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Thread: Food Foresting

  1. Link to Post #101
    Avalon Member nomadguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    keep dreaming!... and dream of it closer and closer as you go.
    Why not now?

  2. Link to Post #102

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  4. Link to Post #103
    Australia Avalon Member Cjay's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    Quote Posted by wolf_rt (here)
    Quote Posted by Cjay (here)
    ...continued from previous post


    Companion Planting Guide



    IDEP’s Companion Planting Guide
    Click here for full PDF
    (Includes natural insect repellent tips)

    Quote Sometimes you end up wishing you had a resource at hand to make it easier to apply Permaculture principles. This was the case for myself when it came time to start thinking about beneficial groupings of plants and those groupings that do not go well together.

    This is what I often find lacking with the current publications on offer from PRI and from those in the community. There is a lot of good knowledge locked up that could benefit so many of us in applying permaculture principles.

    A simple A3 or A4 information sheet or booklet of a small number of pages is easy to mentally digest and take in and very handy to have as a reference, either printed out and hung up on the wall or on the computer when we sit down and start thinking about designing our gardens or food systems.
    Full details: http://permaculture.org.au/2010/07/3...lanting-guide/

    IDEP A3 Poster Chart (external pdf): http://www.permaculture.org.au/resou..._Com_Plant.pdf

    these links seem to be broked, you dont have a full size copy of that chart by any chance do you?
    Sorry for the very slow reply. It's here now: http://www.permaculture.org.au/resources_files/Poster_GDN_Com_Plant.pdf

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  6. Link to Post #104
    Avalon Member nomadguy's Avatar
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    Default Food Foresting; What to eat?

    "Weston A Price discovered that all the indigenous people he studied were getting 10 x the fat soluble vitamins and 4 x the minerals compared to a Western diet of the same time (1930’s). He also discovered that although they all ate very differently, they all followed the same principles in their diets, and all of them were extremely healthy. They knew how to eat to maintain their DNA so that they were extremely healthy and they passed on strong genes.

    These were the principles he discovered they each followed:

    no refined or denatured foods
    all traditional cultures consumed some sort of animal protein and fat
    all diets contains 4 x the minerals and 10 x the fat soluble vitamins ( A, D and K and E)
    in all traditional cultures some animal products were eaten raw
    total fat content of all traditional diets varied from 30 – 80% of daily calorie intake and only around 4 % of that was polyunsaturated oil. The balance was saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids
    traditional diets had a high food-enzyme content from raw meat and dairy and also fermented fruit vegetables and meat/fish
    seeds grains and nuts were soaked, sprouted, fermented or naturally leavened in order to neutralize antinutrients in these foods such as phytic acid, enzyme inhibitors, tannins and complex carbohydrates
    traditional diets contained nearly equal amounts of omega -6 and omega -3
    all primitive diets contained salt
    traditional cultures consumed animal bones, usually in the form of gelatin rich bone broths
    traditional cultures made provisions for the health of future generations by providing special nutrient rich foods for parents to be, pregnant women and growing children."

    Ref-
    Urban design designing for health
    Why not now?

  7. Link to Post #105
    Avalon Member nomadguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    I feel this is an excellent documentary to show us how WE can indeed change things... and quickly
    Why not now?

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  9. Link to Post #106
    Spain Avalon Member
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    This is a great thread. Thank you so much for your contribution, Nomadguy. The art of growing our own food is of major importance for the evolution of human beings.
    Cheers!
    Ferén
    "There are no facts, only interpretations"

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  11. Link to Post #107
    Canada Avalon Member sandy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    Wow nomadguy!!

    What a great documentary that needs to go viral in my opinion. I'm not to computer savvy but I'm going to try and put it on my face book page and hope others pick it up and pass it on over and over again
    Love and Light Always/Sandy

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    nomadguy (1st August 2012)

  13. Link to Post #108
    Avalon Member nomadguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    Here is a nice video on Rocket Stoves,
    Why not now?

  14. Link to Post #109
    Avalon Member eva08's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    Nomadguy, thank you for everything -- I am trying to create an edible garden for my climate by planting various plants close together that will help create micro climates and dappled shade, lots of straw mulch and allowing weeds (at least THEY grow here) and supposedly weeds help bring nutrients into the soil.

    Could you please, repost the links or videos from your first post, the ones I clicked on say, Video unavailable -- and that's a shame for all this fantastic information.

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  16. Link to Post #110
    Avalon Member nomadguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    Quote Posted by eva08 (here)
    Nomadguy, thank you for everything -- I am trying to create an edible garden for my climate by planting various plants close together that will help create micro climates and dappled shade, lots of straw mulch and allowing weeds (at least THEY grow here) and supposedly weeds help bring nutrients into the soil.

    Could you please, repost the links or videos from your first post, the ones I clicked on say, Video unavailable -- and that's a shame for all this fantastic information.
    Will do, though it may take me a few days to gather them.
    Why not now?

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  18. Link to Post #111
    UK Avalon Member Corncrake's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    Really enjoying this thread - especially as I have just started my own little allotment. I also enjoy foraging for food and have just got a copy of Richard Mabey's Food for Free. Have been using nettles and ramsons (wild garlic) for the last month though it is almost over now.

    Thanks for posting Green Cold - wonderful uplifting documentary. So important to watch films like this when there is so much doom and gloom around.

