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    Default That's Impossible - Episode 6 MIND CONTROL

    That's Impossible - Episode 06: Mind Control
    History Channel, Jon Alon Walz, Kevin Commins, John Ealer (director), Jonathan Frakes (narrator)



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=239U9...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nKX5...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBQXd...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2W7n...feature=relmfu

    NAMASTÉ

    PS - LET ME MAKE A WISH HERE... WAKE UP PEOPLE !!!

    http://rt.com/usa/news/texas-microch...-district-262/

    STUDENTS IN TEXAS TO BE MONITORED WITH MICROCHIPSt

    Published: 26 May, 2012, 02:07
    Students walk through campus between classes at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California April 4, 2012 (Reuters/Bret Hartman)

    Students walk through campus between classes at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California April 4, 2012 (Reuters/Bret Hartman)

    TAGS: Information Technology, USA, Education, Security

    If it’s good enough for a dog, it’s good enough for a kid, right? A school district in Texas will be watching over its students a lot more closely, but not with the aid of extra teachers. Instead each pupil will be monitored with microchips.

    Officials at the Northside Independent School District in rural Bexar County, Texas have approved a plan to track the whereabouts of each and every student by requiring them to walk the halls with identification cards in their pockets that are equipped with RFID microchips.

    By using Radio Frequency Identification System technology, teachers and faculty will be able to monitor the move of over 6,000 students at two select schools and every pupil with special needs throughout the district as soon as next semester. If the pilot program is a success, the district intends on expanding the tracking system to all of its 112 schools, totaling nearly 100,000 students.

    Backers of the program say the move is well intentioned and will actually bring the school millions of dollars in extra funding. Ghastly attendance rates in Bexar County currently keeps the district from earning around $175,000 a day in state assistance, reports KHOU News out of San Antonio, TX. Speaking to that city’s Express-News, district spokesman Pascual Gonzalez explains that the school wants “to harness the power of (the) technology to make schools safer, know where our students are all the time in a school, and increase revenue.”

    When each step of the students is being watched by administrators, the district expects to see their absentee count drop drastically. But is it worth the cost of killing the privacy of thousands?

    “It’s going to give us the opportunity to track our students in the building," Principal Wendy Reyes of Jones Middle School tells KHOU. “They may have been in the nurse’s office, or the counselor’s office, or vice principal’s office, but they were marked absent from the classroom because they weren't sitting in the class. It will help us have a more accurate account of our attendance.”

    It will also let teachers know who is in the bathroom and for how long and monitor the group habits of students. It could also become catastrophic, of course, if the very sensitive data ends up in the wrong hands. Similar programs were pitched elsewhere in recent years, but in other instances the American Civil Liberties Union stepped up to speak out; in many cases, the programs were shot down after the ACLU intervened.

    "We are urging the school board to recognize the important civil liberties concerns and safety risks implicated in RFID technology," the ACLU’s Nicole Ozer, the technology and civil Liberties policy director of their Northern California office, wrote in a statement back in 2005 . "RFID badges jeopardize the safety and security of children by broadcasting identity and location information to anyone with a chip reader and subject students to demeaning tracking of their movements. We hope the school district reconsiders this serious issue."

    In that case, the ACLU was opposed to a program at Brittan Elementary School Board in Sutter, California where youngsters were being tracked with RFID chips. Even though that kind of technology has become both more advanced and commonplace in the seven years since, it doesn’t change the concerns that continue to arise.

    "The monitoring of children with RFID tags is comparable to the tracking of cattle, shipment pallets, or very dangerous criminals in high-security prisons," Cédric Laurant of EPIC told the ACLU in 2005. "Compelling children to be constantly tracked with RFID-enabled identity badges breaches their right to privacy and dignity as human beings."

    But, hey — how else is the school going to raise a few grand?

    “I think this is overstepping our bounds and is inappropriate,” Northside school board trustee M'Lissa M. Chumbley tells other district officials this week. “I'm honestly uncomfortable about this.”

    Kirsten Bokenkamp of the ACLU tells the San Antonio Express-News that her organization is once again alarmed by Northside’s plans to implement the program. They are expected to challenge the board’s decision this time around too.
    Last edited by MariaDine; 28th May 2012 at 21:46.

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    Default Re: That's Impossible - Episode 6 MIND CONTROL

    http://news.discovery.com/tech/brain...ve-120421.html

    Brain Implant Helps Paralyzed Hand Move

    Analysis by Jesse Emspak
    Sat Apr 21, 2012 10:28 AM ET
    (1) Comments | Leave a Comment

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    Brain-monkey-no-captions-622

    The dream of true cybernetics -- merging man with machine -- just got a bit closer. Scientists at Northwestern University built a device that can send signals from the brain directly to paralyzed muscles, causing them to move by thought. This technology could help patients who have suffered spinal cord injuries regain the use of their limbs.

