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Thread: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    How Accurate Is USDA Honeybee Health Survey?

    Published on May 18, 2016

    In this week’s segment of The Neonicotinoid View, host June Stoyer and Colorado beekeeper, Tom Theobald talk to commercial migratory beekeeper, Jeff Anderson, owner of California-Minnesota Honey Farms about the new USDA bee health survey, a new study on GMO’s and the impact spraying for the Zika virus will have on bees. Stay tuned!
    “The Neonicotinoid View”, which is produced by The Organic View Radio Show is unique, weekly program that explores the impact of neonicotinoids on the environment. Tune in each week as June and Tom explore the latest research and news from the beekeeping community.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Just a quick post to make a note about the medical application of honey on wounds. You can buy medical honey at the pharmacist, I think they use Manuka, but any honey will work really well. I just wanted to make note of that because it's cheaper.

    My friend had a deep, open wound on his finger, after accidentally slamming a door on it. The wound didn't appear to heal at all for a week. I just grabbed the honey from our pantry and used that. We could see the tissue growing back after just one day and it healed beautifully. I was amazed.
    Never give up on your silly, silly dreams.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Quote Posted by Innocent Warrior (here)
    Just a quick post to make a note about the medical application of honey on wounds. You can buy medical honey at the pharmacist, I think they use Manuka, but any honey will work really well. I just wanted to make note of that because it's cheaper.

    My friend had a deep, open wound on his finger, after accidentally slamming a door on it. The wound didn't appear to heal at all for a week. I just grabbed the honey from our pantry and used that. We could see the tissue growing back after just one day and it healed beautifully. I was amazed.
    I once burned myself on my wrist across a car battery. It was bad enough that I could see the bare, exposed, bone plain as day. The metal watch band I was wearing was destroyed - welded and melted. Fortunately, no major tendons or nerves or blood vessels were destroyed. I dressed it with raw honey right from the start, and it immediately started healing. I never went to the doctor or did anything else. In a few weeks it was all better. Now I no longer remember for sure which wrist it was ... probably my left, since that was where I usually wore my watch. There is no way to tell by looking.

    Two lessons:
    1. Don't wear metal jewelry when working near electricity.
    2. Do keep some good raw honey on hand.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    thanks gals and guys....the list of medical benefits for raw honey is almost endless really.
    with 3 kids and living on a farm I can testify to this since we havnt used antibiotics...zero...in over 15 years and ive treated/cured everything from bladder infections to streph throat.. coughs...burns.. abrasion.. bites and cuts..we consume honey in one form or another everyday since I first extracted my first pound/supper so many years ago.its a medical staple on the shelves.
    one thing research and my exp have taught me is the lower the moisture content in the honey the more antibacterial propertys tend to shine through and it being raw is key.no heat!!!atleast for what you will be using on wounds etc...its really good for burns compared to hydro peroxcide...as the peroxcide tends to dry out the skin and honey doesn't so long term treatment and healing move along much faster..less scarring etc.
    Honey in simple terms once it touches bacteria sucks all the moisture from it... all of it...turns the bact to dust basicly...husk.kills it.and there are not many bugs tha have a defense against this.
    pretty simple tho 100% effective....and pretty cool!!!!


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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    EPA Pulls Glyphosate Paper & Neonic Impact On Kids
    Published on May 18, 2016

    In this week’s segment of The Neonicotinoid View, host June Stoyer and Colorado beekeeper, Tom Theobald talk about the widespread use of pesticides and how it impacts children’s health and news about why EPA removed a report about glyphosate.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Corrupt federal government now using your taxpayer dollars to fund GMO propaganda campaigns that enrich Monsanto



    (NaturalNews) As more and more people find out about the countless dangers to human health and the environment caused by GMO food, and make an effort to actively avoid it, many food companies are starting to meet the demand by going GMO-free.

    In an ideal world, this would be the beginning of the end for the GMO industry. Unfortunately, that's not the way it works in a world where the biotech industry, and Monsanto in particular, have friends in very high places.

    In fact, a new federal spending bill could mean that even if you steadfastly refuse to buy GMO foods, you will still be paying for the GMO industry's propaganda campaign! As reported by Activist Post, the' target='_blank'>http://appropriations.house.gov/uploadedfile... bill states:

    $3,000,000 shall be used by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, in coordination with the Secretary of Agriculture, for consumer outreach to promote understanding and acceptance of agricultural biotechnology and biotechnology-derived food products and animal feed, including through publication and distribution of science-based educational information on the environmental, nutritional, food safety, economic, and humanitarian benefits of such biotechnology, food products, and feed.


    Good for the environment? Ask the important pollinators such as bees' target='_blank'>http://www.bees.news/">bees and butterflies that are dying off by as much as 40 percent in some places, leading to lower crop yields and higher prices. Ask the dead soil that lacks the microbes needed to support plant life.

    Nutritional benefits? Even the World Health Organization acknowledges it's a "probable carcinogen." It stays in our bodies even after we stop eating it, and has been linked to immune problems, infertility, allergies and insulin regulation issues, to name just a few. It's particularly dangerous for pregnant women and babies.


    Monsanto propaganda experts
    The notion that GMOs provide environmental and nutritional benefits is completely laughable and not supported by facts, so one might wonder exactly how they plan to educate consumers about its "benefits."

    They will probably accomplish this in the same way that they have always operated: buying their way to the top; using junk science and getting misleading studies published; lying to regulators; using flawed procedures; and bullying and threatening scientists and journalists who speak out against them.

    Lying and bribing their way to global dominance
    Monsanto has a history of coercing and paying off government officials both in the U.S. and abroad. At least 140 officials have been on the receiving end of http://www.naturalnews.com/Monsanto.html>Mon... bribes in Indonesia. Monsanto has installed its own people in important government positions in Brazil, Europe and India. Meanwhile, here in the U.S., the person in charge of the FDA's GMO policy was actually Monsanto's Deputy Commissioner for Policy, Michael Taylor. After that, he was the vice president of Monsanto, before returning to the FDA as the food' target='_blank'>http://www.truthwiki.org/michael-r-taylor-fd... safety czar!

    Monsanto's tactics when it comes to rigging research are equally outrageous. For example, their studies might take such dishonest approaches as not using enough subjects to obtain statistically significant results, keeping studies short to avoid uncovering long-term impacts, or employing poor detection techniques and statistical methods. They have also been known to use animals with different starting weights to help obscure certain effects.

    The biotech industry fought tooth and nail to try to get the government to ban' target='_blank'>http://www.labeling.news/">ban the labeling of GMO foods, but they ultimately failed. Now they are taking a different approach, and are trying to get all of us to pay for it. While we can insist on eating organic food and educate ourselves on food safety thanks to books such as Mike Adams' ' target='_blank'>http://foodforensics.com/">Food Forensics, we need to do more to expose this corruption and prevent lies that threaten our very existence.

    Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/054101_Mo...#ixzz49Uc0Z7JT
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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    African beekeeping stops mites wiping out hives



    Traditional African beekeeping methods offer better protection against hive-destroying varroa mites than pesticides which, according to a study, are losing their potency.

    The mites, which attach to bees and suck their body fluids, are increasingly resistant to pyrethroids, according to a study, published yesterday in PLOS One.

    The research shows that genetic mutations are enabling the mites to survive persistent spraying efforts.

    As a result, the mites are wreaking havoc among bee populations in Europe and the United States, the research says. But bee farmers in most developing countries have little to fear from the mites, says Richard Ridler, the chairman of Bees Abroad, a charity that supports indigenous beekeeping methods.

    The main difference is that African bee farmers are relaxed about swarming, which happens when a bee colony splits, or absconding, when bees abandon a hive, Ridler explains. “When bees swarm or abscond, the majority of mites are left behind, because they mostly live in the bee brood,” he says.

    Ridler says that Western bee farmers spend a lot of time preventing swarming, despite it being a natural process, as it temporarily halts honey production. But housing large bee populations in close proximity and preventing swarms encourages the spread of varroa mites, he explains.

    Varroa mites originally affected only the Asian bee, which has developed resistance to the parasite. But in the early twentieth century, the mites jumped species to the European bee, the paper says.

    The mites have since spread around the world, killing untreated hives within about three years from the start of infestation.

    According to the Rothamsted Research institute in the United Kingdom, the effectiveness of common pesticides has declined since the 1990s, when the mites developed resistance to pyrethroid-based poisons. The new research on varroa mite DNA allows scientists to run a test on mites and find out if they are part of the mutated strain that is resistant to pesticides.

    “The diagnostic test should help beekeepers to decide whether to use pyrethroid-based chemicals to control this highly damaging parasite,” says lead author Joel Gonzáles-Cabrera, a scientist at Rothamsted.

    But for developing countries, the priority should be to support traditional and indigenous beekeeping styles to ensure local bee farmers do not become reliant on expensive pesticides or lose their swarms to varroa, says Ridler.

    “In Africa, hives are not even treated for varroa,” he says. “And farmers get away with this because their style of beekeeping is different.”


    References
    Joel González-Cabrera and others Novel mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel of pyrethroid-resistant Varroa destructor populations from the southeastern USA (PLOS One, 18 May 2016)

    http://www.scidev.net/global/farming...tes-hives.html
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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Moving a honeybee swarm with bare hands

    Published on May 20, 2016

    A new born swarm of honeybees can be moved and touched in this gentle way when we have an intimate understanding of this unique being.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    interesting studys....coming to light...

    Can Light Benefit Health?

    Research conducted by Professor Glen Jeffery and his team at the Institute of Ophthalmology at University College London has demonstrated that exposing animals to light of a specific wavelength can have significant beneficial impact to their eyesight, mobility and memory. According to Professor Jeffery, the light itself plays an important role in promoting the activity of mitochondria that are present in all cells. Mitochondria have been described as "the powerhouses of cells" due to the fact that they generate the cell's supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), an energy currency that is used by every cell in the body to keep it alive.

    However, as cells in the body start to age, the activity of the mitochondria starts to decline and their potential to produce the ATP necessary for cellular metabolism is reduced. The ageing process also leads to the increase in what is known as reactive oxygen species by the mitochondria, all of which leads to stress, inflammation and degradation of the cells. And since certain cells in the body -- such as those in the retina -- have greater metabolic demands than others, they are the ones that are most likely to age relatively early.

    Light elevated ATP in fruit flies and reduced inflammation

    In studies of laboratory mice, which typically would only live for four months in the wild, the production of ATP produced by mitochondria in the retina decreases by about one third over a twelve month period, while in the brain, it declines by one third to one half. But by exposing the mitochondria to light, the decline in their activity can be ameliorated.

    Electron transport chain

    In the mitochondria, a complex enzyme-driven process called the electron transport chain creates an electrochemical proton gradient that drives the synthesis of the ATP energy currency. In most organisms, the majority of ATP is generated in these electron transport chains by four membrane-bound complexes which work in concert with one another. According to Professor Jeffery, part of the ATP production process involves the absorption of light of 670nm, 810nm and 1070nm wavelengths by a large protein in the electron transport chain called cytochrome c oxidase (COX) which helps to establish an electrochemical gradient that increases the production of ATP. By exposing the cells to increased doses of light of near infra red 670nm wavelength, both the mitochondrial membrane gradient and the production of COX can be increased.

    “When aged mice were exposed to such light, the production of ATP in the retina significantly increased. The increase was discovered to be associated not only with increased COX production, but also by the reduction of cell signaling proteins involved in systemic inflammation and stress in the retinal cells that accompany diseases such as age-related macular degeneration ,” said Professor Jeffery. Having established that light can affect the production of ATP in the mitochondria, and that it also reduces both inflammation and stress, Professor Jeffery performed a number of electroretinogram (ERG) tests to measure the electrical activity generated by neural and non-neuronal cells in the retina in response to a light stimulus. Here again, he found a marked increase in the retinal function of those animals subjected to the 670nm light.

    A group of fruit flies were exposed to 670 nm radiation and their survival rate examined over a period of twelve weeks. The effect of the light produced an elevated ATP in the insects and reduced inflammation. Critically, there was a significant increase in average lifespan: 100–175% more flies survived into old age following exposure to the 670 nm light. Those flies also had significantly improved mobility.

    But could the exposure of an animal to near infra light also extend its lifespan as well? To discover whether that was the case, Professor Jeffery and his team exposed a group of fruit flies to the 670 nm radiation and examined the survival rate of the flies over a period of twelve weeks.

    “Again, the effect of the light produced an elevated ATP in the insects and reduced inflammation with age. Critically, there was a significant increase in average lifespan: 100–175 percent more flies survived into old age following exposure to the 670 nm light. Those flies also had significantly improved mobility which was measured in terms of their ability to climb a distance greater than 90mm and the distance that they travelled in 1 minute,” said Professor Jeffery.

    Interestingly, Professor Jeffery and his team have also conducted experiments to show that exposing the flies to near infra red radiation can also improve their short term memory. To do so, the flies were placed in one end of a tube with a light at the other. In normal circumstances, insects would fly toward the light, but by placing an aversive stimulus of quinine chlorhydrate in the tube, young flies with a good memory were dissuaded from doing so, while older flies with decreased short term memory still attempted the journey. However, after the older flies had been irradiated with the 670nm light, they not longer took the flight, demonstrating an improved ability to remember that the quinine was present.

    Bee decline

    Professor Jeffery believes that his research could be of great importance in helping ameliorate the global decline in bee populations due to the widespread deployment of neonicotinoid pesticides such as Imidacloprid. These chemicals are undermining mitochondrial function, resulting in depleted ATP production. As their ability to produce ATP is depleted, the insects become immobile and starve. To show how exposure to light might expend their lifespan, Professor Jeffery examined the survival rate of different set of bees, some which had been exposed to Imidacloprid insecticide, while others to both the insecticide and doses of 670nm light. Their survival rate was also compared to two control groups of bees -- those that were unexposed to insecticide or light and those unexposed to insecticide but treated with UV light. “The results of the experiment showed that the group of bees exposed to just the insecticide had a significantly shorter lifespan than those that were not. However, those bees exposed to the insecticide and the near infra red light showed a marked increase in lifespan. Indeed, the 670nm light had effectively lengthened the lifespan of the bees treated with insecticide to that of their cousins in a natural insecticide free environment similar to that found in flies,” said Professor Jeffery.

    In addition, the experiment also proved that by exposing insecticide ridden bees to 670nm light also had an impact on their mobility as well as the electrical activity generated by neural and non-neuronal cells in their retinas. So much so in fact that there was little difference between the mobility or the electrical retinal activity of the bees treated with the insecticide and 670nm light and the control bees that had not been subjected to the light or insecticide.

    Human health

    Human health To date, many of Professor Jeffery’s experiments examining the effect of light have been carried out on animals. But since ATP is produced by the mitochondria in human beings in exactly the same way, the impact of his research could have far reaching consequences on human health as well. However, despite the clear benefits of irradiating animals with 670nm light, modern lighting commonly found in homes and office buildings does not emit 670nm or any significant near infra red (810nm) light at all, so produces no useful benefits to human beings living or working under such conditions. But Professor Jeffery believes that if lighting manufacturers would consider producing lighting that did emit light at such wavelengths, the benefits would be profound. Perhaps his current work examining the effect of 670nm light on the vision of groups of ageing individual human beings in residential care homes might prove enough to convince manufacturers to reconsider doing so.

    Written by Dave Wilson, Senior Editor, Novus Light Technologies Today - See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/can-light-....IHas7LG4.dpuf
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  19. Link to Post #1030
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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Quote Posted by william r sanford72 (here)
    interesting studys....coming to light...
    ...

    Human health

    Human health To date, many of Professor Jeffery’s experiments examining the effect of light have been carried out on animals. But since ATP is produced by the mitochondria in human beings in exactly the same way, the impact of his research could have far reaching consequences on human health as well. However, despite the clear benefits of irradiating animals with 670nm light, modern lighting commonly found in homes and office buildings does not emit 670nm or any significant near infra red (810nm) light at all, so produces no useful benefits to human beings living or working under such conditions. But Professor Jeffery believes that if lighting manufacturers would consider producing lighting that did emit light at such wavelengths, the benefits would be profound. Perhaps his current work examining the effect of 670nm light on the vision of groups of ageing individual human beings in residential care homes might prove enough to convince manufacturers to reconsider doing so.

    Written by Dave Wilson, Senior Editor, Novus Light Technologies Today - See more at: http://www.novuslight.com/can-light-....IHas7LG4.dpuf
    Hmmm ... interesting.

    I just took the LED grow light (Red: 655~660nm, Blue:460nm) that I had been using as part of my procedure to restructure and re-energize the water I drink, and turned it on next to where I spend much time, on the computer.

    If it's good for the bees, and good for my water ... perhaps it will be good for me

    Thanks!

    P.S. -- Here's far more than you ever wanted to know about LED light and its biological effects: http://www.heelspurs.com/led.html
    Last edited by Paul; 26th May 2016 at 04:57.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    thanks for the link/info Paul....meanwhile....EPA lackys are at it again...get off your knees and tell your masters..NO!!!!
    Beekeepers/protectors.....Tell em NO!!!!!

    MS GETS EPA APPROVAL TO USE UNAUTHORIZED PESTICIDE TO SAVE GRAIN SORGHUM CROP

    Farmers in Mississippi will now have another tool to avoid economic losses by using a unauthorized pesticide to defend certain crops from bugs that destroy them. Experts disagree over the impact the pesticide poses to honey bees. As MPB's Mark Rigsby reports, the Environmental Protection Agency is taking public comment on a new plan to put the pesticide, Sulfoxaflor, back on the market.

    On a warm spring day, in a rural part of Madison County, in central Mississippi, Greg Logan opens the top of one of his bee hives to check on how much honey his bees have made.

    "You can tell these frames are full of honey. You can see the wax cap, white in color," says Logan.

    Logan has been a beekeeper since he was a teenager. He's not worried about his bees coming into contact with pesticides when outside the hive.

    "Certainly, will come into contact with them. I'm not concerned pesticides are going to cause them significant problems. We hopefully have the E.P.A. watching out for us in that fashion. Responsible farmers doing what they should be doing, then they should be able to coexist without any problems," says Logan.

    The Environmental Protection Agency is granting the state Department of Agriculture and Commerce a federal emergency exemption to use Sulfoxaflor on grain sorghum. Grain sorghum is mostly used as feed for livestock. The crop contributed $39 million to Mississippi's agriculture economy last year. The pesticide is used to protect against the destructive sugarcane aphid.

    "The sugarcane aphid is an extremely damaging insect," says Deputy Agriculture Commissioner John Campbell. He says the bug has become a big problem for farmers over the past few years. He says the aphid is able to develop a resistance to pesticides. He says research shows Sulfoxaflor to be very effective against the bug.

    "We need two products, a minimum of two products to control it. As well as, this product allows for a shorter pre-harvest interval, that the other does not. Without this tool, we could see substantial yield loss and economic loss to our farmers in Mississippi," says Campbell.

    Sulfoxaflor is produced by Dow Agrosciences. It goes by the brand name Transform. The label says it's highly toxic to bees, and there are instructions for farmers to minimize the risk. The pesticide was being used in the U.S. and other countries for a few years prior to a lawsuit brought by a group of bee keepers.
    The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in California ruled the EPA improperly approved the pesticide.
    The EPA pulled it from the market. They're currently taking public comment on a new proposal intended to protect bees by limiting how it's used.

    "We do not want to ban pesticides. We realize farmers need to protect their crops. Many beekeepers are farmers," says Michelle Colopy, program director for the Pollinators Stewardship Council. It's a watchdog group for the agriculture industry, with a focus on beekeeping. The group took administrative legal action against the EPA, asking for more research on the pesticide's long-term impact on bees.

    "We do need to protect our bees, which are intergral to crop yield. To protect them so they can continue to pollinate a third of our food supply," says Colopy.

    In a 2015 press release, Dow says Sulfoxaflor showed excellent performance and had "no noted adverse effects on pollinators." You would think the Mississippi Beekeepers Association would be against the use of Sulfoxaflor on crops, but they're not.

    "If the farmers can't use chemicals, most of them are going to go out of business, and so there's going to be no crops to go to," says Johnny Thompson, vice president of the Mississippi Beekeepers Association.

    The group sent a letter to the EPA asking to give farmers permission to use it.

    "We have to assume some of that risk, and not say put it all on the farmers as their responsibility," says Thompson.

    Beekeepers produced $3.2 million worth of honey in Mississippi last year. Jeff Harris is the honeybee expert at Mississippi State University Extension Service.

    "I think our beekeepers have decided the risk to their bees from this particular compound is relatively low, compared to what they're already exposed to in their environments already. They're actually in support of the farmers having the tools to protect their crops," says Harris.

    The state has another request to use Sulfoxaflor on cotton. It's still under consideration. Justin Ferguson from Mississippi Farm Bureau believes if farmers aren't permitted to use it, the economic consequences could be devastating.

    "This product is vital to the use for protection from insects in grain sorghum and cotton for Mississippi farmers," says Ferguson.

    "If we didn't have it what would happen?"

    "It would be an economic disaster for those crops," says Ferguson.

    Ferguson says there's been a lack of communication between farmers and beekeepers in the past.
    So the Mississippi Bee Stewardship Program was created to build strong relationships to maintain the economic prosperity of row crops, and the health of honey bees.

    http://www.mpbonline.org/blogs/news/...-sorghum-crop/
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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    NATIONAL HONEY REPORT

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Why Are More Bees Dying In Ontario
    Published on May 27, 2016

    In this week’s segment of The Neonicotinoid View, host June Stoyer and Tom Theobald talk to Tibor Szabo, President of the Ontario Beekeeper’s Association about a new press release concerning more massive bee deaths in Ontario, Canada. Stay tuned! “The Neonicotinoid View”, which is produced by The Organic View Radio Show is unique, weekly program that explores the impact of neonicotinoids on the environment. Tune in each week as June and Tom explore the latest research and news from the beekeeping community.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    have posted most of this 4 part art.if memory serves the 3rd part had to do with tracking wild colonys to there homes..Thomas D. Seeley..and his wonderful book “Honeybee Democracy...is the basis of the 4 part series.

    When honeybees journey to their new home

    In this fourth and final segment in my series: “Swarming Honeybees, with Cornell Professor of Biology Thomas D. Seeley” we will explore another of honeybees’ incredible abilities. In the past three months (using his book: “Honeybee Democracy”), we’ve seen how a honeybee swarm comes to be, how the parent colony survives the loss of its queen and two-thirds of its workers when they swarm, and how a swarm finds, assesses and decides to move into the best site in a square mile or more.

    Today, from the same book, we will look into how they are able to fly to and quickly build combs in their new home, which may be a few miles away.

    When it comes to knowledge about honeybees, not only is Seeley well-read, but he is a master experimenter. He confirms and learns for himself. When I asked Penn State’s entomologists and our bumblebee expert, Robbin W. Thorpe, questions about honeybees, they both sent me to Seeley. I’ve read two of his books and am halfway through a third. “Following the Wild Bees,” his fourth (new — 48 color photos), just arrived (http://www.facebook.com/followingthewildbees/). It’s getting rave reviews. This is not the last we’ll be hearing from Seeley.

    In order to survive, honeybees must have an exacting efficiency, including timing, in everything they do. To avoid starvation, the swarm has about a week to decide where to live, and fly there. We join a swarm cluster whose scouts have already decided, democratically, where they will live.

    Seeley said, “I wouldn’t be surprised if the bees possess some secret gadgetry for ensuring that a swarm about to take flight is well-stocked with the informed bees who can pilot it safely to its new home.” (p. 197).

    The scouts and workers on the cluster’s surface heat their bodies up to 95 degrees to coincide with the workers and queen beneath the surface. Increasingly, from 90 minutes before, until takeoff, scouts run about excitedly, stopping for a second every few seconds so each can press her thorax against another bee. There’s a corresponding shrill high-frequency piping that peaks for the final half hour before takeoff, when the entire swarm reaches 99 degrees. Layer by layer, the honeybees take to the air. About a minute after this explosive takeoff begins, all have left.

    Only the about 400 scouts have been to the new home and must lead 11,000 workers and the queen to it. The swarm is soon cruising at 5 mph, with scouts continuously dropping back and leading by streaking forward at 20 mph, mostly above the swarm, toward the new home. Strong winds can temporarily blow the swarm off course.

    Seeley speaks of the queen’s “pheromone that wafts steadily from her body.If the bees in an airborne swarm keep smelling this particular chemical substance, they will keep flying toward their new home address, but if they don’t catch its aroma, because their queen has dropped out to rest, they will cease flying forward, mill about until they find their missing queen, and then cluster around her wherever she has alighted. Sooner or later, the swarm will again take off and proceed to its destination. Clearly, the workers in a flying swarm take great care to avoid losing their all-important queen. (pp. 176,177).

    “As the group closes on its destination, it gradually lowers its flight speed so that it stops precisely, and gracefully, at the front door of its new home.” (p. 176).



    The colony’s race against time is boosted by the fact that the workers arrive with white wax scales attached under their abdomens, enabling them to get right to building honeycombs and brood combs. This amazing workable wax that dries hard when made into thin cell walls is another example of honeybees’ mind-boggling technology and efficiency.

    Despite the wax and the bees’ legendary work ethic, around Ithaca, Seeley found that less than 25 percent of the new colonies survived their first winter. He attributes this to swarming too late to have time to make enough honey to feed the colonies during the entire winter, while they’re active within their hives. Honeybees don’t hibernate. Old established hives, in the wild, often have hundreds of pounds of accumulated honey and 80 percent survive the winter. In domestic hives, beekeepers take each year’s “extra” honey for us to eat.

    There’s reason to believe we can greatly increase the odds for new colonies. Take the land I work on. Last year (long cold winter), a swarm from a box hive clustered on May 26. This year (short mild winter), the beekeeper split both box hives, making four, telling me he had to do it before the bees swarmed away in two days (May 2). In both years, the bees had the advantage of an acre of the very early, difference-making purple creeping thyme (honeybees on them on March 27, 2016 and millions of flowers by mid-April), combined with an overlapping abundance of essential dandelions. Last year’s swarm moved into the barn and is doing well. So they’re surviving the winter at a 100 percent rate so far. More early flowers equal more nectar made into early honey, which makes for earlier swarms. In addition, colonies close to starvation after winter can sometimes collect enough early nectar to survive. Each time a new colony makes it, as opposed to starving, it will usually swarm and we’ll have two colonies instead of none. Since they’re among the only April/May flowers here in great numbers, honeybees often depend on creeping thyme and dandelions to get them to summer.

    The Hudson Valley has hundreds of honeybee colonies in house or barn walls; ideal places for them to thrive. When I was growing up we had one in our house wall for at least 10 years and nobody ever got stung. If the entrance is low, you will not want to spend too much time near it (a couple of guards might be forced to do their job), but otherwise they’re harmless. These produce at least two new colonies (swarms) per year, in addition to pollinating your flowers and produce.

    The Hudson Valley has hundreds of honeybee colonies in house or barn walls; ideal places for them to thrive. When I was growing up we had one in our house wall for at least 10 years and nobody ever got stung. If the entrance is low, you will not want to spend too much time near it (a couple of guards might be forced to do their job), but otherwise they’re harmless. These produce at least two new colonies (swarms) per year, in addition to pollinating your flowers and produce.

    A friend from Florida told me, “The thing I like most about the northeast is the beautiful yellow flowers growing in the green lawns.” It’s estimated that 50 to 80 percent of our food depends on honeybee pollination (a third of our fruits and vegetables and much of the grain fed to cattle), and honey is arguably the healthiest and sweetest food on Earth. So, do the honeybees, the world and yourself a favor — plant beds of creeping thyme and let the dandelions flourish.

    http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/s...arms/84973644/
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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    I sing The body electric...

    Dancing hairs alert bees to floral electric fields

    May 30, 2016




    Tiny, vibrating hairs may explain how bumblebees sense and interpret the signals transmitted by flowers, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol.

    Although it's known that flowers communicate with pollinators by sending out electric signals, just how bees detects these fields has been a mystery - until now.

    Using a laser to measure vibrations, researchers found that both the bees' antenna and hairs deflect in response to an electric field, but the hairs move more rapidly and with overall greater displacements.

    Researchers then looked at the bees' nervous system, finding that only the hairs alerted the bee's nervous system to this signal.

    The findings, published in the international journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) today, suggest that electroreception in insects may be widespread.

    Electroreception may arise from the bees' hairs being lightweight and stiff, properties that confer a rigid, lever-like motion similar to acoustically sensitive spider hairs and mosquito antennae.

    Dr Gregory Sutton, a Research Fellow in the University of Bristol's School of Biological Sciences, led the research. He said: "We were excited to discover that bees' tiny hairs dance in response to electric fields, like when humans hold a balloon to their hair. A lot of insects have similar body hairs, which leads to the possibility that many members the insect world may be equally sensitive to small electric fields."

    Scientists are particularly interested in understanding how floral signals are perceived, received and acted upon by bees as they are critical pollinators of our crops.

    Research into these relationships has revealed the co-evolution of flowers and their pollinators, and has led to the unravelling of this important network which keeps our planet green.

    Electroreception is common in aquatic mammals. For example, sharks are equipped with sensitive, jelly-filled receptors that detect fluctuations in electric fields in seawater which helps them to home in on their prey.

    Explore further: Bees and flowers communicate using electrical fields, researchers discover

    More information: Mechanosensory hairs in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) detect weak electric fields, PNAS, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1601624113


    Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences search and more info website

    Provided by: University of Bristol


    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-05-hairs-b...ields.html#jCp
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    Thumbs up Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    William R. Sanford ~

    I'd like to personally acknowledge and give thanks to your steadfast dedication in updating this thread ...
    While keeping us all abreast to all things associated with those of the anthophilous kind ...

    Blessings Always Gio

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Yes, I agree with Gio. William R. Sanford


    Paula

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    GIO..RUNNING DEER....thank you seems so inadequate..to express/the energy and emotions of graditude I feel...how small things can lighten the heavy...
    blessing and love back at yah..
    and thank you.

    William.
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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Some footage I took today of a swarm ive been watching over for the last week...Enjoy.
    .
    The Waggle Dance!!

    Published on Jun 1, 2016

    Honeybees preparing to leave for a new home and some great footage of them performing the waggle dance.

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    Default Re: Calling all light warriors - the Bees need you!

    Live from the Hive: world's first live tweeting honeybees in Bristol project

    Press release issued: 31 May 2016

    A new project comparing the lives of bees living in the countryside with those in the city is being launched today, featuring the world's first live tweeting honeybees.



    The University of Bristol has joined forces with At-Bristol, one of the UK's leading interactive science centres, and BeeBristol to create 'Live from the Hive' – a research project which aims to engage people with the lives of the bees through innovative use of technology and social media.

    The science centre's green roof became home to an urban beehive in July 2015, which is tended to by At-Bristol staff specially trained by BeeBristol.

    Now that the hive is established, it has been fitted with scientific equipment to capture data on bee behaviour, air quality and weather, which will be compared with a rural hive in Langford 14 miles south of Bristol.

    Both Twitter feeds - @citybeehive and @countrybeehive - will tweet in character about their daily activity, which will be triggered by live data collected and analysed as part of the scientific research looking at the impact of city living on honeybee colonies.

    It is predicted that human activity will have an effect on urban bees as a result of seven day cycles in air quality, due to pollution caused by Monday to Friday commuter traffic.

    Visitors to At-Bristol will be able to take part in Live from the Hive through a new exhibit in an indoor greenhouse in the Food! exhibition.

    The exhibit will enable visitors to compare the behaviour of the two bee colonies in real time using live webcam images of the bees, interactive graphs using live data including 'bees per minute', air quality, weather, and the latest tweets from the both of the beehives. Live from the Hive will also be accessible online from the At-Bristol website.

    Dr Dominic Clarke, Post-Doctoral Research Associate in Sensory Biophysics in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Bristol, said: "This is an exciting opportunity for us to share science with the public as it happens. Maybe someone out there will spot something interesting in our data before we do."

    Live images from inside At-Bristol's beehive will be featured on the popular BBC Two programme Springwatch, running from 30 May for three weeks.

    Big Screen Bristol will also be showing live images of the hives at regular intervals throughout the project, and on 1 June DreamWorks Animation's Bee Movie will be screened for free in Millennium Square to celebrate the launch of the project. Until 5 June a 'Feed the Bees' activity is also running in the greenhouse, where visitors can take home a sweet treat for our fuzzy friends

    Chris Dunford, At-Bristol's Sustainability Engagement Manager, said: "We are delighted to be launching Live from the Hive! We are committed to becoming the most sustainable science centre in the UK, and part of that work involves supporting pollinators, so we are very proud to use our hive in academic research. We hope that everyone will enjoy following the lives of our bees and learning more about how city life effects them."

    Tim Barsby, Founder and Director of BeeBristol, added: "Live from the Hive is an important, unique and visionary experiment pioneering an interactive and engaging experience that connects people with nature. Thanks to attentive beekeeping we have nurtured a healthy colony of urban bees on the roof of At-Bristol, so we are very excited to see the results and start tweeting!"

    For further information on the project visit the At-Bristol website and follow the bees on Twitter @citybeehive and @countrybeehive.

    Further information

    About At-Bristol Science Centre

    At-Bristol is a leading science centre in the UK and a major player in the worldwide science centre movement with over 300,000 visitors a year, including over 62,000 school visits. It aims to be a world-class science centre that makes a distinctive, valued and recognised contribution to science learning and public engagement with science across Europe. A registered charity, At-Bristol has hosted over four million visits since its opening in June 2000 and continually strives towards making science accessible to all.

    About BeeBristol

    BeeBristol plants, manages and maintains areas of wildflower in Bristol. We educate and communicate the value of pollinators by engaging with community groups, schools, individuals and organisations. Through education, conservation, art and installations, working with the public and our partners, we hope to help make Bristol a pollinator friendly city.

    http://bristol.ac.uk/news/2016/may/hive.html
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