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Thread: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

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    Avalon Member truthseekerdan's Avatar
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    Default Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    Survival prepping can be taken to the extreme, especially if one has enough financial resources and physical space. However lets look at the scenario where you have limited resources and are on a tight budget, but you are convinced and motivated that you need to begin prepping for an uncertain future. How do you prioritize your preparedness purchases as it relates to your expenses, what is the plan, and what do you do first?

    First of all let me say that survival preparedness is not solely about having preps stored away, although this is an essential step. Preparedness really is a way of life, a way of thinking in your every day life. It is a mind set that is significantly different from the typical brainwashed citizen worker bee.

    Okay, having said that, lets look at the situation. Number one, look at your budget. Assuming there is debt being serviced, be it credit cards or loans, take a hard look at your monthly essential payments for your expenses. Really strip it down to the basics. How much take-home do you need to survive in your present situation. Keep in mind that paying minimum payments on credit cards will not get you out of debt anytime soon.

    With limited money and space, what should I purchase first for my survival preparedness?

    Lets be smart about this and start with the necessities of life, Water and Food. IN THAT ORDER.

    Water is First Priority for Survival Preparedness

    Water is a resource which often gets ignored or overlooked because of it’s seemingly endless supply. Every day, we need to intake about 2 to 3 quarts of water. Some of this comes from the food we eat, maybe twenty percent, but the rest is from what we drink. Think about this… If the regional power goes out, it may not take long before the water pressure may drop, depending on your location, situation, and the municipal backup generator situation . You will not survive more than 3 – 5 days without any water. Period.

    Water sources are often readily available, so long as you don’t live in the desert. Maybe a nearby reservoir, a river or stream that is not far away, or the lake or pond nearby will all provide alternative sources of water. That is all good and well, but remember that you will have to transport the water, so be sure you have the means to do so (simply storing water ahead of time will be easier and healthier). You will definitely need to have a filtration method to screen out any ‘bad’ stuff from collected water. I highly suggest investing in a good water filter. I personally have several – the main water filter that I use is a counter top filter named the Berkey. My secondary water filter is a smaller portable filtration system named Katadyn that I keep with my vehicle 72 hour kit as well as a spare at home just in case. Depending on the size of the Berkey water filter that you choose, the price range is between $200 – $300 as of my last online check. The smaller portable Katadyn filter looks to be around $65 at this moment.

    If you solely depend on a municipal water source, and you do not live right near a source of water, then you need to make other preparations. Either you need to be prepared to leave your area completely and during the first sign of trouble, or you need to be prepared by physically storing water. A potential problem with storing water is that it is quite heavy. One gallon of water weighs about 8 pounds making storage in large volumes nearly impossible to move (which may not be a problem for you if stored in a good accessible area).

    How Much Water Do I Need for Survival Preparedness ?

    The average 200 pound person will need about 3 quarts of water per day, strictly for consumption. Lets add one more quart for a safe margin and make it a gallon of water per day, or 7 gallons per week per person, strictly for consumption. Do the math and figure out what you will need for your family and the length of time that you are preparing for. As an example, 2 adults for 4 weeks will require about 56 gallons of water. Water storage for the same two people for 3 months will require 168 gallons. Remember, even more water will be needed for cooking and sanitary reasons. For example, without water pressure, how many gallons does it take to dump into a toilet to flush it out? Answer, probably between 2 and 3 gallons. Add up all of your use-case scenarios and factor them into your water storage calculations. For those that live where you can count on rainfall throughout the year, you can utilize rain runoff from the roof and gutters into collection barrels. This would be great for secondary water usage requirements, but you will need to filter and purify this water for drinking.

    How Do I Store Water ?

    A guideline to storing water is to mix one eighth teaspoon (1/8 teaspoon), or about 8 drops of regular unscented bleach to each gallon of water for purification. You can safely store water in clean containers that had consumable liquids such as milk jugs or soda bottles. Best to store in a dark place away from heat. It is generally recommended to drain and refill the water containers every six months or one year. This is not critical because water will basically last forever, but a periodic check for impurities or problems is a good idea.

    To store enough water for several people for one month or more, it may be practical to purchase water storage barrels, commonly available in 55 gallon plastic drums. Be sure that the plastic barrel you choose is food grade (HDPE #2). Although I’m sure these barrels can be purchased at many locations, here is one water storage barrel source that I found while searching. Looks like about $100 for a 55 gallon water storage barrel. You will probably want a hand pump for the barrel too. There are quite a variety of hand pumps ranging from $20 and up.

    The bottom line is to start with your water preparations so that you will live to utilize your next prep which is food.

    Food is Second Priority for Survival Preparedness

    Beginning your food storage preps is actually pretty easy. Instead of starting off by ordering cases of MREs or 50 pound bags of rice and beans, it is far better to begin by simply buying a few more of the same items that you buy at the grocery store every time you visit. The point here is to buy what you normally eat. If you have searched around other sites, I’m sure you’ve heard this before, and it is absolutely true. Also, another great idea to keep in mind is to think ‘variety’. In addition to buying what you normally would eat, pick up some treats and sweets too.

    Storing the extra food is also pretty simple, even in a small apartment. You can buy just about any size plastic storage bin these days, which make perfect containers for any food item. We also found some perfect sized bins that fit and slide right underneath your bed, which perfectly holds the typical size canned food. When determining how much food to store, you can calculate using 2,000 calories per day per person as a minimum requirement. Simply look at your food container and multiply the calories per serving times the number of servings in the container to give you the total for that item. I put together a food storage inventory spreadsheet that keeps a nice organized list of your items along with the survival day count based on calories. You can download it here.

    Once you have built up a base supply of the foods you normally eat, then you can venture into other things like that 50 pound bag of hard red wheat. However you will need to learn proper ways to store it for long term, and you will need to be sure that you know what to do with it when you need it (making your own wheat bread for example). Also it will be a good idea to try these other foods first, to be sure you don’t have allergies and that your system can handle it

    So, there you have it. For your survival preparedness plan, first get started with water storage and then food storage. Then and only then, should you move on to other things. If you begin this way, the resource burden should not be too heavy or too expensive. Go at your own pace as your budget allows. Stick with water storage and food storage before you are tempted to purchase other preparedness items. Remember, you are doing this for you and your own liberation. This process will begin to change the way you think. Like I said, it is a way of life, even in good times.

    Read more: http://modernsurvivalblog.com/preps/...ted-resources/
    Unity Consciousness
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    United States Avalon Member Beth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    Thanks Dan, good stuff. We have been getting an extra few cans of food every time we (or I should say John, I abhor grocery stores) go to the store. Thanks for the tips on water.

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    Australia Avalon Member Anchor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    The OP is good thinking. It is important to go through the preparedness mindset and loose the doom and gloom. **** does happen and being prepared for some types of it is worth doing.

    Water is the absolute key to getting through protracted periods of supply hassle. One of the main problems is the amount you need and it takes up so much space. If your food storage plan involves the use of dehydrated food products, then you should allow extra water for that. If you are *really* (as in life/death) short on water, its worth remembering your body needs water it to digest protein, so if you have been eating lots of protein, you will need to increase your water intake. Its an equation that usually means in a real pinch, best not eating much protein.
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    Ireland Avalon Member Mulder's Avatar
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    I have water purifying tablets because I'm not sure about using bleach. I don't think I can store enough water because it is really bulky. If theres time, I hope to fill up the bath tub & I've brought some collapsable water storers I can fill. If theres no time remember the water in the toilet cistern & hot water cylinder - both can be drunk (its a good idea to clean the cistern every so often).
    “There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.” -- Carl Jung

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    UK Avalon Member Ammit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    Nice thread Dan
    Appologies as I started one last night about grab bags.
    I dont know how water is stored in houses in other countries, but, dont forget in the UK we have a large tank in the roof that can store quite a lot of water. Mine holds about 40 gallons so have a reserve straight away. As long as no contaminates are pumped into the systems first. They usually have a stop cock fitted to the inlet so can be turned off. Also dont forget the immersion heater tank also holds quite a bit. Check this.......

    As I stated in another thread, keep an emergency grab bag in your car or somewhere safe away from your house, if you are stuck in the middle of nowhere or cannot return to your house then you atleast have a tool kit to begin with.

    I enjoy hiking, while walking my local area I have sourced water springs, outside taps etc. Areas of good natural foliage are handy to know. A small book with reminders is handy to keep in a grab bag on how to find, distille normal and sea water, identify plants etc. Its ok knowing all this stuff but once you get into a situation where you have to put this into practice or you are tired and dehydrated ( which could easily happen ) then your mind will be cloudy and a reminder will never hurt.

    Blessings


    Ammit
    Love. peace and Blessings to you all.

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    UK Avalon Member Ammit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    Oh, and uk people need to do some research as I have not yet found a perfume free bleech yet....
    Love. peace and Blessings to you all.

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    Avalon Member kcw_one's Avatar
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    We get purified water delivered biweekly to our house in those big 19 liter bottles. Have had for years now. With the plan we're on with the water company, they end up dropping off more water than we can use before the next delivery. As a result, we've accumulated 15 or so 19 liter bottles in the basement, kind of by accident. Over the years I've found it kind of reassuring though, as our little family of four plus three dogs could go a while with our stored riches with enough to share with neighbors.

    I've been reading about the bug out bags for a couple years, and have prepared a little with some items like a good first aid kit and a wind up flashlight, but my inner sense sez that if difficulties arise we'll be in the right place at the right time connecting with the right people. Not sure if this is naive or soft headed of me, but all this survivalist talk made me think "so what if you got yer bunker in the hills all stocked with pinto beans and duct tape, but the world went to crap when you were visiting the inlaws in another part of the continent?". That would suck.

    I like the idea of a grab bag though. Portable and having some basics, but not too expensive or difficult t manage. The best preparation, like was stated, is psychological rather than physical. Have some knowledge and handy skills, but above all know that you will be okay as long as you stay calm and be okay with things that come up.

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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    Being a grandmother who lives alone with her cat, I realized I wouldn't get 3 blocks carrying a days supply of canned food and my cat....So last year I bought a dehydrator and I now dehydrate organic veges and fruit. Very light weight and nutritious, ideal for having to hit the road. As well, I do stock up on other foods in case I'm house bound for a while...and extra for friends and neighbours should they need some assistance.

    You're right..being prepared is a mind set, so one can remain calm and keep a rational head, while others are panicking. You're bettier able to help yourself and others in difficult times.



    If the poop hits the fan I'm sure my cat will be happy I'm a vegetarian.

    Soj

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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources


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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    I'd like to add #101 and #102 to that list...weapons and ammo. (or did I miss that on your list?)
    Even if the natives are friendlies...It's easier to hunt with a gun.
    A good rifle for bigger game...deer, antelope, elk, pig and eventually, cattle.... and a good shotgun for birds. (In my area we have massive amounts of Canadian geese, ducks, pheasant and turkey...but city dwellers could get some serious protein from squirrel and pigeon.
    add a good bow and stockpile of arrows for when the ammo runs out.
    We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    LOL Ki`s
    Guns are not a good idea around here. For most game I have a "game killer" catapult, have taken rabbit and pidgeon with it often and usually a straight kill.

    KCW_ONE, be carefull of your supply as without your dogs or neibours you have enough for 23 days for your little family, and that does not include washing or cooking. If you take into acount of the heat in Alberta, you may need around 3 litres each per day especially if rations were low or needed rehydrating to cook.

    Grab bags are brilliant items, I may put up a list of what my little bag contains later.

    Blessings

    Ammit
    Love. peace and Blessings to you all.

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    United States Avalon Member jjl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Survival Preparedness With Limited Resources

    it's not a bad idea to invest in some sanitary napkins, need them or not. They make fine bandages to staunch bleeding and are steril. They can also be traded...soap, tampons shamppo and tooth brushes will be way valuble, as will cheap reading glasses from a dollar store...
    we keep survival books in the bathroom, and by the bed. Everyone should have a bugout bag, EVERYONE.

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