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Thread: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

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    Avalon Member Jill's Avatar
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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    I was curious about this so asked a friend who speaks Hebrew and this is what she has come up with for the first 2 words:

    'First word is Hebrew meaning king'. Second word could be Le’ benee meaning time my son
    To my son'

    She hasn't responded (yet) about the remainder of the sentence but if she comes up with a meaning, I'll post it.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Good day all and thank you for your great input on this topic. I am the former “guest” now member who contacted Bill hoping for answers to the puzzle of this phrase. Everyone has been so helpful and I thank you all. I feel it is important to put this phrase in context if a definitive answer is to be found. I told Bill I was hesitant to share how I came to hear this phrase but he has assured me the members of this forum are open minded and accepting so here is my story.
    I heard this phrase and in fact spoke this phrase during a past life regression. I was a five-year-old boy who had been hiding in a cave used for storage. When I came out of hiding, I saw that my city had been destroyed and burned. I was the sole survivor. Everyone had been either taken away or killed. I learned that I had starved to death. I also had the impression that this was the ancient city of Ur and that it was during a significant drought. My impression was that the city had been conquered and all viable persons taken away as slaves. As I lay dying, I saw a huge man in full armor approach. I was scared and thought he was a soldier returning to hurt me. I heard a voice say “not a soldier. An angel.“ It was at that time I uttered the phrase. I am keenly interested in all of your comments and hope that by putting the phrase in context an answer may be found. I am most grateful and humble.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Welcome Tupelo, to Avalon, so glad to have you join us, I have been following this thread and looking forward to others thoughts, I find it very interesting.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Hi, Folks: an Avalon guest has emailed me for help. She has a phonetic phrase in an unknown ancient language which she wants to translate. (In other words, this is what it sounds like.)

    I told her I was no linguist myself (far from it!), but that maybe members here might be able to dig out some possible meanings. My own first guess might be Latin, which I did study long ago, but that might well be quite wrong and it could be anything at all from any era.

    Melach libani nonay usni
    Now I'm no linguist and have problems speaking English ; but after reading this and thinking about it all night. I woke up this morning and thought it may mean something like this ' My name is Melach and I am here to take you to your Mother. '
    My thoughts on this are :- Melach being a name, Libani meaning liberty, Nonay is similar to the Italian slang name for Grand-mother/female carer and Usni being a verb or something similar - to take, to carry.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Tupelo (here)
    Good day all and thank you for your great input on this topic. I am the former “guest” now member who contacted Bill hoping for answers to the puzzle of this phrase. Everyone has been so helpful and I thank you all. I feel it is important to put this phrase in context if a definitive answer is to be found. I told Bill I was hesitant to share how I came to hear this phrase but he has assured me the members of this forum are open minded and accepting so here is my story.
    I heard this phrase and in fact spoke this phrase during a past life regression. I was a five-year-old boy who had been hiding in a cave used for storage. When I came out of hiding, I saw that my city had been destroyed and burned. I was the sole survivor. Everyone had been either taken away or killed. I learned that I had starved to death. I also had the impression that this was the ancient city of Ur and that it was during a significant drought. My impression was that the city had been conquered and all viable persons taken away as slaves. As I lay dying, I saw a huge man in full armor approach. I was scared and thought he was a soldier returning to hurt me. I heard a voice say “not a soldier. An angel.“ It was at that time I uttered the phrase. I am keenly interested in all of your comments and hope that by putting the phrase in context an answer may be found. I am most grateful and humble.
    If this was the city of Ur, or in the land of Ur, it's possible that you spoke in Summerian, or perhaps Akkaddian.

    Do you remember how you felt when you spoke the phrase?

    As a curious aside, here's a document with some summerian translations.
    https://www.bulgari-istoria-2010.com...Dictionary.pdf

    And welcome to Avalon Tupelo.
    Last edited by edina; 3rd October 2020 at 18:00.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Welcome here at Project Avalon Tupelo!

    You'll meet a lot of like-minded people here and quite a few of us have some experience with past lives and regression.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Hi, Folks: an Avalon guest has emailed me for help. She has a phonetic phrase in an unknown ancient language which she wants to translate. (In other words, this is what it sounds like.
    Melach libani nonay usni
    I thought I could click the underlined word "sounds" like, and listen to it, how increddibly silly of me

    Bill, any hint of why this is of importance to understand, was she given it in a divine dream, or why the importance?

    Anyway, I agree with the post of it being Croatian in origin, found this via Google (don't be evil) LOL , well here it is anyway.

    "This is a digital copy of a book that was prcscrvod for gcncrations on library shclvcs bcforc it was carcfully scannod by Google as part of a projcct"

    Digital scaning couldn't se c from e, obviously for unknown reason?

    to make the worlďs books discoverablc onlinc.

    Full text of "Květy"
    https://archive.org/stream/kvty03unk...ngoog_djvu.txt

    ** Update! I sent the text to a friend from former Jugoslavia and she responded it looks like Polish. **
    Last edited by Rawhide68; 3rd October 2020 at 21:18.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Rawhide68 (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Hi, Folks: an Avalon guest has emailed me for help. She has a phonetic phrase in an unknown ancient language which she wants to translate. (In other words, this is what it sounds like.
    Melach libani nonay usni
    I thought I could click the underlined word "sounds" like, and listen to it, how increddibly silly of me

    Bill, any hint of why this is of importance to understand, was she given it in a divine dream, or why the importance?

    Anyway, I agree with the post of it being Croatian in origin, found this via Google (don't be evil) LOL , well here it is anyway.

    "This is a digital copy of a book that was prcscrvod for gcncrations on library shclvcs bcforc it was carcfully scannod by Google as part of a projcct"

    Digital scaning couldn't se c from e, obviously for unknown reason?

    to make the worlďs books discoverablc onlinc.

    Full text of "Květy"
    https://archive.org/stream/kvty03unk...ngoog_djvu.txt

    ** Update! I sent the text to a friend from former Jugoslavia and she responded it looks like Polish. **

    Hi 🙏 I think I don’t understand the relevance of the link you’ve posted towards the original message since the magazine “Květy” ( meaning flowers) was old Czech magazine.
    So is the archive record although containing some digital gibberish.

    The original message posted by Bill here bears no similarity to any European languages known to me ( most certainly not Czech language).

    Perhaps not what you were looking for ?



    🌟

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Tupelo (here)
    Good day all and thank you for your great input on this topic. I am the former “guest” now member who contacted Bill hoping for answers to the puzzle of this phrase. Everyone has been so helpful and I thank you all. I feel it is important to put this phrase in context if a definitive answer is to be found. I told Bill I was hesitant to share how I came to hear this phrase but he has assured me the members of this forum are open minded and accepting so here is my story.
    I heard this phrase and in fact spoke this phrase during a past life regression. I was a five-year-old boy who had been hiding in a cave used for storage. When I came out of hiding, I saw that my city had been destroyed and burned. I was the sole survivor. Everyone had been either taken away or killed. I learned that I had starved to death. I also had the impression that this was the ancient city of Ur and that it was during a significant drought. My impression was that the city had been conquered and all viable persons taken away as slaves. As I lay dying, I saw a huge man in full armor approach. I was scared and thought he was a soldier returning to hurt me. I heard a voice say “not a soldier. An angel.“ It was at that time I uttered the phrase. I am keenly interested in all of your comments and hope that by putting the phrase in context an answer may be found. I am most grateful and humble.
    Hi there. Given this context, the simplest answer is probably the correct one. If as a small child you heard “not a soldier. An angel.“, then you probably answered “An angel you are, not a soldier.“ It has already been pointed out that Melach is cognate with words for angel (e.g. Hebrew); nonay would then mean not: many Indo-European languages associate the N sound with the Negative, No, Not, Non, Ne, Ni….


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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Rawhide68 (here)

    Bill, any hint of why this is of importance to understand, was she given it in a divine dream, or why the importance?
    Read up the thread: new member Tupelo's explanation is in her post #22 above.


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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by araucaria (here)
    Quote Posted by Tupelo (here)
    Good day all and thank you for your great input on this topic. I am the former “guest” now member who contacted Bill hoping for answers to the puzzle of this phrase. Everyone has been so helpful and I thank you all. I feel it is important to put this phrase in context if a definitive answer is to be found. I told Bill I was hesitant to share how I came to hear this phrase but he has assured me the members of this forum are open minded and accepting so here is my story.
    I heard this phrase and in fact spoke this phrase during a past life regression. I was a five-year-old boy who had been hiding in a cave used for storage. When I came out of hiding, I saw that my city had been destroyed and burned. I was the sole survivor. Everyone had been either taken away or killed. I learned that I had starved to death. I also had the impression that this was the ancient city of Ur and that it was during a significant drought. My impression was that the city had been conquered and all viable persons taken away as slaves. As I lay dying, I saw a huge man in full armor approach. I was scared and thought he was a soldier returning to hurt me. I heard a voice say “not a soldier. An angel.“ It was at that time I uttered the phrase. I am keenly interested in all of your comments and hope that by putting the phrase in context an answer may be found. I am most grateful and humble.
    Hi there. Given this context, the simplest answer is probably the correct one. If as a small child you heard “not a soldier. An angel.“, then you probably answered “An angel you are, not a soldier.“ It has already been pointed out that Melach is cognate with words for angel (e.g. Hebrew); nonay would then mean not: many Indo-European languages associate the N sound with the Negative, No, Not, Non, Ne, Ni….

    Sounds like plausible explanation to me 🙏🍵

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    A thought. Brian Muraresku, interviewed here by Joe Rogan with Graham Hancock, is a Sanskrit scholar. Go to 7:50 in this video, and be impressed.


    If this is the language of the phrase (which has to be possible), Brian will know. He's a young, bright, enthusiastic guy, and I bet he'd respond to a query like this. (The best thing might be to record the phrase as you remember it sounding, and send him a brief audio file.)

    His email is brian.muraresku@gmail.com, and his resume is here.


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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    This does sound like it could well be Czech - I'm a bit rusty but it could well be something like "malýk líbání no aj usnjí" which sounds similar to the phonetics of "Melach libani nonay usni" - basically it says "my little loved one now go to sleep".
    Last edited by Radekp81; 5th October 2020 at 02:44.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    I think, you can well ask your own member shaberon about Sanskrit roots,
    myself I’ve studied Sanskrit with traditional Indian teachers since I was 19, and on and on, well that’s long ago, it’s on my resume and part of what I was doing in back days , the journey never ends.

    While the dream was located somewhere in ancient Assyria closed to the city of Ur,
    it’s likely that the language spoken then does not exist in pure form today
    and most languages in the Middle East influenced each other for thousands of years,
    shared vocabulary and word roots are shared among distinct language groups
    and much closer ethnic dialects.

    The message is not “in Sanskrit”, if I did not say that : Sanskrit was composed as so called “pure language” as opposed to “naga(r)-krit” the city(folk) language with regulated grammar- so it speaks in verses and metres that can be recognised.

    Word roots can be traced all over the globe though as far as people travelled.
    Even a century later they’re indistinguishable part of the language and considered unique heritage of the tribe/people using them.


    One of countless examples can be found here in Himachal Pradesh with commonly spoken “Himalayan” languages such as Gaddi or Pahari.
    ( Gaddis are the shepherds of Himalayas). Many of the older generation did not get through more than few years of school, speaking of 60 or 70 years ago.

    Their parents and grandparents generations however adopted many English words to their tribal language while India was occupied by the British Empire,
    British troops were stationed here and people had to cope with these overlords on daily basis.
    Today’s Gaddi is not an official language, children learn Hindi, Sanskrit and English at school and pure Hindi is the closest spoken language to Sanskrit

    while Gaddi sounds more like mixture of both Hindi/Sanskrit and English which is funny to observe.

    The same thing happened to Hebrew when spoken by Jewish settlers for couple centuries in Europe while most classic and official communication was based in German and evolved to Yiddish that in turn shared its vocabulary with any language officially spoken ( other than the two previously mentioned).

    Such as most of our grandparent generations in Central Europe ( Czechs for example) spoke German ( but not English) because we have shared same territory and education system for centuries before winning their independence from the Empire.
    But they would quite commonly pass Yiddish terms around as well using them mostly as “slang words”.
    As a child you had to ask what does that “curious word” mean or where did it come from. But that’s on the anecdotal edge ( for me at least).
    My parents never used foul language with me as I also strongly rejected it even as a kid. Mum was great rhetorician (and talked a lot) so I’d never struggle linguistically at schools or with talking.

    I think it’s why I turned my life focus beyond languages, discovering mind and enjoying silence and sciences.

    Talking too much does not help 😀


    🙏

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Radekp81 (here)
    This does sound like it could well be Czech - I'm a bit rusty but it could well be something like "malýk líbání no aj usnjí" which sounds similar to the phonetics of "Melach libani nonay usni" - basically it says "my little loved one now go to sleep".

    That’s a pretty nonsense trying to turn ancient Middle Eastern language and twist it to fit your Slovan roots. The effect creates pretty bad linguistic bastard.

    I think I’m getting bit disappointed with the idea that someone could step in and start bastardising languages “as they wish” and yes, the Czechs , the Czechs are so fond of that.

    Czech slang can be as colorful and variable as old English slang.

    Ok, not my area of expertise and I avoid people speaking bastard-ese in all cultures so getting out of here.

    🙏

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Agape (here)
    Quote Posted by Radekp81 (here)
    This does sound like it could well be Czech - I'm a bit rusty but it could well be something like "malýk líbání no aj usnjí" which sounds similar to the phonetics of "Melach libani nonay usni" - basically it says "my little loved one now go to sleep".

    That’s a pretty nonsense trying to turn ancient Middle Eastern language and twist it to fit your Slovan roots. The effect creates pretty bad linguistic bastard.

    I think I’m getting bit disappointed with the idea that someone could step in and start bastardising languages “as they wish” and yes, the Czechs , the Czechs are so fond of that.

    Czech slang can be as colorful and variable as old English slang.

    Ok, not my area of expertise and I avoid people speaking bastard-ese in all cultures so getting out of here.

    🙏
    I find your response unnecessarily offensive and unhelpful - I'm simply adding a reply with what I hear in reading the phrase - maybe it helps, maybe it doesn't. Can we say for certain we are looking for an ancient middle eastern language?

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Radekp81 (here)
    This does sound like it could well be Czech - I'm a bit rusty but it could well be something like "malýk líbání no aj usnjí" which sounds similar to the phonetics of "Melach libani nonay usni" - basically it says "my little loved one now go to sleep".
    This makes sense to me.

    However, it's really about if it's meaningful to Tupelo, since it was Tupelo's experience.

    The phrase, as translated here, expresses a very kind, sweet sentiment. And fits the circumstances as described by Tupelo. Thanks Radekp81, for sharing.
    Last edited by edina; 5th October 2020 at 15:02.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    I consulted a friend who speaks Farsi, and he sent me this reply:

    Hi Bill,
    nonay refers to bread in Persian (if pronounced 'noonay').
    melach means salt in Hebrew.
    Not sure about the overall meaning as I don't recognize libani and usni.

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    Canada Avalon Member DeDukshyn's Avatar
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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    Quote Posted by Tupelo (here)
    Good day all and thank you for your great input on this topic. I am the former “guest” now member who contacted Bill hoping for answers to the puzzle of this phrase. Everyone has been so helpful and I thank you all. I feel it is important to put this phrase in context if a definitive answer is to be found. I told Bill I was hesitant to share how I came to hear this phrase but he has assured me the members of this forum are open minded and accepting so here is my story.
    I heard this phrase and in fact spoke this phrase during a past life regression. I was a five-year-old boy who had been hiding in a cave used for storage. When I came out of hiding, I saw that my city had been destroyed and burned. I was the sole survivor. Everyone had been either taken away or killed. I learned that I had starved to death. I also had the impression that this was the ancient city of Ur and that it was during a significant drought. My impression was that the city had been conquered and all viable persons taken away as slaves. As I lay dying, I saw a huge man in full armor approach. I was scared and thought he was a soldier returning to hurt me. I heard a voice say “not a soldier. An angel.“ It was at that time I uttered the phrase. I am keenly interested in all of your comments and hope that by putting the phrase in context an answer may be found. I am most grateful and humble.
    Hi Tupelo, welcome to the forum.

    A bit off topic, but can I get you to describe this huge, armoured "angel" in more detail? Was he larger than a human would normally be able to grow to? Was the armour like medieval armour or was it different?

    Also I am wondering if we can narrow down the phonetics a little more? For example usni could be pronounced "uh-snee" or "ooz-knee" or "oos-nih", etc.
    When you are one step ahead of the crowd, you are a genius.
    Two steps ahead, and you are deemed a crackpot.

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    Default Re: An ancient language phrase: what does this mean??

    DeDukshyn,

    Thank you for your response. I am happy to answer your questions. The man in armor seemed very large to me, larger than the people of my town. His armor was unblemished from battle, shiny and very elegant. His helmet was rounded and had no protrusions. He wore a breast plate, arm and shin guards. All were silver in color.

    As for phonetics, the first example you wrote is the closest.

    I hope I have answered your questions and that you find this information useful.

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