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Thread: Being a permaculture farmer.

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    Australia Avalon Member panopticon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Being a permaculture farmer.

    G'day All,

    Quote Posted by Hughe (here)
    This is a little off topic. I realized why peace is so important for us. Will majority of population fed up against the warmongers and say 'No'? It will has to be come pretty soon.

    If any organizations are up to what they say, first of all they should disclose all the information for general public. Only capable individuals can attend their seminar, courses physically and have face-to-face learning from them. I've spent at least few hundred hours related to Permaculture.

    Putting aside construction of infrastructure, the most important thing is the localized edible plants/trees database. It will takes few years for me to build a sounding plant database that Koreans use it without trial errors. Suppose people can access such information anywhere in the world, anybody who has chunk of farm land or property can buy bunch of seeds and plant them.
    @panopticon I watched old videos of Bill Mollison and Masanobu Fukuoka.
    Hughe: sorry, I don't understand what you're saying in your post.

    Quote Posted by Cjay (here)
    With permaculture, we are working WITH nature, not against it - we are giving nature an accelerated, low-input, low-maintenance, jump-start. The technology exists TODAY. Most of it is actually relatively low-tech.

    Ok. Roll-call time. Who wants to get their hands dirty? (literally or metaphorically). We can all help in different ways. Who wants to help and HOW can you help?
    Cjay, you know I'm happy to spread Permaculture knowledge, information, research and my experiences. But what are you asking for here?

    For those who haven't come across the work of French inventor Jean Pain (seemed relevant):
    http://www.daenvis.org/technology/Jeanpan.htm

    And the obligatory videos:



    Kind Regards,
    Panopticon
    Last edited by panopticon; 27th April 2012 at 02:44.
    "What we think, or what we know, or what we believe is, in the end, of little consequence.
    The only consequence is what we do."

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    Australia Avalon Member panopticon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Being a permaculture farmer.

    G'day All,

    I thought I'd supply a link to 2 extensive databases of edible and medicinal plants from around the world for those who might be interested.

    First is from 'Food Plants International' (yet another Tasmanian/Australian resource supplied freely for the world) which is based on the life work of agricultural scientist Bruce French and provides access to his database of somewhere near 20,000 edible plants.
    In an interview Bruce said:
    Quote Lots of people keep taking soya beans in the tropics. I say, "Why are you taking a subtropical plant to the tropics? Leave a subtropical plant in the subtropics and look for some of the tropical ones." They said, "What is there?" "What about a winged bean?" I say. It's the most nutritious bean in the world, already far more nutritious than soya bean. You can eat the flowers, you can eat the leaves, you can eat the seeds, the pods, you can eat the roots, you can eat the whole plant. I keep saying to the villagers, "Why aren't you growing it more?" And they said, "We didn't realise it was so valuable and so important. We'll grow a little bit 'cause we like it." I said, "You should be growing lots more, distributing the seed round, giving it out to people, 'cause it improves the soil and it's the most nutritious bean in the world."
    Anyway Bruce French's contributed and supported 'Food Plants International' and the Rotary supported 'Learn Grow' are:
    http://www.foodplantsinternational.com
    http://www.learngrow.org

    The database is available here (just choose "Guest Account" and there's no login required):
    http://www.cmsvr.com/fmi/iwp/cgi?-db...ay&-loadframes

    The second database I'm linking to is the one from 'Plants For A Future' which is based on the work of Ken and Addy Fern in Cornwall. The research they undertook on temperate edible plants has resulted in a site with over 1500 edible plants. The database has somewhere around 7000 edible and/or medicinal plants with extensive information pages including a rating for edibility and for medicinal properties, cultivation advice, picture of plant and nutritional breakdown.

    The PFAF database is accessible here:
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/plantsearch.aspx

    Edible plant list:
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/edibleuses.aspx

    Medicinal plant list:
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/MedicinalUses.aspx

    Hope this is helpful to someone.
    Kind Regards,
    Panopticon

    Sources:
    http://www.foodplantsinternational.com
    http://www.learngrow.org
    http://australianetwork.com/nexus/stories/s2160583.htm
    http://www.cmsvr.com/fmi/iwp/cgi?-db...ay&-loadframes
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/cmspage.aspx?pageid=9
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/cmspage.aspx?pageid=28
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/plantsearch.aspx
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/edibleuses.aspx
    http://www.pfaf.org/user/MedicinalUses.aspx
    "What we think, or what we know, or what we believe is, in the end, of little consequence.
    The only consequence is what we do."

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to panopticon For This Post:

    Hughe (27th April 2012)

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