    The work was done in rhesus monkeys, who were given a local anesthetic to block nerve activity at the elbow, which caused temporary paralysis of the hand. Before they were given the anesthetic, though, the monkeys were trained to grasp a ball, lift it and release it into a tube. The signals from their brains to their hands and arms during these activities were recorded via an electrode implanted painlessly into their brains. After many repetitions, the researchers were able to see what kinds of signals were necessary to cause the the limbs to move. It turned out that the information was encoded in only about 100 neurons.
    coughing robot
    DNEWS VIDEO: MODERN MEDICINE AND TECH

    Knowing that, the scientists designed a device, called a multi-electrode array, that was able to pick up the tell-tale signals from the 100 or so neurons, decipher them, and send them to the muscles -- bypassing the anesthetized nerves.

    The signals that reached the muscles made them contract, enabling the monkeys to pick up the balls almost as well as they did before they were given the anesthetic.

    The motions weren't perfect. Lee E. Miller, a professor in neuroscience at Northwestern and the lead investigator of the study, said it might be because it takes some time for a monkey to learn how to use its arm again this way.

    Other research teams have enabled monkeys to take mental control of machines, and there has been some work done in humans on linking prostheses to neural signals. But the big advance here is better voluntary control and directly connecting to the brain. Previous efforts have been geared to interpreting signals through the skin at the end of an amputee's stump, for example, or controlling arms via shoulder movements. This type of interface provides voluntary movement more like that experienced naturally.

    via Northwestern University

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-nsc041712.php

    Public release date: 17-Apr-2012
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    Contact: David Eve
    celltransplantation@gmail.com
    Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair
    Neural stem cell transplants for spinal cord injury maximized by combined, complimentary therapies

    Tampa, Fla. (April. 17, 2012) – Combined, complimentary therapies have the ability to maximize the benefits of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation for spinal cord repair in rat models, according to a study carried out by a team of Korean researchers who published in a recent issue of Cell Transplantation (20:9), now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/.

    "When transplanted, neural stem cells have demonstrated their therapeutic potential to reverse complex pathological processes following spinal cord injury," said study corresponding author Dr. Byung G. Kim of the Ajou University School of Medicine's Brain Disease Research Center and Department of Neurology, Republic of Korea. "However, many obstacles cannot be overcome by NSC transplant alone."

    Their study demonstrated that a combination of treatment strategies - a polymer scaffold, neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and chondroitinase (an enzyme which helps digest the glial scar that formed after a spinal cord injury) - provided added therapeutic benefits to NSC transplantation. The implantation of a polymer scaffold designed to bridge lesion cavities, created a favorable tissue environment for nerve growth. Incorporating the NT3 gene into the transplanted cells improved cell survival and migration while the addition of chondroitinase positively affected neural activity between the scaffold and the spinal cord.

    "The poly (ε-caprolactone) [PCL] scaffold in our study appeared to function like a reservoir supplying migratory NSCs to the spinal cord," said Dr. Kim. "The NSCs grafted with the scaffolds survived the transplantation and migrated to the host spinal cord."

    The study included four animal groups, only one of which received the full combination of therapies. Rats in the full combination therapy group were found to have some restored neuroplasticity and enhanced remyelation of contralateral white matter. All four groups subsequently underwent functional testing for locomotor recovery.

    "Rats in the full combination group attained well-coordinated plantar stepping accompanied by improved ankle positioning and toe clearance and reduced paw placement errors," explained Dr. Kim. "Furthermore, animals with the full complement of combination strategies responded to transcranial magnetic stimulation."

    The researchers concluded that, given their success, similar treatment for humans should be carried out in a chronic injury setting.

    "We believe that our results have important clinical implications regarding the future design of NSC-based therapeutic strategies for human victims of traumatic spinal cord injury," concluded Dr. Kim and co-authors.

    "The use of multiple strategies to treat spinal cord injury, could prove to be more effective than any single treatment." Cell Transplantation section editor Dr. John Sladek, professor of neurology and pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "Changing the hostile environment post spinal cord injury by the use of scaffolds, neurotrophins and breakdown of the glial scar creates a favorable milieu for NSCs to be able to exert benefit".

    ###

    Contact: Dr. Byung G. Kim, Brain Disease Research Center, Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Neurology, Ajou University School of Medicine, San 5, Woncheon-Dong, Yeongtong-Gu, Suwon 443-721, Republic of Korea.
    Tel. 82-31-219-4495
    Fax. 82-31-219-4530
    Email kimbg@ajou.ac.kr

    Citation: Hwang, D. H.; Kim, H. M.; Kang, Y. M.; Joo, I. S.; Cho, C. S.; Yoon, B. W.; Kim, S. U.; Kim, B. G. Combination of multifaceted strategies to maximize the therapeutic benefits of neural stem cell transplantation for spinal cord repair. Cell Transplant. 20(9):1361-1379; 2011.

    The editorial offices for CELL TRANSPLANTATION are at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, College of Medicine, the University of South Florida and the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Contact, David Eve, PhD. at celltransplantation@gmail.com or Camillo Ricordi, MD at ricordi@miami.edu

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    Default Re: That's Impossible - Episode 6 MIND CONTROL

    LA CREME DE LA CREME !

    http://www.nhs.uk/news/2012/05may/Pa...paralysis.aspx

    'Nerve bypass' restores movement in man's paralysed arm

    Wednesday May 16 2012

    Nerve 'bypass' provides hope for spinal cord injury

    Revolutionary surgery has given a paralysed man the ability to move his arms and hands again, it has been widely reported. The surgery, which made global news, has shown that rewiring nerves may allow surgeons to restore basic arm and hand control after serious spinal cord injuries.

    A 71-year-old patient had been left paralysed from the neck down after the base of his neck was injured in a traffic accident. In a world first, surgeons were able to successfully bypass the injury site by grafting arm nerves from below the injury to nerves originating above the site of his injury. The surgery was given 23 months after his accident, and after several more months of therapy and training the man can handle objects, feed himself and even do basic writing.

    This success story is clearly of massive significance to the man involved but also provides a blueprint for other surgeons around the country for how this technique may be applied in similar situations.

    However, despite this fantastic success, it is important to bear in mind that this was an individual case, and it is not clear whether this technique will be equally successful in other patients with different types of spinal injuries or circumstances. The severity and location of the spinal cord injury are likely to be important factors in the success of this type of operation.


    Where did the story come from?

    The research was detailed in a report written by researchers from the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the Department of Neurological Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Missouri in the US. The case report was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Neurosurgery. The report did not specify any sources of funding for the research.

    This story received widespread media coverage and many papers reported on the restoration of function in a previously paralysed man. The coverage of the story was generally well balanced and reflected the case report accurately.


    What kind of research was this?

    This case report described a surgical technique designed to restore nerve function to the arms and hands of a 71-year-old man who had been injured in a road traffic incident and left paralysed. The patient had experienced severing of the spinal cord at the top of his spine, causing him to be paralysed below the site of his injury. This meant the paralysis affected his arms and hands, as the nerves that control the arms are situated below the site of his spinal cord damage.

    In this cutting-edge research surgeons created a 'nerve bypass' by grafting a working nerve originating in the spine above the injury site to the nerves in the lower arm originating below the injury site to restore some level of control lost following the injury.

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating for the individuals affected and their families. Recovery from a complete SCI is rare, leaving most patients with significant permanent disability affecting the area below the site of the SCI. Despite advances in understanding the processes that occur in short- and long-term SCI, corresponding advances in surgical techniques or applications to repair them have so far lagged behind.

    Case reports are often published that share interesting developments or new techniques in a particular medical field, in this case surgery. Case reports provide a detailed description of the background of a single person and the treatment they received, along with how effective the particular treatment course has been. They do not necessarily reflect what will be seen in all patients treated with the same techniques in the future, but still provide a good insight into new or experimental techniques.


    What did the research involve?

    The right-handed 71-year-old man presented to a surgical department 22 months after he was injured in a motor vehicle accident. He had sustained a spinal injury to the lower part of his neck, called the C7 vertebra. This caused extensive paralysis below the injury site. The strength and mobility of his limbs were extensively assessed to see if surgery might be able to help. Before surgery, he could flex his right wrist only weakly and could not pinch or grip with either hand. He could also not move his fingers on either hand.

    A month after his initial assessment, the patient had surgery on both arms in a bid to restore some of the function of his hands. This was based on the concept that a working nerve originating in the spine above the injury site could be grafted onto the nerves in the lower arm to restore some of the control lost after the injury. The 'nerve transfer' surgical technique involved taking a working nerve in the upper arm that originates from the C6 vertebral level (above the site of the injury), and joining it to the nerve system in the arm that originates from the C7 vertebra (the site of the injury).

    This 'nerve rewiring' allowed working nerves above the spinal injury site to artificially connect with nerves below the injury site, which were previously unable to receive a signal due to the injury. Nerve transfer for spinal injuries is not new, but its application has so far been relatively limited.

    After the surgery, the patient received continued hand physiotherapy to aid recovery and rehabilitation of the wasted hand muscles due to the injury.


    What were the basic results?

    During the operation, the surgeons stimulated the newly rewired nerves to check they were working and found that the nerve responses were essentially normal for the rewired nerves feeding the hand.

    Eight months after the operation, the patient was able to move his left thumb and perform a pinching motion with his fingers and thumb in his left hand. The same increase in movement was achieved in the right hand after 10 months.

    The authors report that he can now use his right hand to perform simple 'hand to mouth movements', and with his left hand he can feed himself and perform rudimentary writing activities. Recovery in the right hand has been slower than in the left.

    Videos made available by the study group show that the man is now able to handle a ball with both hands, touch his fingers against his thumb in a pinching motion and feed himself. These were all activities he could not do before the surgery.


    How did the researchers interpret the results?

    The researchers said that, to their knowledge, this is the first reported case of restored nerve control of the thumb and finger flexing movement after a spinal cord injury.

    They also said the patient’s 'function has improved significantly with his ability to feed himself'.


    Conclusion

    This case report represents the positive experience of a paralysed 71-year-old man who has been granted some manual control after a serious spinal injury to his neck. Before surgery, he could only make minimal arm movements controlled by the nerves above his injury site, but no lifting or fine hand movements as they are controlled by nerves joined lower down the spine, below the site of his injury.

    While the nerve transfer technique given to this patient is not new, its application is not widespread and the authors say this is the first time it has been used to successfully rewire the nerves supplying a hand. Furthermore, these gains occurred after surgery that was carried out 23 months after the injury was sustained. This suggests that surgery does not have to be performed immediately, and that it may be possible to carry out the technique in people who have been paralysed for some time.

    In addition to the hugely significant benefits to the man involved, this success story has also created a blueprint for other surgeons around the country for how this technique may be applied in similar cases.

    However, it is important to bear in mind the limitations of the surgery and the evidence of its effectiveness. This case report represents the experience of just one individual. Therefore, it is not clear whether this technique will be equally successful in other patients with different types of injuries or circumstances. The severity and location of the spinal cord injury are likely to be important in determining the relative success of this type of operation. Also, the level of strength and control achieved in this case did not appear to represent a complete restoration of arm function, although it was clearly still a massive improvement.



    Mackinnon SE, Yee A, Ray WZ. Nerve transfers for the restoration of hand function after spinal cord injury. Journal of Neurosurgery, Published online May 15 2012.


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    Default Re: That's Impossible - Episode 6 MIND CONTROL

    http://www.spinalalignment.com/wp-co...7/02/brain.gif

    PLEASE PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THIS ARTICLE - ABOUT OUR BRAIN MEMORY CENTER

    http://electromagnetichealth.org/ele...mice-proteome/

    Greek Researchers Show Crucial Regions of the Brain Related to Learning, Memory, Alzheimer’s Impacted by Whole Body EMF Exposure in Animals

    25.01.2012 by emily Category Electromagnetic Health Blog

    A Greek scientific study led by Adamantia Fragopoulou and Lukas Margaritis has demonstrated important protein changes in the brain of animals following whole body exposure to RF electromagnetic fields, similar to the kind of microwave radiation emitted from cell phones, portable phones, WiFi and wireless computer equipment. The study, “Brain proteome response following whole body exposure of mice to mobile phone or wireless DECT base radiation”, was published in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, Early Online: 1–25, 2012 (See Abstract, below).

    Important regions of the brain necessary for learning, memory and other functions of the mammalian brain were impacted by the microwave radiation, including the hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal lobe, at exposures below the ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) safety guidelines. A total of 143 proteins in the brain were impacted by the RF radiation over a period of 8 months, providing new evidence for a potential relationship between everyday cell phone use, wireless transmitters and wireless computer equipment and electrosensitivity symptoms, such as headaches, dizziness and sleep disorders, as well as with tumors, Alzheimer’s and even metabolic effects.

    The study simulated 3 hours of cell phone exposure over eight months, 8 hours of DECT portable phone exposure over eight months, and included a sham exposure control group. The results showed both down regulation and up regulation of the proteins.



    Several neural function related proteins (i.e. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), Alpha-synuclein, Glia Maturation Factor beta (GMF), and apolipoprotein E (apoE)), heat shock proteins, and cytoskeletal proteins (i.e. neurofilaments and tropomodulin), were shown to be impacted by the radiation, as well as proteins of the brain metabolism (i.e. Aspartate aminotransferase, Glutamate dehydrogenase), in nearly all of the brain regions studied.

    Figure 2 from the study shows the 143 proteins that have changed (up- or down-regulated) and their functional relationship based on a literature survey.



    Adamantia F. Fragopoulou, M.Sc., PhD Candidate, in the Dept of Cell Biology and Biophysics at University of Athens, Greece, lead author of the study, says,

    “Our study is important because it shows for the first time protein changes in the mouse brain after EMF exposure and in particular in very crucial regions like hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal lobe, all involved in learning, memory and other complicated functions of the mammalian brain. We have demonstrated that 143 proteins are altered after electromagnetic radiation, including proteins that have been correlated so far with Alzheimer’s, glioblastoma, stress and metabolism. In its perspective, this study is anticipated to throw light in the understanding of such health effects like headaches, dizziness, sleep disorders, memory disorders, brain tumors, all of them related, to the function of the altered brain proteins.

    “Until now there is limited evidence relating EMFs with the impact on specific brain proteins. Further analysis of the affected proteins as well as replicating the experiment under similar conditions (data presently under analysis) is expected to offer new insights explaining the overall effects.”

    Lukas H. Margaritis, PhD, Professor Emeritus (as of Sept 2010) of Cell Biology and Radiobiology, Dept of Cell Biology and Biophysics, University of Athens, head of the Athens research group, says,

    “A high throughput approach (mass characterization of biomolecules, similar to microarrays that analyze the total genes of an organism) as that of the Proteomics* has never been used so far in EMF research of BRAIN TISSUES following whole body exposure of model animals (mice) at SAR values below ICNIRP’s recommendations. It is also the first time that wireless DECT phones base radiation is involved in lab animal studies and specifically in such molecular effects. The message taken out of this work is that people should be very cautious when using mobile phones next to their body (especially next to their brain), whereas the wireless DECT should be located as far away as possible from places that people use to spend many hours a day, not to mention children of all ages.”

