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Thread: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    Glen is doing his best but I don't think he's a great voice for balanced intelligent reason.
    I suggest everyone watch the video for themselves because I think Glenn Greenwald makes some strong points.
    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." - Arthur Schopenhauer

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Quote Posted by Openmindedskeptic (here)
    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    Glen is doing his best but I don't think he's a great voice for balanced intelligent reason.
    I suggest everyone watch the video for themselves because I think Glenn Greenwald makes some strong points.
    He does, but I hope others can do a better job of it.
    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    Quote Posted by Openmindedskeptic (here)
    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    Glen is doing his best but I don't think he's a great voice for balanced intelligent reason.
    I suggest everyone watch the video for themselves because I think Glenn Greenwald makes some strong points.
    He does, but I hope others can do a better job of it.
    We have several other eloquent NSA whistleblowers speaking out besides Edward Snowden including William Binney, Thomas Drake, Kurt Wiebe and Russ Tice. Here's a video of Mr. Tice making some scathing accusations.



    Pretty obvious to the rest of the world that the US Intelligence Agencies are doing their best to replicate East Germany's Stasi.
    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." - Arthur Schopenhauer

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Quote Posted by Openmindedskeptic (here)


    Pretty obvious to the rest of the world that the US Intelligence Agencies are doing their best to replicate East Germany's Stasi.


    ...... OR....... soft sell big brother.
    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Quote Posted by norman (here)
    Quote Posted by Openmindedskeptic (here)


    Pretty obvious to the rest of the world that the US Intelligence Agencies are doing their best to replicate East Germany's Stasi.


    ...... OR....... soft sell big brother.
    Recall that the USA brought back General Markus Wolf to the US to train their highest levels of the FBI, and to cascade those methodologies and mindsets throughout the FBI. At the very least.

    His 'Curriculum Vitae' (resume) Includes being the head of the East German Spy agency,and being remarkably effective in that posting.

    From his wiki bio:

    Quote Shortly before German reunification Wolf fled the country, and sought political asylum in Russia and Austria. When denied, he returned to Germany where he was arrested by German police. Wolf claimed to have refused an offer of "seven figures", a new identity and a home in California from the Central Intelligence Agency to defect to the United States.[5]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markus_Wolf

    Thus, the bush/nazi replication of the Stazi ~IN~ the USA is directly attempted and run, as a program.

    Also note that Joseph Farrell (in his books) illustrates that the agreement was, after WWII, to leave the NAZI German spy organization intact, and running under it's own steam, through it's own original Nazi spies and spy masters. to leave the entire organization intact, as it was behind the 'iron curtain'.

    when you add in the point of the Federal reserve banks gathering together and financing the Nazis via a banking concern created for that reality (Run by a Bush family Member) and then 'skull and bones members' (Kerry, Bush I&II, Dulles brothers, etc) running that banking concern..and the direct connection to the CIA (run by Bush I and oe Dulles Brother-It was the OSS back then), via the Dulles brothers who ran Project paperclip to bring Nazi scientists back to the US to work in many many black ops projects and advanced science that is still under wraps...well...you begin to get an understanding of what is going on.

    Real Nazi's, real fascists, real highly advanced scientific black ops, real societal control, real hidden agendas, real evidence, all properly supported and backed up.

    That fascism has a solid and near inescapable history of turning to totalitarianism, and ultimately totalitarianism...turns to bloodbaths of population reduction.

    (the point is that the public record has him turning down the CIA. The rumour mill and evidence has him showing up being connected to training the FBI)

    My point is that they already have replicated the East German Stazi (which evidence supports as being fascist).....with the same methods and the same PEOPLE.

    Communists, as we have seen in this world so far, are more akin to fascists with tight controls and limits. I see little to no difference between the two. I see organized systems of societal control and manipulation where one bears a striking resemblance to the other. Capitalism run rampant tends to look the same. Which is why America has turned fascist, as it was and has been, as a slow conversion in it's public face.

    Fascism has to HIDE itself inside of and via other cloaks... as it is known by the world that it is probably one of the most dangerous ideologies to ever emerge.
    Last edited by Carmody; 4th October 2013 at 19:25.
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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Quote CIA contractor-turned-whistleblower Edward Snowden should be on a hit list rather than a list of names recently nominated for a Prize for Freedom of Thought. That was a joke made by former NSA director Michael Hayden. But his humor has sparked a wave of criticism. He told RT's Marina Portnaya he was misunderstood.
    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." - Arthur Schopenhauer

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    'US unchained itself from constitution': Whistleblowers on RT after meeting Snowden



    Quote Edward Snowden's revelations about the activities of NSA forced him to go on the run and seek sanctuary from US intelligence agencies. But it also won him a lot of support and praise. Just yesterday he received the Sam Adams prize for 'Integrity in Intelligence'. RT welcomes whistleblowers and activists Jesselyn Radack, Thomas Andrews Drake, Ray McGovern and Coleen Rowley in the studio. They saw the whistleblower in Moscow and presented him with the award.
    Thanks to brave whistleblower Edward Snowden it appears the winds of change may finally be blowing here in the US.

    Patriot Act author prepares bill to put NSA bulk collection 'out of business'

    Quote The conservative Republican who co-authored America's Patriot Act is preparing to unveil bipartisan legislation that would dramatically curtail the domestic surveillance powers it gives to intelligence agencies.

    Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner, who worked with president George W Bush to give more power to US intelligence agencies after the September 11 terrorist attacks, said the intelligence community had misused those powers by collecting telephone records on all Americans, and claimed it was time "to put their metadata program out of business".
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ct-author-bill
    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." - Arthur Schopenhauer

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations




    10 October 2013 Last updated at 13:12

    NSA deputy Chris Inglis pledges 'more transparency'By Gordon Corera

    Security correspondent, BBC News




    National Security Agency Deputy Director Chris Inglis testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on 18 June 2013



    National Security Agency Deputy Director Chris Inglis discussed the agency's efforts
    to increase transparency with the BBC The US electronic spy agency is committed
    to being more transparent, a senior official has told the BBC.

    In a rare interview on a recent visit to London, National Security Agency (NSA)
    Deputy Director Chris Inglis spoke to the BBC about cyber-security.His comments
    came in the wake of revelations about the agency's work from former contractor
    Edward Snowden.Mr Snowden's leaks sparked a debate about secrecy and the scale
    of the agency's powers.

    In the interview, Mr Inglis said there was a need to consider the balance between
    secrecy and transparency in order to have the public's confidence.

    'Destructive acts'

    With the world becoming more reliant on the internet, Mr Inglis outlined concerns
    over three threats in cyberspace: the theft of intellectual property and secrets;
    disruption of networks (for instance, attacks that have taken websites of American
    banks offline in recent months); and destructive acts such as those that targeted
    Saudi Aramco last year, destroying tens of thousands of computers.


    NSA Deputy Director

    Snowden's father arrives in Russia

    "There is no failure of imagination in this space," he said of those seeking to exploit
    the internet.

    Dealing with threats requires more being done by both the private sector and the
    government to better defend networks and deter adversaries, he said.

    Responses to cyber attacks - such as those on American banks, which many
    commentators believe came from Iran - needed to be carefully thought through and
    might involve a range of tools, the NSA's number-two said.

    "If at the end of the day we were to determine that those were attributable to
    another nation state, then surely we might think that is then the crossing of a red
    line," Mr Inglis said. "But the response should be proportionate," adding that it may
    come from the private sector rather than government.

    Dealing with commercial espionage in cyberspace, he said, might also involve a
    range of measures including private or public diplomatic pressure and the targeting
    of individuals for criminal prosecution.

    The job of the NSA, Mr Inglis said, was to exploit networks to collect intelligence in
    cyberspace and to defend certain networks - but not carry out destructive acts.

    "NSA had a responsibility from way back, from our earliest days, to both break
    codes and make codes," he said. "We have a responsibility to do intelligence in a
    space we once called the telecommunications arena - now cyberspace - and the
    responsibility to make codes or to defend signals communications of interest.

    "That's different than what most people conceive as offence or attack in this space."

    'People are nervous'

    That task of destructive cyber attack, if ordered, lies with the US military's rapidly
    expanding Cyber Command.



    National Security Agency Director General Keith Alexander and NSA Deputy
    Director John Chris Inglis testified on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on 18 June
    2013 National Security Agency Director General Keith Alexander (right) testified
    before the House Select Intelligence Committee in June 2013 However, both the
    NSA and Cyber Command are led by the same man - General Keith Alexander -
    because the three fields of exploiting, defending and attacking are closely related.

    "We realised a long time ago that the predicate for all those actions is first
    understanding how cyberspace works," Mr Inglis said. "Second: finding, fixing,
    holding in your mind's eye the thing that you would either defend, or exploit or
    attack. And then - and only then - do you make that final choice about what you
    are going to do about that.

    "At least in the military component, the US has chosen to invest all those things in
    a single person such that that person may then orient and synchronise those
    activities in a way that they complement each other."

    Mr Inglis has worked for more than 25 years in the NSA, the last seven as deputy
    director, the highest-ranking civilian.

    There is no doubt that the last few months will have been the most difficult as the
    NSA - which was so secret people used to joke that its initials stood for "no such
    agency" - has been thrust into an uncomfortable spotlight by the leaks by Mr
    Snowden.



    NSA headquarters, Fort Meade, Maryland The NSA is based at Fort Meade outside Washington DC

    "I do think there needs to be more transparency," Mr Inglis told the BBC.

    "We've had a discussion many times across the summer about the need to perhaps
    rebalance the balance between national security and civil liberties," he said.

    "I don't think that is the case. I think that both of those must be given equal and
    full support. I don't think that we trade one for the other.

    "But I do think we have to consider the balance between secrecy and transparency
    in order to have the public's confidence or [that of] those who stand in the shoes of
    the public and act on their behalf, say in the Congress," Mr Inglis added. "There
    needs to be greater transparency and we are committed to that."

    The revelations from Mr Snowden have indicated a scale of capability that has
    surprised even close observers of the NSA and its British partner GCHQ, and this
    has raised concerns over whether the capabilities are sufficiently accountable.

    "I can appreciate that people are nervous," Mr Inglis said.

    "And we ourselves at NSA need to respect that and therefore offer up whatever is
    necessary in terms of transparency to secure the confidence of our overseers and
    beyond them the American public - and for that matter allies."

    Decryption denial

    One of the tensions for the NSA over many years is the balance between its two
    roles of defending networks and exploiting them for intelligence.

    Edward Snowden Edward Snowden fled to Russia this year with a wealth of secret
    data about the NSA The most controversial revelation within the cyber security
    community was the claim that the NSA had been deliberately weakening some of
    the security protocols surrounding encryption, either by introducing back doors or
    by modifying international standards to ensure it could gain access to gather
    intelligence on its targets.

    "What we have found over time is that our adversaries are using precisely the same
    communication systems, services, pathways as our citizens," Mr Inglis told the BBC.

    "But in pursuing our adversaries we must also defend our citizens," he said. "We
    must not hold them at risk. And so we do try to crack the encryption used by
    terrorists and other adversaries in that system. We need to make sure that we do
    not hold at risk the encryption that is used by US citizens."

    "So that's rule one and we do in fact find ways to do precisely that," he added. "It
    is false to imagine or say that NSA broadly has the capability to decrypt most of the
    encryption that is used by any citizen in the world but in particular US citizens."

    The revelations by the Guardian newspaper that the NSA was collecting metadata
    about US communications raised concerns that the agency was getting involved in
    domestic surveillance.

    Mr Inglis argued that this collection operated under constraints.

    "Beyond saying that I'm not Big Brother I think we are committed to demonstrating
    we are not Big Brother," he said, adding that this would involve illuminating the
    controls on the NSA's actions and performance statistics on those controls.

    Even beyond the revelations by Mr Snowden, the role of the NSA in cyberspace and
    the resulting questions of where responsibility lies for defence, intelligence
    gathering and attack mean the agency is unlikely to be able to retreat back into the
    secrecy that it enjoyed for so long.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24470450
    Last edited by Cidersomerset; 14th October 2013 at 14:53.

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations



    11 October 2013 Last updated at 12:16

    Snowden leaks 'worst ever loss to British intelligence'



    Sir David Omand Sir David called the leaks the "most catastrophic ever"


    Leaked surveillance programme details have been the "most catastrophic loss to
    British intelligence ever", a senior UK security expert has said.

    Former No 10 adviser Sir David Omand said he assumed data leaked by ex-US
    intelligence worker Edward Snowden was being analysed by Russia and China.

    He said the breach was worse than that by the Cambridge spy ring in the 1950s.

    The Guardian has said it will continue to publish leaks by Mr Snowden, who is now
    in Russia.

    Meanwhile, Business Secretary Vince Cable said the newspaper had performed "a
    very considerable public service" - appearing to contradict his party leader Nick
    Clegg who described the publication of the leaks as damaging.

    But former Home Secretary Jack Straw hit out at the Guardian saying its stance
    was "indulgent irresponsibility" which did not help protect the public.

    'Proper oversight'

    Sir David, the former head of the UK's communications surveillance centre GCHQ,
    told the Times: "You have to distinguish between the original whistleblowing intent
    to get a debate going, which is a responsible thing to do, and the stealing of 58,000
    top-secret British security documents and who knows how many American
    documents, which is seriously, seriously damaging.

    "The assumption the experts are working on is that all that information or almost
    all of it will now be in the hands of Moscow and Beijing.

    "It's the most catastrophic loss to British intelligence ever, much worse than
    Burgess and Maclean."

    Donald Duart Maclean and Guy Burgess were among a group of British officials who
    met at Cambridge University and passed information to the Soviet Union during
    World War II and into the 1950s, other notable members being Kim Philby and
    Anthony Blunt.

    In May, Mr Snowden leaked information to the Guardian about mass surveillance
    programmes such as the US National Security Agency's Prism and GCHQ's Tempora
    operations.



    Cambridge Spies Donald Maclean, left, and Guy Burgess, right Maclean, left, and
    Burgess passed western secrets to the Soviet Union.


    Mr Cable told BBC Radio 4' Today programme: "I think Mr Snowden's contribution
    is two-fold. One is a positive one - the whistleblowing, the other is more worrying
    which is a large amount of genuinely important intelligence material does seem to
    have been passed across.

    "We do need to have proper political oversight of the intelligence services and
    arguably we haven't until now."

    On Thursday, Deputy Prime Minister Mr Clegg said stories in the Guardian about
    GCHQ "would have been of immense interest to people who want harm".

    There was however a legitimate debate to be had about the use of mass
    surveillance programmes, he added.

    Earlier this year, the government's Intelligence and Security committee's powers to
    scrutinise the work of the security services were increased.

    But a source close to Mr Clegg denied a suggestion made by Mr Cable on Today
    that the deputy prime minister was seeking a specific review of the system of
    political oversight of the intelligence services.

    He said that in the coming months there would only be discussions within
    government about some of the issues thrown up the Snowden case.

    Mr Straw's comments came in an interview to be broadcast on the BBC's Sunday
    Politics Wales.

    He said the Guardian had a "sense of power of having these secrets and
    excitement... about these secrets has gone to their heads".

    "They are blinding themselves about the consequence and also showing an
    extraordinary naivety and arrogance in implying that they are in a position to judge
    whether or not particular secrets which they publish are - are or not - likely to
    damage the national interest," said Mr Straw.

    Temporary asylum

    On Tuesday the director general of the security service MI5, Andrew Parker, warned
    in a speech the disclosure of the "reach and limits" of GCHQ's capabilities was
    a "gift" to terrorists.

    Mr Parker dismissed suggestions that the agencies were trawling through people's
    private lives for anything that looked interesting as "utter nonsense".

