

    “Cutting back on food budgets is one of the first things people do,” said Elaine Waxman, a senior fellow in the Income and Benefits Policy Center at the Urban Institute. “It’s a strategy for trying to cope with an economic shock, or persistently limited resources."

    Free produce, dry goods and meat are seen at a Food Bank for New York City distribution event at Barclays Center on July 30. (Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank for New York City)

    More than 1 in 6 adults were food insecure in May, according to an analysis by the Urban Institute. That gap had moderated slightly since earlier in the pandemic, in part due to the $600 employment benefit, Waxman said.

    One of the draft stimulus bills Congress is considering would not expand the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), also known as food stamps. It also would not extend the Pandemic EBT program, a debit-card benefit for households with children who have temporarily lost access to free or reduced-price school meals.

    Food insecurity, Waxman said, casts a long shadow. After the Great Recession, rates of food insecurity remained at high levels for a decade. Estimates about when the economy might recover are hard to come by, since a turnaround depends largely on getting a public health crisis under control. But food insecurity will persistently drag behind, Waxman said.

    “One of the things that’s hard to explain to people is that poverty lags unemployment,” Waxman said. “If we woke up tomorrow morning and things were dramatically better, I think we can expect food insecurity to be at elevated rates for a considerable period of time.”

    Over the past few weeks, as the $600 benefit was set to expire, the North Texas Food Bank saw an uptick in families served by its emergency pantry, said Valerie Hawthorne, director of government relations.

    “We think those folks are preparing for what’s coming,” Hawthorne said.

    Hawthorne said she was particularly concerned about the elderly, since many seniors are only eligible for the minimum amount in SNAP benefits — which can be as low as $16 a month. Looking ahead to the fall, Hawthorne said parents will have to weigh the cost of child care vs. leaving their jobs to stay home and care for kids.

    “It could potentially be a perfect storm,” Hawthorne said. “You have to pay your rent or your mortgage. You have to make that car payment. But food can be negotiable.”

    In Orlando, Lindsay Reynolds, 27, was furloughed from her job with a major theme park company in mid-April. Relying on the $600 boost, Reynolds recalibrated her budget to cover rent, utilities and a car payment, allotting no more than $75 a week for groceries. She sought out discounts at Publix, avoided more expensive organic products and tried to eat healthfully while living off chicken, pasta and rice. She’d sometimes treat herself to a cheap takeout meal once a week.

    That was sustainable until her enhanced jobless benefits vanished, slicing her weekly payment to just $247 from the state of Florida after taxes.

    Reynolds is eager to go back to work, but her company relies on tourism. Over the weekend, she moved back in with her parents — a privilege she knows isn’t available to everyone trying to make ends meet.

    “As I was crunching the numbers, everything started to implode, and I called my parents sobbing,” Reynolds said. “They said, ‘Why don’t you consider driving home for a little bit. … Come home so we can cover your food so you can use all of your employment money for all of your other bills.' ”

    As she was packing up to leave, Reynolds darted into a Publix to snag some Lysol wipes for her parents. The $6.50 price tag was hard to swallow. Reynolds figured it was the least she could do.

  32. The Following 17 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    Anka (10th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Constance (13th August 2020), fifi (15th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), happyuk (10th August 2020), Harmony (9th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), lisalu (9th August 2020), Mike (8th August 2020), pyrangello (11th August 2020), Sadieblue (13th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (8th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), Sunny (9th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020), Yoda (8th August 2020)

  33. Link to Post #17
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    25,030
    Thanks
    102,556
    Thanked 317,446 times in 23,518 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    I've only just seen this video, made by Dave Paulides on 2 April 2020 about the Skinwalker Ranch. But the reason I'm sharing that here is his last 3 minutes, starting at 16:45.

    David has as much integrity, goodwill and intelligence as anyone might ever wish to see in one person. His comments — about American people going hungry, and how could this happen?? — are concise, accurate, heartfelt, and absolutely to be noted.


  34. The Following 17 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    Alecs (11th August 2020), Alekahn2 (11th August 2020), Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Ewan (12th August 2020), Franny (10th August 2020), Harmony (12th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), justntime2learn (12th August 2020), kudzy (15th August 2020), lisalu (11th August 2020), palehorse (14th August 2020), pyrangello (11th August 2020), Ron Mauer Sr (15th August 2020), Sadieblue (13th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), Trisher (11th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020)

  35. Link to Post #18
    United States Avalon Member
    Join Date
    25th March 2010
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,229
    Thanks
    2,950
    Thanked 7,117 times in 1,065 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    States Secretly Stockpiling Food for Need Ahead - "To the Roof!"---------- Something is going on , isn't it? Whenever I here that there's a food recall I'm thinking the other way, where are they taking the recalled food? So called recalled food? Hmmmmmmmmmmm , don't know .

    Last edited by Bill Ryan; 12th August 2020 at 13:40. Reason: embedded the video

  36. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to pyrangello For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (12th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Harmony (12th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), justntime2learn (12th August 2020), Kamikaze (18th August 2020), lisalu (12th August 2020), palehorse (14th August 2020), Sadieblue (13th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (13th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020), Valerie Villars (27th August 2020)

  37. Link to Post #19
    Canada Avalon Member azproductions's Avatar
    Join Date
    12th April 2020
    Language
    English
    Age
    23
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 200 times in 19 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Thank you for your responses!!!

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    I've only just seen this video, made by Dave Paulides on 2 April 2020 about the Skinwalker Ranch. But the reason I'm sharing that here is his last 3 minutes, starting at 16:45.

    David has as much integrity, goodwill and intelligence as anyone might ever wish to see in one person. His comments — about American people going hungry, and how could this happen?? — are concise, accurate, heartfelt, and absolutely to be noted.

    Thank you!

  38. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to azproductions For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (13th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Harmony (13th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), justntime2learn (13th August 2020), palehorse (14th August 2020), Sarah Rainsong (13th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020)

  39. Link to Post #20
    Canada Avalon Member azproductions's Avatar
    Join Date
    12th April 2020
    Language
    English
    Age
    23
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 200 times in 19 posts

    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by lisalu (here)
    Hello All,
    I live in Maine and have since early Spring have watched it become nearly impossible to buy chicks having to wait months to get them. Everyone here is growing a garden and raising chickens. I have always been an avid canner but limited to water bath canning, I've never owned a pressure canner and thought I'd better get one so I could can meat and low acid veggies, including beans. I started looking for one in early May. There were none to be found anywhere in the country. The manufacturers saying that they wouldn't have any available until November! I was lucky enough to find one on Ebay, and paid more than it was worth but I got it and have been putting up food since. I also have a dehydrator and have been putting that to work as well. There are several really good YouTube videos out there that will teach you how to do this properly. Freezers were also impossible to get. Even if you don't have a lot of money to dump into food preservation you can always just buy a little extra every week and put it up. Like buy an extra bag of onions and celery, chop it up and dehydrate it and put it away. Can or dehydrate those tomatoes that are coming in now. Just keep at it. There is a lot you can do now to prepare for hard times. If you have dogs or cats, by all means buy extra pet food every week. I have a few metal garbage cans that I store pet food in, it keeps it pretty safe from bugs and rodents. But now is the time to be prepping! And water is something to think about, A Berkey water filter is a must have. We just installed an old fashioned hand pump to a shallow well so now when we lose power we can still get water, that right there was such a relief to get done.
    Yes, I’ve had my eye on a Berkey for a year now, but unfortunately can’t afford it. I always think “maybe next month I’ll be able to afford it!!”. Maybe one day

  40. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to azproductions For This Post:

    Bassplayer1 (5th September 2020), Bill Ryan (13th August 2020), Franny (13th August 2020), Harmony (13th August 2020), janette (16th August 2020), lisalu (13th August 2020), palehorse (14th August 2020), Stephanie (13th August 2020)

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1 4 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts