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Thread: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Check out these military funded projects as well ...

    Cross-posting from: http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...-Plague/page25

    -----------

    TerraSwarm

    The TerraSwarm Research Center: The Center will focus on the challenge of developing technologies that provide innovative, city-scale capabilities via the deployment of distributed applications on shared swarm platforms. Two scenarios are of interest: a city during normal operation and a city during natural or man-made disasters (such as accidents, failures, hurricanes, earthquakes or terrorist attacks). Terraswarm is hosted at the University of California-Berkeley with collaborators from California Institute of Technology, Carnegie Mellon University, University of California-San Diego, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, University of Michigan, University of Pennsylvania, University of Texas-Dallas, and the University of Washington.

    CoABS

    The Control of Agent Based System (CoABS) Grid is an advanced service-oriented architecture (SOA) that supports distributed object management; mobile computing and surrogate processing for constrained devices; multi-modal, adaptive user interfaces; collaborative computing; intelligent software; and intelligent heterogeneous data access. It supports protocol-independent communications and provides rapid, evolutionary development of user-centered information systems that can be easily integrated into legacy systems. CoABS has been developed with military applications in mind and provides a general-purpose, lightweight integration framework for a wide variety of applications. The CoABS grid is based on JINI and RMI.

    The CoABS Grid is designed to integrate large-scale distributed applications from small independently developed components to meet the needs of rapidly evolving, geographically dispersed organizations. The technology's goal is to strike a practical balance between recent innovations in distributed agent technology, emerging from advanced research, and the practical demands of real-world applications.

    TERN

    Effective 21st-century warfare requires the ability to conduct airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) and strike mobile targets anywhere, around the clock. Current technologies, however, have their limitations. Helicopters are relatively limited in the distance and flight time. Fixed-wing manned and unmanned aircraft can fly farther and longer but require either aircraft carriers or large, fixed land bases with runways often longer than a mile. Moreover, establishing these bases or deploying carriers requires substantial financial, diplomatic and security commitments that are incompatible with rapid response.

    To help overcome these challenges and expand DoD options, DARPA has launched the Tactically Exploited Reconnaissance Node (TERN) program. Seeking to combine the strengths of both land- and sea-based approaches to supporting airborne assets, TERN envisions using smaller ships as mobile launch and recovery sites for medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) fixed-wing unmanned aircraft (UAVs). Named after the family of seabirds known for flight endurance – many species migrate thousands of miles each year – TERN aims to make it much easier, quicker and less expensive for DoD to deploy ISR and strike capabilities almost anywhere in the world.

    [...]

    "We're trying to rethink how the ship, UAV and launch and recovery domains – which have traditionally worked in parallel – can synergistically collaborate to help achieve the vision of base-independent operations for maritime or overland missions," Pat said.

    SeeMe

    While UAVs have joined spy satellites as an indispensable part of America's military operations—especially in delivering timely, accurate intel to troops on the ground—they are not the end-all-be-all perfect solution, even in coordination. That's why DARPA plans to supplement these unmanned intelligence gathering platforms with jet-deployed constellations of micro-satellites. Soon, every grunt will have access to a real-time battlefield mini-map just in like video games.

    [...]

    DARPA’s SeeMe program aims to give mobile individual US warfighters access to on-demand, space-based tactical information in remote and beyond- line-of-sight conditions. If successful, SeeMe will provide small squads and individual teams the ability to receive timely imagery of their specific overseas location directly from a small satellite with the press of a button — something that’s currently not possible from military or commercial satellites.

    The program seeks to develop a constellation of small “disposable” satellites, at a fraction of the cost of airborne systems, enabling deployed warfighters overseas to hit ‘see me’ on existing handheld devices to receive a satellite image of their precise location within 90 minutes. DARPA plans SeeMe to be an adjunct to unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology, which provides local and regional very-high resolution coverage but cannot cover extended areas without frequent refueling. SeeMe aims to support warfighters in multiple deployed overseas locations simultaneously with no logistics or maintenance costs beyond the warfighters’ handheld devices.

    -----------

    The sources are in the link if you're interested.

    See also: GHO ISR UAV - IARPA contract awarded to D-STAR Engineering

    ADD: Ahhh, browsing your current threads I see you have explored SeeMe.
    Last edited by Jeffrey; 18th December 2013 at 22:52.

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Yup Jeffrey - I have a thread that goes in depth for the See Me series of Satellites that have linkup with drone and ground control. (SeeMe See you - new spies in the skies
    Mission: See Everything)

    This thread we are on now has a lot of the existing systems..

