+ Reply to Thread
Page 92 of 92 FirstFirst 1 42 82 92
Results 1,821 to 1,827 of 1827

Thread: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

  1. Link to Post #1821
    United States Avalon Member william r sanford72's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th February 2013
    Location
    rural southcentral iowa
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,483
    Thanks
    56,082
    Thanked 9,369 times in 2,377 posts

    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Principles of using of vibro-acoustic markers and communicational signals in the process of bees' lives

    August 31, 2018, CORDIS

    How do the bees use this system of vibro-acoustical signals? Understanding now, how marker and communicational vibro-acoustic signals are arranged, and what, in principle, they serve, let's consider their application in the daily life of beehives.

    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-08-princi...-bees.html#jCp

    Let's suppose that a bee of the age of about 5 days moves along the hive. Its own marker is set in the "position" "free," or it is not emitted in principle. The bee falls into the zone of action of vibro-acoustical marker signals of the group of bees No. 1, engaged in feeding the larvae with royal jelly. Her internal program verifies the possibility of joining this cluster. She analyzes the correspondence of work to her age. The answer is "no," this work cannot be performed yet.

    It's too early. Her glands are not matured yet. The bee continues her movement, and falls into the zone of action of vibro-acoustical marker of the group of bees No. 2. This marker determines the work of the bees on cleaning the cells for laying eggs by the queen. Her internal program analyzes the situation. The answer is "no." The bee has already left this age range. The bee continues her movement, and falls into the zone of action of vibro-acoustical markers of the group of bees No. 3. They are engaged in feeding the larvae with honey and pollen. The internal program of the bee analyzes the situation. The analysis shows that according to the age of the bee, this work is quite suitable for her. The bee joins the cluster, setting her own marker in accordance with the work being performed.

    The view is somewhat simplistic. Most likely, there should be some marker, or communication, which may be tactile, that determines the need for such connection to the cluster of working bees.

    It is possible that American scientists observed one of these signals during their studies. This was so-called worker piping. It is possible that this signal had a different purpose, because the bee roamed the honeycomb for a long time, and periodically released it—during an hour, or an hour and a half.

    In all cases, the signal was seen as a short pulse, lasting from 0.5 to 1.5 seconds, filled with a frequency of 337 + -15 hertz. This data also confirms once again our idea that the bees communicate using very short impulse signals, which are difficult to process with the help of Fast Fourier Transform algorithms.

    But this is not the end of the problems. There are some other technical features involved in understanding of the "language" of bees, but we do not have space and time to talk about them in this article.

    Thus, we once again wish to state the following:

    The vibro-acoustic signals of bees are a set of short pulses of certain frequency, or sum of frequencies, followed by certain intervals, and are markers of the type of activity of the bees, or communicational signals. These markers and communicational signals do not carry in themselves meaningful, as in our understanding, information, such as letters or words. They are only a means to attract attention, and markers of performed works or emotional states.
    All these signals are used together with tactile signals and with the eyesight of bees.

    Explore further: Sick bees eat healthier

    https://phys.org/news/2018-08-princi...kers-bees.html
    TRUTH and BALANCE

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to william r sanford72 For This Post:

    Bluegreen (2nd September 2018), Foxie Loxie (3rd September 2018), MistressJan (5th September 2018), Sstarss (16th September 2018), Star Tsar (4th September 2018)

  3. Link to Post #1822
    United States Avalon Member Foxie Loxie's Avatar
    Join Date
    20th September 2015
    Location
    Central NY
    Age
    74
    Posts
    3,079
    Thanks
    67,683
    Thanked 17,092 times in 2,949 posts

    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Fireflies....who doesn't remember catching fireflies to put in a jar on warm summer nights?!

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Foxie Loxie For This Post:

    Sstarss (16th September 2018), william r sanford72 (5th September 2018)

  5. Link to Post #1823
    United States Avalon Member william r sanford72's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th February 2013
    Location
    rural southcentral iowa
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,483
    Thanks
    56,082
    Thanked 9,369 times in 2,377 posts

    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Don't feel bad Foxie..I did the same and I also used em for night fishing back in the day..when a fire couldn't bee made or a lantern drew to many bugs as kids we would catch em and smear the ends of our pole with the glow..wouldn't think of doing that now...


    William.
    TRUTH and BALANCE

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to william r sanford72 For This Post:

    Sstarss (16th September 2018)

  7. Link to Post #1824
    United States Avalon Member william r sanford72's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th February 2013
    Location
    rural southcentral iowa
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,483
    Thanks
    56,082
    Thanked 9,369 times in 2,377 posts

    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Telling the Bees

    By John Greenleaf Whittier

    Here is the place; right over the hill
    Runs the path I took;
    You can see the gap in the old wall still,
    And the stepping-stones in the shallow brook.

    There is the house, with the gate red-barred,
    And the poplars tall;
    And the barn’s brown length, and the cattle-yard,
    And the white horns tossing above the wall.

    There are the beehives ranged in the sun;
    And down by the brink
    Of the brook are her poor flowers, weed-o’errun,
    Pansy and daffodil, rose and pink.

    A year has gone, as the tortoise goes,
    Heavy and slow;
    And the same rose blows, and the same sun glows,
    And the same brook sings of a year ago.

    There ’s the same sweet clover-smell in the breeze;
    And the June sun warm
    Tangles his wings of fire in the trees,
    Setting, as then, over Fernside farm.

    I mind me how with a lover’s care
    From my Sunday coat
    I brushed off the burrs, and smoothed my hair,
    And cooled at the brookside my brow and throat.

    Since we parted, a month had passed,—
    To love, a year;
    Down through the beeches I looked at last
    On the little red gate and the well-sweep near.

    I can see it all now,—the slantwise rain
    Of light through the leaves,
    The sundown’s blaze on her window-pane,
    The bloom of her roses under the eaves.

    Just the same as a month before,—
    The house and the trees,
    The barn’s brown gable, the vine by the door,—
    Nothing changed but the hives of bees.

    Before them, under the garden wall,
    Forward and back,
    Went drearily singing the chore-girl small,
    Draping each hive with a shred of black.

    Trembling, I listened: the summer sun
    Had the chill of snow;
    For I knew she was telling the bees of one
    Gone on the journey we all must go!

    Then I said to myself, “My Mary weeps
    For the dead to-day:
    Haply her blind old grandsire sleeps
    The fret and the pain of his age away.”

    But her dog whined low; on the doorway sill,
    With his cane to his chin,
    The old man sat; and the chore-girl still
    Sung to the bees stealing out and in.

    And the song she was singing ever since
    In my ear sounds on:—
    “Stay at home, pretty bees, fly not hence!
    Mistress Mary is dead and gone!”

    https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poe...lling-the-bees
    TRUTH and BALANCE

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to william r sanford72 For This Post:

    Sstarss (16th September 2018), Star Tsar (8th September 2018)

  9. Link to Post #1825
    United States Avalon Member william r sanford72's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th February 2013
    Location
    rural southcentral iowa
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,483
    Thanks
    56,082
    Thanked 9,369 times in 2,377 posts

    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    “Telling the Bees”
    In nineteenth-century New England, it was held to be essential to whisper to beehives of a loved one’s death.

    By Colleen English.

    While most common in the nineteenth century, the practice of “telling the bees” about significant life events endures, albeit in a different form, to the present day. The most pervasive and affecting depiction of this tradition can be found in the New England Quaker writer John Greenleaf Whittier’s 1858 poem “Telling the Bees.”

    An unnamed speaker returns to his lover’s abode after a year’s absence. He describes his previous visit there in careful detail before noting that nothing had changed, not the house or the trees, save the family beehives. The speaker’s attention is drawn to these objects by the movements of a “chore-girl small” who sings a mournful tune as she drapes the hives with “shred of black.” It is apparent from the actions of the chore-girl that something is very wrong here. This is a house in mourning, a realization that sends a wintry chill through the speaker, who then begins to listen intently to the girl’s lachrymose tune. He becomes aware that “she was telling the bees of one / Gone on the journey we all must go!”

    His first thought is that his beloved’s grandfather has died, a conclusion that gives him comfort, knowing that he “sleeps / The fret and the pain of his age away.” His thoughts are then interrupted by the sound of a dog whimpering. He looks up. There, in the doorway, is the old man, his head resting on his cane, very much alive. The chore-girl continues to sing to the bees, and now he can make out what she is telling them. She sings: “Stay at home, pretty bees, fly not hence! / Mistress Mary is dead and gone!” The poem ends with this communication to the bees, foregrounding their importance in a ritual conveying human grief.

    Whittier himself was eager to locate the tradition of “telling the bees” within the folklore of rural New England. When he published the poem in the Atlantic in 1858 he included an introduction to the poem where he notes that this ritual that has “formerly prevailed” was brought to America from “the Old Country.” That Whittier felt it necessary to include a note about this tradition indicates that, even in the mid-nineteen-century, the tradition of “telling the bees” was fading.

    In an 1858 letterto fellow poet and Atlantic contributor Rose Terry Cooke, Whittier mentions that, following the advice of the Atlantic’s first editor, James Russell Lowell, he changed the title to “Telling the Bees” and added a verse “for the purpose of introducing this very expression.” Whittier’s comments, and his introductory note, indicate a desire to preserve this particular folkloric ritual, to educate the unaware. The emphasis that Whittier places on this concept of delivering important information to the bees implies that there is a special relationship that exists between honeybees and humans that is essential to maintain.

    This practice of “telling the bees” may have its origins in Celtic mythology where the presence of a bee after a death signified the soul leaving the body, but the tradition appears to have been most prominent in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in the U.S. and Western Europe. The ritual involves notifying honey bees of major events in the beekeeper’s life, such as a death or marriage.

    While the traditions varied from country to country, “telling the bees” always involved notifying the insects of a death in the family—so that the bees could share in the mourning. This generally entailed draping each hive with black crepe or some other “shred of black.” It was required that the sad news be delivered to each hive individually, by knocking once and then verbally relaying the tale of sorrow.

    Charles Fitzgerald Gambier Jenyns, a British Victorian apiarist and rector, in his A Book about Bees (1886) asserts that this message should be delivered to the hives at midnight. In other regions, like in Whittier’s New England, they simply hung crepe on the hive and then sang to the bees that, “So-and-so is dead.” Other variations include merely telling (rather than singing) or whispering the information. In some places they may say “Little brownies, little brownies, your master (or mistress) is dead.”

    Tammy Horn, a literary scholar and apiarist, writes in Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation (2005) that in New Hampshire, the news of a death must not only be sung, but the verses must also rhyme. She provides a sample verse: “Bees, bees, awake! / Your master is dead, / And another you must take.” If the bees begin to buzz after this information has been delivered, it is seen as a good omen.

    Horn also writes of another death custom associated with bees: that of “ricking,” a ritual that required the eldest son in the bereaved family to shift all of the hives to the right in order to signify that a change has occurred. Another take on this was to shift the hives so that their entrances faced the family home. This tended only to occur if the deceased was being waked in the home.

    The consequences of not telling the bees could be dire. Another Victorian biologist, Margaret Warner Morley, in her book The Honey-Makers (1899), cites a case in Norfolk where a man purchased a hive of bees at an auction. When the man returned home with them, the bees appeared very sickly. It occurred to their new owner that they hadn’t been properly put into mourning after the death of their former owner. He decided to drape the hive with black cloth, and soon after he did, the bees regained their health. There are also tales of entire bee colonies dying if the family failed to notify them of a death.

    Throughout the nineteenth-century and well into the twentieth, there were reports of rural people who firmly believed in this tradition of telling the bees. There is even a report of bees brought to a funeral, presumably after being told of the death. In 1956, the AP reported a strange occurrence at the funeral of John Zepka, a beekeeper from the Berkshire Hills. As the funeral procession reached the grave, the mourners discovered swarms of bees hanging placidly from the ceiling of the tent “and clinging to floral sprays. They did not annoy the mourners—just remained immobile.” According to a New York Times dispatch from Adams, MA, published on July 16, 1956: “Nothing like it had ever been seen before.” This curious case seemed to confirm the need to “tell” the bees, further strengthening the conviction that there exists a mournful sympathy between bees and humans.

    The mourning practices of this area of New England were, as nineteenth-century folklorist Pamela McArthur Cole has commented, anachronistic even in 1894. These practices included the superstition that you must touch the corpse before burial, else the departed will reappear to the mourner in a dream. Cole observes that, by 1842, only a few individuals had actually witnessed the ritual of “telling the bees.” Although Whittier’s popular ballad would not be published for another sixteen years, the tradition, while not widely practiced, had clearly taken hold in the public imagination.

    Unhappy events were not the only occasions that the bees were invited to participate in. The bees were in fact so integral to human rituals that Cole notes of a wedding: “The little workers were to be informed of the event, and receive a bit of wedding cake.” The hives were sometimes adorned with flowers to celebrate the proceedings.

    Morley (the Victorian biologist) observes that, in Brittany, it was traditional to decorate the hives for wedding celebrations with scarlet cloth, while in Westphalia, Germany, the newlyweds must introduce themselves to the bees or else they will have an unlucky marriage. This homage paid to the bees during nuptials could be a way of compensating the creatures for the vast amounts of honey consumed during the celebrations.

    Yet it is in mourning rather that in nuptial celebrations that the tradition of telling the bees lingers. “Telling the bees” resonates in the poetry of twentieth-century confessional poet Sylvia Plath’s “bee poems,” a poetic sequence in her collection, Ariel. Plath had direct experience with beekeeping: Her father was an entomologist who specialized in bees. Shortly before her suicide, Plath began to keep bees herself. In “The Arrival of the Bee Box” (1962), she compares the “clean wood box” to a small coffin and refers to the beekeeping net as a “funeral veil,” thus drawing explicit connections between beekeeping, death, and mourning.

    Today, with the bee crisis reaching alarming heights, we seem to have returned to a morbid intimacy with bees. In early June 2018, French beekeepers, many clad in traditional protective suits and veiled hats, held a symbolic funeral in central Paris to protest the use of pesticides that many see as being responsible for the death of thousands of honeybees. This problem is not unique to France, or even to Europe: In North America, colony collapse disorder—the name given to the phenomenon where honeybees suddenly abandon their hive—has raised alarms about the environmental implications of diminishing honey bee populations.

    While many nineteenth-century commentators on the tradition of “telling the bees” speculated that the custom would die out as more information was gained about beekeeping, the mock-funeral in France attests to its legacy.

    In Paris, as beekeepers hovered over gravestone-like bee boxes and coffins containing beekeeper effigies, it was unclear whether the beekeepers were mourning for the bees or for the demise of their profession. Given that bees pollinate 70 of the 100 crops that feed 90% of the world, this mourning for the bees—and for the humans that tend to them—is fitting. It is more than likely that if the bee population becomes extinct, humankind will follow close behind. While the future of the honeybee remains uncertain, this staged funeral serves as a powerful reminder that our fate is inexorably linked to that of bees. If they were to depart, the journey “we all must go” will come sooner than we realize.

    https://daily.jstor.org/telling-the-bees/
    TRUTH and BALANCE

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to william r sanford72 For This Post:

    Paul (9th September 2018), Sstarss (16th September 2018), Star Tsar (10th September 2018)

  11. Link to Post #1826
    United States Avalon Member william r sanford72's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th February 2013
    Location
    rural southcentral iowa
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,483
    Thanks
    56,082
    Thanked 9,369 times in 2,377 posts

    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Musical intermission..Book of Bad Decisions...Emily Dickinson.




    Rock on..
    TRUTH and BALANCE

  12. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to william r sanford72 For This Post:

    Bluegreen (9th October 2018), Sstarss (16th September 2018), Star Tsar (10th September 2018)

  13. Link to Post #1827
    Avalon Member Star Tsar's Avatar
    Join Date
    10th December 2011
    Location
    Virgo Supercluster
    Posts
    9,771
    Thanks
    25,658
    Thanked 27,768 times in 9,069 posts

    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Hey William hive been missing you...

    Quote Posted by Star Tsar (here)
    Smithsonian Magazine

    Bees Take A Break During Total Solar Eclipses

    Published 10th October 2018



    On August 21st 2017 human beings in North America from the Pacific coast to the Atlantic seaboard took a break from their normal routines to experience the marvel of the total solar eclipse.

    And so did the Bees...

    Read all about it here: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...ses-180970502/

    I for one will join in with anyone, I don't care what color you are as long as you want to change this miserable condition that exists on this Earth - Malcolm X / Tsar Of The Star

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Star Tsar For This Post:

    Bluegreen (12th October 2018), Valerie Villars (12th October 2018)

+ Reply to Thread
Page 92 of 92 FirstFirst 1 42 82 92

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts