+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 8 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 153

Thread: Ham radio information needed

  1. Link to Post #21
    Netherlands Avalon Member Old Snake's Avatar
    Join Date
    28th September 2011
    Age
    73
    Posts
    96
    Thanks
    224
    Thanked 305 times in 84 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Bill

    CB is not only local when transmitted in AM mode instead of FM wich reaches line of sight+, furthermore for shtf you can have a booster amp , against that time no one will give a damn.
    Besides that you can say all you want ,wich you cannot as a ham operator.

    To avoid spurious signals buy only Hi Q stuff.

    Old Snake

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Old Snake For This Post:

    M6* (9th May 2012), Operator (9th December 2011)

  3. Link to Post #22
    Avalon Member 13th Warrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th November 2010
    Posts
    1,192
    Thanks
    1,196
    Thanked 2,859 times in 904 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Quote It can't easily be regulated or shut down: if the grid goes down, phones no longer work, or the internet is 'shut off' -- then ham radio will be the only way to send messages to other communities or other countries.
    Satellite is another option.
    “Bundinn er bátlaus maður”

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to 13th Warrior For This Post:

    M6* (9th May 2012)

  5. Link to Post #23
    United States Avalon Guide: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Age
    77
    Posts
    1,929
    Thanks
    12,581
    Thanked 15,091 times in 1,864 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Amateur radio can be very useful during an emergency. Communication cannot be terminated as easily as cell phones and the internet. The only way to stop communication for sure is to kill off all the Hams.

    Amateur radio bands are grouped as HF (high frequency), VHF (very high frequency), UHF (ultra high frequency), and more. The most reliable long distance communications band is 20 meters within the HF group.

    The high frequency (HF) bands (160 meter thru 10 meters) are capable of long distance communication depending upon atmospheric conditions and time of day. HF radios typically are powered by 12 volts DC which is very convenient for automobile power or a small solar energy system. My choice for a relatively inexpensive HF radio was the ICOM 718 that I purchased used for $400. Used HF radios can be found for even less money on eBay.

    If you spend a lot of money on an HF rig you will end up with a radio that is probably too complicated to use unless you are a real enthusiast, and there are many.

    The currently issued U.S. licenses are (in order of simplicity and privileges) are Technician, General and Extra. With few exceptions, if you want to talk around the world you will need at least a General license. In the U.S. there is no need to learn Morse code to get a license. Tests are multiple choice and given by volunteers in local radio clubs. All the questions and answers are selected from a pool that is available online. Practice exams are available online.

  6. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to Ron Mauer Sr For This Post:

    Anchor (10th December 2011), crosby (9th December 2011), Fred259 (21st December 2011), Ivanhoe (12th December 2011), M6* (9th May 2012), Nenuphar (2nd August 2012), Operator (10th December 2011), partsdale (17th May 2015), Red Skywalker (21st December 2011), Reirrac (6th December 2012), Turcurulin (14th March 2012)

  7. Link to Post #24
    Australia Avalon Member Anchor's Avatar
    Join Date
    10th February 2010
    Location
    Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Age
    55
    Posts
    4,291
    Thanks
    10,184
    Thanked 22,540 times in 3,414 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Quote Posted by Unified Serenity (here)
    I have an emergency radio system, but am not licensed so I don't talk on it. All you have to do is get a handle and license then start playing with it. They are very good for communicating.
    With respect, you need this thread badly, because I think you are missing a lot of information here and you have made a lot of assumptions that need challenging.

    HAM radio is *meant* to be a highly regulated and disciplined use by competent people (who have to train to get the license) of a very scarce resource.

    If you have a radio that can reach huge areas of the world - and so does thousands of others - and they all try to talk at the same time on the same frequency bands - what do you think happens?
    Those of the positive polarity are of service when by action or thought or even intention, another entity or the self is freer to seek his or her own path than before the intended service was performed. --L/Leema

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Anchor For This Post:

    Cigan Mojia (25th January 2014), M6* (9th May 2012)

  9. Link to Post #25
    United States Avalon Guide: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Age
    77
    Posts
    1,929
    Thanks
    12,581
    Thanked 15,091 times in 1,864 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Some popular websites for the purchase of amateur radio equipment are:

    Ham Radio Outlet

    Universal Radio

    R&L Electronics

    Another website that is very useful to find owner reviews of used and new equipment is http://www.eham.net/reviews/

    ICOM, Kenwood and Yaesu all manufacture (relatively) low cost high quality HF transceivers.