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    nomadguy (13th June 2013)

  20. Link to Post #112
    Avalon Member nomadguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    It has come to my attention that some of the videos posted in this thread were only available
    for free ~ for a limited time.
    I posted the videos I found immediately after I found them and they have long since expired. Some of the other videos posted by other members have also been removed as free viewing.

    For a small investment you can get all the videos posted by Geoff Lawton from Ecofilms - http://www.ecofilms.com.au/introduct...re-design-dvd/
    I am sorry I could not find or relocate all of the videos posted on this thread.
    Here are the videos I did find that are still available on Youtube.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6juUcYsLAYw
    Establishing A Food Forest with Geoff Lawton

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QG_vRG66wkA
    7 Food Forests in 7 Minutes with Geoff Lawton

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5ZgzwoQ-ao
    300 Year Old Food Forest in Vietnam

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hftgWcD-1Nw
    2,000 Year Old Food Forest in Morocco

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vJdZP_FMi4
    Bill Mollison Global Gardener 2 Dry lands

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhwTtbSYf68
    Farming with Nature - A Case Study of Successful Temperate Permaculture
    Sepp Holzer

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiHQU_p8rCY
    Permaculture own root fruit trees and the Coppice Orchard P1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WL58i5QbZQ
    Permaculture own root fruit trees and the Coppice Orchard P2

    Carry On ~ (new information and videos to be posted here soon!)
    Why not now?

  21. Link to Post #113
    Avalon Member Delight's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    I want to bump this thread as it has some great information. It made me think about the drought happening in the far west US and about the way we might choose to retool our way of geoforming in line with nature's principles. This is exciting...in only 80 years an oasis self created in the Sonoran desert with the proper assistance from people.

    I just saw this article:
    Quote Discovering an Oasis in the American Desert




    We’re out in the hot Sonoran Desert, somewhere near Tucson, Arizona. It’s hot. Very hot. I’m down to a small amount of water in my bottle and it’s disappearing fast. I’m starting to think one could go crazy and possibly die of thirst out here filming this stuff. Luckily I’m with Geoff Lawton and Brad Lancaster, both experts in water harvesting. Geoff, however, has abandoned me under the shade of a desert tree with my camera gear to go wandering off with Brad into the desert, searching for something rumored to be out there.

    A mythical Moby Dick for a permaculture enthusiast – a big mother swale. It was meant to support an oasis but very few people had ever seen it. Untouched and eighty years old, it was supposed to have been built by men with carts and horses during the Roosevelt years in the 1930s.

    Bill Mollison visited these swales in the Global Gardner TV series twenty years ago. He thought they were superb and should have been extended everywhere in drylands. But they’ve been now largely forgotten and abandoned.

    Until now, that is. Geoff was on a mission to track them down.

    Various Permaculture students had reported online to have photographed a few of these swales and said it was all over-hyped. The growth spindly and sparse and nothing looked too extraordinary, in their view, from the rest of the desert environment.

    Looking at the harsh surrounding desert environment, I was beginning to believe they were right.

    I crawled up onto the ridge of a big swale, it was the size of a small hill, to get a better view, looking for Geoff. In the distance, dust devils swirled in the afternoon sun. Above me, a buzzard circled. It was only a matter of time before they would pick through my bones, I thought.

    Then in a spot of green spiky scrub I saw Geoff’s hat bobbing up and down. He was returning. I can still hear his excited voice, calling out to me.

    “I found a diamond!” he yelled.

    “What?”

    “The big swale is out there. About a kilometer away!” he said.

    I grabbed my camera. Renewed with energy. Geoff’s face looked flushed and red. But his eyes were shining bright.

    “I never doubted you’d find it Geoff!” I lied.

    I now know how explorers feel to have discovered something new.

    Geoff explained that he had seen this larger oasis on his laptop, using Google Earth software. It’s just that nobody had picked up on it before.

    Geoff led the way and in minutes we were scrambling over the edge of the mother swale and down into a majestic field of green lush grass. A microclimate of cool, shady, trees and a field of open grass lay before us. It was untouched. A magnificent thing to view. The contrast between the outside blistering desert and this cool calm environment was extraordinary.

    We took a moment to let it all sink in. The soil was springy and spongy when you walked on it. Like an uncompacted garden bed it was full of mulch captured by rain water. Eighty years of humus was deposited here during flash floods, without any help from mankind.

    The trees were all self seeded.

    I asked Geoff, how come it was a rich verdant grassland in the centre? He explained it was a water basin. Any tree that took hold here would be uprooted in the next downfall of rain.

    But the potential was amazing.

    Geoff plunged his hands into the soil and went down 8 inches of moist, black, rich, composted soil. It was still damp.

    “You couldn’t make better soil than this.” he said. “You could plant all sorts of fruiting trees here on the swale mound.”

    It was pretty impressive as a natural oasis.

    “No one will believe this is for real.” I said to Geoff.

    “Thats why we’re filming it.” he smiled.

    It’s all there — done before by our grandfathers. We just have to have the will and the training to do these kind of things again.

    Trailer


    Full video here:
    An Oasis in the American Desert

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  23. Link to Post #114
    Avalon Member Delight's Avatar
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    Default Re: Food Foresting

    This link has several great videos along the right margin.

    How to Survive the Coming Crises

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