+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Five Steps To Tyranny

  1. Link to Post #1
    Unsubscribed morguana's Avatar
    Join Date
    10th February 2010
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,571
    Thanks
    224
    Thanked 308 times in 132 posts

    Default Five Steps To Tyranny

    To implement tyranny, the aspiring tyrant should do as follows:
    1. ‘Us’ and ‘them’: use prejudice to foster the (fictional) notion of the existence of superior and dominant in-groups and inferior and powerless out-groups.
    2. Obey orders: insist that all people under your wing are to obey your orders.
    3. Dehumanize the enemy: emphasize on making inimical factions look less than human.
    4. ‘Stand up’ or ’stand by’: suppress dissenting or opposing opinions to your own.
    5. Suppress Individuality: foster the development of group identities while suppressing the individual.
    http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/...ps-to-tyranny/

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...7996551858132# this vid is well worth watching, its about an hour long

    http://www.psychexchange.co.uk/tag/obedience/



    makes one think doesnt it?
    love m x
    Last edited by morguana; 31st March 2010 at 12:38.

  2. Link to Post #2
    Unsubscribed morguana's Avatar
    Join Date
    10th February 2010
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,571
    Thanks
    224
    Thanked 308 times in 132 posts

    Default Re: Five Steps To Tyranny

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milgram_experiment

    Quote The Milgram experiment on obedience to authority figures was a series of social psychology experiments conducted by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram, which measured the willingness of study participants to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts that conflicted with their personal conscience. Milgram first described his research in 1963 in an article published in the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology,[1] and later discussed his findings in greater depth in his 1974 book, Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View.[2]

    The experiments began in July 1961, three months after the start of the trial of German Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem. Milgram devised his psychological study to answer the question: "Was it that Eichmann and his accomplices in the Holocaust had mutual intent, in at least with regard to the goals of the Holocaust?" In other words, "Was there a mutual sense of morality among those involved?" Milgram's testing suggested that it could have been that the millions of accomplices were merely following orders, despite violating their deepest moral beliefs............

    Before conducting the experiment, Milgram polled fourteen Yale University senior-year psychology majors as to what they thought would be the results. All of the poll respondents believed that only a few (average 1.2%) would be prepared to inflict the maximum voltage. Milgram also informally polled his colleagues and found that they, too, believed very few subjects would progress beyond a very strong shock.[1]

    In Milgram's first set of experiments, 65 percent (26 of 40)[1] of experiment participants administered the experiment's final massive 450-volt shock, though many were very uncomfortable doing so; at some point, every participant paused and questioned the experiment, some said they would refund the money they were paid for participating in the experiment. Only one participant steadfastly refused to administer shocks below the 300-volt level.[1]
    love m x

  3. Link to Post #3
    Unsubscribed morguana's Avatar
    Join Date
    10th February 2010
    Age
    41
    Posts
    1,571
    Thanks
    224
    Thanked 308 times in 132 posts

    Default Re: Five Steps To Tyranny

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_prison_experiment

    Quote The Stanford prison experiment was a study of the psychological effects of becoming a prisoner or prison guard. The experiment was conducted in 1971 by a team of researchers led by Psychology Professor Philip Zimbardo at Stanford University. Twenty-four undergraduates were selected out of 70 to play the roles of both guards and prisoners and live in a mock prison in the basement of the Stanford psychology building. Roles were assigned at random. They adapted to their roles well beyond that expected, leading the guards to display to authoritarian and even draconian measures. Two of the prisoners were upset enough by the process to quit the experiment early, and the entire experiment was abruptly stopped after only six days. The experimental process and the results remain controversial. The entire experiment was filmed, with excerpts soon made publicly available, leaving some disturbed by the resulting film. Over 30 years later, Zimbardo found renewed interest in the experiment when the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse scandal occurred............

    The experiment quickly grew out of hand. Prisoners suffered — and accepted — sadistic and humiliating treatment from the guards. The high level of stress progressively led them from rebellion to inhibition. By the experiment's end, many showed severe emotional disturbances............

    The Stanford experiment ended on August 20, 1971, only six days after it began instead of the fourteen it was supposed to have lasted. That day, Zimbardo called both the guards and inmates to a meeting and announced that the 'prison' was closing down. The experiment's result has been argued to demonstrate the impressionability and obedience of people when provided with a legitimizing ideology and social and institutional support. It is also used to illustrate cognitive dissonance theory and the power of authority.

    The results of the experiment are said to support situational attribution of behaviour rather than dispositional attribution. In other words, it seemed the situation caused the participants' behaviour, rather than anything inherent in their individual personalities. In this way, it is compatible with the results of the also-famous Milgram experiment, in which ordinary people fulfilled orders to administer what appeared to be damaging electric shocks to a confederate of the experimenter.

    Shortly after the study had been completed, there were bloody revolts at both the San Quentin and Attica prison facilities, and Zimbardo reported his findings on the experiment to the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary.
    love m x

  4. Link to Post #4
    United States Avalon Member
    Join Date
    25th March 2010
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Age
    52
    Posts
    460
    Thanks
    109
    Thanked 1,322 times in 322 posts

    Default Re: Five Steps To Tyranny

    This is a great video to watch , very imformative , check it out.

    Everyone should know this!



    http://www.wimp.com/thegovernment/







    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts