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  1. Link to Post #21
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    From Mike Adams, just posted.

    (Of course, this is USA-centered, as is often the case with news articles. In Ecuador where I am, there are no shortages of anything. It'd be interesting to hear reports from other areas, such as Canada, Europe and Australia.)
    Grocery prices soar and supply chains experience backlogs amid coronavirus pandemic



    As the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic spread throughout America during the first half of 2020, worried citizens flocked to stores to stock up on essential supplies. Shoppers bought items like canned soup, cleaning supplies and toilet paper in bulk, emptying grocery shelves due to worries that they might not have enough to last until the pandemic ends.

    Five months after the pandemic forced the country to adapt to the “new normal,” data from a market research firm suggests that while supplies of items that were popular during the first half of 2020 are now easier to come by, America may still experience the scarcity of other grocery items as the pandemic continues to cripple the supply chain.

    From bad to worse

    According to IRI, a renowned market research company, supplies of staple goods are currently recovering. However, grocery shelves are still mostly empty than they were before the pandemic began.

    The company warned that consumers should brace themselves as the worse was yet to come.

    Coronavirus continues to skyrocket in certain states, and grocers are reporting a new increase in the purchase of staples that could once again cause a shortage in stores across the country.

    Shoppers are also buying more kitchen staples like baking ingredients and paper towels. The increased demand has made it hard for manufacturers to produce the items fast enough to ensure that store shelves stay full.

    Mostly empty store shelves may be a normal sight during the pandemic

    To meet increased consumer demand due to the coronavirus pandemic, manufacturers of food, beverages, paper products and cleaning supplies increased production during spring to give grocers a chance to refill store shelves.

    At the peak of worried shoppers cleaning out stores near the end of March, stores in the country sold out on at least 13 percent of items on average. For August, about 10 percent of store items remain out of stock.

    The normal range of out of stock items was only from five to seven percent before the pandemic.

    The numbers seem small, but research from trade associations suggests that it would cost the supermarket industry a whopping $10 billion in lost revenue to keep store shelves at least 90 percent full for half a year.

    This means grocery shoppers with about 20 items on their list would be unable to find two items in one store. Shopper surveys have found that if buyers can’t find all the items they need in one location, they will move on to a different store.

    A retailer missing some items from their store shelves could also lose this customer to their competitors for good.

    According to estimates from the IRI, these popular grocery items were back in store shelves by August:
    • Cookies and crackers
    • Dairy
    • Frozen fruits and vegetables
    • Laundry products
    • Over-the-counter medicine
    • Paper products (e.g., paper towels and toilet paper)
    However, these items are still hard to find as manufacturers struggle to meet consumer demand:
    • Barbecue tools
    • Breakfast foods
    • Canned vegetables
    • Coffee and tea
    • Frozen meals
    • Frozen meat, poultry and seafood
    • Household cleaning products
    • Household plastics and storage products
    • Office and school supplies
    • Pest control
    • Refrigerated dough
    • Vitamins, weight loss products
    Out of stock items and increasing prices

    Because of the pandemic, manufacturers and retailers are working to make, deliver and stock up on in-demand items. However, this can lead to out-of-stocks of niche or seasonal items, like barbecue equipment and tools.

    Other grocery aisles have mostly empty shelves since the sector is unable to produce enough items. This includes flour mills that are behind on deliveries even after increasing production by at least 40 percent during the pandemic.

    Ken Romanzi, B&G Foods Inc.’s Chief Executive, shared that once spikes in Covid-19 cases have forced some states to delay their reopening plans, grocery makers and retailers were also in a bind: As demand for certain products increases, it became even harder to produce extra stock.

    B&G Foods, the producer of Green Giant canned and frozen vegetables, said it exhausted its supplies in the spring. Despite working to produce more items, the company is unable to make extras to stay ahead of another wave of shutdowns.

    Other manufacturers like Campbell Soup Co., General Mills Inc. and Kimberly-Clark Corp. are also having trouble rebuilding inventories due to increased demand post-pandemic.

    Purchase limits and reduced shopper discounts

    Before the coronavirus pandemic hit the country, stores enticed shoppers by offering discounts and promos on various goods.