    * Proteomics is the study of the structure and function of proteins. Proteins are the primary components of the physiological metabolic pathways of all cells. They influence the functioning of all bodily systems, such as the immune system, endocrine system, neurological system (including cognitive function), respiratory system, etc. Malfunction in protein integrity has been linked to hereditary diseases, nervous system disorders, diabetes, to name just a few cases. Proteins are responsible for energy production and information transfer, in fact modern CELL BIOLOGY considers that there is no single cellular function that is not mediated by proteins.

    The study by Fragopoulou et al. suggests immediate follow up on these findings are warranted, as changes in molecular effects in the brain can raise questions about what the effects would be on the brain after much longer durations of exposure to RF radiation, as is common today from frequent cell phone use and wireless exposures, as well as the effect of cumulative exposures on the brain and mental functioning; immune system defects; fatigue; chronic sleep disorders; and effects on fetuses and sperm quality. The research extends our understanding from the Volkow et al. study (JAMA. 2011;305(8):808-813. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.186), which demonstrated impacts of cell phone radiation exposure on brain glucose metabolism, without understanding the mechanisms of action. The Fragopoulou et al. study presents a plausible theory why glucose metabolism in the brain may become altered, possibly through an oxidative stress effect.

    Special Concern for Children

    Regarding the implications of the Greek findings for the learning capability of children in formative years, the authors say,

    “The evidence for disregulation of proteins in the brain from whole body exposure to RF/MW radiation, such as the radiation emitted by cell phones, portable phones, wireless devices or ambient RF/MW from cell towers, whether proteins are upregulated or downregulated, is of great concern for its impact on children’s capacity to learn. “

    When considered together with other studies published by the University of Athens team (Fragopoulou et al., 2010, on spatial memory disorder, and Ntzouni et al., 2011 on recognition memory disorders, the authors say, “This proteome study implies that mobile phone radiation exposure at a normal intensity (and even below ICNIRP’s guidelines) is capable of detuning learning/memory functions and possibly other brain functions important in person-to-person communication and understanding. The impacts on society are unpredictable as EMFs are not a drug that is delivered to specific body parts or functions. EMFs can attack through oxidative stress every single cell that receives enough energy at non-thermal levels. The potential consequences for learning, memory and interpersonal relations, at the very least, need society’s immediate attention, given the widespread exposure to microwave radiation across the globe.”

    People exposed to microwave radiation from cell phones, wireless networks and citywide Wi-Fi have long complained of cognitive difficulties ranging from attention problems, difficulty focusing, poor memory, visual and hearing disruptions, headaches, dizziness, depression and foggy thinking. The Fragopoulou et al. study deepens scientists’ understanding of the mechanisms of action of microwave radiation’s effect on the brain, and on mental functioning, due to changes in proteins and in protein functioning .

    Dr. Martin Blank, Associate Professor, Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University, and Past President of the Bioelectromagnetics Society, says,

    “The paper by Goodman and Henderson (1987) showed that short-term (minutes) exposure to EMF will stimulate protein synthesis, and Fragopoulou et al. now show that this can lead to important changes in brain composition and function. Such changes may account for symptoms like insomnia, nervousness, fatigue, headaches, etc. that people report after exposure to cell phones and other wireless technologies. The biological verdict became obvious when Goodman and Blank (1994) showed that cells react to EMF as potentially harmful by activating the cellular stress response. There is no question that we should limit our exposure to EMF to help protect our brains and all cells in the body.”

    Studies Showing RF Effects Below Safety Guidelines

    A growing body of research clearly shows health effects from microwave radiation at non-thermal levels of exposure, and effects at exposures far lower than international safety guidelines. One review of the literature, by Carlos Sosa, MD of Columbia, South America, found biological effects from non-thermal levels of EMF exposure at exposure levels well below international safety guidelines in several respects:



    The UK charity MobileWise recently published “Mobile phone health risks: the case for action to protect children” in November 2011, summarizing and listing more than 200 peer-reviewed studies from a range of international research institutions linking mobile phones at non-thermal exposures to serious biological and health consequences.

    A Russian team of researchers also has recently released a study published in Radiation Biology, Radiation Ecology 2011. Volume 51, No.5, p 611-623 showing significant long-term (4 years) cognitive decline in children (ages 7-12) in users of mobile devices compared to controls, once again demonstrating exposure guidelines are inadequate. Lead author of the study, Professor Yury Grigoriev, Chairman of Russian National Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and a member of the WHO’s International Advisory Committee on “EMF and Health”, says,

    “Our recent 4-year monitoring of effects from cell phone radiation on children, published in Radiation Biology. Radiation Ecology (Volume 51, No.5, 2011), demonstrates an increase in phonemic perception disorders, abatement of efficiency, reduced indicators for the arbitrary and semantic memory and increased fatigue. Over the four-year monitoring of 196 children ages 7-12 who were users of mobile communication devices, a steady decline in these parameters from high values to bottom standards compared to controls, was observed. The short-term and long-term potential consequences for society from exposing children to microwave radiation from cellular communication devices must be immediately acknowledged, globally, and responsibly addressed.”

