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Thread: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Hi, Folks: an Avalon guest has emailed me for help. She has a phonetic phrase in an unknown ancient language which she wants to translate. (In other words, this is what it sounds like.)

    I told her I was no linguist myself (far from it!), but that maybe members here might be able to dig out some possible meanings. My own first guess might be Latin, which I did study long ago, but that might well be quite wrong and it could be anything at all from any era.

    Melach libani nonay usni

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Hi, Folks: an Avalon guest has emailed me for help. She has a phonetic phrase in an unknown ancient language which she wants to translate. (In other words, this is what it sounds like.)

    I told her I was no linguist myself (far from it!), but that maybe members here might be able to dig out some possible meanings. My own first guess might be Latin, which I did study long ago, but that might well be quite wrong and it could be anything at all from any era.

    Melach libani nonay usni
    I'm not a linguist by any stretch, but I'd guess we need some phonetic symbols or something if we're going by how it sounds.

    Just going with the first word...
    Melach... Is is the "Me" portion MEE? MEH? MEY?
    What kind "a" is in "lach"? A as in apple? A as in ape? A as in America? or another form of a?
    What kind of "ch"? hard as in anchor? soft as in church?
    And which syllable gets the accent?

    Not trying to make things difficult or anything. The English language is just ridiculously inconsistent.
    The world is changed... I feel it in the water... I feel it in the earth... I smell it in the air...
    Much that once was is lost, for none now live who remember it.

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Melach libani nonay usni
    I went to this excellent online Latin dictionary. (The phrase doesn't sound like Greek, which I also studied.) The result is like a kind of crossword puzzle.

    https://online-latin-dictionary.com/...dictionary.php
    • Melach is problematic. It might be mălăchē, meaning "a kind of mallows" (which might be a confection, like marshmallows?? But that seems unlikely! )
    • libani (phonetically) could be the genitive of Mount Lebanon, in Syria.
    • nonay (phonetically) could be a declension (maybe genitive) of "nonius", meaning "ninth". Or, nonnĕ is an interrogative, expecting the answer "yes".
      But >>
    • usni doesn't seem to have any obvious matches. (neither does osni or usini)
    Or maybe the words aren't separated like that.... the last two could be noneus ni. (ni means "not".)

    Of course, it might not be Latin at all. It could be almost anything, from anywhere, including an unknown language.

    One of the issues with phonetics is that there's limited knowledge of what a spoken ancient language might have sounded like to the ear. Much of that, we may never know. But there are some clues regarding Latin, coming from the meter of poetry (i.e. the precise rhythm of how lines of poetry would scan, which the Romans were very keen on).

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    I was able to find only first word in biblestudytools:

    Melach -> https://www.biblestudytools.com/lexi...jv/melach.html

    Where is this phrase from?

    Regards

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    If you run this phrase, "Melach libani nonay usni " through Google translate it detects Croatian.

    And suggests a change in spelling for the first and third words "Melač libani nonaj usni"

    Translated into English, you get, "Lebanon grinder nonaj lips".

    And another suggestion from Google Translate: 'Kolač libanon onaj usni"

    Which translates to, "Lebanon cake that lips"

    Perhaps it would make better sense to the Avalon guest in the context it was heard?
    Last edited by edina; 1st October 2020 at 13:46.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    It doesn't help a lot because I found three different ancient languages but there is a vague connection in the definitions. I couldn't find something for "nonay".

    Melach: Hebrew - melach, meh'-lakh; from ; properly, powder, i.e. (specifically) salt (as easily pulverized and dissolved):—salt(-pit). Also, Melach is a river of Tyrol, Austria.
    Libani: Greek - Λιβάνι: incense.
    nonay: ?
    Usni: Sanskrit - Uṣṇi (उष्णि):—[from uṣ] mfn. burning

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    At first glance, and if I bet intuitively on the first try, I would say that it is an extremely simple semantics only that the letters can be easily reversed. But that could mean billions of searches and I do not want to "consume" the information in searches.
    I could say directly:
    The "testament / declaration" of a "tree / being" renews the "space after" with the simple semantics and phonetics of a quote, perhaps known.
    It could also be
    "Faith roots the boundless universe"

    Usually random ideas, without any specifics, bring results or at least substance.
    As a substance in words, and because my native language gives birth to this kind of intuition, I see (with absolutely no connection in particular) the following expressions:

    The fruit of the gods, Energy at the edge, distance (interval) in steps, Roman calendar (or a numerator / number), new morphology, null-a continuity (or series in stationary), regeneration or meta-path.

    But it's just a game, although I'd bet on a few more options if I heard how it sounds. But I could add to my intuition a little research, if I knew where to start, or not.
    I would like to help, but I think the research is safer.
    Every human is a question asked to the Spirit of the Universe,again and again,because every human is an endless row of humans and in all humans together dwelling the Great Human Spirit.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Where was your friend located ? Country ? What race ? when was she born roughly ? Any religious surroundings near by ? Personality ie. emotional or mechanical ?

    Just trying to gather some background as to where the phrase might have originated from ? I looked in 'The Urantia Book' for starters, next the 'Internet Archive' then the Gutenburg Bible. Perhaps the 'Library of Congress'..... nothing. The Vatican library ? Which ultimately returned me here to Avalon ?

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Plotus (here)
    Where was your friend located ? Country ? What race ?
    She thinks it might be Persian (what was called Persia is now Iran) — quite a while back. But that's not at all certain.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    This is fascinating, Farsi is considered an ancient language, 2500 years old according to this article: 12 Oldest Languages In The World Still Widely Used!

    I plugged the phonetic phrase into Google translate, when I looked for Farsi, it wasn't available, so I selected Persian and was given an option to translate a phrase written in a Persian type.

    ملکه لبنی نونی وسنی

    (I'm completely unfamiliar with that alphabet to know if would make any sense, or connection?)

    I had already wondered if nonay may be referencing a name? The translation of the phrase in Google ended up being, "Noni and Sunni dairy queen".

    I'm thinking the phrase was a colloquialism? Understanding the culture it was used in would help clarify the meaning.

    In the english alphabet version, the word "libani" seems to reference Lebanon, consistently. Lebanon was known for it's cedars, so the relationship of it's name to incense would make sense.

    Are there any Farsi speakers here?
    Last edited by edina; 1st October 2020 at 19:23.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Sounds kinda like Aramaic, to me.
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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Lebanon was known for it's cedars, so the relationship of it's name to incense would make sense.
    Cedar of Lebanon is the strong, fragrant wood used to build David's house, Solomon's house and much of the First Temple. It was also used along with hyssop in the cleansing of a leper's house. It speaks of protection, strength, permanence, wholeness and restoration.

    Ps 92:12 "The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree: he shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon."
    Oel ngati kame

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    Smile Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Hello All,

    With all your respect Bill, I am not sure if this has any Latin origin but who knows really, anything is possible.

    Reading that sentence per se sounds very Arabic/Middle Eastern to me; It wouldn't surprise me either if the origins of that word are from even further lands, known or not.
    I base that assumption on the fact that the first word that jumped at me "literally" is Melach, which when letters are inversed sounds very much like "Malik, Malek, Malick, or Melekh" which means "King" and "Malika" for the female counterpart; "Malika" being a common name in North African territories (e.g. Morocco); it does bring a feeling/sense of grace to the one who carries that name if it makes sense.

    You could also think of the name "Malachi" translated as the Messenger

    No sense of confusion with "Libani" here, Lebanon comes to mind without hesitation.

    "Usni" well, this one reminds me of the name "Husni" which is an indirect Quranic name for boys in general which means" Good, Handsome, Kind, Joyful, Happy"

    "Nonay" is usually name that can be found in the Philippines, apart from that I will have to searh of bit more.

    Could we have something like " A kind/humble/good king/queen/Messenger who came from the Philippines to/from Lebanon", " A kind/humble/good king/queen/Messenger who came from the Lebanon to the Philippines...

    There are multiple options here and it would be good to know where your friend got this sentence from Bill? As well as the origin of the person who sent it to her :-)

    That is my quick two cents for now.

    Cheerios

    SM
    I have seen life on this planet, and that is exactly why I am looking elsewhere.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Psychic impression: "A messenger (or angel) from Lebanon or Sinai" Probably Aramaic, or ancient Hebrew.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    I tried Forgotten Languages - http://forgottenlanguages-full.forgottenlanguages.org/ -

    No results matching the query: Melach libani nonay usni. - https://forgottenlanguages-full.forg...ni+nonay+usni+
    You Can't Talk and Listen at the Same Time

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Messages delivered by Spirits of either kind belong mostly (and can be thoroughly understood) by the recipient himself but rarely by “other people”.

    Linguistic roots were commonly shared and transplanted through all human cultures but in millions of variations - and meanings. The beauty of phrases and idioms is in delivering profound meaning in “simple terms” ( such as : “all that glitters is not gold” ).

    But one single idiom or phrase can deliver multiple meanings when vocalised and addressed to individual recipient.
    Such as in “all that glitters is not gold” may refer to the person themselves or objects or people they’re dealing with.

    So, one can but offer some lame suggestions here:

    Melach could refer to salt ( powder) in Hebrew

    https://www.messie2vie.fr/bible/stro...16-melach.html

    but Old Hebrew quite like ancient Sanskrit are very smart and playful languages.
    A change in one letter can change the meaning of sentence completely.

    Malkhut in Hebrew means Kingdom and Melekh means Kings.

    Libani (as in Lebanon) seems to be derived from much older Phoenician root for “white”. The same root can be found in Latin words for “whiteness” such as “album” or albino.


    Usni(sa) has plenty of meanings in Sanskrit indeed:

    14 definitions of Usnisa in Sanskrit

    but in essence and common understanding refers to the “top”, tip or uppermost level of person or a structure.
    Used as adjective (usni) by pre-modern-Sanskrit speaker it can refer to “upper” or as we would say “superior”.

    NN : nonay: would likely signify “isn’t or aren’t”,
    in the context of the phrase and with leisure
    of linguistic sensitivity shared among tribes and cultures.


    So if I were to understand and translate the message to today’s wording
    “White salt ( King) isn’t (always) the best”

    it does make some sense to me, regardless.

    What did it precisely mean to people at times of its origin is difficult to guess though as cultural sarcasms aren’t easy to decipher.


    🙏🥳

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    I studied a bit of Judaism & Hebrew in the past & 'Malach' looked familiar. It means Angel or messanger...From Wikidepidia:

    "Angels in Judaism

    Etymology
    Hebrew mal’akh (מַלְאָךְ‎) is the standard word for "messenger", both human and divine, in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), though it is rarely used for human messengers in Modern Hebrew[2] as the latter is usually denoted by the term shaliyah (שליח‎)."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angels_in_Judaism

    The other words I do not recognize, sorry - however, my Hebrew is very, very rusty, lol. They may be words I just don't know.
    Last edited by Ami; 2nd October 2020 at 07:03. Reason: add link for quote

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    I will give it a try... via a total different approach.
    We don't know indeed - as Edina mentioned above - what the context is of the phrase.
    So, I did my best to be creative... and saw it as an anagram.

    Can you make something sensible out of it? And if so, how to interpret it?

    A possible anagram is " I ANNUL MACHINABLE YONIS".

    And what can that mean? The "I", who says this, is important. Is it possible that the person who heard this, did hear it in a dream or something like that? In that case, this "I" would or could have quite some power.
    To annul, that is clear. Machinable, well, that is an interesting one! We are all human. We do live in a time of "transhumanism", which most of us consider a threat. To be machinable means that it can be turned into an automaton, a machine.

    And yonis, a "yoni" is Sanskrit for the vulva, but it also is a representation of Shakti. From Wikipedia:

    "Shakti = Energy, ability, strength, effort, power, capability and it is the primordial cosmic energy and represents the dynamic forces that are thought to move through the entire universe.
    Shakti is the personification of the Energy that is creative, sustaining, as well as destructive, sometimes referred to as auspicious source energy.
    As the Shakti or Creatrix, She is known as "Adi Shakti" or "Adi Para Shakti" (i.e., Primordial Inconceivable Energy). On every plane of creation, Energy manifests itself in all forms of matter, thermal energy, potential energy, gravitational energy etc.
    These are all thought to be infinite forms of the Paraa Shakti. But Her true form is unknown, and beyond human understanding. She is Anaadi (with no beginning, no ending) and Nitya (forever).
    In Shaktism, Adi Parashakti is worshipped as the Supreme Being. Shakti embodies the active dynamic energy of Shiva (as Devi Shivaa / Shive) and is synonymously identified with Tripura Sundari or Parvati."



    A "machinable shakti" would - or could - mean the highest "form" of mechanization, almost god-like. So, some-Thing that could annul thàt would be quite beneficial.

    Translation: "I eliminate completely artificial gods".

    In case one wonders how I got to this, when reading the OP, I had an intuitive hunch, and "sort of" heard "anagram".

    When you would be a Power that can do the above and you want to give a message to someone human, in an AI-like world, then it would make sense NOT to use any language, ancient or other, because what are machines good at? Indeed, languages! Think of Google translate and the like.

    So, an angaram would be, if words need to be used, one of the few possible ways to communicate. I did not just put the sentence in an "anagram machine" by the way. And second, the meaning of "yonis" here would be close to be impossible to come up with in this context. The keyword in all of this is CREATIVITY and if there is some-thing machines are not good at, it's just thàt!

    Bill, maybe this person has a good connection to a benevolent - Natural - force of some kind, and it would not be a coincidence either that she came to PA for clarification. It can be someone who is VERY close to Nature, communicating with Nature in unique ways. Maybe there is more to this short message than one would think at first sight.

    Definitely worth pursuing and following up I think!

    Maybe this is VERY far from what it REALLY means, but it does make kind of sense, doesn't it?
    Last edited by Johan (Keyholder); 2nd October 2020 at 08:02.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Close to: "Melech" (מלך) is a Hebrew word that means king, and may refer to: Melech (name), a given name of Hebrew origin. the title of "king" in ancient Semitic culture, see Malik. the deity Moloch.
    • it may not be related at all but if it is it may help
    Last edited by ExomatrixTV; 2nd October 2020 at 11:35.
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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    For some unkown reason this phrase resonanates with me , I dont know what it means but it does resonate with me ( by the way I am not a great fan of the expression resonates)

    I have spent some considerable time in Israel and many surrounding countries 35 years ago , no religous upbringing or affiliations, some bizarre experiences of being able to access information from nowhere or acashic knowledge in moments of concern / danger, have experienced sleep paralysis on a regular basis periodically over many years , and I am convinced I have experienced many different lives but no definite recollections although I was drawn to relocate 20 years ago to south west France.

    Now to address the enquiry, did this person hear this expression, experience it or read or envisionage it , I believe this may be the key to unlocking the meaning , but as to the meaning I am sorry I do not know , but perhaps with my admissions, the guest may not feel so alone if this an experience

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