  10. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Ron Mauer Sr For This Post:

    Anchor (10th December 2011), haibane (10th December 2011), M6* (9th May 2012), Operator (10th December 2011), Turcurulin (14th March 2012)

  11. Link to Post #26
    Avalon Member 13th Warrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th November 2010
    Posts
    1,192
    Thanks
    1,196
    Thanked 2,859 times in 904 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Bill,

    Have you found the information that you were looking for?
    “Bundinn er bátlaus maður”

  12. Link to Post #27
    Avalon Member
    Join Date
    12th June 2011
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    311
    Thanked 216 times in 51 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Henry Deacon always told us that ham radio can be used as a complete internet substitute... for communicating speech, audio, video, images, and text files of every kind.
    Fascinating idea. I had never considered using HAM for transmitting digital signals. Might be spotty and slow but what a nifty alternative.

  13. Link to Post #28
    United States Avalon Member Siberia9's Avatar
    Join Date
    20th March 2011
    Age
    49
    Posts
    393
    Thanks
    1,661
    Thanked 1,661 times in 349 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    I used to own a trucking company and drove a tractor trailer some in the 90's. I remember getting into areas around Texas where you could hear the HAM radio folks from South America etc calling family in the US from the middle of nowhere. I always imagined from a jungle hut, heh heh. Anyway it was annoying but the signal was compatible with the CB radio, I could talk to them because I had a 350 watt booster for the regular 18 watt CB (this is illegal but I never cared about that) we called it "catching skip" as their signal would skip to me in my area. Now some guys had side band CB radios in their trucks and would talk to people huge distances away and these guys almost never had any license. These radios were about 400.00 bucks in the truck stop and ran on a automotive battery obviously.
    I seriously doubt these Spanish folks had a license in the US or in Columbia either. I say if its for an emergency situation/breakdown of society etc then why would you want a license? I dont trust the govt anyway so I can tell you that I would not tell them who or where I am through any kind of license info collection myself.
    So if you want to stay off the grid if it hits the fan and your going to keep it to a minimum anyway I doubt they will bother looking for you if you dont have the paper work, they may be too busy. Unless of course you intend to bradcast daily etc.
    BTW Bill what are the lic requirements in Ecuador? Do you even need one down there? If so then what are the penaltys for being a radio outlaw?
    Also before you guys lecture me about how great it is to get licensed, let me just say that I have decided a long time ago not to comply with any of their garbage. A license is a waver from the govt to do something illegal, I dont want their permission as they do not own me. They can not make me do anything, I will not comply, just say'n.

  14. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Siberia9 For This Post:

    HaveBlue (17th December 2012), M6* (9th May 2012), meredith (18th December 2011), RMorgan (13th December 2011), Strat (16th June 2012), Turcurulin (14th March 2012)

  15. Link to Post #29
    United States Avalon Member grampah's Avatar
    Join Date
    16th December 2011
    Location
    Southern California mountains
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    125
    Thanked 98 times in 28 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    I have been licensed since 1994 at the Technician grade level. Up to post #28 I didn't see mentioned the relaying of two meter messages across the country, aided by having signal repeaters put into emergency only traffic. I lived in southwest Missouri for 18 years and some area hams were involved in relaying messages related to the Katrina aftermath from Texas to the east coast. There is a standard text protocol for such relaying. Our local club had us practice such on our weekly call in.

    My main activity was in weather watch, alert and information. I would monitor 2 meter hams who were out "in the field' as spotters, primarily for tornadoes. I would relay their information to my local rural fire department via one of their radios since at that time none of the volunteer fireman had ham licenses. I would be in my house and also relaying TV weather information until that power went off. I always operated my Kenwood mobile rig with a deep cell 12 volt battery continually recharged by a trickle charger. My antenna was in an upstairs room so fully protected from lightning, winds and ice.

    The national weather service in Springfield Missouri monitored our ham bands when we were in emergency mode related to storms. They would ask for clarification before they passed our information onto their broadcasts. We met with them and also the major TV station a few times a year. It always helps to be able to recognize people by their voice on the ham band.

    At our annual Field Days in June I have witnessed packet radio transmitting text into a laptop computer, albeit very slowly. Also
    the powering of radios with a solar panel.

  16. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to grampah For This Post:

    M6* (9th May 2012), meredith (18th December 2011), Turcurulin (14th March 2012)

  17. Link to Post #30
    United States Avalon Member Providence's Avatar
    Join Date
    8th February 2011
    Location
    Elizabethtown, KY
    Age
    62
    Posts
    195
    Thanks
    705
    Thanked 949 times in 171 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Quote Posted by Operator (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by Operator (here)
    What do you need to know or start to do/organize ?
    Personally -- I'd like to know what to buy that's powerful, not too expensive, and operable by an intelligent novice. (Henry warned us against some models that are technically excellent, but not that simple to master due to their sophistication.)

    I'd also welcome information about ham radio stations that are lightweight and portable, and which can operate on solar power.
    John Waterman promotes this one:

    http://www.yaesu.com/indexVS.cfm?cmd...5&isArchived=0



    It looks like there is a newer model too: FT-897D

    I think those are very complete and nice but .... they will be very sensitive to EMP too ... and difficult to repair.
    I actually bought one of these several months ago, I wanted a way to communicate over great distances. It seems to be a nice unit not too overwhelming and can be used for mobile or home base operations. Finding the right radio was a breeze compared to choosing a suitable antenna. You really need to do a lot of research or find someone that can mentor you when selecting an antenna. I purchased one that had several additional segments to cover the most bandwidth. I have set it up once or twice, just to listen in and get used to the operation. I was studying for my license but haven't taken the test.

    Here is the site I was using for practice tests:
    http://www.qrz.com/ht/?

    Good luck Bill

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Providence For This Post:

    Operator (18th December 2011)

  19. Link to Post #31
    United States Avalon Member Rahkyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    11th June 2011
    Location
    San Marcos, Texas
    Age
    52
    Posts
    2,585
    Thanks
    15,270
    Thanked 20,571 times in 2,450 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    When I was in the Army, I was a "Single Channel Radio Operator" 31C and learned Morse Code also. I suppose this is related to HAM radio. I've often thought about looking into it myself, but have never delved back into it since my Army days. This is a RATT Rig:



    Inside of it we had AM & FM radio and Teletype. In the late 80s we were working still with Korean War/ Vietnam War-era equipment, which the RATT Rigs were:





    You can still get a lot of this equipment for cheap. You can restore some of the pieces or find them and operate them.

    RATT Rigs were Combat Communications, they were to be used 'on the fly'. Got a set of antenna that's relatively easy and quick to set up and it runs on a generator but I'm sure you can set it up for solar relatively easy. Don't know about licensing for the equipment, don't know if it might be the same as HAM.

    Looking at those new radio models, things have sure changed. Miniaturization, for one. Guess I'm getting old, I think I'd rather have my Rig again if it came down to it than one of those little things. Although, come to think of it, being stuck inside a metal box with all of those electromagnetic emissions coming at us couldn't have been good. LOL

  20. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Rahkyt For This Post:

    Fred259 (21st December 2011), M6* (9th May 2012), Operator (18th December 2011), Red Skywalker (21st December 2011), Turcurulin (14th March 2012), Unified Serenity (18th December 2011)

  21. Link to Post #32
    Avalon Member norman's Avatar
    Join Date
    25th March 2010
    Location
    too close to the hot air exhaust
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,884
    Thanks
    7,333
    Thanked 22,776 times in 4,212 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Whaw, that vehicle looks like just the right thing to get hold of. I wonder if they have ever turned up in surplus sales?

    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

  22. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to norman For This Post:

    Operator (18th December 2011), Rahkyt (19th December 2011)

  23. Link to Post #33
    United States Avalon Member Rahkyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    11th June 2011
    Location
    San Marcos, Texas
    Age
    52
    Posts
    2,585
    Thanks
    15,270
    Thanked 20,571 times in 2,450 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    Whaw, that vehicle looks like just the right thing to get hold of. I wonder if they have ever turned up in surplus sales?
    Apparently you can, you can also get them with all of the equipment inside. There is a sub-culture that refits them and all that, from what I was reading on the website and in google. I had no idea, nor had I thought much about it since being out of the military outside of an occasional desire to get my HAM operator license also. I'm thinking that something like this would be good for a community, since that is what an Army Company really is, there was one assigned to each. And the technology would still be useful, in fact moreso, since it has absolutely no dependence upon microchips of any kind. Pure electronica.

  24. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Rahkyt For This Post:

    Fred259 (21st December 2011), M6* (9th May 2012)

  25. Link to Post #34
    Avalon Member Red Skywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Posts
    216
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 936 times in 194 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Hello from another licensed ham radio-operator.

    I don't give my callsign because here I want to be a little anonymous.
    I have installed several Yeasu FT897 radiosets as emergency radios.
    I use the following:

    1x Yeasu FT987D


    I modify them for MARS/CAP or freeband. This means it can transmit not only on Hamradio frequencies, but continuous between 1.8 and 55.999 MegaHerz, thus including the CitizensBand 27 MegaHerz. Max outputpower is 100 Watts. It's not intended for the CB (27 MegaHerz) or pirate frequencies, but because it's too late in case of an emergency to do it then.
    HERE is how to do it and some other non-significant technical modifications.
    It also gives VHF and UHF expansion: 137 - 164 MegaHerz, max outputpower 50 Watts (VHF including mariphone) and 420 - 470 MegaHerz, max outputpower 20 Watts (UHF including PMR and LPD-frequencies).
    The FT897d has also a FM-radio broadcast and commercial aircraft receiver built in for monitoring purposes.

    Of course this is a bit illegal!

    But He, it's for emergency purposes and EVERYBODY is allowed to make an emergency call without having a license.

    1x autotuner LDG AT-897 for auto adjusting the antenna.

    1x internal powersupply which is optional if you have 12 volts with 25 Amps.

    1x Wire-antenna, Fritzel FD-3 (length 20 meters) The FD-3 works between 5 and 30 MegaHerz (approximate) in combination with the LDG autotuner.

    20 meters of coax cable for this antenna.

    1x vhf/uhf vertical antenna, like a Diamond X200n dualband or other type.

    and good quality coaxcable for this antenna.

    This costs less then 2000,- Euro. Works both on 220-110 volts and 12 Volts car-battery. It can be combined to one easy to carry single unit. It all fits in a bag with the wire antenna and some other cables.

    At Classic International you can find the regular prices and order-information for this rig (sorry for this advertisement, look further for best pricing!)

    This is a basic radiostation setup. More then enough for emergencies. It can always be better, but with this you have all you need.

    I used this setup and worked all of Europe from Germany, the UK, Finland and France without a problem (40 and 20 meter bands).
    But at home I have the same setup and worked the US West and East coast, Canada, South Africa, the Middle East, and even Australia. It largely depends on the sun activity and your operating skills.

    The only emergency problem you cannot deal with is the EMP. But if stored in a closed metal case which is grounded, it may survive. To handle the EMP, only transceivers fully build of vaccuumtubes are recommended. But these are not easy to operate. Even operating the above mentioned Yeasu transceiver needs some basic radio skills to get a good result.

    It's possible to combine this radio with a computer, giving you Telex, SlowscanTV for sending still pictures, Packetradio for binary files (slow, but nice) etc.

    Till so far, if you have questions, let me know. As finish here a link to see what is possible with shortwave propagation:

    http://wsprnet.org/drupal/wsprnet/map

    Try the different bands to see how different frequencies propagate. You find the frequency by dividing 300 by the given length, example: 300 / 11 =27,27 Megaherz. That is why the CB is the 11 meter band. It is the speed of light, 300, divided by the length of the wave in meters. (This is the handy formula without all the mega zero's )
    Another note to make is that most of the stations you see on the map use only 5 or 10 Watts!
    Because sunspot activity is increasing, it's possible to use CB for intercontinental calls, both in FM and SSB. There is a great repeater in NewYork on 29.620 Mhz in FM which I sometimes can reach from Europe. So CB is not that bad, but it's crowded and depends heavily on sunspot activity or even HAARP-experiments .

    The site uses software on pc's of ham radioamateurs connected to their radioequipment. The results are shared via the internet and displayed on the map. I use it sometimes too to check the atmospheric conditions.

    All the best and 73's (learn morsecode if you can!)

    Final advise: Before thinking on transmitting, it's recommended to listen first as much as you can on the airwaves and get to know your equipment.
    OR, start with a free Hamradio software simulator which does not need a license: HAMSPHERE



    BEWARE
    Listening to foreign radio is an offense against the national security of our people.
    It will in order of the Fuhrer be punished with heavy prison sentences.

    Hide your radio's, it happened before

    Red Skywalker
    Last edited by Red Skywalker; 22nd December 2011 at 08:20. Reason: Added several external links and more info

  26. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Red Skywalker For This Post:

    Aurelius (31st December 2011), Bill Ryan (22nd December 2011), Fred259 (22nd December 2011), kanishk (5th September 2013), M6* (9th May 2012), Marin (25th September 2012), norman (22nd December 2011), Rahkyt (21st December 2011), SKIBADABOMSKI (9th December 2012)

  27. Link to Post #35
    Avalon Member Hughe's Avatar
    Join Date
    19th November 2010
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    757
    Thanks
    1,129
    Thanked 2,588 times in 607 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Quote Red Skywalker
    Have you accessed internet through Ham Radio?


    There are people who access internet using Ham Radio network, which I'll definitely try it out when I move out of city.

    What I learned so far, you need to get the Ham Radio license in the country you live.
    Set up Ham Radio station that receive / transmit data over Ham Radio network world wide.
    Install Ham Radio software that supports internet access for your computer.
    It's intriguing to think about which bodies charge or control or even monitor internet access on Ham Radio network. LOL

    The information is sporadic. It will takes some time to find out what type of Ham hardware devices are needed, software components, and etc.
    I only use Linux and will put related information how to access Internet through Ham Radio on Linux.
    Last edited by Hughe; 22nd December 2011 at 15:33.
    For free society!

  28. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Hughe For This Post:

    meredith (23rd December 2011), partsdale (17th May 2015)

  29. Link to Post #36
    Avalon Member Red Skywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Posts
    216
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 936 times in 194 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    There is Internet access possible via Ham radio, but it is not for Internet browsing.
    You can use email though. It works via "Packet-radio". You need a PC and special interface called a "TNC", Terminal Node Controller hardware. The email of packet radio can be used separate from the Internet, but is also linked to the Internet.
    The speed is very slow, like working with an old telephone modem of 2400 baud. Higher speeds are possible but then you have to go to UHF, 430 MegaHerz (70 cm band) or higher to the 23 cm, 13 cm and even 3 cm bands
    The range is limited (5 - 10 kilometers), and needs lined up antennas. It's a network, but difficult and only with help and experiments of fellow amateurs accessible.
    VHF (2 meter band, 145 MHz) packet radio is suitable for emails and small binary files (up to 10 kB). The range is about 40 - 50 kilometers.

    I am not an experienced packetradio amateur, but have done some experiments on VHF with 1200 baud and on shortwave with 300 baud. My interest is more to a digitalmode called "PSK31" which gives readable text even when speech is not usable. It has almost the same possibilities as plain morsecode. Another mode is SSTV, slowscan TV. No real movies, but picture stills. It's like a colorfax. Here are 2 examples:


    The distances are about 900 kilometers and done on the 20 meter band (14 MegaHerz)

    You need an interface between the PC and transceiver because the static electricity of the antenna can damage the PC. Learned the hard way
    I use this one, the Microham USB Interface III. Not cheap, but it protects your PC. It's a usb soundcard and datacontroller with full galvanic insulation. It's not a TNC, however there is software available to use this interface as a simple TNC. You need to start up several programs to enter the packet radio network.
    The software (not for packet radio) widely used is HAM RADIO DELUXE. It's free for ham radio-amateurs, you have to register with your call sign. It has most digital modes, like RTTY, PSK, SSTV, even morse by keyboard. But not Packet Radio. Packet radio is a 'difficult' mode.
    But there is much, much more FREE software.

    If you are thinking about becoming a Radio Amateur then listen to this warning! (found this on the website of the programmer of Ham radio Deluxe)

    Red Skywalker
    Last edited by Red Skywalker; 22nd December 2011 at 19:24.

  30. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Red Skywalker For This Post:

    Akasha (6th December 2012), kanishk (5th September 2013), M6* (9th May 2012), meredith (23rd December 2011), Turcurulin (14th March 2012)

  31. Link to Post #37
    Avalon Member Hughe's Avatar
    Join Date
    19th November 2010
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    757
    Thanks
    1,129
    Thanked 2,588 times in 607 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Using wireless router to access Ham Radio bandwidth.

    http://www.qsl.net/kb9mwr/projects/wireless/modify.html
    http://www.qsl.net/kb9mwr/projects/w.../ddwrt-ham.jpg

    If it works, you can install hacked version or firmware on a wireless router and connect internet from other computers without touching anything. This is probably easiest solution who want to access Ham Radio for internet connection.

    The configuration is real Ham Radio station - transceiver/receiver, antenna, other devices - that communicate world wide. Connect the modified wireless router to the station.
    Last edited by Hughe; 23rd December 2011 at 01:47.
    For free society!

  32. The Following User Says Thank You to Hughe For This Post:

    meredith (23rd December 2011)

  33. Link to Post #38
    Australia Avalon Member wolf_rt's Avatar
    Join Date
    22nd January 2011
    Location
    QLD, Australia
    Age
    38
    Posts
    525
    Thanks
    1,536
    Thanked 1,632 times in 418 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    I don't know jack about Ham radio, but from my experience with UHF, ICOM radios are the way to go. The IC-400 is the only UHF that i would buy, and it isn't much more expensive than cheap Uniden or GE sets.

  34. Link to Post #39
    United States Avalon Guide: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Age
    77
    Posts
    1,929
    Thanks
    12,581
    Thanked 15,091 times in 1,864 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Some of the least expensive quality amateur radio transceivers capable of world wide communications are manufactured by ICOM, Yaesu and Kenwood. Of these three, the least expensive is the ICOM IC-718. HRO sells the IC-718 for $614.95 (current sales price).


    Used price for these transceivers is approximately $400.

    Short and long distance (world wide) communications can be established with radios typically labeled as HF (high frequency) transcievers. Long distance communication is a function of atmospheric conditions that vary with time of day and sun activity and can be severely limited by atmospheric noise such as thunder storms. The bottom line is that world wide communications is not available at all times.

    A valuable feature of HF transcievers is that they can be used to receive commercial broadcast frequencies from all over the planet. Receive frequencies are typically from 1.800MHz to 30MHz (160 meters thru 10 meters wavelength) with some radios having a wider range.

    If the cabal shuts down the internet, HF radios will still function as:
    • Transceivers capable of short and long distance communications with other amateur radio operators (although it may become illegal to do so)
    • Receivers to monitor commercial broadcasts around the world which may present a very different perspective than local politically motivated radio stations.
    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 28th December 2011 at 04:44.

  35. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Ron Mauer Sr For This Post:

    kanishk (5th September 2013), Turcurulin (14th March 2012), wavydome (28th December 2011), wolf_rt (28th December 2011)

  36. Link to Post #40
    United States Avalon Guide: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Location
    Virginia
    Age
    77
    Posts
    1,929
    Thanks
    12,581
    Thanked 15,091 times in 1,864 posts

    Default Re: Ham radio information needed

    Have you picked a few candidates for your next radio purchase?

    Use this very useful service from the folks at http://www.eham.net/ to find out what the owners say.

    Use your favorite internet search engine and type "eham [radio model]". Examples "eham ft897" or "eham ic718" or "eham ft817".
    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 31st December 2011 at 18:26.

  37. The Following User Says Thank You to Ron Mauer Sr For This Post:

    Turcurulin (14th March 2012)

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 8 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts