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Thread: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

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    United States Avalon Member Dennis Leahy's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Quote Posted by TargeT (here)
    Quote Posted by Dennis Leahy (here)
    Is Antarctica "freezing?" Really?
    Dennis
    read just a couple posts up on this topic:

    Biased articles can be VERY misleading, this post (a few up from here) helps point this out
    Agreed, it is extremely rare to find a "definitive" article, looking carefully at all sides of any issue simultaneously, and providing unassailable conclusions.

    Because so many of us at Avalon (myself included) are heavily influenced by the conspiratorial or suppressed/hidden information paradigm, I suspect we tend to nearly instinctively debunk ANY information coming out of any agency. It is hard not to - many or most of these agencies/organizations are monetarily biased. Because the imposition of a carbon tax would do absolutely nothing to alleviate CO2 emissions, and is an obvious scam to anyone with even one eye open, we see the bad guys using climate to make a buck (or a few trillion.) That doesn't mean that anthropocentric climate change is not real - and that is the heart of the debate.

    Here's another article, discussing the East Antarctic Ice Sheet: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-355

    Dennis


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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Quote Posted by Dennis Leahy (here)
    That doesn't mean that anthropocentric climate change is not real - and that is the heart of the debate.
    Dennis
    There certainly is some anthropomorphic influence.

    however, what is it, how much, how little?

    this video lays out the situation very clearly:

    Quote Randall Carlson is a master builder and architectural designer, teacher, geometrician, geomythologist, geological explorer and renegade scholar.


    This debate should be taken in a million+ year context; not a few hundred years as the anthropocentric slant does.


    I'm sure it is just as clear to me that the anthropomorphic influence is small as it is clear to you that it is central to the issue; what we base these ideas on does seem to be important; due diligence and sourcing for all!
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    New paper finds Ross Sea ice in Antarctica has increased 5% since 1993


    The Hockey Schtick
    Tue, 27 May 2014 00:00 CDT




    A new paper published in Geophysical Research Letters reconstructs sea-ice area in the Ross Sea, Antarctica from a 130 year coastal ice-core record. The authors find the "data show prevailing stable SIA from the 1880s until the 1950s, a 2 - 5% reduction from the mid-1950s to the early-1990s, and a 5% increase after 1993."

    Thus, the overall trend in the Ross Sea, Antarctica over the past 130 years would be stable to increasing.
    Kate E. Sinclair et al

    We present the first proxy record of sea-ice area (SIA) in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, from a 130 year coastal ice-core record. High-resolution deuterium excess data show prevailing stable SIA from the 1880s until the 1950s, a 2 - 5% reduction from the mid-1950s to the early-1990s, and a 5% increase after 1993. Additional support for this reconstruction is derived from ice-core methanesulphonic acid concentrations and whaling records. While SIA has continued to decline around much of the West Antarctic coastline since the 1950s, concurrent with increasing air and ocean temperatures, the underlying trend is masked in the Ross Sea by a switch to positive SIA anomalies since the early-1990s. This increase is associated with a strengthening of southerly winds and the enhanced northward advection of sea ice.
    Twentieth century sea-ice trends in the Ross Sea from a high-resolution, coastal ice-core record

    SOTT-Comment:
    It's not just Antarctica bucking the trend, but the whole globe. In the last 17 years there has been no 'global warming'. As IPCC lead author Kevin Trenberth said: "The fact is that we can't account for the lack of warming at the moment, and it is a travesty that we can't."

    Yes, it is a travesty! Climate models are only as good as the assumptions they're based on. The authors of climate papers are trained to frame everything in terms of one factor: a carbon dioxide increase they attribute to human activity, which obscures awareness of being part of a much larger system that surely has multiple influences acting on the planet's complex climate.

    Antarctica, is it melting or not? Man-made global warming can't explain this climate paradox
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?


    Lake Superior, 25 May 2014: Heatwave on Ice!
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Volcanoes melting Antarctic glaciers from below

    By Robert On June 10, 2014 ·

    Dive below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and you’ll find fire as well as ice, says this article by Stephanie Pappas.


    The edge of the Thwaites glacier – NASA photo by Jim Yungel

    “A new study finds that subglacial volcanoes and other geothermal “hotspots” are contributing to the melting of Thwaites Glacier, a major river of ice that flows into Antarctica’s Pine Island Bay,” says Pappas.

    “Areas of the glacier that sit near geologic features thought to be volcanic are melting faster than regions farther away from hotspots, said Dustin Schroeder, the study’s lead author and a geophysicist at the University of Texas.”

    “This melting could significantly affect ice loss in the West Antarctic, an area that is losing ice quickly.”

    Using radar data from satellites in orbit, the researchers found subglacial streams flowing beneath the Thwaites Glacier that were too full to be explained by flow from upstream. This indicated unusually high melt, said Schroeder.

    When the researchers checked out the subglacial geology in the region, they found that fast-melting spots were disproportionately clustered near confirmed West Antarctic volcanoes, suspected volcanoes or other presumed hotspots.

    Geothermal heat - not climate change! - is melting the glacier from below.

    The minimum average heat flow beneath Thwaites Glacier is almost double the average of the rest of the continents, the researchers found. In some areas, average heat flow is more than triple the average. They found these sources are distributed over a wider area and are much hotter than previously assumed.

    The extra melt caused by subglacial volcanoes could hasten the ice sheet’s flow toward the sea, Schroeder said.

    Researchers have long known that volcanoes lurk under the ice of West Antarctica, because it is a seismically active region where East and West Antarctica are rifting apart, says Pappas. “In 2013, a team of scientists even found a new volcano beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.” (Rifting is associated with the movement of magma and volcanic activity.)

    The findings “show that the glacier sits on something more like a multi-burner stovetop with burners putting out heat at different levels at different locations,” says phys.org/news.

    Schroeder and his colleagues at the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin (UTIG) plan to expand their study to other glaciers in the region.
    Note: I’m really encouraged to learn about this study. Now I wish we could see more studies about how underwater volcanoes heat the seas. I’ve been harping about them for years. In fact, there’s an entire chapter about the unacknowledged importance of underwater volcanoes (entitled “Fish Stew”) in Not by Fire but by Ice.
    http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014/...rs-from-below/

    Geothermal heat – not climate change! – is melting the glacier from below:
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/06/0...-heat-effects/

    http://www.lunaticoutpost.com/Topic-...arctic-glacier

    http://phys.org/news/2014-06-major-w...ermal.html#jCp
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Coldest Antarctic June Ever Recorded

    Posted on July 12, 2014 by Anthony Watts

    Story submitted by Eric Worrall
    Antarctica continues to defy the global warming script, with a report from Météo France, that June this year was the coldest Antarctic June ever recorded, at the French Antarctic Dumont d’Urville Station.

    La base Dumont d'Urville @ Météo-France / O. Traullé

    According to the press release, during June this year, the average temperature was -22.4c (-8.3F), 6.6c (11.9F) lower than normal. This is the coldest June ever recorded at the station, and almost the coldest monthly average ever – only September 1953 was colder, with a recorded average temperature of -23.5c (-10.3F).

    June this year also broke the June daily minimum temperature record, with a new record low of -34.9c (-30.8F).

    Other unusual features of the June temperature record are an unusual excess of sunlight hours (11.8 hours rather than the normal 7.4 hours), and unusually light wind conditions.

    Dumont d’Urville Station has experienced ongoing activity since 1956. According to the Météo France record, there is no other weather station for 1000km in any direction.

    http://www.meteofrance.fr/web/compre...icleId=8990197
    h/t IceAgeNow
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Yesterday, the Huffington Post had up an article and map showing the weakening of the electromagnetic field in North America while the simultaneously increasing over India. It did not stay long and was taken down. Knowing how the PTB work, I would say that was fair warning. Looking at studies of the 400,000+ ice core studies. The earth has flipped several times in that period. One of the things the article said was while a flip was possible it could take between a 100 and a 1000 years. Anybody who believes that is smoking something.

    My thinking goes with Terrence McKenna's and I think this is a strong possibility. In Geologic time 1 week or a century is almost the same. So 2012 may have been the idyllic time projection, and we may have been given time but..... I read a diary today from a woman dying of cancer. When she was told she asked for 4 yers to settle in effect her bucket list. End of story, she got the four years but did none of it. The diary is about coming to peace with that. I have felt terribly sad since reading it.

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Freak summer blizzard and hail hit Siberia, Urals – Video

    By Robert On July 13, 2014 · 1 Comment


    Exchanging swimsuits for snow boots.
    Heavy rain in the town of Zlatoust in Russia’s South Urals on Sunday, July 12, suddenly gave way to a blizzard.

    “It wasn’t just rain and snow, but real snowfall with snowflakes as white as during winter,” ITAR-TASS quotes an eyewitness, Valery Semyannikov, as saying.

    Snowdrifts piled up on the roads as the abnormal summer snowstorm hit the region. Siberia also witnessed a downpour of giant hailstones.


    Similarly on Saturday, residents of Chelyabinsk and Sverdlovsk, in Russia’s eastern Ural region, were taken aback when it suddenly started snowing … in the middle of summer. Photos and videos on social networks show snow-covered green grass in the middle of July.

    Hail the size of golf balls in Novosibirsk
    Also on Saturday, the eastern Siberian city of Novosibirsk witnessed an unusual downpour of hailstones. Local media reported some to be the size of golf balls or hen eggs.

    A video on YouTube shows the usual summer scenes of beachgoers enjoying themselves while swimming, sunbathing, and playing games.

    A few seconds later, the weather suddenly changes – strong winds start blowing and tearing of branches off nearby trees. The sky goes dark and freakishly large balls of hail start shooting from the sky.

    The beach was covered with a white sheet of hail just one minute after the storm started.

    A scared female voice can be heard saying “If we die, I love you.

    In some parts of Siberia, summer temperatures are similar to the Mediterranean.
    Local media reported snowdrifts along roads, adding that the temperature dropped from over 20C (68F) to almost zero on Saturday.

    http://rt.com/news/172468-freaky-snow-urals-siberia/

    Shows photo of a bride -in her white gown – traipsing through the snow:
    http://voiceofrussia.com/news/2014_0...d-summer-1564/

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/we...ach-goers.html

    In Polish:
    http://wiadomosci.onet.pl/swiat/grad...sybirsku/81ve6

    In Russian:
    http://www.newsru.com/russia/13jul2014/leto.html

    Thanks to Georg Schmidt Weymans, Adoni, Cooper, Craig Adkins and R.A. for these links
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    I hope I'm not too off topic here but I hear that the Atlantic is growing and the Pacific is shrinking.

    What does this mean?

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Quote Posted by Daughter of Time (here)
    I hope I'm not too off topic here but I hear that the Atlantic is growing and the Pacific is shrinking.

    What does this mean?
    Not sure what it's all about without links or references but, at first "think" it seems it would have to do with plate tectonics, subduction zones and rate of accretion at Mid Oceanic Ridges since the Atlantic Ocean is not surrounded by subduction zones and accompanying volcanism as the Pacific Ocean is (Ring of Fire).

    Hence, the Atlantic ocean keeps increasing in size with Africa + Europe going "East" and North + South America going "West." This can only be accommodated by a reduction in size of the Pacific Ocean with North + South America getting closer to Australia and Eurasia by a few inches per year, given that Earth is of a fixed size, and which generates all those earthquakes all along the Ring of Fire.

    Indeed, not much to do with freezing Earth poles
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    bbc
    Greenland ice loss doubles from late 2000s

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28852980

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Methane on the rise Ice volume down.....

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Quote Posted by Amzer Zo (here)
    Quote Posted by Daughter of Time (here)
    I hope I'm not too off topic here but I hear that the Atlantic is growing and the Pacific is shrinking.

    What does this mean?
    Not sure what it's all about without links or references but, at first "think" it seems it would have to do with plate tectonics, subduction zones and rate of accretion at Mid Oceanic Ridges since the Atlantic Ocean is not surrounded by subduction zones and accompanying volcanism as the Pacific Ocean is (Ring of Fire).
    This conveniently adds to that, though the title and article (below) are quite misleading -overall ia strange article. Seems it is really all about the Atlantic Ocean suddenly having quake potential?:

    The East Coast seeps came as a surprise to researchers, as it is not tectonically active nor a known source of oil and gas.


    Quote Scientists Find Widespread Methane Leaks in the Atlantic

    Scientists have found hundreds of methane leak spots on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean near the East Coast of the United States, according to a new study.

    The methane seeps were found in at least 570 places where the continental shelf meets the deeper ocean floor, from near Massachusetts down to North Carolina, researchers said in a study published Sunday in the journal Nature Geoscience.

    Methane is a greenhouse gas believed to contribute to climate change at a rate of about 25 times more than carbon dioxide per volume.

    The volume of the leaks is very small compared to methane seeps from all sources around the world, researchers said. It has likely been leaking for at least 1,000 years, though most of the methane dissolves in the ocean before reaching the atmosphere.

    Methane frequently leaks in more tectonically active ocean floor areas, such as the Pacific Ocean off the West Coast. The East Coast seeps came as a surprise to researchers, as it is not tectonically active nor a known source of oil and gas.


    Read more: http://thehill.com/policy/energy-env...#ixzz3BU95yhro
    Last edited by cursichella1; 26th August 2014 at 08:55. Reason: add quote
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Interesting article basically they don't know , but plenty of
    theories ...............

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------



    21 August 2014 Last updated at 19:45

    .Global warming slowdown 'could last another decade'Matt McGrath
    By Matt McGrath Environment correspondent, BBC News






    global ocean currents Currents in the Atlantic could be
    responsible for a slowdown in temperature rises

    Related Stories
    Sceptics 'winning' climate argument
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24233643
    'Growth drives UK flooding problems'
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28871577
    Carbon concerns over wood burning
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-28457104



    The hiatus in the rise in global temperatures could last
    for another 10 years, according to new research.

    Scientists have struggled to explain the so-called pause
    that began in 1999, despite ever increasing levels of
    CO2 in the atmosphere.

    The latest theory says that a naturally occurring 30-year
    cycle in the Atlantic Ocean is behind the slowdown.

    The researchers says this slow-moving current could continue
    to divert heat into the deep seas for another decade.

    However, they caution that global temperatures are likely to
    increase rapidly when the cycle flips to a warmer phase.

    Continue reading the main story

    Start Quote
    The Pacific is a symptom of the hiatus but not the ultimate cause. The Atlantic is the driver”
    End Quote
    Prof Ka-Kit Tung

    University of Washington

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
    (IPCC), global average temperatures have increased by
    around 0.05C per decade in the period between 1998 and 2012.

    This compares with a decadal average of 0.12 between 1951 and 2012.

    More than a dozen theories have been put forward on the
    cause of this pause in temperature growth that occurred
    while emissions of carbon dioxide were at record highs.

    These ideas include the impact of pollution such as soot
    particles that have reflected back some of the Sun's heat
    into space.

    Increased volcanic activity since 2000 has also been
    blamed, as have variations in solar activity.

    The most recent perspectives have looked to the oceans
    as the locations of the missing heat.

    Last year a study suggested that a periodic upwelling of
    cooler waters in the Pacific was limiting the rise.

    However this latest work, published in the journal Science,
    shifts the focus from the Pacific to the Atlantic and Southern
    oceans.

    The team, lead by Prof Ka-Kit Tung from the University of
    Washington, US, says there is now evidence that a 30-year
    current alternately warms and cools the world by sinking
    large amounts of heat beneath these deep waters.

    They've used observations from a network of devices called
    Argo floats that sample the oceans down to 2,000 metres.

    Ice age fears

    The researchers say that there was another hiatus between
    1945 and 1975 due to this current taking down the heat,
    that led to fears of a new ice age.

    From 1976 though, the cycle flipped and contributed to the
    warming of the world, as more heat stayed on the surface.

    But since the year 2000, the heat has been going deeper,
    and the world's overall temperatures haven't risen beyond
    the record set in 1998.

    "The floats have been very revealing to us," said Prof Tung.

    "I think the consensus at this point is that below 700 metres
    in the Atlantic and Southern oceans [they are] storing heat
    and not the Pacific."

    A key element in this new understanding is the saltiness of
    the water. The waters in the Atlantic current coming up from
    the tropics are saltier because of evaporation. This sinks more
    quickly and takes the heat down with it.



    el nino Atmospheric humidity over the Pacific during the El Nino in 1997
    Eventually though, the salty water melts enough ice in Arctic
    waters to lower the saline level, slowing down the current
    and keeping the heat near the surface.

    "Before 2006 the saltiness was increasing, this indicated that
    the current was speeding up," said Prof Tung.

    "After 2006, this saltiness is diminishing but it's still above
    the long-term average. Now it is slowly slowing down.

    "Once it gets below the long-term average, then it is the next
    period of rapid warming."

    As well as the data from the Argo floats, Prof Tung has also
    examined the Central England Temperature record, that dates
    back over 350 years. He believes that this confirms the regular
    70-year cycles of warm and cold spells.

    This historic pattern, he says, could extend the current period of pause.

    "We probably may have another 10 years, maybe shorter as
    global warming itself is melting more ice and ice could flood
    the North Atlantic, but historically we are in the middle of the cycle."

    Rising staircase of warming

    Several other researchers in this field acknowledge the Tung
    analysis is part of a growing body of evidence that suggests
    the Atlantic has a role in the pause.

    Prof Reto Knutti from the ETH Zurich has recently published a
    review of all the current theories on the hiatus.

    "I see the studies as complementary, and they both highlight
    that natural variability in ocean and atmosphere is important
    in modifying long term anthropogenic trends," he said.

    "A better understanding of those modes of variability is critical
    to understand past changes (including differences between
    models and observations during the hiatus period) as well as
    predicting the future, in particular in the near term and regionally,
    where variability dominates the forced changes from greenhouses gases."

    Other scientists say that the Atlantic hypothesis is interesting
    but a much longer range of observations is needed.

    "We really don't have a lot of data," said Dr Jonathan Robson
    from the University of Reading, UK.

    "So if there is this 60-year oscillation in the ocean, we haven't
    observed it all, basically we've observed the impact of it. We may
    have to wait 15-20 years to know what's going on."

    Prof Tung believes that whatever the cause and the length of the
    pause, we are on a "rising staircase" when it comes to global
    temperatures that will become apparent when the Atlantic current
    switches again.

    "At the end we will be on the rising part of the staircase, and the
    rate of warming there will be very fast, just as fast as the last
    three decades of the 20th Century, plus we are starting off at a
    higher plateau. The temperatures and the effects will be more severe."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28870988

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    This article seems like a rebuff of the one above , pointing out
    they are underestimating the effect of fossil fuels particularly
    coal in China.............




    26 August 2014 Last updated at 19:23

    Full extent of global coal 'binge' is hidden, say researchersMatt McGrath
    By Matt McGrath

    Environment correspondent, BBC News



    coal power China has invested heavily in new coal-fired power stations since 1995



    Continue reading the main story
    Related Stories
    Warming 'pause' may last until 2025
    US unveils coal power curb plans
    Gas from coal: The future or fantasy?

    The climate impacts of the world's fossil-fuelled power plants are
    being underestimated because of poor accounting, say researchers.

    Governments would get a truer picture if they included the lifetime
    emissions of a facility in the year it goes into production

    These "committed emissions" have been growing by 4% a year
    between 2000 and 2012, the scientists say.

    Power plants in China and India alone account for half of this commitment.

    At present, UN accounting procedures only include the emissions from
    coal and gas powered electricity generation in the year in which they occur.

    Continue reading the main story

    Start Quote
    "We've been hiding things from ourselves”
    End Quote
    Prof Robert Socolow

    Princeton

    According to the authors of the new paper, this method means they
    are missing a significant part of the picture.

    "We are trying to get past a kind of myopia that sets in when people
    focus exclusively on the emissions of the day," said one of the authors,
    Prof Robert Socolow from Princeton.

    By taking an expected production life of 40 years, the researchers
    calculated that the new coal and gas plants built in 2012 would, in
    total, produce around 19bn tonnes of CO2.

    This is significantly more than the 14bn tonnes produced by all the
    existing fossil fuel plants in the world in the same year.

    "We've been hiding things from ourselves," said Prof Socolow.

    A new coal plant every week

    What Prof Socolow termed the "Chinese power plant construction binge",
    which has occurred since 1995, was a major factor in the story.

    Plants in China represent 42% of committed future emissions, while
    India is responsible for 8%.

    That contrasts with the US and Europe, which between them account
    for 20% of the committed carbon.

    "The US and Europe, for the most part, have not paid attention that
    such large consequences were turning up in the development decisions
    of the developing world," said Prof Socolow.


    gas flare Natural gas power production has increased significantly since
    1980 but mainly in the Middle East. While the share of commitments
    related to natural gas plants has increased from around 15% in 1980
    to 27% in 2012, much of this development is focussed on the Middle East.

    Apart from this area, almost the entire developing world is looking to
    coal as the power plant fuel of choice on the road to industrialisation.

    According to the report, all the existing fossil fuel plants in world will
    contribute 300bn tonnes of CO2 over their lifetimes, putting a significant
    dent in the remaining carbon budget that would prevent a global
    temperature rise of 2C, the threshold of dangerous climate change
    according to scientists.

    "Worldwide, we've built more coal-burning power plants in the past
    decade than in any previous decade, and closures of old plants aren't
    keeping pace with this expansion," said co-author Prof Steven Davis
    at University of California, Irvine.

    "Far from solving the climate change problem, we're investing heavily
    in technologies that make the problem worse," he said.

    The researchers say that their calculation of committed emissions
    doesn't mean they are unavoidable.

    They argue that with properly functioning carbon markets and the
    development of carbon capture and storage technology (CCS), the
    scale of the impacts on climate could be reduced.

    "The extra piece of this is CCS," said Prof Socolow.

    "There is a tool, it does costs money - but it is one of the ways of
    having your cake and eating it too."

    The research has been published in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

    Follow Matt on Twitter @mattmcgrathbbc.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-28942403

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    -------

    One thought that occurred to me is that if the build-up of ice is asymmetrical, then this might create a very slight wobble on the spinning mass of the planet. I have no idea what effects that might trigger (or if the wobble would be large enough to create a knock-on effect).
    Nah! Check out kids spinning top toys and you'll see they have more weight at the bottom than they do at the top....or they did when I played with them, hehe. Makes them spin better.

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    UN Climate Chief: 'Not Very Far' from Considering
    'Climate Change as a Public Health Emergency'



    August 28, 2014 - 4:25 AM D.Icke.com....





    ===============================================

    cns news.com.......

    UN Climate Chief: 'Not Very Far' from Considering 'Climate Change as a Public Health Emergency'

    August 28, 2014 - 4:25 AM

    By Patrick Goodenough
    Subscribe to Patrick Goodenough RSS




    U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres speaks to reporters in New York
    on September 26, 2013. (U.N. Photo/Sarah Fretwell)




    (CNSNews.com) – Secretary of State John Kerry has called climate change “the biggest challenge of all that we face right now,” and his French counterpart has warned of climate “chaos” in 500 days, and now the U.N. climate change chief is implying that climate change can be viewed on a par with the deadly Ebola outbreak.

    Christiana Figueres told a World Health Organization (WHO)-hosted event in Geneva Wednesday that “we are not very far” from the point where climate change should be declared an international public health emergency, according to her prepared remarks.

    Addressing a three-day global conference on health and climate – the first of its kind – Figueres said in remarks directed at WHO Director-General Margaret Chan, “Dear Margaret, as much as [I] would like you to, I am fully aware of the fact that you have not convened the international health regulations emergency committee to consider climate change as a public health emergency of international concern.”

    “However, we are not very far from this,” she added.

    The committee referred to by Figueres is the expert body on whose advice the WHO three weeks ago declared the Ebola outbreak in West Africa to be a “public health emergency of international concern” (PHEIC).

    Under international health regulations, a PHEIC is declared in a case where “an extraordinary event” is determined to constitute a public health risk through the international spread of disease; and “to potentially require a coordinated international response.”

    In her speech Figueres, who is executive secretary of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) said that while it was easy to view climate change as “the equivalent of a disease” it was actually the symptom.

    “The disease is something we rarely admit,” she said. “The disease is humanity’s unhealthy dependence on fossil fuels, deforestation and land use that depletes natural resources.”

    “At the heart of an effective response to climate change is the challenge of taking responsibility for our actions and above all, making tough decisions to change the patterns that have been at the base of our development over the past 100 years, if we are to prevent severe worsening of health and quality of life conditions over the next 100 years.”

    The U.N. says climate change is having an impact on health in numerous ways, including malnutrition due to crop failures arising from changing weather patterns; water scarcity; the spread of water-borne disease resulting from rising temperatures; and the effect of carbon emissions on rates of cancer and respiratory disease rates.

    Speaking at the conference Wednesday, Chan linked climate change to the emergence of new human diseases. She said many of these originate in wild animals, whose populations, concentration and incursion into areas where humans live are impacted by climate variables.

    But she cautioned against speculation that Ebola may be affected by climate.

    “I am aware of speculation that climate change may influence the frequency of outbreaks of Ebola virus disease,” she said. “I must emphasize we have no evidence that this is the case.”

    Paris agreement will be ‘universal and applicable to all countries’

    Like a number of other events around the world, the conference in Geneva is looking ahead to the next major U.N. climate megaconference, in Paris, France in November 2015, when efforts will be made to finalize a global agreement on cutting “greenhouse gas” emissions.