    Asked about Mr Parker's suggestion, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger said: "They
    will always say that. You read histories of intelligence and you go back to the 1990s
    and the security people were saying the same."

    Mr Snowden has been given temporary asylum in Russia. In the US, he faces
    charges of theft of government property, unauthorised communication of national
    defence information and wilful communication of classified intelligence.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24486649
    Last edited by Cidersomerset; 14th October 2013 at 15:01.

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Three similar articles, but are different.............



    WikiLeaks releases video of Snowden in Moscow




    Published on 11 Oct 2013


    Video of NSA leaker Edward Snowden surfaced late Friday. Snowden was last seen
    on video back in June, when he appears on camera for The Guardian discussing the
    reasons for releasing the details of the NSA's surveillance programs. Since then,
    Snowden received asylum in Russia and just recently was awarded the Sam Adams
    Associates for Integrity in Intelligence award. RT's Ameera David has more on the footage.





    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





    Published on 12 Oct 2013


    Edward Snowden hasn't been seen by the wider public since he received political
    asylum in Russia until now. Wikileaks has released new footage of the NSA
    whistleblower. They did not reveal exactly where it was filmed though, because of
    concerns about his security.
    Last edited by Cidersomerset; 14th October 2013 at 15:11.

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Assange: Snowden safe but journalists dealing with him at risk


    Julian assange explains why the US is miffed at being caught out blackmailing
    Latin American countries and more......



    Published on 11 Oct 2013


    Edward Snowden is safe in Russia, but the fates of journalists who helped him and
    published his leaks are now of more concern for WikiLeaks, Julian Assange said in an
    exclusive interview with RT Spanish 'Behind the News' host Eva Golinger

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    In a Democracy Now special, we spend the hour with four former U.S. intelligence officials -- all whistleblowers themselves -- who have just returned from visiting National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden in Russia. They are former CIA analyst Ray McGovern, former FBI agent Coleen Rowley, former National Security Agency senior executive Thomas Drake, and former U.S. Justice Department ethics advisor Jesselyn Radack, now of the Government Accountability Project. On Wednesday, the group presented Snowden with an award from the Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence. "In our visit, we told Edward Snowden that he had begun the debate by disclosing to American citizens what was going on -- this massive spying upon American citizens," Rowley says. "We were happy to tell him the debate has begun, but he is very concerned, and this is actually the reason he has sacrificed so much: he wants to see these laws, these secret interpretations of the law, I should say, fixed."

    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident." - Arthur Schopenhauer

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Jesse Ventura: Shutdown is 'despicable,' pardon Manning and Snowden



    Published on 2 Oct 2013


    Politics has hijacked the United States and still lawmakers on both sides of the
    aisle have yet to come closer to an agreement that would put nearly 1 million
    government employees back to work. According to a recent poll, 72 percent
    of Americans are opposed of the Republican strategy to shut down the
    government in spite of "Obamacare." And as the dysfunction continues,
    former Independent Governor Jesse Ventura sounds off on the Capitol Hill
    shenanigans with RT's Sam Sacks.

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Evangeline Lilly narrates a nice summary of "the problem".

    The visuals and mashup presentation here is pretty good if you have the time, and its a great summary of what has been exposed so far.

    Those of the positive polarity are of service when by action or thought or even intention, another entity or the self is freer to seek his or her own path than before the intended service was performed. --L/Leema

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who Snowden brought this to at the Guardian, is moving on to create his own news organization.

    I have read Greenwald since he was a lowly blogger on his own self-published site, Unclaimed Territory, early in the Bush first term. His writings documenting the lawlessness and separate laws for ruling elites verses everyone else and the decline of mainstream journalism made him a must-read for me daily for over 10 years now.


    http://www.buzzfeed.com/bensmith/exc...-to-create-new



    Quote Exclusive: Glenn Greenwald Will Leave Guardian To Create New News Organization

    The reporter who broke the NSA story promises “a momentous new venture.” A “very substantial new media outlet” with serious backing, he says. Updated.


    Glenn Greenwald, the lawyer and blogger who brought The Guardian the biggest scoop of the decade, is departing the London-based news organization, for a brand-new, large-scale, broadly focused media outlet, he told BuzzFeed Tuesday.

    Greenwald, 46, published revelations from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden about the extent of American and British domestic spying and about officials’ deception about its scope. He said he is departing for a new, “once-in-a-career dream journalistic opportunity” with major financial backing, the details of which will be public soon.

    “My partnership with The Guardian has been extremely fruitful and fulfilling: I have high regard for the editors and journalists with whom I worked and am incredibly proud of what we achieved,” Greenwald said in an emailed statement. “The decision to leave was not an easy one, but I was presented with a once-in-a-career dream journalistic opportunity that no journalist could possibly decline.”

    Greenwald said that because the news had leaked “before we were prepared to announce it, I’m not yet able to provide any details of this momentous new venture.” It will, he said, “be unveiled very shortly.”

    A Guardian spokeswoman, Jennifer Lindenauer, also stressed that the writer and his news organization are parting on good terms — though she said The Guardian is “disappointed” to lose him.

    “Glenn Greenwald is a remarkable journalist and it has been fantastic working with him,” Lindenauer said in an email. “Our work together over the last year has demonstrated the crucial role that responsible investigative journalism can play in holding those in power to account. We are of course disappointed by Glenn’s decision to move on, but can appreciate the attraction of the new role he has been offered. We wish him all the best.”

    The Guardian, with a tradition of rigorous, crusading, liberal reporting and experience with two extremely sensitive international investigative stories — WikiLeaks and the News Corp. phone-tapping scandals — was in some ways a perfect home for Greenwald’s reporting, which in turn offered a huge boost to The Guardian’s American and global prestige.

    But Greenwald never functioned as a typical employee of a news organization. He told BuzzFeed in August that he had not shared all of Snowden’s files with The Guardian, and that “only [filmmaker] Laura [Poitras] and I have access to the full set of documents which Snowden provided to journalists.” The Guardian, facing intense pressure from the British government, has continued to publish Snowden’s revelations at a deliberate pace in recent weeks; but Greenwald has moved more quickly on his own, publishing stories in Brazil and India. He said recently that he will also publish stories soon in Le Monde.

    Greenwald declined to comment on the precise scale of the new venture or on its budget, but he said it would be “a very well-funded … very substantial new media outlet.” He said the source of funding will be public when the venture is officially announced.

    Politico reported later Tuesday that a “philanthropist” would fund the venture. A spokesman for George Soros, perhaps the most famous philanthropist of the American left, ruled Soros out as the backer. “They have had no contact,” Soros spokesman Michael Vachon said of Greenwald.

    “My role, aside from reporting and writing for it, is to create the entire journalism unit from the ground up by recruiting the journalists and editors who share the same journalistic ethos and shaping the whole thing — but especially the political journalism part — in the image of the journalism I respect most,” he said.

    Greenwald will continue to live in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, he said, and would bring some staff to Rio, but the new organization’s main hubs will be New York City; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco, he said.

    The venture, which he said had “hired a fair number of people already,” will be “a general media outlet and news site — it’s going to have sports and entertainment and features. I’m working on the whole thing but the political journalism unit is my focus.”

    Greenwald said he looked forward to creating a new organization with “no preexisting institutional strictures on what you can do.”

    And he said his move is driven solely by the opportunity presented.

    “When people hear what it is, there is almost no journalist who would say no to it,” he said.
    Last edited by mountain_jim; 16th October 2013 at 13:30.
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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    NSA is collecting Americans' online contact list in



    Published on 16 Oct 2013


    National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden released more documents this week
    about another of the agency's bulk data collection programs. This time around, the NSA is
    collecting data on millions of e-mail address books and instant messaging "buddy lists,"
    including those belonging to Americans. The NSA doesn't need legal justification for this
    program because the data is stored in overseas servers belonging to e-mail services, like
    Google or Yahoo, or social media sites, like Facebook. The NSA is collecting the information
    as it is transmitted into the US. RT's Sam Sacks has more on Snowden's latest NSA leaks.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Snowden leak: NSA heavily involved in CIA's drone warfar




    Published on 17 Oct 2013


    The latest leaked documents by National Security Agency whistleblower
    Edward Snowden show the extent the NSA has been involved with CIA
    counterterrorism activities, specifically drone strikes. In the past, the
    drone-strike program was presented as an exclusive initiative of the
    CIA, but the Snowden documents show that the program depends
    heavily on the NSA's ability to collect information from e-mails, phone
    calls and a myriad of other sources. In the meantime, Snowden's father
    Lon was able to visit the former government contractor in Russia this week,
    and arrived back in the US on Wednesday. RT's Ameera David has the
    NSA's response to the leaks about their involvement in drone warfare,
    as well as the advice Lon Snowden gave his son.

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Grilling Guardian: 'Cameron declares war on investigative journalism'



    Published on 17 Oct 2013


    The British Prime Minister has called for an investigation into
    whether the Guardian newspaper broke the law - by publishing
    the Edward Snowden leaks that sent shockwaves about American
    surveillance worldwide. A parliamentary committee is now
    looking into it. Tony Gosling joins RT to discuss David Cameron's
    gunning for The Guardian.

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    If the law is not clear enough to know easily if it has been broken or not in this context, the I would say it is a bad law.

    One can conclude then that this is a witch hunt/retaliation.

    It aims sends a very clear message to any media that seeks to step out of line.

    (I think I am stating the obvious here - this is not supreme insight is it?)
    Those of the positive polarity are of service when by action or thought or even intention, another entity or the self is freer to seek his or her own path than before the intended service was performed. --L/Leema

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Well, the jury was out for awhile, but as far as I'm concerned, Edward Snowden (SnowJOB) is a confirmed controlled disinfo shill/CIA asset, and here's why:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/...814_story.html

    Quote The disclosures about the hunt for the elusive founder of al-Qaeda are contained in classified documents that detail the fiscal 2013 “black budget” for U.S. intelligence agencies, including the NSA and the CIA. The documents, provided to The Washington Post by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, make only brief references to the bin Laden operation. But the mission is portrayed as a singular example of counterterrorism cooperation among the U.S. government’s numerous intelligence agencies.

    Eight hours after the raid, according to the documents, a forensic intelligence laboratory run by the Defense Intelligence Agency in Afghanistan had analyzed DNA from bin Laden’s corpse and “provided a conclusive match” confirming his identity. The budget further reveals that satellites operated by the National Reconnaissance Office performed more than 387 “collects” of high-resolution and infrared images of the Abbottabad compound in the month before the raid — intelligence that was “critical to prepare for the mission and contributed to the decision to approve execution.”
    A "conclusive match" my A$$!! They still think we're a bunch of effin idiots!

    Not a WORD about anything that really matters. Nothing about 911, nothing about the nuclear tsunami's in Indonesia and Japan, nothing about media hoaxes Sandy Hook, Batman, DC Navy Yard or Boston, nothing about Hurricane FrankenSandy, nothing about UFO disclosure, NADA! ZILCH! Just a bunch of crap we ALREADY KNEW!

    A REAL whistleblower will never get widespread attention from the mainstream media.... NEVER!!
    Last edited by Prodigal Son; 17th October 2013 at 23:27.

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    Default Re: Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations

    Quote Posted by Prodigal Son (here)
    Well, the jury was out for awhile, but as far as I'm concerned, Edward Snowden (SnowJOB) is a confirmed controlled disinfo shill/CIA asset, and here's why:
    ...
    A REAL whistleblower will never get widespread attention from the mainstream media.... NEVER!!
    For the, the balance of probabilities seems to suggest ES being the real deal. I dont see how this changes anything because we have not seen all the data. Also there may well be some self censoring going on on the part of those who are releasing ES's data.
    Those of the positive polarity are of service when by action or thought or even intention, another entity or the self is freer to seek his or her own path than before the intended service was performed. --L/Leema

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