    A history of exposure standard setting in the telecommunications industry, The Procrustean Approach , by Don Maisch, PhD of EMF Facts in Australia, describes ‘the manipulation of telecommunications standards by political, military, and industrial vested interests at the expense of public health protection.’

    The Seletun Scientific Statement, a statement by international scientists in February 2011 (watch video), called for reduction EMF exposures globally to reflect the known biological effects at radiation exposures far lower than international guidelines in order to protect the public health and the health of future generations.

    The recent Fragopoulou et al. research adds to the body of science demonstrating we are changing and disregulating biological functioning in the brain with the unchecked proliferation of RF electromagnetic fields from telecommunication and utility technologies. These effects are occurring at exposures below safety guidelines and the safety guidelines urgently need to be changed to protect public health.



    __________________________________________________ _______



    PRESS RELEASE RELEASED BY UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS TEAM

    Athens, Greece. January 21, 2012. The research group of Professor Lukas Margaritis (Faculty of Biology, University of Athens and the Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens), within the framework of the activities seeking for the truth underlining the possible effects of daily life electromagnetic fields, has performed this study as part of the Doctorate Dissertation of Adamantia F. Fragopoulou.

    Using ordinary working conditions of mobile phone and wireless DECT base and by applying state of the art proteome science approaches, they demonstrated that a large number of major brain proteins have been changed. Namely proteins that are responsible for the integrity of brain functions, in such critical regions like hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal lobe are below normal levels whereas an equally large number are found well above physiological levels. These “underexpressed” or “overexpressed” proteins may play a role in the short term or long term effects reported as a consequence of mobile phone exposure, including memory deficits, headaches, sleep disorders, brain tumors.

    As pointed out in the “DISCUSSION” section of the paper, the possible start-up events may involve the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species) leading to oxidative damage (as suggested recently by Blank and Goodman of Columbia University in New York City); heat shock protein activation; and finally, changing the expression of a large number of brain proteins, as was demonstrated in this study.

    The Fragopoulou et al. study is the first large-scale analysis of the mouse brain proteome to be published so far. The research team having recently been awarded a large “Thalis” grant is potentially aiming in elucidating the EMF effects from the molecular level up to the organism level, exploiting the most suitable model systems (mice, insects, nematodes, lizards, cell cultures, human skin).

    Published in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, Early Online: 1–25, 2012 Copyright Q Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

    Abstract:

    Brain proteome response following whole body exposure of mice to mobile phone or wireless DECT base radiation
    Adamantia F. Fragopoulou1, Athina Samara2, Marianna H. Antonelou1, Anta Xanthopoulou3, Aggeliki Papadopoulou3, Konstantinos Vougas3, Eugenia Koutsogiannopoulou2, Ema Anastasiadou2, Dimitrios J. Stravopodis1, George Th. Tsangaris3 & Lukas H. Margaritis1
    1Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Athens University, Athens, Greece, 2Genetics and Gene Therapy Division, Center of Basic Research II, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece, and 3Proteomics Research Unit, Center of Basic Research II, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of two sources of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the proteome of cerebellum, hippocampus, and frontal lobe in Balb/c mice following long-term whole body irradiation. Three equally divided groups of animals (6 animals/group) were used; the first group was exposed to a typical mobile phone, at a SAR level range of 0.17– 0.37 W/kg for 3 h daily for 8 months, the second group was exposed to a wireless DECT base (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications/Telephone) at a SAR level range of 0.012– 0.028 W/kg for 8 h/day also for 8 months and the third group comprised the sham-exposed animals. Comparative proteomics analysis revealed that long-term irradiation from both EMF sources altered significantly (p , 0.05) the expression of 143 proteins in total (as low as 0.003 fold downregulation up to 114 fold overexpression). Several neural function related proteins (i.e., Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), Alpha-synuclein, Glia Maturation Factor beta (GMF), and apolipoprotein E (apoE)), heat shock proteins, and cytoskeletal proteins (i.e., Neurofilaments and tropomodulin) are included in this list as well as proteins of the brain metabolism (i.e., Aspartate aminotransferase, Glutamate dehydrogenase) to nearly all brain regions studied. Western blot analysis on selected proteins confirmed the proteomics data. The observed protein expression changes may be related to brain plasticity alterations, indicative of oxidative stress in the nervous system or involved in apoptosis and might potentially explain human health hazards reported so far, such as headaches, sleep disturbance, fatigue, memory deficits, and brain tumor long-term induction under similar exposure conditions..