    Next month U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon will host a summit in New York where world leaders will be urged to make commitments ahead of the Paris conference.

    “This agreement will be universal and applicable to all countries,” Figueres said in Geneva. “It will address current and future emissions. If strong enough, it will prevent the worst and chart a course toward a world with clean air and water, abundant natural resources and happy, healthy populations, all the requirements for positive growth.”

    “Seen in this light,” she added, “the climate agreement is actually a public health agreement.”

    This week the administration has come under fire over claims that President Obama is working on reaching an agreement in Paris in a way that will enable him to sidestep Senate ratification, which is constitutionally required for international treaties.

    State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki on Wednesday called a New York Times report on the issue “completely speculative.”

    “Our goal, of course, is to negotiate a successful and effective global climate change agreement that can help address this pressing challenge, but anything that is eventually negotiated and that should go to the Senate will go to the Senate,” she said.

    At the White House, press secretary Josh Earnest said, “Because that agreement is not written, it’s not yet clear exactly what sort of role Congress would be required to play.”

    It remained to be seen whether the agreement would be a “political agreement” or be one that would “require congressional approval in terms of acceding to a treaty,” he said.

    Earnest stressed that Obama has identified climate change as a priority issue, saying he had taken steps to address it at home and “hasn’t been shy about trying to lead on the international stage as well.”




    http://cnsnews.com/news/article/patr...-change-public

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Myth of arctic meltdown: Stunning satellite images show summer ice cap is thicker and
    covers 1.7million square kilometres MORE than 2 years ago…despite Al Gore’s prediction
    it would be ICE-FREE by now

    Sunday 31st August 2014 at 10:00 By david-icke








    Myth of arctic meltdown: Stunning satellite images show summer ice cap is thicker
    and covers 1.7million square kilometres MORE than 2 years ago...despite Al Gore's
    prediction it would be ICE-FREE by now

    Seven years after former US Vice-President Al Gore's warning, Arctic ice cap has
    expanded for second year in row

    An area twice the size of Alaska - America's biggest state - was open water two
    years ago and is now covered in ice

    These satellite images taken from University of Illinois's Cryosphere project show
    ice has become more concentrated

    By David Rose for The Mail on Sunday

    Published: 23:04, 30 August 2014 | Updated: 09:56, 31 August 2014


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz3C0EonBKm
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook








    ‘The speech by former US Vice-President Al Gore was apocalyptic. ‘The North Polar ice
    cap is falling off a cliff,’ he said. ‘It could be completely gone in summer in as little as
    seven years. Seven years from now.’

    Those comments came in 2007 as Mr Gore accepted the Nobel Peace Prize for his
    campaigning on climate change.

    But seven years after his warning, The Mail on Sunday can reveal that, far from
    vanishing, the Arctic ice cap has expanded for the second year in succession –
    with a surge, depending on how you measure it, of between 43 and 63 per cent since 2012.’

    Read more: Myth of arctic meltdown: Stunning satellite images show summer
    ice cap is thicker and covers 1.7million square kilometres MORE than 2 years ago…
    despite Al Gore's prediction it would be ICE-FREE by now

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-FREE-now.html

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  32. Link to Post #219
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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

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    Default Re: The Arctic is melting, the Antarctic is freezing. What does this mean?

    Its hard to keep up with all these threads especially in any detail, I concentrate
    on a few I'm currently interested in, but many of these threads are tied into
    the bigger picture.....

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    UN climate change: 1000 scientists say no

    Saturday 20th September 2014 at 10:33 By david-icke




    ‘Read it.

    It’s a shocking 321-page report assembled by The Climate Depot:

    “More Than 1000 International Scientists Dissent Over
    Man-Made Global Warming Claims.”

    It names names. It lists reasons for the dissent.

    Reality is engineered consensus. But when that doesn’t work,
    “experts” just assert there is a consensus when there isn’t.’

    Read more: UN climate change: 1000 scientists say no

    http://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/20...ntists-say-no/

    ================================================== ====

    There are some articles on this mini thread that may be of interest to add to this thread...

    Arctic Meltdown Myth - New Data Data Shows Global Warming Trends Have Been Stagnant Over Past 19 Yrs

    http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...er-Past-19-Yrs

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