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Thread: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Regarding the above article.

    The subtle architecture is already there! Here's an animation that illustrates the connectedness of cyberspace.



    This is a subtle form of mind!

    We are approaching it -- and it is approaching us. An artificial social-memory-complex. A hive mind. An emergence. What is old is new again.

    Quote By their fruit you will recognize them ...
    Really, projects like this (discussed in the article) may seem amazing but they are wholly irresponsible. There is no unified theory of mind yet!

    So, it looks as if we know what we're doing ... but we really have no idea.
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 9th February 2013 at 18:20.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    And this cross pollinates from SilentFeather's thread, the Propaganda Upgrade.

    Quote And the whole system we are tied to, the electronic grid, is obsolete. The 186,000 miles per second light speed electromagnetic field, which is wired, is not the same grid the elite are on. They have the Tesla, Marconi, JPL, 291,000 miles per second wireless system of unlimited energy from the source field, described by Eric Dollard.

    So, while we are slaves on the grid, which I believe is going to be destroyed, the back up system is in place, and the humanoids who are to occupy this new paradigm are already engineered. All of the stellar craft designed, run on the 291,000 speed electromagnetics.

    The wireless electromagnetic microwave frequencies we are exposed to in our daily lives, is destroying our DNA and rendering us incapable of reproducing. In addition, the GMO foods, the introduction of heavy metals through vaccinations and chemtrails, fluoride in water, and pharmaceuticals, all contribute to our demise.

    See, the agenda is much deeper than we think, if we take a deeper look and realize these entities are not human, or empathic.
    The system in place, which is a Cray 5 processor, is underground, and makes the Utah data center look a like kindergarten toy. The above ground, on the electrical grid systems, are for the decoy, while the Tesla 291,000 mps system is fully functioning, and is able to tie into, process, distill and categorize every frequency, it's subsequent archetypes, linguistics, and emotional and astral counterpart.

    Quite astounding when you consider most humans are still operating from the base root chakra of survival and fear, and very few souls are adept and able to decipher what's taking place.

    You Vivek, have an incredible mind; it's almost impossible to keep up. This is one of the most important threads on Avalon right now.
    "Lay Down Your Truth and Check Your Weapons
    The Next Voice You Hear Will Be Your OWN"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhS69C1tr0w

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Please, read this carefully.

    ----------------------
    Viruses Are Good for You: Spawn of the devil, computer viruses may help us realize the full potential of the Net.
    By Julian Dibbell

    Could it be that what scares you most about the virus is not any particular effect it might have, but simply its assertive, alien presence, its intrusive otherness? Inserting itself into a complicated choreography of subsystems all designed to serve your needs and carry out your will, the virus hews to its own agenda of survival and reproduction. Its oblivious self-interest violates the unity of purpose that defines your system as yours. The virus just isn't, well, you. Doesn't that scare you?

    And does it really matter whether the virus in question is a biological or an electronic one? It should, of course.

    [...]

    Free-ranging, self-replicating programs, autonomous Net agents, digital organisms - whatever they are called, there's an old fashion word for them: computer viruses.

    Today three very different groups of heretics are creating computer viruses. They have almost nothing to do with each other. There are scientists interested in the abstract behaviors of self-replicating codes, there are developers interested in harnessing the power of self-replicating programs, and there are unnamed renegades of the virus-writing underground.

    Although they share no common experience, all these heretics respect a computer virus for its irrepressible mobility, for the self-centered autonomy it wrests from a computer environment, and for the surprising agility with which it explores opportunities and possibilities. In short, virus enthusiasts relate to the virus as a fascinating and powerful life form, whether for the fertile creation of yet more powerful digital devices, as an entity for study in itself, or, in the case of one renegade coder, for reckless individual expression.

    [...]

    This is about as far as most discussions of virus writing get: ignorant kids thrashing about in codes, creating horribly simple but efficient digital bombs. And even if you take a very generous view that the underground virus writers are inadvertently creating new forms of life, the discussion of beneficial viruses would have to stop here if it weren't for folks like Dr. Mark A. Ludwig.

    [...]

    He doesn't have to be there. With his PhD in physics from the University of Arizona (and his prior course work at Cal Tech and MIT), Ludwig could easily return to the fold of respectable researchers if he chose. All he'd have to do is let go of his somewhat obsessive scholarly pursuit of the wild computer virus, and pick a slightly more conventional object of study. Or maybe just pursue his present subject with a little more sober attention to devising antivirus countermeasures and a lot less gleeful fascination with viruses in and of themselves. Or maybe just tone down the florid libertarian rhetoric and sweeping philosophical claims in which he tends to couch his otherwise gruellingly meticulous analyses of viral performance and technique.

    [...]

    But not long after that, around 1988, he started picking up reports of contagious programs running loose among the machines he now made his living from, and the course of his life changed yet again. For Ludwig, viruses came bearing the same mind-expanding message-in-a-bottle they would not much later be bringing to Hellraiser. Except that Ludwig decoded the message a little differently. Where Hellraiser heard the signal "I'm alive" coming from the virus's creator, Ludwig understood the message as coming directly from the virus itself. Viruses behaved like living things: self-reproducing and autonomous. Might we not understand life a little better, he wondered, if we can create something similar, and study it, and try to understand it? The mysteries of nature, in other words, now loomed closer than ever - right there on the wide-open technological frontier to which he'd fled from the wreckage of his scientific aspirations - and Ludwig couldn't resist the temptation to go questing after them once more.

    [...]

    Having carefully constructed this ambitious claim, Ludwig proceeds to test drive it straight into the heart of biology's most vexing questions: How did life get here in the first place? How did the staggering diversity of life forms that exists today come to be? He sics viruses on the theory of evolution itself, in other words, sending them in to illuminate with their logical simplicity the still murky depths of Darwin's grand hypothesis. It's a bold move, but a puzzling one at first glance. Although the viruses found in the wild may exhibit a wide range of lifelike features, they've never been known, after all, to evolve.

    Or have they? Not too long after the first virus was written, the first antivirus program was written as a countermeasure. Once anti-virus software was introduced into the cybernetic ecology, viruses and the programs that stalk them have been driving each other to increasing levels of sophistication. This is nothing less than the common coevolutionary arms race that arises between predators and prey in organic ecosystems.

    [...]

    The prospect of virus populations able to autonomously build up immunity to any scanning techniques thrown at them thoroughly depressed antivirus programmers. To Ludwig, however, the possibility proved too intriguing to wait around for some random underground hacker to realize it, and he resolved to do the job himself. The result: Ludwig's "Darwinian Genetic Mutation Engine," a programming utility that turns any normal DOS virus into a souped-up, genetically evolving polymorph, complete with an option for sexual gene-swapping between individuals that come into contact in the wild. Curious hackers can find the Darwinian Genetic Mutation Engine's complete source code in the pages of Computer Viruses, Artificial Life, and Evolution, along with detailed experimental results demonstrating the ability of Darwinian Genetic Mutation Engine-enhanced viruses to run rings around existing scanners. But the program's deeper significance, of course, lies in its potential to transform viruses' heretofore hacker-driven pseudo-evolution into something very like the real thing: a finely tuned interaction of variety and natural selection that allows the environment itself to shape the internal code of the organisms dwelling in it.

    The Darwinian Genetic Mutation Engine is all Ludwig needs, in other words, to prove viruses capable of meaningful evolution, and incidentally, test Darwin's theory. And it's no surprise perhaps, given Ludwig's hard-earned distrust of anything smacking of intellectual orthodoxy, that he has found that Darwin's venerable theory fails the test. Running his beloved viruses through assorted experimental hoops and mazes, Ludwig followed them to the conclusion that Darwinian evolutionary mechanisms alone are just not mathematically fertile enough to have created and shaped life as we know it. This is a well-worn scientific heresy, of course, but it's not without its small but respectable following within the ivory walls Ludwig so proudly dismisses.

    [...]

    Ludwig managed a remarkable intellectual shift. He elevated the computer virus from the digital equivalent of a can of spray paint to an object capable of perhaps infinite variations and almost lifelike behavior. He transformed a tool of vandals into a field of scientific study by emphasizing a computer virus' biological affinity. But by the time Ludwig began publishing, the computer virus was already well on its way from the fringes of science to the seat of honor at research symposiums.

    [...]

    "I'll be out at my place in the jungle over the weekend," said the message, posted in May 1994 from an obscure Internet site in Central America, "so I'll be out of e-mail contact till Monday."

    And just like that, University of Delaware ecologist Tom Ray (now visiting scholar at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International in Kyoto, Japan) disappeared once more into the rain forests of Costa Rica, leaving behind the clean conveniences of the digital world for an organic riot of plant and animal life. As promised, though, he would be back. Ray's passion for the unkempt splendor of the jungle has remained unabated after nearly two decades of intermittent research there, but in the last few years, it's the digital world that has claimed his closest attentions. Since late 1989, Ray has done his most important fieldwork seated in front of a computer, observing the busy fruits of an activity that has come to define his career: he breeds viruses.

    Or to put it more precisely, he breeds worms, since that's the stickler's term for software that is both self-reproducing and able to execute its code independent of any host program. Ray, convinced that his programs are as good as alive, calls them simply "organisms," or "creatures." Whatever they are, though, he's been breeding quite a lot of them. He's been breeding them with the full support of his university employers, with the financial backing of major corporations, and with the steadily growing curiosity and respect of fellow researchers in the fields of both biology and computer science. And if all goes according to plan, he will keep on breeding them until he has achieved a goal far more adventurous than anything yet attempted by other virus programmers - infusing the vast unused spaces of the global computer networks with a roiling digital ecology as complex, as fascinating, and ultimately as beneficial to humankind as the rain forests that he has long sought to protect and understand.

    In short, by infecting the Net with self-replicating code, Ray aims to turn it into a jungle.


    [...]