    I find the purely and totally robotic drones for instance, the MQ-9 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) aircraft (these are the Hunter-Killer robotic drones), "set and forget" quite challenging to deal with - that a pre-programmed robot is going to determine if shoot-to-kill is the proper action. One author at Brookings was "joking" (at least I hope so), that a special militarized version of windows was being developed to look at the person and vehicle tracking. I think though he was referring to the Northrup Grumman VADAR system described in a post or two above.

    I have been aware of the man-pack radar systems used in Viet Nam during the later 60's and early 70's based on a doppler radar (doppler is similar to the radio wave cop speed guns systems that are ideal for picking up motion).. A very short wavelength microwave doppler on these systems would be pretty impossible to hide from..
    Last edited by Bob; 18th December 2013 at 22:55.

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Excerpts from, The Role of Autonomy in DoD Systems:

    The air domain has received the greatest concentration of visibility as DoD has embraced unmanned technologies. Table A-1 (below) shows that Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) investments will continue to consume a large share of the overall DoD investment in unmanned systems. Over the next 10 years, the Department of Defense plans to purchase 730 new medium size and large unmanned aircraft systems based on designs currently in operation, while improving the unmanned aircraft already in service. This investment represents an inventory increase of 35%; today the Department of Defense has more than 8,000 unmanned systems. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that completing the unmanned systems investments for which there are detailed plans will required approximately $36.9 billion through 2020. Worldwide, more than sixty countries are manufacturing unmanned systems. Fifty countries are designing unmanned systems and there are over 600 different models of unmanned systems worldwide.

    [...]

    The Strategy for the future Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) enterprise of the United States has a single, ambitious goal: to achieve information dominance across the spectrum of conflict through cross-domain integration of ISR from air, land and maritime operations. Wide area sensors carried on airborne unmanned systems to include Full Motion Video (FMV), Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) and Ground Moving Target Indicators (GMTIs) have created an unprecedented amount of “big” data and integration challenges that can be addressed by the application of autonomous technologies.

    [...]

    Unmanned aircraft systems have long held great promise for military operations, but technology has only recently matured enough to exploit that potential. DoD’s 2012 plan calls for purchasing more of the existing unmanned aircraft systems for current operations, improving the systems already in service and designing more capable unmanned aircraft systems for the future. No weapon system has had a more profound impact on the United States’ ability to provide persistence on the battlefield than the UAVs. From a low of 54 deployed unmanned systems in 2001 to nearly 8,000 systems in 2011, this unprecedented growth can be attributed to a dual commitment by government and industry to ensure our deployed forces had unquestioned decision dominance on the battle space, as evidenced during the last 10 years of continuous combat operations.

    [...]

    Unmanned aircraft clearly have a critical role in the future. Admittedly, the development of unmanned systems is still in the formative stage with more focus being given to sensors, weapons, and manned/unmanned operations than in the past. As DoD offices continue to develop and employ an increasingly sophisticated force of unmanned systems over the next 25 years, technologists, acquisition officials, and operational planners must prioritize their investments to focus on the greatest needs of the warfighter. A critical need cited by many of the presenters who briefed the Task Force was to promote integration of UAVs into the National Air Space. Due to Sense and Avoid technologies, redundant flight controls, experience, and revised procedures, the accident rate for most unmanned systems now mirrors manned aircraft. In addition, new missions for aerial unmanned systems are being seriously considered.

    -----------

    Still perusing the report ... Here's the link: http://www.fas.org/irp/agency/dod/dsb/autonomy.pdf


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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Drone Wars - NRUNS started with showing how serial hacker Samy Kamkar has released all the hardware and software specifications that hobbyists need to build an aerial drone that seeks out other drones in the air, hacks them, and turns them into a conscripted army of unmanned vehicles under the attacker's control..

    Hugo Teso, a researcher at security consultancy N.Runs showed how an airplane's computer could be taken over from onboard or ground relays.

    In this link, http://privat.bahnhof.se/wb907234/killuav.htm the author talks about UAV communication systems saying that they have two alternative systems for communication.

    Line of sight radio :
    In the military C-Band 500 - 1000 MHz that can be jammed with simple spark-gap wide band emitter (connected to a directed array antenna of some kind, dish, etc.)

    Satellite communication :
    In the Ku-Band between 10.95 - 14.5 GHz, and the satellite can be jammed.
    The Uplink-Band to the satellite is 13.75 - 14.5 GHz
    The Downlink-Band from the satellite is 10.95 - 12.75 GHz

    The author says that directing said jammer at the Satellite would jam that satellite.

