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    Default Mummy death mystery solved



    Published on 16 Nov 2012 by Channel4News


    The fate of a man whose body has lain on display in the British Museum for 100 years has finally been uncovered. .

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    Virtual autopsy: exploring a natural mummy from early Egypt




    Published on 16 Nov 2012 by britishmuseum


    The life and death of Gebelein Man

    Found in around 1896, the mummy known as Gebelein man was buried in about 3500 BC at the site of Gebelein in Upper Egypt. He has been in the British Museum collection for over 100 years, but it was not until 2012 that he was CT scanned for the first time. Detailed images created from the CT scans' high resolution X-rays are allowing us to look inside his body and learn about his life and his death in ways never before possible.

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    16 November 2012 Last updated at 12:41 page

    British Museum exhibit Gebelein Man died 'violent death' New technology can expose the man's skeleton indicating at closer glance where he

    A virtual post mortem has been undertaken on one of the British Museum's oldest mummies, Gebelein Man.Using technology from Sweden, visitors to the museum will be able use an interactive touch screen to examine his body and internal organs. The mummified man was buried in a crouching position around 3500 BC in Egypt and was discovered in 1896.
    New evidence suggests he was stabbed in the back by a weapon, said curator of physical anthropology Daniel Antoine.Dr Antoine said: "There's a wound on the surface of his skin, which people have been able to see for the last 100 years, but it's only through looking inside his body we've seen than his shoulder blade is damaged and the rib under the shoulder blade is also damaged.

    "All of this suggests a violent death."




    New technology can expose the man's skeleton indicating at closer glance where he was stabbed

    Thought to be between 18 and 21-years-old when he died, he was wrapped in linen and matting and placed in a shallow grave. Direct contact with the hot, dry sand in which Gebelein Man was buried, naturally dried and mummified his remains. He was found at Gebelein, about 25 miles (40km) south of Thebes, in Egypt in 1896 and was acquired by the British Museum in 1900.The digital autopsy table has come courtesy of the Interactive Institute and Visualization Center C based in Norrkoping, Sweden and visitors will be able to view it until 16 December.The technology has made it possible to expose his skeleton and make virtual slices in order to explore his internal organs and brain, which is still present.
    Spokesman David Hughes said: "This powerful visualisation system has enabled not just remarkable new revelations about one of the British Museum's most iconic mummies, but also brings the thrill of discovery straight to the gallery for the public. "Using exactly the same technology that the scientists use, visitors to the museum can now explore for themselves and, who knows, perhaps even maker their own new discovery with the exhibit."The Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan at the British Museum houses the largest collection of Egyptian objects outside Egypt. The artefacts illustrate every aspect of the cultures of the Nile Valley, from the Neolithic period in 10,000 BC until the twelfth century AD.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-20353934

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    Gebelein Man

    Gebelein, Egypt, Predynastic period, around 3500 BC

    A naturally preserved mummy in a reconstructed pit-grave.

    This man died more than five thousand years ago and was buried at the site of Gebelein, in Upper Egypt. The reconstruction of his grave illustrates the early Egyptian custom of placing the body in a contracted, foetal position, usually on the left side, with the head to the south, facing the west, the land of the dead where he would be reborn. Around him were all the things he might need for his afterlife, especially pottery to hold and serve food.

    In the Predynastic period (4400-3100 BC), the time before the pharaohs, the dead were buried in shallow graves cut into the desert sand. The graves were often lined with reed mats, making them like a bed, and the body was covered with linen or skins and more mats, like a blanket, before the grave was refilled and perhaps topped by a mound of dirt. Contact with the hot dry sand naturally preserved the bodies because the sand absorbed the water that constitutes approximately 75% by weight of the human body. Bacteria cannot breed without moisture and as a result, the bodies frequently did not decay, but simply dried out. The body of this man is remarkably well-preserved, even down to his finger-nails and hair, which has probably faded with time.

    Chance discoveries of these sand-dried mummies (for example, when a grave was disturbed by animals or robbers), may have promoted the belief that physical preservation of the body was necessary for the afterlife. This may have led the later Egyptians to develop means of artificial mummification after the introduction of coffins and deeper graves separated the body from the natural drying effects of the sand.

    The objects that surrounded Gebelein Man in his original burial are unknown. On display is a selection of typical grave-goods from other graves of the middle Predynastic period (about 3500 BC), the time we believe he died. Attempts to date the body using Carbon 14 (the radiocarbon method) have so far been unsuccessful.





    http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore...elein_man.aspx
    Last edited by Cidersomerset; 16th November 2012 at 20:39.

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    Ellisa (17th November 2012), mariposafe (17th November 2012), ROMANWKT (16th November 2012)

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    Default Re: Mummy death mystery solved

    Did you notice when he said, "They call him ginger" a sure sign of radiation exposure, ginger hair.

    regards roman

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    Default Re: Mummy death mystery solved

    Quote Did you notice when he said, "They call him ginger" a sure sign of radiation exposure, ginger hair.

    regards roman
    Yes when they said they called him Ginger it rang a bell ! First I thought those darn 'Picts' get everywhere ..LOL..

    Now you mention it, you posted it on your thread Roman......and six thousand years ago is about the time of possible Annunaki wars ? or are you thinking of
    more natural exposure ?
    Last edited by Cidersomerset; 16th November 2012 at 20:45.

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    Default Re: Mummy death mystery solved

    Quote Posted by Cidersomerset (here)
    Quote Did you notice when he said, "They call him ginger" a sure sign of radiation exposure, ginger hair.

    regards roman
    Yes when they said they called him Ginger it rang a bell ! First I thought those darn 'Picts' get everywhere ..LOL..

    Now you mention it, you posted it on your thread Roman......and six thousand years ago is about the time of possible Annunaki wars ? or are you thinking of
    more natural exposure ?
    I am talking what you are saying, exactly that, they had a war that nearly wiped everybody out. It look like they are responsible for the last extinction.

    regards to you Cidersomerset

    roman

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    Cidersomerset (16th November 2012)

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