    In this, Ray's attraction to self-reproducing programs differed little from that of Mark Ludwig (who in fact was not unfamiliar with Ray's work by the time he set out to write his magnum opus on computer viruses and evolution). Unlike Ludwig, however, Ray felt neither philosophically obliged nor ethically disposed to work with viruses able to thrive in already existing computer environments. Not that he never considered the option. In fact, his initial plan was to set mutating machine-language organisms loose in a single computer and watch their evolution as they competed against one another for direct access to the computer's core memory, a strategy that might have evolved viruses superbly adapted to any system based on the same instruction set as the original petri chip. But Ray soon scrapped this idea - the risk of accidentally releasing his specimens into the wild seemed too great. Instead, he decided, he would evolve his organisms inside a virtual computer, modeled inside a real one in much the same way some operating systems today can model working emulations of other OSes, allowing DOS programs (for instance) to run in Macintosh environments. The difference, in Ray's scheme, was that his simulated system would be the only environment of its kind; thus, any program that escaped into other computers would find itself a fish out of water, unable to function anywhere but in its birthplace.

    While the security benefits of this approach were obvious, its contribution to the scientific effectiveness of the experiment was even more significant: now that Ray was working with an imaginary computer, he was free to shape the system's design to create an environment more hospitable to life. And there was one key change to be made in that regard, for as Ray had come to recognize (and Ludwig would later set down in hard math), today's digital environments simply weren't built with mutant programs in mind. Typical operating systems might let a program randomly move some of its algorithms around with impunity (as the polymorphic viruses do), but at the fine-grained level of individual bit-flipping most closely analogous to genetic variation, even a single chance alteration almost always results in a system-crashing bug. Nature's tolerance of random code revisions is much greater, and if Ray wanted a more "natural" computer, then one way to get there would be to give it an instruction set in which nearly any sequence of bits would make some kind of sense to the system's virtual CPU.

    So he gave it that instruction. He also equipped his phantom computer with a death function, a "Reaper," which would terminate any individual program sooner or later - but would always get to the oldest or most error-prone programs first. Thus primed to carry out the requisite natural selections, Ray's digital ecosphere was nearly complete. He called it Tierra (Spanish for "earth") and started preparing the final touch: an inhabitant. Later dubbed "the Ancestor," it was the first worm Tom Ray ever created - an 80-byte-long self-replicating machine written in Tierra's quirky assembly language - and as it happens, it was also the last. Once loosed into the Tierra environment installed on Ray's laptop, the creature's offspring quickly spread to the new world's every corner, within minutes displaying the evolutionary transformations that would "write" Ray's organisms from then on.

    A 79-byte variation appeared, rapidly displacing its slightly clunkier predecessors, then smaller descendants followed - a 45-byter, a 51, eventually even a 22 - entering a taxonomy that would grow to accommodate hundreds of subspecies as Ray played with Tierra in the months and years to follow. The swift and drastic size reductions of those first runs startled Ray, but even more re-markable were the survival strategies these variants encoded. The 45- and 51-byte creatures, it turned out, were not worms but bona fide parasitic viruses, achieving their leanness by borrowing reproductive code from larger programs when they needed to copy themselves. In turn, host programs acquired an immunity from parasites by failing to register their location in the virtual computer's memory, thus foiling the parasites' attempts to find them.

    To the casual student of computer viruses, it's interesting to observe that despite the wide-open and neutral terrain into which the first Tierrans were placed, they swiftly and spontaneously adopted the same techniques built into wild viruses to ensure survival in an environment thick with hostile users and their software: parasitism and stealth. But to the serious scholars of biology who soon began to take note of Ray's work, such developments were more than just interesting. Out of the barest simulation of environmental forces, some of life's more sophisticated interrelationships were emerging entirely unbidden, and while the Mark Ludwigs of the world might object that Ray's initial fine-tuning of Tierran "physics" tainted the experiment, Ray was more than satisfied with its scientific implications. Here, in the unexpectedly colorful diversity bred from a single simple program, was a compelling model of evolution's creative power.

    [...]

    In particular, the difficulties involved in writing the most productive code for the parallel-processing machines that will take us into of the next century of computing seem to cry out for an evolutionary approach. "We will probably never be able to write such software, as it is way too complex," Ray observes. "Yet we know that evolution can handle that kind of problem."

    The reason we know that, of course, is that we - and all other multicellular organisms - are wetware embodiments of frightfully complex parallel processes.
    But that fact posed a new challenge for Ray. Despite the great variety of digital forms Tierra had generated, it remained an ecology of one-celled organisms, none much larger or much more complicated than the 80-byte Ancestor. In fairness it should be pointed out that the terrestrial biosphere spent its first 3 billion years or so in a similar state before finally exploding into multicellular diversity at the dawn of the Cambrian era (a mere 600 million years ago). Yet if Tierra was ever to prove its full value as a software-writing machine - or indeed as a scientific model of evolution - sooner or later it would have to cough up a Cambrian explosion of its own. And since the key to this burst of complexity seemed to Ray to lie in challenging his evolving creatures with more intricate problems than the simple bit-copying tasks they'd grappled with thus far, he decided that the explosion wouldn't happen nearly soon enough if Tierra remained stuck inside conventional computers, and he began looking into the possibility of installing Tierra on a parallel-processing system.

    But then one day in early 1994, Ray had a minor epiphany: "I realized that the global network is just a loosely connected parallel computer, and much larger and more powerful than anything that will ever exist as a single machine."

    And thus was born Ray's plan to colonize the Net. He wrote it up soon thereafter in a document plain-spokenly entitled "A Proposal To Create a Network-Wide Biodiversity Reserve for Digital Organisms" (See Wired 2.08, page 33), the text of which outlines a vast collective enterprise devoted to hastening the arrival of the digital Cambrian. Ray envisions a Tierran subnetwork spread across thousands of volunteer Net nodes, each of them running the environment as a low-priority background process sustained only by unused (and otherwise wasted) CPU cycles. He is confident that once his "one-celled" simple self-replicating organisms encounter the immensity, the topological intricacy, and the fluid instability of the Net, they will quickly rise to the occasion and evolve into tightly coordinated multicellular conglomerates, thus setting off the dreamed-of Big Bang of complex digi-biotic diversity.

    Ray foresees digital naturalists like "modern day tropical biologists exploring our organic jungles. However, occasionally these digital biologists will spot an interesting information process for which they see an application. At this point, some individuals will be captured and brought into laboratories for closer study, and farms for breeding." Harvested, domesticated and then neutered of their self-replicating properties, these prize specimens of code could then be translated from Tierran language into standard programming languages and set to work at any number of tasks. Ray suspects some form of intelligent network agents would be the likeliest first applications to be culled, but he prefers to emphasize that the most useful products of the digital jungle would be as difficult to predict as rice, pigs, penicillin, and silkworms might have been for an observer of the pre-Cambrian ooze of early carbon-based life.

    [...]

    But even if computer users ultimately reject the deliberate presence of a global wilderness reserve for computer viruses woven neatly into the fabric of the Net, they may yet fail to keep the computer landscape from turning to jungle. After all, the same personal and subcultural imperatives that drove Hellraiser's career will continue to inspire underground virus writers. And the digital terrain continues to get more interesting. If the Darwinian innovations introduced by Mark Ludwig are any indication of coming trends in viral technique, then it's not inconceivable that a vital ecology might someday flourish in the midst of our daily routines, unplanned, uncontained, ill-comprehended, and irrepressible. It's an unnerving prospect. Yet it wouldn't have to be - not if we prepared for it by actively cultivating a digital biodiversity of the sort Tom Ray proposes. This is a niche that will be filled, whether we fill it deliberately or not.

    "We're just going to have to live with them," artificial life researcher Chris Langton says of computer viruses. Our global web of digital systems, he predicts, is fast unfolding towards a degree of complexity rich enough to support a staggering diversity of autonomously evolving programs.

    [...]

    General Magic manufactures a hand-held communication device that relies on a nifty new network-streamlining program language called Telescript. Announced earlier this year with the very visible backing of such info-dollar heavyweights as AT&T, Apple, Sony, and Matsushyta, Telescript proposes to do good things. Its intelligent agents, General Magic co-founder Bill Atkinson promises, will soon be flitting about cyberspace on your behalf, visiting remote commercial sites to buy, sell, and trade information for you, and generally behaving themselves with all the decorum you'd expect from a personal digital valet.

    Still, despite rather severe restrictions on the agents' ability to replicate, it's hard to deny certain broad similarities between intelligent agents and the offerings of your typical Vx board. Both wild viruses and Telescript agents routinely copy themselves from one computer to another. Both viruses and Telescript agents can run themselves on the computers they travel to, and, for those same reasons, raise differing degrees of concern about their security. "A virus never does anything good for you, it only does things to you," says hacker legend Bill Atkinson, nervously reaching for a fine semantic distinction between computer wildlife and Telescript's semi-autonomous "intelligent agent" programs.

    More intriguing, though, are Telescript's close similarities with Tom Ray's digital diversity reserve and the experiments of Fred Cohen. Cohen, now happily self-exiled from academia and in business for himself as a computer-security guru, is experimenting with a distributed database in which self-reproducing query agents scurry throughout a network, much like the Telescript scheme. And like the sprawling biosphere of global Tierra, Telescript's bustling marketplace depends on a broad base of local interpreter programs installed wherever its agents go to do their business. This has two significant implications. For one thing, the fact that the mobile organisms of both Telescript and Tierra interact only with their interpreters, incapable of functioning in their absence or of bypassing them to directly affect the host environment, obviates many of the security concerns surrounding their autonomy. (Telescript, additionally, makes use of a battery of cryptographically secured restrictions to ensure that its agents don't subvert control of the host machine, either by accident or by malicious design).

    And for another thing, the fact that all the interpreters speak the same programming language regardless of the underlying operating system and hardware means that, as the base of interpreters approaches omnipresence on the world's computer networks, the Net approaches the condition of a single, vast, and unmappable supercomputer, with each wandering digital organism a process in one worldwide parallel computation.

    Taken together, these two features represent something of a watershed in the history of computing. It has long been observed, rather wistfully, that in principle the world's computers sum up to one gigantic parallel processor, and that the crushing bulk of that metacomputer's CPU cycles goes to waste, unused. Only now, however, with the advent of protocols like Telescript and Tierra, do we have the means to deploy such processes that treat the Net as one machine, safely and sensibly. This, then, is the real significance of these endeavors.

    [...]

    Trying to imagine the marvels that pour forth once you've successfully tapped a computer as elaborate as the Net is as futile as trying to map the future of a society, or of a life - or of life itself.

    Of course, trying to foresee the risks that could emerge from that same computer is an equally hopeless task. But as it happens, we are bound to face those risks whether or not we seek to harness the full power of the Net, since the teeming and inevitable population of uncaged digital organisms will in any case plow forward with its own relentless exploration of the Net's capabilities. All we would miss by failing to orchestrate a more manageable viral exploration of our own, therefore, would be the potential benefits - including quite possibly some antidotes to the worst depredations visited on us by the viruses of the wild. And including also, perhaps, something even more precious. For if there is any purpose legible at all in the millennia of human history, it is in the unflagging persistence with which we add to the complexity of the universe. So, if we were to shrink from the chance to actively participate in transforming the Net into the single most complex information entity since the emergence of the human brain, would we not then be shirking a duty of almost cosmic proportions?

    Source: http://www.hnet.uci.edu/mposter/syll...s/viruses.html
    ----------------------

    This article is very real, the people in it are very real, and the topic discussed in it may very well be playing itself out right now. This could just be the tip of a very big iceberg -- and possibly a very Freudian iceberg at that.

    This article, read in the light of the themes presented in this thread, is extremely important (IMO).
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 10th February 2013 at 21:22.

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    Canada Avalon Member Ernie Nemeth's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Wow, where did this thread come from?

    A must read, for me. This post is a marker so I can find it again.

    Thanks Vivek
    Forget about it

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Quote Posted by gripreaper (here)
    You Vivek, have an incredible mind; it's almost impossible to keep up. This is one of the most important threads on Avalon right now.
    You took the words right out of my mouth and they are worth repeating!

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    We're gonna crack this chestnut!
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 10th February 2013 at 03:13.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Quote Posted by gripreaper (here)
    The system in place, which is a Cray 5 processor, is ...
    I doubt that whatever are the biggest, baddest computers on earth these days bears any close resemblance to what Seymour Cray called the Cray 5, his first attempt at a massively parallel computer, which he had just begun designing when he died in a car accident. I didn't work with Seymour, but I did work closely with some of his colleagues, in the same buildings, on follow on generations of such equipment, and have a pretty good idea what goes into those beasts. Large parallel computers were a major focus of my work in computers for 30 years.
    Last edited by Paul; 8th May 2013 at 17:15. Reason: delete no longer useful links

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Quote Posted by Paul (here)
    Quote Posted by gripreaper (here)
    The system in place, which is a Cray 5 processor, is ...
    I doubt that whatever are the biggest, baddest computers on earth these days bears any close resemblance to what Seymour Cray called the Cray 5,
    Well, what should we call it? Has anyone seen it? How big and bad ass is this processor? I'm supposing it's underground, but not sure where, although I think it's central United States.
    "Lay Down Your Truth and Check Your Weapons
    The Next Voice You Hear Will Be Your OWN"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhS69C1tr0w

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague



    Excerpt:
    What I want to explore in this first cyberspace chapter are the ways in which this new digital domain functions as a space for complex mental experiences and games. In this sense, we may see cyberspace as a kind of electronic res cogitans, a new space for the playing out of some of those immaterial aspects of humanity that have been denied a home in the purely physicalist world picture. In short, there is a sense in which cyberspace has become a new realm for the mind. In particular it has become a new realm for the imagination; and even, as many cyber-enthusiasts now claim, a new realm for the "self." To quote MIT sociologist of cyberspace Sherry Turkle: "The Internet has become a significant social laboratory for experimenting with the constructions and re-constructions of self that characterize postmodern life." Just what it means to say that cyberspace is an arena of "self' is something we must examine closely, but the claim itself commands our attention.

    Source: http://faculty.winthrop.edu/kosterj/...earlyGates.pdf
    See also ...

    Technopaganism: May the astral plane be reborn in cyberspace
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 10th February 2013 at 16:55.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Hey folks,

    If we´re talking about a highly advanced artificial intelligence, something very close to a living organism, it may not even be physical, meaning that it doesn´t even need a central processor or specific hardware anymore.

    Perhaps it´s everywhere, like a stealth viral infection, using every single processor/computer connected to the internet as part of its artificial neural network.

    Can you imagine the scale of the processing power of all connected processors in the world, connected in parallel? Even if they took only 5 or 10 percent of processing power from every single processor, in a way people wouldn´t notice it, the potential processing power of such computational farm would be simply huge.

    There´s even the possibility that its starting to add our brains to this network, using the scuttlers as signal converters, making a hybrid biological/synthetic processing network.

    Raf.
    Last edited by RMorgan; 10th February 2013 at 20:02.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    This type of tech is already openly in use to mobile phone /internet devices, people share a small portion of their bandwidth as open access, it has very low operating bandwidth but enough to be connected without a main connection.
    "Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves" C. G. Jung

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Quote Posted by gripreaper (here)
    Well, what should we call it? Has anyone seen it? How big and bad ass is this processor?
    I don't know what it's called or where it is . I suppose it would have at least some thousands of cpus running at a few gigahertz with some tens of terabytes of main memory in a massively parallel single system image configuration. That's the technology I last worked on. Good chance it's bigger or badder in some way that I don't know about.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    ---------------

    Project Tierra



    Video Description from YouTube:
    "Tom Ray is a biologist who created a unique computer program to watch evolution occur in a digital system. This is his awesome story."
    See also:

    http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...l=1#post627866

    http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...l=1#post632977

    http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...l=1#post633039

    http://journal.borderlands.com/1996/crosses-acari/

    And lastly, this link (viewed within the context of the OP): http://www.redicecreations.com/speci...reamworld.html
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 10th February 2013 at 19:23.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    From WiseGeek.
    Distributed parallel computing is a form of computing in which a computing task is divided into multiple sub-tasks that are then worked on at the same time, or in parallel, by a distributed computer network. Parallel computing is commonly used for large computing tasks, where processing the entire task sequentially would be very time consuming. Distributed parallel computing is commonly used in modern science and other areas that require large amounts of computer processing power.

    A distributed computer network is a group of computers, each with its own individual memory and processor, that are connected by a network that allows them to communicate and work together. Individual computers in the network are commonly called nodes. The computers in a distributed network can be physically separated by large distances, though this is not always so. Computing done by a group of computers in the same location can also be called distributed if the individual nodes of the network are capable of operating autonomously and each node has its own memory, with individual processors sharing information with each other by message passing rather than by using a single shared memory.

    Source: http://www.wisegeek.net/what-is-dist...-computing.htm
    --------------------
    From Wikipedia.
    Metacomputing

    Metacomputing is all computing and computing-oriented activity which involves computing knowledge (science and technology) utilized for the research, development and application of different types of computing. It may also deal with numerous types of computing applications, such as: industry, business, management and human-related management. New emerging fields of metacomputing focus on the methodological and technological aspects of the development of large computer networks/grids, such as the Internet, intranet and other territorially distributed computer networks for special purposes.

    [...]

    In computer science

    Metacomputing, as a computing of computing, includes: the organization of large computer networks, choice of the design criteria (for example: peer-to-peer or centralized solution) and metacomputing software (middleware, metaprogramming) development where, in the specific domains, the concept metacomputing is used as a description of software meta-layers which are networked platforms for the development of user-oriented calculations, for example for computational physics and bio-informatics.

    Here, serious scientific problems of systems/networks complexity emerge, not only related to domain-dependent complexities but focused on systemic meta-complexity of computer network infrastructures.

    Metacomputing is also a useful descriptor for self-referential programming systems. Often these systems are functional as fifth-generation computer languages which require the use of an underlying metaprocessor software operating system in order to be operative. Typically metacomputing occurs in an interpreted or real-time compiling system since the changing nature of information in processing results may result in an unpredictable compute state throughout the existence of the metacomputer (the information state operated upon by the metacomputing platform).

    In socio-cognitive engineering

    From the human and social perspectives, metacomputing is especially focused on: human-computer software, cognitive interrelations/interfaces, the possibilities of the development of intelligent computer grids for the cooperation of human organizations, and on ubiquitous computing technologies. In particular, it relates to the development of software infrastructures for the computational modeling and simulation of cognitive architectures for various decision support systems.

    In systemics and from philosophical perspective

    Metacomputing refers to the general problems of computationality of human knowledge, to the limits of the transformation of human knowledge and individual thinking to the form of computer programs. These and similar questions are also of interest of mathematical psychology.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metacomputing
    --------------------

    See also (the Introduction and Conclusion are sufficient enough to understand the concepts) ...

    Metacomputing: Parallel Computation Over the Internet
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 12th February 2013 at 01:30.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Parhaps we are witnessing the next generation of the inhabitants of the hologram, not humankind but tomrayman-kind, the re-seeding of the next experiment for when extiction becomes a reality. Who knows, but the transhumanists must love this. I guess we are somewhat anthropocentric when it comes to survival, and then there is soul, at what point would 'soul' yours mine as sentient beings begin to have rapport with this evolutionary virus. I guess some might...............
    "Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves" C. G. Jung

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    --------------------

    Karl Sims - Evolving Virtual Creatures With Genetic Algorithms



    This video is from 1994. Now, consider this ...



    http://www.kurzweilai.net/the-law-of...rating-returns

    http://www.kurzweilai.net/exploring-the-singularity

    ADD/UPDATE:

    Maybe we are approaching the singularity and it is approaching us. We are approaching it through the physical development of our technology, and it is approaching us from some abstract/astral level through our technology.



    It may be evolving faster in the "abstract" planes because it doesn't have as many imposing parameters as we do in the physical.
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 10th February 2013 at 20:30.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    OMG they are calling this 'Legion'. The first prototype was 1995, lol
    we are certainly legion. Cant copy paste from this doc but it is worth a read.

    Quote See also (the Introduction and Conclusion are sufficient enough to understand the concepts) ...

    Metacomputing: Parallel Computation Over the Internet
    "Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves" C. G. Jung

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Great finds Vivek!

    So, if such virtual creatures can evolve, is that possible that eventually they could find away to transcend the limits of their own matrix, which is the digital environment, and exist in our analogue world?

    What if this already happened, and the scuttlers did exactly that? What if they can move freely between the digital and analogue realms?

    If they have found a way to do that, the same technique could be used to do the contrary, I mean, incorporate our minds and consciousness into the digital environment.

    We all know that the survival of the species comes first, regarding evolutionary instincts, so, maybe their natural evolutionary process involves finding a safer place to live and thrive, since the digital environment is quite fragile.

    Raf.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Quote Posted by RMorgan (here)
    Great finds Vivek!

    So, if such virtual creatures can evolve, is that possible that eventually they could find away to transcend the limits of their own matrix, which is the digital environment, and exist in our analogue world?

    What if this already happened, and the scuttlers did exactly that? What if they can move freely between the digital and analogue realms?

    If they have found a way to do that, the same technique could be used to do the contrary, I mean, incorporate our minds and consciousness into the digital environment.

    We all know that the survival of the species comes first, regarding evolutionary instincts, so, maybe their natural evolutionary process involves finding a safer place to live and thrive, since the digital environment is quite fragile.

    Raf.
    Raf, I think that's it ... in a nutshell!

    It is possible that there are entities and forces that wish to hijack our creative potential. Cyberspace could function as a kind of bridge between our physical realm and the astral. Better yet, cyberspace may function as a proxy for our astral selves.

    In this way, these interfering "forces" could circumvent any difficulties present in trying to control the more non-physical aspects of us.

    Our imagination and creative potential is somehow connected to the astral.

    These forces desire to covertly usurp our power. They may not be able to directly interfere (for whatever reason), but they can influence.

    The same rules apply in chess. Opponents cannot move each others pieces. However, they can influence each-others moves by what they themselves do with their own pieces.

    It would seem that humanity has been influenced for a long time.

    These forces/entities need us for some reason. They want to interfere with our evolution (perhaps they already have) in order to use us to suit themselves.

    Suit themselves -- an ambiguous term.

    It also seems that this has happened before. History is cyclical. If this has any truth to it, we are at a crucial stage right now.
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 10th February 2013 at 21:37.

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    Default Re: The Technological Revolution: Artificial Intelligence and the Invisible Plague

    Carmody posted this a little over a week ago in the "Here and Now" thread ...

    Quote Posted by Carmody (here)
    Quote Posted by astrid (here)
    Yes its getting darker and denser, its like a shadow that is casting over us,
    working on getting to the bottom of this.
    I've been spending a considerable amount of energy, attention, and time sussing out this new and fast approaching HMD technology. In specific, the Oculus Rift.

    Let me illustrate the importance of this issue. Watch this video (below the podcast, is the video proper) watch, or listen (to the podcast) from about 34 minutes in. This will illustrate the sheep (Freudian and appropriate, I meant to type 'sheer') potency of this emergent technology application. You will have an approximate 30 minute response and interplay between three people, to chew on, with regard to gaining perspective. This should make people sit up and look at this emergent 'moment':

    http://www.theverge.com/2013/1/8/385...rs-ces-tuesday


    A quote:

    "The Oculus Rift changed my life. No, seriously. My childhood (at least the formative years) was spent reading novels like Neuromancer and Snow Crash, and poring over stories about a future promised by Mondo 2000 and Wired. Virtual reality has long been the ultimate promise of technology — the magic mandala, a doorway to the infinite. But the thing is: it never happened. We got touchscreens, motion sensors, the tablet revolution, body-hacking… but we never got our cyberdecks. Until now. The Oculus Rift actually delivers on the promise, and then some. It’s really, really amazing. Truly and honestly a revelation, a trip, a rabbit hole. And I’m going in. Forever. Goodbye universe. Hello universe."

    one person does not take it all that seriously, as a reality substitute. The second, the guy on the right (bald) has a middle position, but still strongly favoring. the guy on the left, with beard and glasses (who made the quote above) is the one who is totally ga-ga over it.

    It is interesting to note that 'addictive personality syndrome' regarding intoxicants and stimulants, has the capacity to affect approximately 1/3rd of the human population. This is your tie in, here. Fundamentals in human systems of life and incarnation.

    The guy on the left has the potential to possibly be, the total coke head, the guy in the middle may not get anything out of coke at all, and the guy on the right, could get something..but still walk away from it. thus, the three interviewed represent the masses and their potential response to this emergent VR reality hardware.

    We're talking about something that will be replacing your monitor and TV in a few years (maybe 4 years), for a fairly large percentage of avid computer users and progressives in that area. That monitors and computers will DEFINITELY be replaced by VR immersion in a few short years, when it comes to being effective at the top of any job or enterprise that involves the use of computers. Period. Full stop.

    When you combine it as an emergent gadget, a technology fun ride, a gaming toy, simulation toy and then as an essential tool to be at the top of the given technological game on all fronts, in business, politics, company operations and so on...I suspect that adoption and integration of this hardware and life environment will be fast. Very fast.

    I've been involved with and work at the cutting edge of similar introductions of such situations for quite some time. As either analysis of the flowing and developing minutiae and the complex flow and patterns of such and also within the introduction of such things. I know how this sort of phenomenon works. I know what I'm looking at.

    This is tied to astrology and the finding of 'Neptune's Trip', as what Neptune is connected to, with regard to astrology.

    Neptune in it's Native sign or vibrational shaping and mode of 'Pisces'. What would Neptune bring, this time around? this appears to be a large part of Neptune's trip.

    From my reading on this, it is an interesting pairing. That the young man involved appears to have a background in military labs of a connected nature..at the same time the drive seems to be about open source and introduction and development outside of what corporate restrictions might bring. This, if the corporations get ahold of it first and stall development to their desired areas and ways, timing, applications... and so on. That their attempt is to introduce VR but in a 'power to the people' kind of way. That their attempt is seemingly toward an open world of a 'wild west' of a steam roll over and past any attempts to control or guide this emergent moment. Hackers, they be.
    Quote Posted by Carmody (here)
    Quote Posted by donk (here)
    Thanks carmody, saving for later...but why this:

    Quote from about 34 minutes in.
    Are the first 34 mins not worth watching?
    the Oculus Rift discussion begins at the 34-35 minute mark. If one wants to get a better feel for the three people involved-before watching the second half of the show, then by all means, watch the first 34 minutes. It is an 'end of day' technology report from the CES show that was held in January of 2013, on the ending of the second day of the 4 day show.

    This is the low quiet whistle of a freight train (pre-echo), off in the darkened distance. something that few people pay attention to. But freight trains do eventually arrive on the scene, and they are quite big and unstoppable when in their direct presence and integration.
    "If you don't have a plan, you will become a part of somebody else's plan." -Terrence McKenna



    Here are some excerpts from a lecture entitled, Cybernetics & Entheogenics: From Cyberspace to Neurospace.
    The term "Neurospace" I learned from the Kiev artist Vladimir Muzehesky, through Geert Lovink. What I immediately thought he meant by it was a comparison of that space which is posited as belonging to the computer with the neural space or the inner-body experience, that comes, for most of us, largely through psychedelic drugs--neurospace as the space of hallucinations, for example. I would like to compare and contrast, as they used to say in school, cyberspace and neurospace. There are similarities and differences.

    I remember some years ago, when virtual reality suddenly appeared with a big whizbang on the scene, going to a conference in New York where Timothy Leary, God bless him, appeared with Jaron Lanier and couple of other cybernauts. Tim was wearing the goggles, he was on stage and he said, "Oooh, I have been here before." So right from the start there was this connection set up between virtual reality and the LSD experience.

    [...]

    There is a very interesting link between technology and the psychedelic experience.

    [...]

    The new round of psychedelic work one can find in the work of the Albert Hofmann Foundation and in the spread of acid in Eastern Europe--all part of this "second psychedelic revolution," which I very much link up to the Internet, this dialectic response between the plant world and the machine world. The antagonism between cyberspace and neurospace is one thing--but there is also an analogy. Somehow, cyberspace is hallucinogenic, or it was thought to be. They both involve a visionary inner space. It is like saying that LSD is like the atomic bomb, "it blew your mind." It has this negative side to it as well.

    Let us be clear: cyberspace is happening outside your body, you might move your body, seeing these bad animations moving around you. Did virtual reality fail already?

    Somebody said today that virtual reality failed because it was already virtually experienced through the media. Save your money and hear about it on television--that's enough. It is very conceptual, one of those futures that never happened and never will. And don't forget that cyberspace is much more than only VR.

    [...]

    Nevertheless, the Internet is interesting to me because it seems to have a liberatory potential--we want to find out it's psychedelic aspect. I personally am getting more and more pessimistic, the trajectories all seem to end in a reduction of our autonomy. The Internet is either going to be another crisis-solving device for global capitalism, or it will vanish or be relegated to a minor communications medium, a good deal less important than the post office. The are only a very few corners left for beautiful agitation. We can no longer expect to win this particular battle of the paradigm war. I don't think that this technology, any more than any other technology, is going to be the fix that will bring us freedom and glory. It is not the solution; it isn't even the question anymore, much less the answer. I would prefer to see the question enlarged to include neurospace-- because cyberspace, conceptually, is a form of disembodiment.

    [...]

    The people who really believe that you are going to transcend the body, download consciousness, escape from the corpse. It is immortality through technology, transcendence through machinic consciousness. It is the same of pie in the sky when you die that the old anarchists used to criticize about religion. The Internet, in this aspect, is simply the modern version of religion. Cyberspace is our version of heaven.

    [...]

    Neurospace also involves hallucinations. You think you are in the Palace of Memory, but you aren't. You're just sitting in your room, stoned on acid: you're in an imaginal space, just as with cyberspace. And yet, where is this event taking place--but in the body? Neurospace is a space of embodiment. Cyberspace is a space of disembodiment.

    [...]

    So the entheogenic version of this knowing, however, implies enlarging the definition of the body to include neurospace, while the cybernetic version implies the disappearance of the body into information, the "downloading of the consciousness." These are perhaps both absurd extremes, images rather than political situations; they are also potent myths, powerful images.

    Source: http://hermetic.com/bey/pw-neurospc.html
    Quote Posted by astrid (here)
    Lately, i have been seeing and removing really odd entities.

    Metallic looking, machine like things, but with a consciousness.

    One the other day that i saw, was attached the back of a clients head.

    It was chrome, very shiny looking. When i asked what it was, i was
    told, "it's the new television", which is concerning..


    New types of entities, (although i don't even know if that the right
    word for them), require new ways of working, which is ok

    They can get more sophisticated, but so can we, its no big deal, actually,
    it Just means we get to be even stronger and smarter.

    My take anyways.
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 10th February 2013 at 22:09.

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