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    Question How to prevent running out of stored food.

    From survivalblog.com
    Among the multitude of preparations conducted by would-be survivalists, gardening is often minimized in value compared to the physical purchases of beans, bullets, and band-aids. However, in any long-term TEOTWAWKI event, gardening would probably become nearly the sole means of subsistence for your family and as such, it is critical that you make the efforts now to learn the ins and outs of how to produce a year's worth of fruit and vegetables from your own land.
    Prior to moving to our retreat, my family lived in a moderate-sized city and neither of my parents grew up with any genuine country-life experience, be it with gardening or anything else to do with growing your own food. Due to God's providence, we fell into company with a master gardener, himself concerned about world events, and over the first winter after we moved to our retreat we jointly plotted how the first garden would be planted. Since then, we have learned how to consistently produce enough vegetables to carry us through a year, and many lessons were learned the hard way. The following article sums up many of those lessons as well as other important principles. It is my hope that you would carefully consider them in regards to your own garden.

    First, A Word on the Importance Of Gardening
    Gardening ought to become a priority for everyone. No matter how many buckets of grain you have stored away, no matter how many cans of freeze-dried food are in your closet, you can count on running out eventually, and the food supply grid may not yet be restored. A large garden, plus orchards of fruits like raspberries, strawberries, and apples, and hopefully a few chickens, pigs, goats, and cows, will supply you with a large portion of the food necessary to survive.
    Those of you who are, like us, preparing on a shoestring budget, can go a long way in stocking up by growing your own vegetables and canning, dehydrating, or otherwise storing them for future use. It will be much cheaper and in many cases, healthier as well (and WTSHTF, you'll need all the health you can get!). This year we put a lot of effort into the garden, and by the end of this season we will have two years of canned vegetables and fruits stored away. Not only will this leave us with our current goal of a complete, well rounded, one extra year's food supply, but it will also safeguard us in case next year's garden does not produce as well. Two years ago, we canned two year's worth of carrots, and last year, we hardly harvested any. That extra year of canned carrots saw us through that lean year until now, when we once again have a large quantity of carrots that we will be soon canning in massive quantities.
    Even if a major TEOTWAWKI event never occurs in our lifetimes, we can all clearly see the faltering economy and the skyrocketing prices of food. We can begin combating inflation right now by taking control over what we eat and growing it ourselves. My family of six lives on a food budget of less than $200/month, and we eat heartily with no lack of good tasting, nutritional food.

    Garden Location
    Your garden should be located where it will obtain full sunshine. It should not be in a low area with poor water drainage, or on a relatively steep slope, and should be convenient for frequent access.

    .
    Summer Fallowing
    After the initial confusion and frustration over when to plant seeds, how many to plant, and how far apart to place them, the main lesson we learned the first year was the value of consistently summer fallowing a new piece of ground. Throughout our first garden season, we battled quack grass and numerous other weeds that filled our entire plot. Looking back, I remember that we did a very poor job of weeding and the amount of vegetables obtained suffered greatly because of being choked out by weeds. During that season, however, we used a garden tractor pulling a small disc to regularly run over a larger garden plot that we planned to use the next season. Every time the weeds began to show above the surface, we took the disc over them. Of course, it wasn't until the next year that we truly realized the benefits of this technique. When the next season rolled around and several weeks had passed since the first seeds were planted, my family was delighted to discover that there was almost no quack grass in the entire garden, and the only weeds to deal with were less noxious ones like pigweed, lamb's quarters, and shepherd's purse. Those were easy to chop off with a hoe several times per week.
    A year ago, we took a shortcut and planted quite a few fruit trees into an area that we had not kept well fallowed, and within a month or two we were once again reminded of the value of keeping the weeds tilled down for a season previous to planting. Grass and thistles sprang up everywhere and even now we are forced to work hard to keep on top of everything. Please, if you're going to garden in a new plot, fallow it regularly for a year before planting there. If you have to, do like we did and plant in one (albeit weedy) spot while you prepare another section for next season.


    Extend the Season
    Unless you live far enough south that you can garden practically the entire year round, it is important to take certain steps to extend your season, allowing a head start on planting to ensure a virtual guarantee of a harvest—prior to the frost! There are many varied ways of doing this, but most methods involve some form of greenhouse and starting seeds early indoors. If your house has plenty of windows on the southern side, and plenty of ledges for trays of seeds to sit on, it is a great way to extend the season all the way back to February for the longer-season transplantable plants like tomatoes, peppers, herbs, and the like. An attached greenhouse is convenient and will have much more space.

    When the ground is beginning to thaw but the weather is still cold, a hoop house works well. Ours consists of a framed 12'x8' wall and rebar extending out behind that in multiple half circles, connected by horizontal pieces of rebar. Six mil plastic is placed over the rebar and nailed down with slats to 2x8s running the length of the structure. A barrel wood stove is used to keep it warm on the cold nights. Once the temperature is warm enough, we remove the plastic. In the fall, we often decide to reinstall the plastic as a temporary shelter for tools and implements that we're using, and to allow more time for any vegetables that are not fully ripe.

    Stagger Production
    A key to not becoming overwhelmed by all the produce is to stagger production. Corn can be planted in one-week intervals; beans can be staggered by at least a couple weeks, and peas can be planted very early so as to ensure their harvest prior to the larger crops. Root crops, such as onions, carrots, and potatoes can wait until the very end of the garden season to be harvested.

    Mulching
    Mulch is important in a garden for several reasons. Number one, it retains moisture in the ground so any rain you do receive is used for maximum benefit, and it is not necessary to personally water as frequently. Second, mulch will help keep soil compaction down to a minimum. Third, it will add organic matter to your soil to help replace the nutrients that are drawn out over the years of leaving the soil bare to the elements and harvesting plants from it. To a certain extent, mulching also keeps weed levels reduced but you need to make sure you use a thick enough layer or else you will regret it later. When hay or straw mulch is put on too thinly, the weeds will come up as numerous as ever and it is much more difficult to hoe and nearly impossible to roto-till without clogging the tines on the tiller.

    Watering Your Garden
    As I mentioned above, your garden will hopefully be located near a water source. This can be your well, but in our case we have been told that our well water is not good for the soil as it will leach nutrients out from it. Thankfully we have a good-sized body of water a couple hundred yards from the garden. It's not ideal to have the garden located that far away, but it frosts much earlier down in the valley so we are safer to do it on top of the hill. However, we do plan on plowing up a smaller plot next to the water and planting the shorter-season vegetables and root crops down there. If electricity failed and we couldn't operate our pump system, at least we wouldn't have to carry buckets as far. (By the way, stock up on as many 5 gallon pails as you can afford, it seems there is a use for them all the time and you will never have too many.)

    Currently, we have a two horsepower electric pump at the water, and a two inch black poly pipe running from there up the hill. Various smaller pipes extend from that central pipe into different areas of the garden, with fittings that allow one-inch hoses to be inserted for further reach. Of course, our system isn't exactly a self sufficient setup unless it was run by solar or wind power. That is certainly possible, but with electricity currently remaining cheap and in abundant supply you will still be able to beat the effects of inflation by a long shot.

    Lots of Water!
    Everything should be kept well watered. Don't allow anything to become really dry, especially the peppers and tomatoes. If they begin to wither, it's too late for them or at least your harvest will be significantly delayed. Believe me, I know what I'm talking about from experience! Just stick your finger in the dirt and if it doesn't feel moist. You know what to do. When you do water, it's not necessary to do it every day unless it is extremely hot and the soil dries out rapidly. You need to water the plants heavily, so that it soaks down for at least three or four inches. That means probably an inch of water or more at a time. Don't worry about it puddling. You'll figure it out after you do it a few times and keep checking the moisture level with your finger. Water is the life-giver, and without it, your garden will be slowed, yield will decrease, and your plants may even die. Don't hesitate to use a lot! Like our master-gardening friend said, you'll be sick of watering long before you put enough water on to drown the plant. Of course, you must be careful with smaller plants but the larger ones tend to be plenty hardy.

    Storing Food
    You will need between 150 and 200 canning jars per person to store a year's worth of vegetables and other food items. In addition, you should stock up on as many canning lids as possible because it is much more difficult to preserve large quantities of vegetables without them. It is possible to reuse them but they tend to not seal consistently, so it is best to use new ones. Make sure you have a wood stove handy to be able to can on if the power is out.
    Of course, the other methods of sustainable food storage include using a root cellar and dehydration. The short bibliography at the end of this article gives references to detailed books on these subjects, which are beyond the scope of this paper.

    Seed Saving
    The only sustainable way to garden is to save your own seeds every year. Although seed saving is relatively basic, it does involve some forethought and planning on your part. First, you must plant only open-pollinated seeds. The hybrids that most stores carry will not stay true to their kind. There are many sources of open pollinated “heirloom” seeds, but our favorite is currently Baker Creek, found on the web at Rareseeds.com. While you're at it, get an extra two or three years worth of seed in case your garden doesn't do well, or for bartering purposes.
    It is easiest to plant only one variety of each vegetable to prevent cross-pollination, but you will probably want to hedge your bets by planting more than that. It is much more labor-intensive to do so, but possible. I highly recommend Suzanne Ashworth's book, “Seed to Seed,” for detailed information on preventing cross-pollination, harvesting, and seed storage. Depending on what plant it is, you will use hand pollination, time distancing (such as planting an early variety of corn, and then a week or two later longer season variety), and physical distancing although most plants require such far separation that it is impractical for the homesteader.
    Seeds, once dried, are best stored in air-tight glass containers in a cool, dark area. As long as the electricity still functions, this means a freezer or refrigerator. Prior to planting, you can test the germination rate of your seeds by placing a small amount in a moist paper towel that is placed inside a plastic bag and set in a warm portion of your house—in our case that means near the wood stove Wait a few days and check it to see how many seeds successfully germinated. If only half of them did, and you are not able to purchase new seeds, you will have to plant twice as many.

    Diligence
    It may seem obvious, but plain-old diligence is the key to raising your food supply. Observe the “windows of opportunity” and take advantage of them accordingly. You need to research ahead about how to do it, order your seeds in plenty of time, plant the seeds as soon as it is the right “window of opportunity” for planting, and then weed your garden daily. No, daily weeding isn't a chore when you keep up with it, but it definitely becomes a pain when you leave it for very much longer. Just run through with a hoe for a half hour or so a day and you will go a long ways in keeping a well-maintained, eye-pleasing vegetable garden.
    Don't put anything off until later, because with most garden-related duties they must be done as soon as you discover it is necessary. There is a certain period of time within which you must plant. There is a certain time wherein you need to harvest the corn. Beans will be too big if you leave them too long. Potato bugs will kill your plants if you don't pick them off right away and keep them off. Carrots won't grow very large if you don't thin them while they're small. For everything, there is a time and a season and life runs a lot smoother when you stick within the parameter of those windows.

    My family uses a simple technique to stay oriented and getting everything accomplished on time, and it's something that I recommend to everybody I talk to. Keep a running list of everything that needs to be done. One column on the page could list longer-term projects like “build chicken coop,” or “dig root cellar,” and the other side will be filled with smaller items such as “pick beans,” “weed strawberries,” “give goats water,” or “put away the pitchfork.” Even the smallest item is placed on the list and then crossed off as someone completes the task. In the mornings, I'll often look at the list and place a little star beside the items that are most critical to get done that day, and we will focus our energy on those. The younger boys will be assigned a few of the easier projects, and the rest of us will tackle the difficult or otherwise labor intensive ones. It's rewarding to come in at night and review the list and see all the rows crossed off. The next day, we might take a new sheet of paper and write down a few new things we just thought of and also include the projects we did not complete the day before. List keeping is simple, takes a small amount of time, and does wonders in keeping everyone productive all day long.