    Just a point of notice here - (besides it being highly illegal to actually do such), during an all out war-time event, no doubt people are going to want to try to find ways to deal with such technology. Jamming satellites will incur the wrath of all the agencies, and tptb, no question.

    No spark-gap system is going to be able to destroy the front-end receivers of such satellites, however the EMP generation systems that may be on some hunter killer drones might be able to be used in reverse to not only jam the drones electronics but possibly destroy the front end of satellites, similar to a massive Solar Event (a CME).

    is what the author posted from that website, their idea of how the system works.

    DARPA has been designing jam-proof radios based on spread spectrum, wideband receivers and transmitters which only stay on one unique frequency for a short period of time, dividing up the information across the radio spectrum to attempt to defeat wide-band jammers.. It is quite cat and mouse technologically.

    We could literally as a planet be seeing drones hunting drones, hunting both airborne and ground based transmission stations as these "wars" escalate in the immediate future.

    From The Register, UK - http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/09...amming_squads/
    "The US has created electronic-warfare squads capable of jamming enemy satellite transmissions. Fearful of losing its advantage of superior technology resources over its potential enemies, the US has established mobile teams equipped with electronic jamming gear capable of disrupting attempts to interfere with its satellite resources, The Washington Times reports.

    "You can't go to war and win without space," Gen. Lance Lord, the four-star general in charge of the Colorado-based Air Force Space Command, told the paper. Air Force Space Command is tasked with both protecting Us satellites from attack or disruption.."

    From ABC Australia - http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/s...ish_120537.htm
    "This week's New Scientist reports that instructions on how to build satellite jammers, using cheap equipment from home improvement stores and electronics fairs, are to be found on the internet.

    "The US Air Force team, dubbed the Space Aggressor Squadron, was set up to look for weak spots in satellite communications and navigation systems by playing the part of a potential enemy."


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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    On Monday, a predator drone used by US Customs and Border Patrol crashed off the coast of San Diego California. The crash was deliberate, and a decision by the operators based in Arizona.


    The $12m surveillance drone was part of a fleet of 10 the Department of Homeland Security uses to patrol the border.

    It was just one of two maritime Predator B drones equipped with radar specifically designed to be used over the ocean. It was flying offshore when mechanical problems developed.

    Offshore flights are used to monitor for illegal entry via the sea into US territorial waters or onto the US shores.

    The whole fleet is said to be grounded while the search for the cause of the mechanical failure is researched.

    ref: http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...ifornia-mexico The Guardian, UK

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    everyone's house will have a set of tiny blimps tethered to the chimney to keep the surveillance drones at bay.....Ah, what a bright and cheery future they are creating for us.

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Short snippet of a long and detailed article regarding the soon to arrive next generation of drones. Many images.

    Perhaps ... with luck ... the financial situation will change enough soon to mitigate this from coming to fruition???

    _____________________


    New drone technology "equivalent to the capabilities of 100 Predator drones"


    Police State USA
    Sat, 08 Feb 2014 19:39 CST


    To understand the extent to which the federal government has the ability to spy on us, we must attempt to understand the technologies it has at its disposal. Through the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Defense Department has spent hundreds of millions of dollars on one particular project alone. Known as ARGUS, it is a surveillance platform with the capability to maintain continuous 24/7 surveillance, day or night; able to track multiple moving targets miles apart in high definition without refocusing the camera; and with a resolution so astounding that it can detect objects as small as a cellular phone from several miles in the sky. It quite literally provides ubiquitous surveillance over a whole city from one drone.

    "This is the next generation of surveillance," said Yiannis Antonaides, an engineer for BAE Systems who led the design of the project. "It is important for the public to know that some of these capabilities exist."

    The Government's All-Seeing Eye

    ARGUS stands for Autonomous Real-Time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance. Its alternative designation is Wide Area Persistent Stare (WAPS). The project integrates many sophisticated technologies into a formidable surveillance system, combining images from 368 independent into a single mosaic image. The result is a video with a combined resolution of reportedly 1.8 gigapixels.

    The massive collection of data is equivalent to having 100 Predator Drones hover over a medium-sized city at once.


    http://www.sott.net/article/273546-N...redator-drones

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    I was at a wedding last night and spoke with a man who used to make drones before he retired. He said they are quite inaccurate at 'hitting their targets' as there is a 30 second delay between the operator in the UK and the response from the drone, so by the time a target is lined up and the order to shoot is given, the designated target may well have moved out the way and some other poor person stepped into the line of fire. I would liked to have asked more, but it wasn't appropriate at the time, it being a wedding.

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    I wouldn't be surprised if the rabble-rousers, those upset about things, insurgents, don't start using remotely piloted vehicles (another name for "drones"), RPV's against things like the power grid.

    RPV's used against other "drones" (the drone wars) where low cost commercial vehicles become hunter-seekers no doubt is on the future horizon. Need begets solutions has been the way of the world for thousands of years, both in biological and physical issues.

    There are so many potential vulnerabilities, in so many perceived "immune" infrastructures, even the "toys" such as the:
    "Parrot-AR-Drone-2-0-Remote-Control-Quadricopter" - controlled by the iPhone or iPad, with camera, and a potential payload is a significant concern.


    For instance, when the Iraqi wars were conducted, part of the attacks were to take out the electric power grid. Forces dropped carbon conductive fibre all over the power lines, transformer substations.. Such created an intense short circuit to the high voltage, and of course created a massive manpower intensive situation to clean up such to restore the power grid. Similarly, any exposed phone lines which could be shorted out to the high voltage lines, would be affected..

    With modern commercial remotely piloted "smart" vehicles in the hands of those who are rabble rousers or for that matter, armies looking at cost savings, for a few hundred pounds sterling totally, to outfit micro-over-the-counter RPV with for instance, a conductive carbon liquid would create formidable systems, rivaling the carbon fibre strand deployment systems used in the Iraqi wars. Each of the softbombs are in the range of several hundred thousand dollars (dumb bombs that release carbon fibre into the air which arbitrarily float and without intelligence guidance can hit power-wires or transformers, evoking a short).


    ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BLU-114/B_%22Soft-Bomb%22 - carbon fibre soft bomb took out 85% of Iraqi power grid

    ref: http://www.lion.co.jp/en/chem/product/industry/i03.htm - electro conductive carbon black liquid

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Since there is little or no nature surroundings in my area, I go once in a while to a field near an orchard not too far from where I live and lie down on the ground or meditate. Today, as a month ago, I was having drones fly above my head without even hiding. Last month it was two white drones Humming over in the sky, passing back and forth across the place where I lay, I followed it with my gaze to make sure that it was not some gilders enthusiasts. Today, I heard the humming again despite having an MP3 in my ears, (not sure how long it was there) by noticing it, I started broadcasting through my mind a vision of my intention to intercept the UAV, it then continued with the round and went away.

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    I would love to see a video of a drone dogfight,... this could get interesting!

    Picture it, 2 drones going at it (with whatever attachments would allow them to engage one another) while another drone w/ a camera records it,...

    ... before long spectator drones would start lining up,... perhaps a reporter drone would commentate in front of the camera drone,....
    Last edited by Shezbeth; 23rd January 2015 at 20:44.

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    -------

    Light relief:

    The Drone Spotting App — by JOYCAMP (highly recommended!)




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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Quote Posted by Bob (here)
    [...]
    RPV's used against other "drones" (the drone wars) where low cost commercial vehicles become hunter-seekers no doubt is on the future horizon. [...]
    Too late:

    Quote Posted by Hervé (here)
    Flying hacker contraption hunts other drones, turns them into zombies

    Ever wanted your own botnet of flying drones? SkyJack can help.
    by Dan Goodin - Dec 3 2013, 11:49pm RST



    Serial hacker Samy Kamkar has released all the hardware and software specifications that hobbyists need to build an aerial drone that seeks out other drones in the air, hacks them, and turns them into a conscripted army of unmanned vehicles under the attacker's control.

    Dubbed SkyJack, the contraption uses a radio-controlled Parrot AR.Drone quadcopter carrying a Raspberry Pi circuit board, a small battery, and two wireless transmitters. The devices run a combination of custom software and off-the-shelf applications that seek out wireless signals of nearby Parrot drones, hijack the wireless connections used to control them, and commandeer the victims' flight-control and camera systems. SkyJack will also run on land-based Linux devices and hack drones within radio range. At least 500,000 Parrot drones have been sold since the model was introduced in 2010.

    Kamkar is the creator of the infamous Samy worm, a complex piece of JavaScript that knocked MySpace out of commission in 2005 when the exploit added more than one million MySpace friends to Kamkar's account. Kamkar was later convicted for the stunt. He has since devoted his skills to legal hacks, including development of the "evercookie," a highly persistent browser cookie with troubling privacy implications. He has also researched location data stored by Android devices.

    SkyJack made its debut the same week that Amazon unveiled plans to use drones to deliver packages to customers' homes or businesses.