    However, from March to July of this year, manufacturers and retailers reduced discounts. This meant stores have had to increase the prices of food and household goods and enforce limits on popular items like pasta and paper towels. (Related: Coronavirus causes food prices to soar to record highs.)

    But retailers are hopeful since promotions have made a comeback this summer, which helped average price increases slow from May. The IRI reported that store prices are still five percent higher on average than a year ago.

    Usually, inflation would cause a two percent increase.

    Strangely enough, some categories are offering more discounts compared to before the pandemic began. For example, grooming-supply companies are trying to improve sales since consumers have prioritized other needs over their appearance.

    In the same vein, sports and energy drinks offered more during the peak of the pandemic since gyms were closed and people didn’t frequent convenience stores as they normally did.

    Manufacturing updates

    The pandemic resulted in nonessential businesses being shut down and total manufacturing in the country has significantly slowed.

    While factories churning out food and other items for grocery stores increased their capacity from 10 to 40 percent, others producing large quantities for hotels, restaurants and schools reduced their output as they couldn’t produce retail-sized products.

    Overall, factories producing food, paper products and cleaning supplies didn’t experience a pandemic-related disruption compared to other industries like autos and appliances.

    What does this mean for the average shopper? If your supplies are already running low or you want to prepare before your state goes into lockdown, below are items that you should stock up on before the nearest grocery store runs out of items (again).

    Food
    • Canned vegetables (low-sodium)
    • Canned fruit
    • Dairy like cheese and milk
    • Dried fruit
    • Frozen fruit
    • Healthy fats such as chia seeds and olive oil
    • Jarred salsa and tomato sauce
    • Protein like chicken, tuna, seafood, lentils and nuts
    • Grains like brown rice, oats and whole wheat
    Cleaning products and toiletries
    • Alcohol solutions with at least 70 percent alcohol
    • Bleach
    • Floss
    • Hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol
    • Hand soap
    • Razors and shaving cream
    • Shampoo and conditioner

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    France Avalon Member Deux Corbeaux's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Here in France, no shortages of any kind, as far as I’ve experienced.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Lots of shortages here in the Bluegrass. Metal products are non-existent(hardware cloth, t-posts, rebar, cattle panels, tomato cages, fencing, etc). I managed to get 5 miles of electric fence wire two months ago. Felt like I’d won the lottery! The problem is the trade war with China. Food is available, but not the quantity or quality it once was. The prices have also gone through the roof. Everyone is prepping and buying in advance of autumn when they will no doubt double down.
    “The World is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don’t do anything about it.”
    Albert Einstein

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Millions of acres of crops in the central US have been destroyed by a series of historic natural disasters

    Michael Snyder
    The Economic Collapse Blog
    Wed, 12 Aug 2020 14:19 UTC


    While the mainstream media focuses on the upcoming election, COVID-19 and the endless protests going on in our major cities, another great tragedy is unfolding all across the middle of the country. A nightmarish drought, horrific flooding along the Mississippi River and a giant "derecho" that just hit the farm belt have combined to make this one of the toughest years for farmers ever. And this comes at a particularly bad time, because the stress that the COVID-19 pandemic has put on food distribution systems has already created periodic shortages of certain items around the nation. We definitely could have used an uneventful growing season this year, and unfortunately we didn't get it.

    On Monday, an absolutely massive "derecho" roared through the Midwest. According to USA Today, the storm had winds of up to 112 miles per hour...
    The storm had winds of up to 112 mph near Cedar Rapids, Iowa - as powerful as an inland hurricane - as it tore from eastern Nebraska across Iowa and parts of Wisconsin, Indiana and Illinois, including Chicago and its suburbs.
    Most hurricanes don't have winds that high once they finally reach shore, and I have personally never experienced wind speeds of such magnitude.

    Needless to say, this very unusual storm caused immense devastation. According to Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds, approximately 10 million acres of crops were destroyed in Iowa alone...
    Early estimates say the derecho flattened at least one-third of Iowa's crops - about 10 million acres, according to Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds. In addition, tens of millions of bushels of grain that were stored at co-ops and on farms were damaged or destroyed as bins blew away.

    And it rocked Marshalltown, Iowa, where an EF-3 tornado destroyed the town's business district just two years ago. With winds of 99 mph, Monday's storm damaged some businesses that had recently recovered, even damaging the scaffolding being used to repair the historic courthouse dome.
    I can't remember a storm ever causing this much damage in the middle of the summer.

    If about 10 million acres were flattened just in Iowa, how many more acres did this storm destroy in Nebraska, Wisconsin, Indiana and Illinois?

    Sadly, this one storm is going to completely financially ruin some farmers. For example, Iowa farmer Tim Bardole is facing losses that could potentially exceed one million dollars...
    Corn that used to stand upright on Bardole's farm is now laying on its side. Some stalks snapped off, others ripped out of the ground at the roots.

    Bardole estimated he'll be out $200 an acre, which is $500,000 total.

    Worst-case scenario, that could go up to $500 per acre. That would equate to $1.25 million.
    How would you feel if you lost a million dollars because of one storm?

    Further south, many farmers along the southern Mississippi Delta have already had their growing seasons wiped out by historic flooding for the second year in a row...
    The southern Mississippi Delta is home to some of the most fertile farmland in the United States.

    But not a single crop of soybeans, cotton, corn, or rice has been planted at many farms in the region — one of the poorest in the country.
    This wasn't supposed to happen.

    The flooding of 2019 was a complete and utter nightmare, and this was the year when the recovery was supposed to begin. But instead, "hundreds of thousands of acres" are currently entirely buried by water...
    For the second year in a row, widespread flooding has left hundreds of thousands of acres of farmland underwater, ruining entire harvests. And now, with their fields submerged, farmers are bracing for another year of no income.
    Meanwhile, countless other farmers are having their growing seasons ruined by a crippling drought.

    I know that many of you are reading this article and are thinking that what I am saying sounds contradictory.

    After all, how can there be severe flooding and severe drought at the same time?

    I know that this sounds very strange, but it is actually happening. We are witnessing severe flooding right along the Mississippi River, and at the same time historic drought conditions are creating massive problems across much of the western half of the nation.

    In fact, we are being told that drought conditions in some areas have already become the worst "in almost a decade"...
    Drought conditions throughout the country are reaching their worst levels in almost a decade.

    This summer, drought has hit large portions of the United States, especially slamming key pasture and ranges for ranchers. But crops are also seeing downward trends in quality thanks to the hot, dry weather.
    Things are particularly bad in the Southwest, and this is making life very difficult for many ranchers...
    The worst-hit section of the country, with the highest levels of drought, are in cattle country: West Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Kansas. That's led to really damaged, dry topsoil and grazing land, which could force ranchers to invest in other feeding options for livestock. Only 36 percent of the country's pasture and range land is rated good or excellent; 30 percent is rated poor or very poor, reports FarmFutures.
    If you look at the latest U.S. Drought Monitor map, you will see that the drought is the worst in the areas where the original "Dust Bowl" developed back in the 1930s. Those that follow my work regularly know that I have been warning about a return of "the Dust Bowl" for many years, and now it is starting to happen.

    2020 seems to be a year when the bad news never ends. First we were hit by the worst public health crisis in 100 years, then the U.S. economy collapsed, then massive riots erupted in our major cities, and now farms are being absolutely devastated all across the United States.

    All throughout 2019 I warned that a "perfect storm" was coming, and what we have experienced so far is just the leading edge of that storm.

    So I would encourage you to use the relative tranquility of the month of August to get prepared for what is ahead, because the month of September is almost here, and the presidential election is right around the corner.
    About the Author:
    My name is Michael Snyder and my brand new book entitled "Lost Prophecies Of The Future Of America" is now available on Amazon.com. By purchasing the book you help to support the work that my wife and I are doing, and by giving it to others you help to multiply the impact that we are having on people all over the globe. I have published thousands of articles on The Economic Collapse Blog, End Of The American Dream and The Most Important News, and the articles that I publish on those sites are republished on dozens of other prominent websites all over the globe.
    SOTT Comment: As well as natural disasters devastating crop growth, the insane response to the coronavirus crisis and losing value of currency in Western nations in particular, have made the production, availability, purchasing and distribution of food - a MAJOR global issue the likes of which we haven't seen in generations.

    Related:

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    ... And as we receive news about millions of acres of destroyed crops in the US this season, Joseph P Farrell in today's News and Views from the Nefarium brings to light, from recent articles, the devastation of China's grain production due to not just flooding in the south, but also drought in the north, along with pests.



    Dr. Farrell has, for some time, speculated that this has all the aspects of weather warfare (in China).

    Well, I'm keeping in mind that two can play that game. Also, keeping in mind that it's the populations and the countless animals who effectively take the hit.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    I work on the shop floor of a British supermarket and only a few items have been unavailable in the past few months. Prices have remained stable, even some reducing such as milk, seeing as producers have lost their restaurant supply trade. Even though farmers were warning that there would be a shortage of workers to pick fresh produce, there hasn't been a shortage of fruit and veg. Some items are unavailable for a few days and then a stock arrives.

    Supplies of pasta have been erratic; I read that Italy doubled its production during the initial panic buying, but would not be able to sustain this beyond a few weeks. I haven't seen macaroni or small pasta such as orzo for about 2 months in our store, but most types of pasta are available.

    Edit to add - we had quite a drought in Britain in April and May and our local farmers were worried about the crops failing, but there has been a lot of rain since the end of June which helped the crops to recover and they are now being harvested.
    Last edited by HikerChick; 14th August 2020 at 11:29.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Coming from CA I am spoiled rotten. I have always had a treasure trove of good healthy looking produce and full shelves. However, in the rural area of Tennessee now in my retirement years, I am hard pressed to find decent anything be it cantaloupe or organic strawberries. The hunt is on weekly and monthly. On top of which, you used to be able to know when shipments arrived at stores and shopped accordingly. Not any more. Since Covid, everything is helter skelter. My point is cannot garden with outside critters in the forest and although I am 2000 ft up ( some poster mentioned that would be ideal with a 4000 ft mountain nearby which I do have in the Catoosa Mts, it is ideal for a safe environment away from terror and chaos but not for gardening. My sun room we learned did not offer enough sun. So be it for the name. And I had to throw out vegetable plants that did not thrive. I could not get enough artificial lighting to cover tomatoes and peppers etc. So what I am left with is sprouts and microgreens. The sprouts in summer do not do well in a hot house. So sprouts during the rest of the year work well.
    Best suggestions taken is to double up on groceries that will not perish each time you visit a store and find a storage area to keep those items safe in the event . . . I have already purchased a propane stove for emergencies. It has been four years since there was a ice storm and scary not to have heat in a winter which I have not experienced yet nor wish to.
    When you age, you are not in the realm of keeping up with survival needs. Everything comes down to simplifying.
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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    This report, from The Times of India (India's most prestigious newspaper), was published 4 months ago.
    World faces food crisis in wake of coronavirus: UN, WTO

    1 April, 2020

    Many governments around the world have put their populations on lockdown causing severe slow-downs in international trade and food supply chains. Panic buying by people going into confinement has already demonstrated the fragility of supply chains as supermarket shelves emptied in many countries.

    Paris: The heads of three global agencies warned Wednesday of the risk of a worldwide "food shortage" if authorities fail to manage the ongoing coronavirus crisis properly.

    Many governments around the world have put their populations on lockdown causing severe slow-downs in international trade and food supply chains.

    Panic buying by people going into confinement has already demonstrated the fragility of supply chains as supermarket shelves emptied in many countries.

    "Uncertainty about food availability can spark a wave of export restrictions, creating a shortage on the global market," said the joint text signed by Qu Dongyu, head of the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO) and Roberto Azevedo, director of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

    "In the midst of the COVID-19 lockdowns, every effort must be made to ensure that trade flows as freely as possible, specially to avoid food shortage(s)" from developing, they said in their statement.

    "When acting to protect the health and well-being of their citizens, countries should ensure that any trade-related measures do not disrupt the food supply chain," they added.

    Over the longer term confinement orders and travel restrictions risk causing disruptions in agricultural production due to the unavailability of agricultural labour and the inability to get food to markets.

    "Such disruptions including hampering the movement of agricultural and food industry workers and extending border delays for food containers, result in the spoilage of perishables and increasing food waste," said the three leaders.

    They also stressed the need to protect employees engaged in food production, processing and distribution, both for their own health and that of others, as well as to maintain food supply chains.

    "It is at times like these that more, not less, international cooperation is essential," they said.

    "We must ensure that our response to COVID-19 does not unintentionally create unwarranted shortages of essential items and exacerbate hunger and malnutrition."

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    This report, from The Times of India (India's most prestigious newspaper), was published 4 months ago.
    World faces food crisis in wake of coronavirus: UN, WTO

    1 April, 2020

    Many governments around the world have put their populations on lockdown causing severe slow-downs in international trade and food supply chains. Panic buying by people going into confinement has already demonstrated the fragility of supply chains as supermarket shelves emptied in many countries.

    Paris: The heads of three global agencies warned Wednesday of the risk of a worldwide "food shortage" if authorities fail to manage the ongoing coronavirus crisis properly.

    Many governments around the world have put their populations on lockdown causing severe slow-downs in international trade and food supply chains.

    Panic buying by people going into confinement has already demonstrated the fragility of supply chains as supermarket shelves emptied in many countries.

    "Uncertainty about food availability can spark a wave of export restrictions, creating a shortage on the global market," said the joint text signed by Qu Dongyu, head of the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO) and Roberto Azevedo, director of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

    "In the midst of the COVID-19 lockdowns, every effort must be made to ensure that trade flows as freely as possible, specially to avoid food shortage(s)" from developing, they said in their statement.

    "When acting to protect the health and well-being of their citizens, countries should ensure that any trade-related measures do not disrupt the food supply chain," they added.

    Over the longer term confinement orders and travel restrictions risk causing disruptions in agricultural production due to the unavailability of agricultural labour and the inability to get food to markets.

    "Such disruptions including hampering the movement of agricultural and food industry workers and extending border delays for food containers, result in the spoilage of perishables and increasing food waste," said the three leaders.

    They also stressed the need to protect employees engaged in food production, processing and distribution, both for their own health and that of others, as well as to maintain food supply chains.

    "It is at times like these that more, not less, international cooperation is essential," they said.

    "We must ensure that our response to COVID-19 does not unintentionally create unwarranted shortages of essential items and exacerbate hunger and malnutrition."
    Everything is going pretty much according to the program that has been put into motion by the global handlers operating behind the curtain.

    Watch the Netflix documentary "Tread", and you will get a sense of what many people are starting to feel about the minions doing the handlers' bidding and the lengths to which some, nay many, of them will soon go when, after a lifetime of toil, everything they think they earned and worked for has been taken from them--or more to the point, they perceive that it has been taken from them.

    The SHTF time is fast approaching.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Water retrieval - You need a plan.
    For those who have a well, you can get water when the power goes out.
    Water bucket


    Another simple water collection solution when it rains.
    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 17th August 2020 at 00:03.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?




    Washington State has been stocking away millions of dollars of non-perishable food -- so have other US states, and the federal government -- in anticipation of "the need ahead." If states are preparing, so too must you be today. And spread the word.


    From Ice Age Farmer.


    Love peace and joy to all!

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by Satori (here)
    Everything is going pretty much according to the program that has been put into motion by the global handlers operating behind the curtain.
    I wouldn't say that,even if things show like that and are forced in that direction. Just wait and do what you supposed to do
    "Your planet is forbidden for an open visit - extremely aggressive social environment,despite almost perfect climatic conditions.Almost 4 billion violent deaths for the last 5000 years and about 15000 major military conflicts in the same period."

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    United States Moderator Karen (Geophyz)'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Here in the southern US, there are definite shortages of some products and I have noticed a large price increase in others. You cannot get paper towels or any bleach product. I did see 3 cans of Lysol spray for well over $100 on Amazon last night. I grow and can most of my food and I hunt for the meat so I know exactly how it was processed but coffee has gone up so high I am considering just not drinking it. I guess I need to stock pile. I was talking to someone yesterday who is sure we are in a civil war and between now and the end of the year it is going to get much worse. So much for peace and love. Now we all need to be prepared.

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Quote Posted by Geophyz (here)
    Now we all need to be prepared.
    I really do think so. With practical prepping, the key (of course) is to stock up with simple longlife items that one would be sure to use later anyway.

    And it really doesn't have to be expensive. Ignoring luxuries, a few big sacks of brown rice and beans, plus oil, salt, oats, different kinds of flour, yeast, sugar, spices (for variety and interest!), dried milk, etc etc will do a lot to keep one alive and healthy if times do get tricky — and they really might. Even $200-$300 will go a really long way with basic necessities.

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    Brazil Avalon Member
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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    There is no shortage of food in Brazil, which seems to be the Farm of the World. . We are breaking crop record. What is happening here is that we are currently selling the 2022 crop that has not yet been planted. China and other countries are buying it.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    In the beginning of the lockdown in March, people started stocking food at home. But the Supermarket Association wnet on Television and asked Brazillian people to stop stockpiling food at home because there were no risk of food shortage. And so we did. Our Supermarkets are full of food on the shelves. No shortage here. It all depend on the behaviour of consumers. If 210 million people decided to stockpile food here in Brazil we would collapse the market. That´s what is happening in United States.

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    Romania Avalon Member Anka's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Here in Romania, there is no shortage of food, I have worked in the big supply trade and I know the laws and methods of foreign suppliers, it is not even about trade, it is an underground cash flow correlated with storage and recirculation of goods on which many depend on business, and even if the food is thrown away, the flow must flow, that's why I quit my job, I can't participate in such a thing, it's a crime against people's needs to eat healthy food and a mockery of the planet's resources (processing, electricity,transport..)

    The European Parliament tried to take measures to reduce food losses (note that it only tried in a written report)
    Every year, up to 50% of consumable and healthy food in the EU is wasted in households, supermarkets, restaurants and along food chains, from producer to consumer, while 79 million Europeans live below the poverty line, and 16 million receive their food from charities.

    The first European country to fine shops that do not donate unsold food was France.

    I think it is always good to make food supplies with extended shelf life, here in the country, I have learned to make a list of necessities suitable for a whole month of living, so that every day there is another menu and to complete the necessary intake of vitamins I have a garden from which I preserve everything, some jars keep well even for two years.

    At the beginning of each autumn we gradually start to buy salt, sugar, sunflower oil, vinegar, corn, ground semolina, barley, dried lentils, flour, rice, pasta, spices, cocoa, coffee, household hygiene products and medicines, in case of emergency, so that when winter comes we don't have to travel so much in less favorable weather conditions.

    In order not to occupy the space, flour, sugar, salt can be stored in buckets with airtight lids, protected from moisture, kept in a dark and cool place.
    I can order flour online in a 50 kg bag (there are still people who grow wheat nearby) and they can bring my bag home with free shipping, I need a lot of flour, for homemade bread and cakes (yeast i can freeze and last up to almost a year, frozen), cheeses without much water content, can be frozen and used in about 5 months.
    Frozen fruits are a consistent intake of vitamins,
    can be thawed in the winter to make milkshakes or fresh jam.
    I found sugar at at a promotional price, and bought a larger quantity the day before, but I need it to preserve pears and apples by making compote for the winter.

    You can also buy fresh meat, leave it in salted water (2 tablespoons per liter) for two days in the refrigerator with spices, remove from salted water, wipe and smoke slowly (there are tutorials on the internet) and you can keep very well for at least 4 months hanging in cold air currents, or frozen in smaller parts for almost a year, it becomes a good ham for sandwiches, and even a tasty base for soups.

    Carrots keep very well in wooden crates with sand (one layer of sand, one layer of carrots), to avoid light because they sprout, place a lid (from newspapers to breathe a little).

    If the food is withdrawn from the shelf for purposes well established by others, it will indeed be a crisis and we will have to prepare ourselves even for that, it makes you think, which is the limit to which we will have to go back to our source of survival, the Earth.
    I pray every day for all the children who suffer from hunger, I would like my waste (too many vegetables that I have nowhere to offer) that I return to the earth, to be a part of the food of those children.

    I photographed the shelves full of goods, to see the difference if they end up empty, it's not a joke, but it somehow alleviates the shock, although it doesn't save the situation.I would like all mankind to have everything they need for daily living.



    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    From Zero Hedge: (four days ago)
    Dramatic Photos: Desperate For Provisions, Thousands Of Cars Line Up At Texas Food Bank

    14 August, 2020

    Dramatic images released this week show thousands of cars stretching for miles, lining up for provisions at a Texas food bank as the state continues to deal with the effects of its coronavirus outbreak.

    At a food drive held in Dallas County on Tuesday, cars from "the other side of the state" showed up, according to the Daily Mail. Photographs show cars bumper to bumper while 90 volunteers worked to distribute 10,000 boxes of food. People had started lining up for the food before dawn, hoping to get boxes that included dairy, canned goods, noodles, peanut butter and other basics.



    Richard Archer, who showed up at the food bank this week, said: "If it wasn't for this, we'd probably go hungry. With unemployment benefits cut, [my daughter's] husband's been laid off for three months. So, it's just been a struggle. If it wasn't for church, and food giveaways, the kids would be going hungry."



    Diana King, another person at the food drive, told CBS: "There's times I open the refrigerator and there's little there. We make do with what we have and we make it stretch. It helps pay a bill, so the water doesn't get turned off. The gas doesn't get turned off. Mortgage? We are right there on the borderline."



    The scramble for free food comes as about 30 million Americans surveyed last month said that they "didn't have enough to eat". This marked about 12% of all people polled. At the same time, the country is mired with record unemployment numbers. 28 million people remain unemployed nationwide as a result of the pandemic.



    According to the Daily Mail, the numbers in Texas are dire: "Dallas County has recorded 55,787 cases of coronavirus and 794 deaths. In Texas there are 524,814 cases and 9,552 deaths. The positivity rate in Texas is 24.5 percent - the highest since the start of the pandemic."



    The economic situation in Texas has been deteriorating even as the number of new covid cases in the state peaked one month ago and has been declining ever since (although some blame this on declining testing)



    "I actually live in West Dallas. But I came this far just to get the help," Rene Hightower told CBS Dallas. It goes without saying that if only these people had used their government benefits payments to buy deep out of the money Tesla calls, then everyone would be rich by now.

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    Thank you to everyone for your responses!

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    Default Re: Food shortages soon?

    From Russia Today, just published:
    ‘Famine of biblical proportions’ looms over humanity due to Covid-19, UN food chief warns

    22 August, 2020



    The Covid-19 pandemic may lead to a calamity of epic scale, with millions facing starvation worldwide, the head of the UN’s hunger-fighting body has warned.

    “All the data we have, including WFP forecast that the number of people experiencing malnutrition will grow by 80 percent by the end of the year, … points to a real disaster,” David Beasley, Executive Director of the UN World Food Program (WFP), said.

    We are risking a famine of biblical proportions

    The rapid increase in the number of people who can’t feed themselves will be just an immediate outcome of the pandemic, which caused a disruption of food growth and logistics worldwide. More long-term damage is bound to materialize in the years to come.

    “Obviously social tensions will grow, migration will increase, conflicts will escalate and hunger will likely affect those who didn’t experience it before,” the official told the Russian news agency TASS.

    WFP projections say Latin American nations face the most dramatic change in their situation, with the number of malnourished people increasing by as much as 269 percent, Beasley said. The same metric for countries in Eastern and Central Asia stands at 135 percent. Sub-Saharan Africa may see the number of their hungry almost double.

    Global hunger is already high, Beasley warned. Unless bold action is taken now, “many will die, children will suffer from the consequences of malnutrition for many years, and the world will lose all the progress made in fighting hunger over the past decade,” he said.

    The price of inaction will be incredibly high

    This year some 138 million people in 83 countries rely on WFP for their food supply, the official said. For many of them the UN humanitarian body is the “last hope for survival”. In South Sudan 1.6 million people were added this year to the 5 million already requiring assistance. In Yemen, the WFP feeds 13 million.

    The situation in Lebanon became particularly grim after a devastating blast two weeks ago in Beirut. The explosion not only destroyed stockpiles of grain, but also cut supply chains because the damaged port was used to deliver some 85 percent of the food that Lebanon needs.

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