    How Do You Get It All Done?
    It may seem overwhelming trying to keep up with a garden large enough to supply your family with a year's worth of food, but as long as you tend to it each day, it isn't as difficult as one might think. If you have children who are old enough to understand instructions, you can put them to work doing some of the more mundane tasks while you take on the more advanced projects that require precision. I'm 17 years old, and my 14 year old brother and I actually do most of the garden maintenance (although Dad helps a lot with watering frequently in the mornings while we do chores). The two younger boys help with various projects that need more help, such as picking and snapping beans or cutting up apples in preparation for making applesauce. Mom mostly handles the indoor work; primarily cooking the meals to keep us going, canning the thousand or more jars we do each year, and processing other foods in preparation for freezing.
    Of course, if you are serious about survival, it is important to actually live the self-sufficient life. This means severely reducing trips to town, for both shopping and various extraneous events. Get rid of the television, and minimize time spent on non-productive entertainment. We are a homeschooling family, and that gives us a flexible schedule with plenty of time to focus on what is important to us.
    If you live in town and can't do everything you would like to, you can still eliminate wasteful uses of time, plant every spare space you have, and read many good how-to books. You can visit the country to practice outdoor skills, and help out a farmer to get some good exercise.

    Conclusion
    In conclusion, I want to encourage everyone to begin gardening on their own, regardless of location or how much land they own. Even if you are in an apartment, you can grow plants on a balcony and begin to learn the techniques of growing food.
    Food is necessary for our survival, and nothing makes more sense than controlling your own food—because when you control your own food, you are free from the chaos that most of the country may soon face. You will not only be able to continue to live relatively comfortably long after your stored food runs out; you will become part of the solution to the crisis. You will be there to show other people how to provide for their own families.
    Now is the time to learn how to garden, not after TEOTWAWKI. Go out in your backyard, till out a plot, and get busy!
    Reference Books
    -Square Foot Gardening, by Mel Bartholomew/ (for smaller gardens)
    -Seed to Seed, by Suzanne Ashworth and Kent Wheely
    -Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning, by the Gardeners and Farmers of Centre Terre Vivante
    -Encyclopedia of Country Living, by Carla Emery/ (The best general reference we've found, on gardening but also on everything else related to homesteading)

    Download this article as a pdf below
    Last edited by Richard; 17th March 2010 at 15:20. Reason: added pdf

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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    Thank you for a very through article. We are on our 2nd season of gardening productively as we also laid our garden fallow w/a cover crop that first Fall/Winter '08-'09, also incorporated a lot of straw. We then incorporated a great macro/micro mineral product into the soil because we had to purchase topsoil, our acreage being quite rocky, and we also raised the 40'x40' space a foot above ground (yeah, we blew a bundle building this garden, but for the long term, not wanting to relocate, it had to be done).
    Fencing was a must also because we have quite a lot deer. It doesn't keep the racoons out, let me tell you, they have a real talent knowing when melons are truly Ripe.

    You are very fortunate to have your entire family involved, it's just myself & husband, and it's quite a lot of work, he is 66 and I'm 57. We've discussed building a cabin on the property so that we could at least house extra help in exchange for work & a small rent fee to cover the cost of building it

    We also extended the enclosed garden considerably to accommodate fruit trees and berries.

    I was really blown away how much food it really takes to feed two people! So, with my pressure canner, I also can things like chili and soups in the off months from food bought at the markets. A pressure canner is a must for anyone, whether you garden or not, you can still buy at farmer markets or neighboring gardeners, and you're right, you can't have enough extra canning lids.

    We also raise chickens for eggs. 24 Rhode Island Reds is way too many hens for two people, however, we do sell the extras & of course, they would trade well. But when I think about how we would have to feed them if times get really hard, is a Real crash happens and feed is not there to buy at the co-op, well, we're just beginning to see the real hardships that can ensue if TSHTF.

    USEFUL TIP: You can preserve fresh eggs from a year to 2 yrs by covering them in water glass, found at the hardware store as Cement Floor Sealer, sodium silicate. Place fresh, unwashed eggs, narrow end down, into an earthenware crock, stacked upon each other. Mix 11 pts water with 1 pt sodium silicate and cover to 2 inches above eggs. One qt of water glass will treat about 16 dozen eggs. The recipe is on the back label.

    We do have a greenhouse, a passive solar, dbl polycarbonate glazed, south slope, w/a water wall (that turned out not to be such a dependable heat source... I was shocked to see we had maybe 2 days of sun out of 7 this winter here in NW Arkansas)... so we had to use electricity but do plan to place a small woodstove in there for next winter (we have LOTS of wood around here). $100 worth of heat per month to produce 3 or 4 zuccini, 4 or 5 cucumbers, lots of lettuce, spinach... the tomatoes took a LONG time to ripen. We were eating them just last February, so I will be starting them much earlier next time.

    We are novices when it comes to solar, but we do have some panels purchased for back up air circulation, that sort of thing... so much to learn, we're trying!

    And we found a spring just east of our pond, had the spot dug into a deep pool that keeps replenishing, so we tap that to the pond (which we've stocked w/fish) and also use it to fill a cistern behind the greenhouse for watering. I discovered that barley straw will keep down the algae bloom. I had to order it, so we'll see how that works. We'll be getting a couple of carp on Friday to help w/that as we had the pond enlarged and the algae was Terrible last year. Tom used copper sulfate (and was too heavy handed about it... arghhh).. so we're trying these other options this year!

    I mean, we appear to have pretty much what we need, except for some more hands and muscle around here. It can be daunting what all is needed to survive without a run to town. Man, are we spoiled or what? I'm freakin' Tired, worn out! We've spent quite a bundle of cash so far, but ya know? You can't eat money and you might as well Invest for the long terms, come what may.

    Hope I helped in some way.

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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    Well as for the people with a shorter growing season let me remind everyone of an alternative that everyone should look into...

    Hydroponics, giving up one room in your home to become a growing area for food you will need fresh to survive through long winters. Using Solar Panels or wind energy you can capture enough to keep the grow lamps shining. by cutting off outside lights you can cut the day down to 16 hours 8 hours of light 8 hours of darkness accelerating your crops quickly.

    Since 95% of the worlds population is in big cities they don't have the luxury of getting a tiller to go tear up their yards and start planting crops, and then how would you protect it when someone walking down the street is hungry?

    I highly recommend everyone starts researching indoor gardening...

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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    What I really wanted to talk with Jester about is the capability of using his powering system to run the grow lamps...

    something like this one, which is 1000W could light up a whole room at a cost of ~100

    Garden light


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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    Rocky, do you have any good links that explains this technique?
    "Vision without action is merely a dream.
    Action without vision just passes the time.
    Vision with action can change the world." Joel Arthur Barker

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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    some great points and advice so far!

    I have just copied this from one of the downloads in my 'survival' library on the PC.. covering the basic food supplies..

    "Now, let's talk about what most of think of when we begin to talk "food storage": If
    you eliminate all other cans or bottles or boxes of food in your pantry, there are seven
    categories of whole foods plus water, which will provide you with ALL of the
    nutrition that you need to last a lifetime. And with a little bit of knowledge, will
    provide you with delicious and varied meals every day. We call this our seven plus
    one chart.
    You can get a textual version of this discussion called "Seven Plus One: Categories of
    Food Storage" in the articles section of SimplyLivingSmart.com.

    Water:
    This is the first thing you MUST have in your food storage. Every guide I have read,
    from government publications to church guidelines suggest 1 gallon per person per
    day for two weeks. That means 14 gallons per person in the household. PLUS you
    need the knowledge and ability to clarify and purify more. See our Emergency
    Preparedness lesson on Water. You cannot survive without water. Within hours of an
    emergency, water will become critical. So, on our 7 plus 1 chart, Water is the PLUS
    one, right in the center.
    Wheat and Grains:

    Wheat is the King of grains. It is amazingly versatile. Most people think of bread, but
    wheat can be used for tortillas and rolls, crackers, cakes, cookies, and pies. But, it can
    also be prepared as an alternative to meat and as a sweetner. With appropriate spices,
    wheat can "become" just about anything. But Wheat is only one of the grains. The
    other grains provide wonderful taste alternatives to wheat in many recipes. Also, for
    those who are gluten intolerant, many of the other grains can be substitued. Please see
    our article "Summary of Grains and their Uses". Experiment with various other grains
    as your experience increases.

    Legumes:

    Beans are the natural complement to Wheat and grains. Separately, neither wheat nor
    grain contains a complete protein because one or more of the eight essential amino
    acids are missing or in short supply. However, mixing grains, seeds, and legumes
    provide all of the essential amino acids to build complete protein.
    Most people think only of cooked beans in their whole form. And many, including
    myself before I learned more, didn't really care for beans. I like chile, but I'm not a
    whole bean fan. But, by grinding beans into a flour, you can use them in your recipes.
    Anitra will show you some marvelous recipes. We now use beans nearly every day, in
    breads, in smoothies, in gravy . . . in almost every way you can imagine. And no, you
    don't get the gas you might otherwise get and no, your foods don't taste like lima
    beans. Learning how to use beans is one of the most remarkeable "secrets" about food
    storage.

    Powdered Dairy:
    Powdered Dairy is the next "secret" that you should know about. And you guessed it.
    Anitra has many lessons on this topic. You might be thinking, "Powdered milk? I hate
    powdered milk." You know what. So do I, almost. I grew up milking cows and
    drinking whole milk. I know what real milk tastes like. I can often tell the difference
    between the breed of cow and what the cow ate. I have found one or two brands of
    powdered milk that I don't mind drinking. Nevertheless, I still prefer not to drink
    powdered milk.
    But I'm talking abot MORE than powdered milk. I'm talking about powdered butter,
    powdered shortening, powdered eggs and egg whites, and powdered cheese. Of
    course you're not going to spread powdered butter on you bread. But you could use
    powdered butter in your cakes. Wow! All of a sudden you can now store all of the
    ingredients you need for cake mixes, soup mixes (yes, like those you buy, but without
    the preservatives), caserole and dinner mixes that can be quickly combined to make
    dinners in literally minutes instead of hours. Powdered Dairy is one of the powerful
    additions to a food storage plan.
    Sprouts:
    When I learned about sprouts, my whole perspective on foods storage changed.
    Sprouts multiply the vitamins and nutrients in seeds and nuts. By learning to sprout a
    few different variety of seeds and nuts, you can acquire ALL of the vitamins and
    essential nutrition that you need. Anitra uses a variety of sprouts throughout her
    lessons. The health benefits have been well researched and documented.

    Honey and Sweetners:
    There are a variety of sweetners to store in your food storage. Honey is natural and
    the most healthy. But most of us will also store processed sugar. Also consider
    molasses and maple. We don't have lessons specifically devoted to sweetners, but
    nearly all recipes call for one or another. Again, you can use our spreadsheet or
    http://www.trackmyfoodstorage.com to determine the amounts that you might need to
    store. In general, 60lbs per person per year is necessary.

    Salt and Seasonings:
    You should include 8 pounds of salt per person per year. But the seasonings is up to
    you.
    What do we mean by seasonings? This would include spices, seasonings, bulion cubes
    or powder (make sure it does not contain MSG), cocoa powder, vanilla, flavorings.
    etc. I mean every type of seasoning that you would use. The more the variety that you
    have, the more variety you will have in your dinners. Learn to use a variety. After you
    establish the basics in seasonings and spices, you can begin to add pudding mixes,
    drink mixes, and other enhancements. We highly recommend buying your seasonings
    and spices in bulk. Antira will teach lessons on finding excellent prices on bulk spices
    and how to organize them.

    Oils:
    Most sources recommend 10 quarts per person per year. This would include cooking
    oil, peanut butter, shortening, butter, etc. Remember, that you can get powdered
    shortening and powdered butter and margarine. This extends the storage life from
    months to years. Plus, you gain the advantage of making your own mixes which can
    be used for quick meals.
    These are the basic ingredients of a complete food storage. You could easily live off
    these foods with amazing variety. Nevertheless, these are only the basics."

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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    I am not an expert and have just recently started looking into it but there are a few really good magazines that go in depth on their info...

    http://www.tigmag.com/Theindoorgardener2.pdf

    here is one available to download with an article starting on page 46 that is pretty good...

    Volume 5


    another good magazine offering info on indoor gardening is http://www.maximumyield.com/

    Maybe one of us could get in touch with one of their experts to come in and share with all of us tips and techniques for getting started.

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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    I remember when I used to grow plants back in UK.

    Of course its difficult to grow and properly maintain "large" amounts intended for consumption/food later on,
    But actually just growing a plant is very easy, much more than people think.

    Get a handful of Cotton (yep, Cotton), plant any seed (one that grows) right buried in the middle, place it under a lightbulb or near any window with sunshine, sprinkle it (lightly) for a few days and see what happens.


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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    what I was thinking Jester would be interested in was what I found in this international directory, Grow panels that are only 28Watts...

    Best of 2010 International on Page 6



    These are LED panels...

    Come on Jester we're waiting...
    Last edited by Rocky_Shorz; 17th March 2010 at 18:46.

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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    The LDS have made food storage into a lifestyle. Very useful info in this free pdf:

    http://www.abysmal.com/LDS/Preparedn...eparedness.pdf
    "Vision without action is merely a dream.
    Action without vision just passes the time.
    Vision with action can change the world." Joel Arthur Barker

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    Avalon Member 5thElement's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    We found our new favorite gardening book: The Vegetable Gardener's Bible by Edward Smith
    " No vegetables are healthier, fresher, less expensive, or more local than the ones you grow in your own back yard. The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible will show you how. "
    He covers everthing from how to make a garden thru how to use a spare cabinet as a root cellar. All organic and high yield from small spaces


    http://www.storey.com/book_detail.ph...&cat=Gardening

    5th
    Last edited by 5thElement; 18th March 2010 at 18:04. Reason: spelling
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    United States Avalon Member conk's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    Whole quinoa, flax, and chia are excellent sources of long term food. All are extremely nutrient dense. They even have the fatty acids which are so important. We have many, many pounds of these seeds. Store them in buckets with oxygen eaters.

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    UK Avalon Member Ammit's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    Um, you stored them with what?, oxygen eaters?? please can you elaborate.
    Love. peace and Blessings to you all.

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    Australia Avalon Member Anchor's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    I like reading survival blog from time to time. JWR's approach to building a garden would be to design radar controlled automated pop-up auto-gun emplacements at each corner and that would be before building the reinforced and heavily armoured walls

    "They are MY vege's and they are going to stay MINE" - lol

    Once you get past the firearm obsession, you find that a lot of common sense is spoken on that site when dealing with the practical realities of dealing with difficult circumstances.
    Last edited by Anchor; 14th September 2010 at 01:49.
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    United States Unsubscribed wynderer's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to prevent running out of stored food.

    i suggest creating invisibility spells also, for when the marauding & stealing begins

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