    "How fun would it be to take over drones, carrying Amazon packages... or take over any other drones and make them my little zombie drones," Kamkar asked rhetorically in a blog post published Monday. "Awesome."

    SkyJack: autonomous drone hacking.

    SkyJack works by monitoring the media access control (MAC) addresses of all Wi-Fi devices within radio range. When it finds a MAC address belonging to a block of addresses used by Parrot AR.Drone vehicles, SkyJack uses the open-source Aircrack-ng app for Wi-Fi hacking to issue a command that disconnects the vehicle from the iOS or Android device currently being used to control and monitor it. Operators of the flying hacker drone are then able to use their own smart device to control the altitude, speed, and direction of the hijacked drone and to view its live video feeds.

    At the moment, SkyJack is engineered to target a small range of drones. That's because it's programmed to take over drones only if their MACs fall inside an address block reserved by Parrot AR.Drone vehicles. If the MAC falls outside that range, SkyJack takes no action at all. But the software is built in a way to easily target other types of drones that have communication systems that are similar to Parrot. That means a much broader range of devices may be susceptible to radio-controlled hijacking if they fail to adequately secure their connections.
    And:

    Quote Posted by Hervé (here)
    Slowly dripping into the public domain...

    Tiny Helicopter Piloted By Human Thoughts
    Elizabeth Palermo, TechNewsDaily Contributor
    Date: 04 June 2013 Time: 07:03 PM ET


    CREDIT: University of Minnesota


    You may have had remote controlled airplanes growing up, but they probably weren't as cool as the quadcopter. This tiny helicopter looks a lot like a toy, but it's really a high-tech robot controlled exclusively by human thought.

    Developed by a team of researchers at the University of Minnesota, the four-blade helicopter, or quadcopter, can be quickly and accurately controlled for a sustained amount of time using the electrical impulses associated with a subject's thoughts.

    The team used a noninvasive technique known as electroencephalography (EEG) to record the electrical brain activity of five different subjects. Each subject was fitted with a cap equipped with 64 electrodes, which sent signals to the quadcopter over a WiFi network.


    The subjects were positioned in front of a screen that relayed images of the quadcopter's flight through an on-board camera, allowing them to see the course the way a pilot would. The plane, which was driven with a pre-set forward moving velocity, was then controlled by the subject's thoughts.

    By imagining that they were using their right hand, left hand and both hands together, subjects controlled the flight path of the plane. If they imagined raising their left hand, for example, the plane turned left. If they imagined raising their hands together, the plane lifted higher in the air.

    Once they got the hang of it, subjects were able to fly the quadcopter through foam rings scattered around the indoor course.

    "Our study shows that for the first time, humans are able to control the flight of flying robots using just their thoughts, sensed from noninvasive brain waves," said Bin He, lead scientist behind the study and a professor with the University of Minnesota's College of Science and Engineering.

    He and his fellow researchers plan on using the study to further their understanding of how a brain-computer interface (BCI) can help assist, augment or repair cognitive or sensory-motor functions in those suffering from paralysis or other disabilities.

    "Our next goal is to control robotic arms using noninvasive brain wave signals," said He. "With the eventual goal of developing brain-computer interfaces that aid patients with disabilities or neurodegenerative disorders."

    The University of Minnesota team isn't the only group of researchers making breakthroughs in the field of brain-controlled avionics. Scientists at the University of Essex in the U.K. are also working with researchers at NASA to create a BCI that can be used aboard a spacecraft simulator. The team hopes to one day use the interface to assist fatigued astronauts during space travel.

    And last year, researchers at Zhejiang University in China were able to control a hovering drone using a commercial EEG headset, setting the stage for more advanced uses of this noninvasive brain technology in the future.

    This story was provided by TechNewsDaily, a sister site to LiveScience. Email asklizzyp@gmail.com or follow her @techEpalermo. Follow us @TechNewsDaily, on Facebook or on Google+.

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    Default Re: World says MORE DRONES are the solution

    Well, private licenses now are going to be required.

    After a period of time, where private drones were able to fly around, some of them got into airspace with other larger commercial aircraft..

    The FAA said, WELL.... LICENSE TIME.. no more freedom to fly what you want..

    (Source)


    Quote If you get a new drone this holiday season, you might have to register it with the US government.

    According to a report from NBC News, the US is ready to announce new requirements for consumers purchasing drones, the most notable of which is that you'll need to register it with the department of transportation.

    It's part of a plan to make sure that drones don't end up colliding with aircraft flying in and out of airports, something that has the government rightly concerned.

    The plan is expected to be announced as soon as Monday, and the DOT wants it in place by Christmas.

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