    Media may request a copy of the study from Adamantia Fragopoulou, Lukas Margaritis, Corresponding Authors, at madofrag@biol.uoa.gr, lmargar@biol.uoa.gr

    Electromagnetic Biology Lab
    Dept of Cell Biology and Biophysics
    University of Athens

    http://kyttariki.biol.uoa.gr/EMR_GROUP_GR.htm (greek version)

    http://kyttariki.biol.uoa.gr/emr_group.htm (english version)

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  9. Link to Post #5
    Portugal Avalon Retired Member
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    Default Re: That's Impossible - Episode 6 MIND CONTROL

    CHECK THE LATEST NEWS ABOUT MIND CONTROL TODAY

    http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...972#post496972

  10. Link to Post #6
    Avalon Member Flash's Avatar
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    Default Re: That's Impossible - Episode 6 MIND CONTROL

    Quote Posted by MariaDine (here)
    That's Impossible - Episode 06: Mind Control
    History Channel, Jon Alon Walz, Kevin Commins, John Ealer (director), Jonathan Frakes (narrator)



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=239U9...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nKX5...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBQXd...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2W7n...feature=relmfu

    NAMASTÉ

    PS - LET ME MAKE A WISH HERE... WAKE UP PEOPLE !!!

    http://rt.com/usa/news/texas-microch...-district-262/

    STUDENTS IN TEXAS TO BE MONITORED WITH MICROCHIPSt

    Published: 26 May, 2012, 02:07
    Students walk through campus between classes at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California April 4, 2012 (Reuters/Bret Hartman)

    Students walk through campus between classes at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California April 4, 2012 (Reuters/Bret Hartman)

    TAGS: Information Technology, USA, Education, Security

    If it’s good enough for a dog, it’s good enough for a kid, right? A school district in Texas will be watching over its students a lot more closely, but not with the aid of extra teachers. Instead each pupil will be monitored with microchips.

    Officials at the Northside Independent School District in rural Bexar County, Texas have approved a plan to track the whereabouts of each and every student by requiring them to walk the halls with identification cards in their pockets that are equipped with RFID microchips.

    By using Radio Frequency Identification System technology, teachers and faculty will be able to monitor the move of over 6,000 students at two select schools and every pupil with special needs throughout the district as soon as next semester. If the pilot program is a success, the district intends on expanding the tracking system to all of its 112 schools, totaling nearly 100,000 students.

    Backers of the program say the move is well intentioned and will actually bring the school millions of dollars in extra funding. Ghastly attendance rates in Bexar County currently keeps the district from earning around $175,000 a day in state assistance, reports KHOU News out of San Antonio, TX. Speaking to that city’s Express-News, district spokesman Pascual Gonzalez explains that the school wants “to harness the power of (the) technology to make schools safer, know where our students are all the time in a school, and increase revenue.”

    When each step of the students is being watched by administrators, the district expects to see their absentee count drop drastically. But is it worth the cost of killing the privacy of thousands?

    “It’s going to give us the opportunity to track our students in the building," Principal Wendy Reyes of Jones Middle School tells KHOU. “They may have been in the nurse’s office, or the counselor’s office, or vice principal’s office, but they were marked absent from the classroom because they weren't sitting in the class. It will help us have a more accurate account of our attendance.”

    It will also let teachers know who is in the bathroom and for how long and monitor the group habits of students. It could also become catastrophic, of course, if the very sensitive data ends up in the wrong hands. Similar programs were pitched elsewhere in recent years, but in other instances the American Civil Liberties Union stepped up to speak out; in many cases, the programs were shot down after the ACLU intervened.

    "We are urging the school board to recognize the important civil liberties concerns and safety risks implicated in RFID technology," the ACLU’s Nicole Ozer, the technology and civil Liberties policy director of their Northern California office, wrote in a statement back in 2005 . "RFID badges jeopardize the safety and security of children by broadcasting identity and location information to anyone with a chip reader and subject students to demeaning tracking of their movements. We hope the school district reconsiders this serious issue."

    In that case, the ACLU was opposed to a program at Brittan Elementary School Board in Sutter, California where youngsters were being tracked with RFID chips. Even though that kind of technology has become both more advanced and commonplace in the seven years since, it doesn’t change the concerns that continue to arise.

    "The monitoring of children with RFID tags is comparable to the tracking of cattle, shipment pallets, or very dangerous criminals in high-security prisons," Cédric Laurant of EPIC told the ACLU in 2005. "Compelling children to be constantly tracked with RFID-enabled identity badges breaches their right to privacy and dignity as human beings."

    But, hey — how else is the school going to raise a few grand?

    “I think this is overstepping our bounds and is inappropriate,” Northside school board trustee M'Lissa M. Chumbley tells other district officials this week. “I'm honestly uncomfortable about this.”

    Kirsten Bokenkamp of the ACLU tells the San Antonio Express-News that her organization is once again alarmed by Northside’s plans to implement the program. They are expected to challenge the board’s decision this time around too.
    school is now a jail for all these student. Knowing how long you are in the toilet...... this is jail like no doubts. (I can imagine my daughter not wanting to put make up on because of the time it takes on the days she has to change her napkins as well...)

  11. Link to Post #7
    Avalon Member Sidney's Avatar
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    Default Re: That's Impossible - Episode 6 MIND CONTROL

    Quote Posted by MariaDine (here)
    That's Impossible - Episode 06: Mind Control
    History Channel, Jon Alon Walz, Kevin Commins, John Ealer (director), Jonathan Frakes (narrator)



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=239U9...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nKX5...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBQXd...feature=relmfu

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2W7n...feature=relmfu

    NAMASTÉ

    PS - LET ME MAKE A WISH HERE... WAKE UP PEOPLE !!!

    http://rt.com/usa/news/texas-microch...-district-262/

    STUDENTS IN TEXAS TO BE MONITORED WITH MICROCHIPSt

    Published: 26 May, 2012, 02:07
    Students walk through campus between classes at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California April 4, 2012 (Reuters/Bret Hartman)

    Students walk through campus between classes at Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, California April 4, 2012 (Reuters/Bret Hartman)

    TAGS: Information Technology, USA, Education, Security

    If it’s good enough for a dog, it’s good enough for a kid, right? A school district in Texas will be watching over its students a lot more closely, but not with the aid of extra teachers. Instead each pupil will be monitored with microchips.

    Officials at the Northside Independent School District in rural Bexar County, Texas have approved a plan to track the whereabouts of each and every student by requiring them to walk the halls with identification cards in their pockets that are equipped with RFID microchips.

    By using Radio Frequency Identification System technology, teachers and faculty will be able to monitor the move of over 6,000 students at two select schools and every pupil with special needs throughout the district as soon as next semester. If the pilot program is a success, the district intends on expanding the tracking system to all of its 112 schools, totaling nearly 100,000 students.

    Backers of the program say the move is well intentioned and will actually bring the school millions of dollars in extra funding. Ghastly attendance rates in Bexar County currently keeps the district from earning around $175,000 a day in state assistance, reports KHOU News out of San Antonio, TX. Speaking to that city’s Express-News, district spokesman Pascual Gonzalez explains that the school wants “to harness the power of (the) technology to make schools safer, know where our students are all the time in a school, and increase revenue.”

    When each step of the students is being watched by administrators, the district expects to see their absentee count drop drastically. But is it worth the cost of killing the privacy of thousands?

    “It’s going to give us the opportunity to track our students in the building," Principal Wendy Reyes of Jones Middle School tells KHOU. “They may have been in the nurse’s office, or the counselor’s office, or vice principal’s office, but they were marked absent from the classroom because they weren't sitting in the class. It will help us have a more accurate account of our attendance.”

    It will also let teachers know who is in the bathroom and for how long and monitor the group habits of students. It could also become catastrophic, of course, if the very sensitive data ends up in the wrong hands. Similar programs were pitched elsewhere in recent years, but in other instances the American Civil Liberties Union stepped up to speak out; in many cases, the programs were shot down after the ACLU intervened.

    "We are urging the school board to recognize the important civil liberties concerns and safety risks implicated in RFID technology," the ACLU’s Nicole Ozer, the technology and civil Liberties policy director of their Northern California office, wrote in a statement back in 2005 . "RFID badges jeopardize the safety and security of children by broadcasting identity and location information to anyone with a chip reader and subject students to demeaning tracking of their movements. We hope the school district reconsiders this serious issue."

    In that case, the ACLU was opposed to a program at Brittan Elementary School Board in Sutter, California where youngsters were being tracked with RFID chips. Even though that kind of technology has become both more advanced and commonplace in the seven years since, it doesn’t change the concerns that continue to arise.

    "The monitoring of children with RFID tags is comparable to the tracking of cattle, shipment pallets, or very dangerous criminals in high-security prisons," Cédric Laurant of EPIC told the ACLU in 2005. "Compelling children to be constantly tracked with RFID-enabled identity badges breaches their right to privacy and dignity as human beings."

    But, hey — how else is the school going to raise a few grand?

    “I think this is overstepping our bounds and is inappropriate,” Northside school board trustee M'Lissa M. Chumbley tells other district officials this week. “I'm honestly uncomfortable about this.”

    Kirsten Bokenkamp of the ACLU tells the San Antonio Express-News that her organization is once again alarmed by Northside’s plans to implement the program. They are expected to challenge the board’s decision this time around too.

    As I understand, there could be benefits to this, like anything else it can be abused, etc. kids could be card swapping, etc. Not a guarantee. SO........

    Again, PROBLEM REACTION SOLUTION = AGENDA

    "Problem" Take all the funding away from schools, make them desperate.------------- "REACTION" Non funded schools don't have enough programs for kids, educational or other, resulting in mis-behavior ,drug use, SKIPPING etc. ------------" SOLUTION" Offer schools funding IF IF IF they are willing to implement a new "system". AGENDA now launched and in motion. Next it will be nationwide, then it will be injectable chips.


    This is sick.

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