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Thread: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

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    Canada Avalon Member DeDukshyn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Hi all,

    I have been exposed to a few preliminary studies on an optimized form of curcumin (turmeric root extract). I work for a company that sells this form of curcumin, but it can be had via other brands in the USA. I make no money from this, but I do work in more an IT role within the company, and I think this may be worth sharing.

    Curcumin is not easily taken in by the body - first your digestive system plain won't let the curcumin through the gut - not a whole lot gets through this way. Direct injections work better, but the body immediately flags the curcumin molecules for excretion by the liver (glucuronidation) and thus there's not really much time for the curcumin to do it's thing. This has been the frustrating aspect of curcumin treatments, considering the molecule is amazing for its ability to treat disease.

    This "optimized curcumin" created by I believe, UCLA, and sold under the trade name "Longvida" has been tweaked to allow it it high absorption through the gut and hides the free molecules from tagging for excretion. Some of the results have indicated that this tweaking allows the curcumin through the blood brain barrier and directly into the brain, where it appears to be able to clear buildups of beta amyloid plaque's - a contributor to Alzheimer's.

    I am not asking anyone to believe me outright, or buy a product, but here is some additional reading with references to the studies:

    http://www.drnibber.com/exciting-evi...imers-disease/


    http://www.drnibber.com/ucla-study-l...ase-pathology/

    http://www.aor.ca/new-study-shows-al...vida-curcumin/

    http://www.aor.ca/wp-content/uploads...-Cognition.pdf
    Last edited by DeDukshyn; 17th December 2014 at 05:28.
    When you are one step ahead of the crowd, you are a genius.
    Two steps ahead, and you are deemed a crackpot.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    My Mother-in-Law had a pretty good brain. She won the Senior Olympics 'Bridge' card playing championship in her home town of 100,000 people not once , but 5 years in a row. Then poof!-Alzheimers. Gram ended up in a 'Memory' unit. She couldn't remember what happened 5 minutes ago, but she could remember all her friends names in an old high school photo. We taped that photo to the door to her room so she would recognize that it was 'her' room.

    They took her to her doctor for an annual physical. One of the questions her doctor asked was "How about your bowels? When's the last time you had a bowel movement?" She answered quite honestly, "I can't remember the last time I had a bowel movement." Freakin doctor prescribed a strong laxative. I'll leave the results of this to your imagination!

    On Gram's 90th birthday we brought cake and ice-cream for a birthday party. When we brought Gram in she said "Yeah! A Party!" She loved parties! Then she asked "What's the party for?" My Wife to Gram, "It's a birthday party for you." Gram asked "It's my birthday?" My Wife to Gram, "Yes Mom, it's your birthday!" Gram asked "How old am I?" My Wife to her Mom, "You are 90 years old today!"
    Gram said, "Oh my!" and then a long pause, and then Gram said "DON'T TELL ANYBODY!"

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    Australia Avalon Member MacStar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by grannyfranny100 (here)
    Waves, I have already started to stockpile my pain pills. Previously, I didn't believe in suicide but when my lucidity become intermittent, I want the choice. I think most of us who have dealt with dem/az may prefer this option. I prefer to be remembered in my prime!!!!!!


    Truglivartna, think I will add coconut oil to my diet; it does sound hopeful!!
    Most definitely grannyfanny100! We consume Banaban Coconut Oil every day and have for a few years now. We also eat....umm I mean "feed our budgie" hulled Hemp seeds with every meal too so look into that

    I must say thanks to Bill for not only starting this thread,but also for supporting Billy with an equally difficult part of this terrible disease. All these story's are really hitting the heart as my Grandfather also had Alzheimer's when I was about 6 or 7. Obviously at the age I was,it was very hard for me to grasp as the onset was rather fast as was the decline.
    My Grandfather Alec was just like most have relayed here. He was and still is a huge influence on myself and what a real Man should be like. He took life in his stride,never looked back and was a strong willed,kind and gentle man.
    I remember him being ok and then in no time he was put into a home. It was gut wrenching to see the rapid decline that I didn't understand,especially one visit when I walked in and he had no idea who I was anymore.
    I still remember looking into his eyes on that last visit...they were like looking into clear cat's eye marbles. I just couldn't see him inside anymore,though he still smiled....something that I will never forget.I think I only got to see him twice before the disease took his life.
    This does run in the Family (although I'm adopted and know some of my lineage) but I'm seeing signs in my Mum and have for a while now and her brother is already on the decline. My Dad passed of a heart attack quite some years back. I'm doing all I can to help Mum with her diet and some supplements and she is slowly starting to see the merit in what I've been suggesting she drop out and what to start adding as it does have a correlation to increasing or decreasing the chances of the onset and or severity.

    Still on topic but I'd also like to mention that our departed member, my mate Shipo also went through the stress of caring for both his Mum and Dad before he passed last year from lung cancer. I'm sorry that I didn't let the community here know too,so please forgive me as a lot has been going on since and still is.
    It will be 1 year to the day tomorrow....SirDipSwitch,I thank you and the other's in the OBE thread for getting him there. He was fine to go mate so thanks.

    We used to chat on Skype at least 3 times a week and he told me all about how draining it was on him,which was becoming quite evident and also the equally painful decision to see them into a home which broke him but also was a release. Thanks to his siblings finally taking notice of his plea's for help,they helped out which was good.

    My Partner used to work in Community Aged Care and dealt with a lot of people with cognitive decline as her job was house visits in the Palliative sector. She saw a lot of these poor disoriented diseased people and it did take it's toll on her as you could imagine. She left not long after we met 7 years ago and took on the role of Carer for me whilst going through the hell ride of long term/high dose prescription Benzo Withdrawal. I still have a little way to go to freedom but I'll get there in tact soon.
    I guess this is where my interest and studies in reversing cognitive decline comes in as that group of drugs are Neuro-Toxins that actually do damage receptors,cause memory impairment and for most,quite severe cognition problems.

    I know Bill wasn't after remedies and treatment posts yet but I feel it necessary in my position to say that indeed food and supplements markedly improve cognitive damage. I have mentioned Hemp Seeds,also Coconut Oil by Truglivartna.
    Things are definitely much clearer when these are "on the menu",esp. the Hulled Hemp Seeds as we have ran out before for about a month. I really noticed the "brain fog" returning full steam and though we still had Coconut Oil,the skin,hair and eyes just were not as healthy until we got some more in.

    The other thing to look at is the role of Acetylcholine especially and also the Russian developed -racetam's. There are plenty of published studies on these and Alzheimer's/Dementia etc. I take CDP-Choline twice a day with Oxiracetam from research and trial and error with excellent results. I found this combo for me worked especially well to clear the afternoon "brain fog". My memory and recall has improved probably better than it was before they drugged me.

    Anyhow,enough from me and I hope I haven't de-railed Bill's intentions by putting in my findings this early in the thread. I fully expect Bill also knows about L-Dopa.

    Wishing all the best to those that care for loved one's or work in the industry...you are unsung Hero's and deserve more resources.

    Hang in there Billy.

    Cheers,
    Andrew
    "The shaman is not merely a sick man, or a madman; he is a sick man who has healed himself.”
    ― Terence McKenna, The Invisible Landscape: Mind, Hallucinogens and the I Ching

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    United States Avalon Member Gatita's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Dementia can definitely tear families apart. The person with dementia sometimes retains enough savvy to manipulate family members against each other. Or they fake things well enough to convince the primary care physician that driving is still a safe activity. My mother did both of those things.

    Cat

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by Gatita (here)
    Dementia can definitely tear families apart. The person with dementia sometimes retains enough savvy to manipulate family members against each other. Or they fake things well enough to convince the primary care physician that driving is still a safe activity. My mother did both of those things.

    Cat
    Hi Cat,

    My old mate Shipo had one that did this,the other couldn't remember the last 5 mins or the past.
    "The shaman is not merely a sick man, or a madman; he is a sick man who has healed himself.”
    ― Terence McKenna, The Invisible Landscape: Mind, Hallucinogens and the I Ching

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    United States Avalon Member Joe Sustaire's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    One thing to remember is that even though their memory, ability to track thoughts, and understand and use words can diminish to really unbelievable levels, their emotional life and response remain strong. In other words they do feel and respond to joy, sadness, anger, etc. They don't remember why they are sad or angry, but the emotional life is real and strong.

    The best/only way I can still strongly connect with Patty is love. By nature she has always been the most loving, happy and positive person I ever met. She taught me how to love. For ten years she was a child protective services worker in Texas. After she burned out from the stress of that job she moved into inspecting daycare centers for the state, and then finally she ran a daycare for the Fort Worth Daycare Association. So love and empathy for the "least of mine" was always her calling, bringer of light, love and joy.

    If you can imagine, losing your memories and basic knowledge of most everything in your environment, from people, to what they are doing when trying to help you by taking your blood pressure or changing your briefs and cleaning you up, the world becomes a pretty scary place. Anger and fight or flight kicks in, and you no longer have the ability to run away. So hollering and cussing steps up, and watch out for those hands and feet. You're just trying to defend and protect yourself.

    When I visit Patty I approach her calmly, slowly and quietly with love. I tell I came to see her, I tell her she looks pretty today, I ask her if she has a smile in there, usually she gives me one and I tell her she has a pretty smile. Usually before long she's reaching to hold my hand, we're smiling and laughing, admiring the view out her window or the flowers in her room. Maybe she'll ask what my name is, I'll tell her I'm Joe, she's Patty, and we're Patty and Joe. We're best buddies, we've been together a long time and we know how to have fun! I'll hold her hand and kiss her fingers, she'll often kiss mine, maybe we'll start making goofy sounds or faces at each other and winking, and maybe sing simple nursery rhymes and children songs. We connect, I tell her I love her, she tells me she loves me and she's glad I'm here, we help each other to feel loved.

    When we have reached this stage, if she starts having anxiety over something, tv, loud noises, seeing, hearing and talking to things and people that aren't there.......oops, I forget where I am, this is Avalon! Rather when she has anxiety or starts getting upset with voices or people that "I" can't see... :-) I tell her it's all right, we're okay, we're just taking a rest, and she calms down and is reassured that everything is all right. If I'm there when she needs changing I'm able to hold her hands, have her lean into me and tell her it's all right, we're okay, they are just helping us out, fixing us up etc., and it helps her weather the "assault" of having her pants pulled down and her private parts cleaned. When you can't understand what's going on around you, it's a mighty scary world. Love gets through. Thankfully we were able to find a facility has many open, caring, and loving ladies/girls working there. And as in so many areas in life, those least paid do the most work and have the biggest impact on the resident's quality of life it seems. God bless them.

    I pray to Great Spirit morning and night asking for help, and guidance, for myself, Patty, and the ladies that take care of her. I meditate and ask for strength, direction, and help, as I work through this new stage of my life. And it helps.

    Love to all!

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Dr Deagle claims the flu jab well Three flu jabs to be precise will give you this disease I am not so sure but worth sharing, also a diet rich in magnesium as talked of in the "Alzheimers Conquered" book by a chap that had been diagnosed with early onset Alzheimers, the claim was he progressed with the disease but one day he- as it were- woke up! gradually improved thanks to his wife persisting with a diet rich in magnesium , he halted the disease and wrote the book.

    I nursed my own mother for over 5 years eventually getting her into a residential home not because I couldn't care for her any more but because I wanted her to die quickly from some kind of infection - it only took a few months she died of pneumonia, I explained what had happened to her after she had died just in case she felt confused in death- not recognise her lifeless body or my own ageing self. This made me feel better anyway.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0...ls?ie=UTF8&me=

    Homocysteine levels are also associated with Alzheimers
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12849121
    Last edited by sheme; 17th December 2014 at 16:40.

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    Scotland Moderator Billy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Hi everyone, First and foremost i wish to thank Bill for creating this valuable thread. As Bill mentioned i unexpectedly but willingly find myself caring for my mum who is suffering with this dreaded curse at this time of her life.

    Wow, I am stuck for words at this moment after reading through the comments and with everyone being so open when sharing their personal experiences in relation to this beast that we call Alzheimer's.

    @Joe, Your sharing truly touched my heart brother, Peace of mind and heart to the one you love.

    I think in the future i may also find myself in the position of finding myself, as i seem to be many persons through my mums eyes as we go through the days. Depending on what past years she is seeing in her minds eye, One day i am her brother by name, next moment i am her husband, my father by name. It is rare now that she sees me as her eldest son and forgets my name. Then in moments of clarity i hear her call "Billy" can you bring me whatever. It is truly a living in the moment situation.


    But hey i can role play any character whom she imagines is beside her. Sometimes i correct her and remind her of who i am, she says "Oh so you are" and other times i find it better to just leave it alone, as i have also found that correcting her can cause unnecessary confusion.

    This all seems to have began when my father was ill at home and nearing the end of his days with Leukemia, He passed away in Jan 2013, and after 64 yrs together my mum lost the will to carry on, I think myself the shock of his passing kick started the memory loss, and then very quickly it accelerated into Alzheimer's.
    Which i have just found out is something that doctors are not allowed to diagnose. And has to be diagnosed by a Psychiatrist.

    Early November Last year she fell outside, this was when i arrived to stay for a while, It turned out she had broken her knee and ended up in hospital for 6 months. a rapid downhill slide while there. This was when the UTI's (infections) began, they poison the brain and cause hallucinations and unbelievable confusion. Seeing my father and others who had passed away. Forgetting she could not walk (Ever again it turned out) she fell at least 15 times while in hospital care. Covered in bruises but lucky there was no more serious breakages. Although the authorities wanted to place her in a care home.

    It was this lack of care due to understaffed and overworked nurses that made me decide to bring her home and care for her myself. The UTI's happens every month or so. and this is the difficult times. Up all night dealing with hallucinations ect. It is during those times i have shared the odd rant with Bill and the Team in the Skype chat. And all have been amazingly supportive. Because of Bill's experiences he has passed on some welcomed tips. Having a Routine was one. What time of the day it is becomes important.

    She has now lost or blanked out the last 20yrs of her life. She does not recognize her home where she has lived for the last 15yrs (Pre Dads illness), but in her mind she is in her previous home, (Happier times), Although we are on a ground floor flat she asks me to go upstairs to fetch this or that, We do not have stairs. And she constantly asks "When can i go home" But i manage to remind her with the familiar furniture and surrounding photo's that she is already home.

    I have a care plan in place, four visits a day for 20mins a visit. Helping with meds, toilet visits, Although i have usually already taken her minutes before they arrive.

    I try and keep a sense of humour at all times, And we do have some funny moments. Moments like the following. Shared by Jean-marie.
    Quote she looked at my husband Todd and said, "Oh I remember you, I always liked you! Did you ever find a good woman?"
    My mum looked in the mirror one morning a few weeks ago and was shocked and shouted. WHERE HAS ALL MY RED HAIR GONE. Having not had it for 30yrs now. so this is a story she tells when visitors come.

    [QUOTE] Power of attorney[QUOTE]

    Yes this is important. My sister and brother and i have a very close relationship. My sister now has power of attorney. And they both take turn about every couple of weeks to let me out overnight.. Time out is my life saver.

    God it has taken me all day just to share this. food time for mum now.

    Thank you everyone for sharing. I have more to share and I am always here to assist others, If i ever find myself climbing walls and to let out a scream, i may just pop in here now.
    When you express from a fearful heart in the now moment, You create a fearful future.
    When you express from a loving heart in the now moment, You create a loving future.

    Have no fear, Be aware and live your lives journey from a compassionate caring nurturing heart to manifest a compassionate caring nurturing future. Billyji


    Peace

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    I worked with Alzheimer residents in a private elite home for the elderly as an intern in a post-graduate Art Therapy program. This is the
    kind of disease that you're really not going to become acquainted with on a deep intimate level unless you've had hands-on experience with it.
    Unfortunately, all of us oldsters here, 50 and over, eventually will have encounters with this disease somewhere down the line via our family and friends
    who end up being diagnosed with it. But don't be fooled if they don't know who you are when you visit them because just like how it is with coma patients,
    on a subconscious level, they are completely lucid and understand everything you are saying to them. Tell them that you love them while looking in their eyes and
    holding their hand. They are still there and remember everything even though they look like they are very, very far away.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Coconut oil is very hopeful! No less than 5 Tbsp a day for someone with the disease, 2-3 as a preventative. Also, take every SPECK of wheat out of the diet. Better yet - absolute ketogenic. This means 30 grams or less of carbohydrates from fruits and vegetables but NO grains or legumes at all. "Grain Brain" by David Perlmutter is a must read. The disease is preventable and if caught soon enough, curable with diet.

    My mother had senile dementia, which is not Alzeimers. She spent her last 3 months in a nursing home after a stroke, and I decided I would rather die - literally. If there is no other way, I will stop eating or drinking.

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    United States Moderator Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    not too long ago I worked in a hospital as a "safety companion". I was put mainly with dementia patients. basically I kept them from tearing out their IV's, catheters, so forth. I prevented them from hurting themselves and provided basic assistance when necessary.

    I got the job thru a temp agency. I had no training, and no idea what I was in for. it was a new program there at the hospital.

    my first day was with an older man named Will. I had no idea what his condition was or even what I was there for, really. he didn't either. he kept asking why I was there, and all I could offer in return was my job title: safety companion. he'd nod knowingly every time i recited this line and then ask me the same question no less than 5 minutes later. "safety companion" i'd say, and we'd repeat the ritual again. in between this inanity we sat and talked pleasantly. he talked quite a bit about fighting in world war 2. and when he wasn't doing that he would occasionally sing the song 'ring of fire' at a volume registering just over a mumble. I didn't think anything of it. he was just a charming old man who happened to like johnny cash.

    I broke for dinner about 4 hrs in. what a job! I thought. soft! and it paid well too.

    after dinner, as I left the elevator and made my way to Will's room I heard 'ring of fire' being belted out at a volume that could have been detected in space. he must have been singing the entire time id been gone, because his voice had grown hoarse and wheezy. it was as if he was being strangled to death and decided to sing 'ring of fire' to express his fear instead of just crying out for help. when I entered the room I observed a completely different individual than the one id left no more than an hour ago. his previous calm was replaced by madness and fear, his hair was tousled and reaching in all different directions. he was writhing around almost uncontrollably and punching the air as he gave homage to johnny cash..."burn! burn! burn! the ring of fire! the ring of fire!!!" against my better judgment I asked him why he was violently swinging his penis around, and his response was that he thought it was a microphone.

    Will sang 'ring of fire' for the rest of my shift. that was 4 more hours in case youre wondering. it was utter madness. he had completely forgotten what we discussed before I'd left for lunch. he'd completely forgotten who I was! and now he was blasting out 'ring of fire' for the whole world to hear. he may have broken a record for most bowel movements in a 4 hour span too. a nurse aid and myself would change him...and then, like clockwork, 30 or so mins later he'd go again. meanwhile I was frantically trying to keep him from ripping out his IV and catheter. he was old and sick but still surprisingly strong! restraining him wasn't easy!

    the whole experience was one of total insanity. "burn! burn! burn! the ring of fire! the ring of fire!"

    I watched Will for several weeks before I was reassigned to another patient. and every day with him was nearly the same: 4-7 was pleasant conversation...7-8 was dinner...and 8-midnight was non-stop 'ring of fire' interspersed with a seemingly constant stream of sh!t coming from Will's bowels. ring of fire indeed. after the first week I decided to heed the old axiom ' if you cant beat 'em, join 'em. I joined Will many times in screeching, profoundly off-key renditions of 'ring of fire'. I sang till I was hoarse...till my hair was matted down with sweat...till my eyes went bloodshot. I stopped short of using my penis as a microphone, but still..if someone walked in randomly and didn't know who I was, it may have taken a moment before they realized who the patient was and who the worker was.

    this was just the tip of the iceburg too. I worked there for a year and a half or so, and I considered the place more insane asylum than hospital. when I left I'd felt like I'd barely escaped with my sanity. the one thing I learned dealing w/dementia and alzheimers patients- the most important thing - is that you have to allow yourself to laugh at it all once in a while. you'll feel a bit guilty at first, but you must allow yourself this one luxury. it's the only thing that'll keep you sane
    Last edited by Mike; 17th December 2014 at 20:04.

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    Canada Avalon Member Aspen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Coconut oil mixed with hemp seeds is very good. My mother used to make an icecube tray full and keep it in the fridge and pop one ice cube sized piece into my father's mouth every day.

    My father had both Alzheimers and Parkinsons and my mother was his main caregiver for the last three years of his life. She burned out emotionally and physically about four months before his death. SHe was simply not getting enough sleep at night because he was so restless. I remember spending one night in their place and allowing my mom to go home. He got up five times that night and I was exhausted after one night! We were always afraid he would fall and fracture a hip. It was a great relief for us all when he passed away - to see an end to his suffering. However the grieving was complicated for my mother by her burn out and all the unresolved issues that had remained from their marriage (he had been very controlling when he was well and she still carried a lot of resentment). She ended up attempting suicide more than two years after his death, but now she is finally doing great. So it is very true that the caregivers need lots of support, more than they themselves realize!
    When I did some research on Alzheimers and their cargivers I was shocked to read that many caregivers pass away before the Alzheimer's patient! I suppose it is because half of the time it is their marriage partner who also happens to be elderly. Just guessing.

    I found it is emotionally and physically draining to take care of a parent in this condition. I was very grateful that we were able to find a spot for him in an Alzheimer's ward. Myself and my sister would go to see him every day. I tried to be there at mealtime to help feed him and several times ended up changing a diaper. I am very glad that I was able to take the time to be part of his life in the last few years. It gave me the much needed time with dad that I had missed early in life. Even though he was confused about who I was I still felt like he knew it was someone who loved him, even at the end. We ended up not choosing a feeding tube and he , essentially, starved to death. However it seemed to be quite painless. He was enjoying music and art right up to the day before he died. I remember bringing his favourite Waylon Jennings and Johnny Cash music to the care center and he was swinging his feet back and forth in time to the music. My paramedic brother was amazed at the courage he appeared to have. I have heard of other people consenting to a feeding tube and prolonging the persons life for years. But years spent in bed is not what my father would have wanted. He asked me while he was still lucid, two years before he died to help end his life "when things get really bad." Not giving the feeding tube is the best I could do. It was a very special experience to be present at his death and my sister and I both sensed the presence of angels.

    The people in the care center are for the most part loving people doing the best they can, but it is true that they are understaffed. However, in the last few months it would have taken 3 family members to provide 8 hour shifts around the clock. We were simply not able to do it. We would have had to quit our jobs. Stopping in at the care center every day was the best we could do. I enjoyed my walks with him, I would take the wheelchair outside. He did adjust to the care center after 3 months but the first month was difficult. His sleep schedule got mixed up and he would be dosing in his wheelchair at meal time and ended up getting dehydrated. But he did finally adjust. Unfortunately his bed was considered a respite bed and was temporary so they did move him again. He died within a week. I believe it was because he could not adjust. So, the moral of the story seems to be that if there are family members living close to a care facility, find a spot before the Alzheimers gets too advanced. It was very traumatic to see my father treated like a piece of luggage. I often wonder if the health care system knows that advanced dementia patients are likely to die if they are moved and deliberately move people to speed up the process??? The caregivers that knew him were very distressed about he decision the day he was moved. They followed us out the door practically wringing their hands.

    My mother was helped somewhat by moving into a senior's lodge with him when he was not quite so advanced. She received help with bathing and clothing him and the meals were provided. The staff would also give her breaks by "babysitting" him for an hour at a time in the middle of the day. That worked okay for about 6 months and then he lost his appetite and started to go downhill more quickly. The (Parkinsons medication is so bitter! And they lose their sense of taste with Parkinsons.)

    Caregivers need break! For their mental health. Some families find it helpful to hire caregivers for nighttime so that the family caregivers gets enough sleep.

    As to the causes, I believe it has to do with the neurotoxins we have in our water supply, (like the fluoride) and other toxins in the air, the food, the immunizations and medications, especially those that affect the nervous system. Researchers are saying that MS, Alzheimers and Parkinsons are linked. They are all diseases of the nervous system and have more in common than previously realized. In Alberta there are a lot of gas wells and flaring is commonly used. Flaring of oil and gas wells is not 100% efficient at burning off toxins. If it is windy a lot of the toxic gases end up in the air. Alberta has one of the highest rates of MS in Canada. I wonder what the Dementia and Parkinsons rates are?

    One thing I would try now, if I were to do it over again, is radionics. Apparently some success has been achieved with radionics for dementia.

    Another point is, my father was very careful with his diet. From the age of 25 he was vegetarian for a few years and believed in organic all his life. Diet was certainly not a cause in his case! He took lots of supplements, my mom always had a big garden and they grew their own meat. One cause of Parkinsons is head trauma. So I wonder if that is a factor in dementia as well. He had suffered major trauma at a young age - one year in prison camp. I can't help but wonder if it caused brain damage??? that may have started a sequence of events later in life . . . .
    Last edited by Aspen; 17th December 2014 at 20:17.

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    Avalon Member avid's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Post-it notes everywhere, even to remembering to read them is crucial! My daily duty, cross off stuff done, and flag up critical issues. I just thought that the major loss I've experienced this year, has sent me 'over the edge'! I just can't seem to focus any more, or deal with tradespersons who are needing to be kicked into touch. I am not senile, I am only 65, but it seems like I am 'kicking against the pricks'. Tomorrow - I am 'snagging' major works, and unfortunately, will have to sack a person brought in by my decorator. I've done this loads in my life, in the education business, but it's Xmas, and I have been 'taken to the cleaners' as a vulnerable person. Will have to steel-up and sack this chap. He's made more of a simple job than I needed, and the recompense is immense. I reckon I'll 'snag' him tomorrow, and if he doesn't make amends, he'll not work locally again.... Why are folk so cruel
    The love you withhold is the pain that you carry
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...lzheimers.html

    Good news for Alzheimer's sufferers! Clinical trials are underway in the UK and research in other parts of the world looks promising. It is for early stages of dementia. But Terry Pratchet has had it for a while now, so I gather it can be used even after having the disorder for several years, depending on how quickly the disease has progressed in specific persons. . . .

    "Sir Terry Pratchett has been trialling a revolutionary new device that claims to slow, and even reverse the effects of Alzheimer's.

    The award-winning author, who was diagnosed with dementia in 2007, is one of the first patients in the UK to try the anti-dementia helmet.


    The device sends intense bursts of light at a particular wavelength the a patient's skull.


    The helmet's designer, Dr Gordon Dougal is convinced the device could transform the lives of thousands of people with Alzheimer's, which currently affects 700,000 people in the UK.


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...#ixzz3MBbAbNeE

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    This is one of the most moving threads I have ever read on this forum. Thank you everyone for sharing your very personal stories. My parents died from uterine cancer and heart disease at 64 and 57 respectively and I have often felt cheated of their love and company. However, I am now at an age when many of my friends' parents are suffering this debilitating condition and though I wish I had had my parents around for longer I am truly grateful they did not have to go through this. The film 'Iris' about the celebrated British writer Iris Murdoch is a realistic depiction of losing a loved one to this.


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    Avalon Member avid's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by Snowflower (here)
    Coconut oil is very hopeful! No less than 5 Tbsp a day for someone with the disease, 2-3 as a preventative. Also, take every SPECK of wheat out of the diet. Better yet - absolute ketogenic. This means 30 grams or less of carbohydrates from fruits and vegetables but NO grains or legumes at all. "Grain Brain" by David Perlmutter is a must read. The disease is preventable and if caught soon enough, curable with diet.

    My mother had senile dementia, which is not Alzeimers. She spent her last 3 months in a nursing home after a stroke, and I decided I would rather die - literally. If there is no other way, I will stop eating or drinking.
    This is what happened to my father, and many of his friends recently, they refuse to eat, they die. It's happening to at least 4 close families NOW! Nothing can tempt them to eat - even a lovely ice-cream! It seems to be their last stand, and the olde 'double fingered' salute to us who are desperate to keep them going, for US, and really not for them. So don't despair if an aged loved-one won't eat, it would seem that it is a pattern we must accept. Even the heavy breathing is 'normal' at 'the end' - they are just drifting away naturally.

    Many folk who I now have just said the same thing, the olde folks have just 'shutdown', won't eat. So many now, I've tried to tempt lovely food - but really, they want to "switch off" asap! Don't despair - you've done your best, they have not starved!! They just want to"go" - not your problem, they need/want to leave, so let them go with love. "They" know you have have done your best for them. Uncle P and Aunty Edith are together at last, my family have loved them 'in extremis', and a wee visitation in Cockermouth cemetary - a wondrous place, total peace, and a babbling brook Elizabeth Howden, and Patricia King, just over the bridge and to the right..
    Mum and Dad are at Crosby now, but at least they are together, as they both wanted. At least we did that right. Bless all those who follow, and especially Cath and Mary xxxxx
    Last edited by avid; 17th December 2014 at 22:00.
    The love you withhold is the pain that you carry
    and er..
    "Chariots of the Globs" (apols to Fat Freddy's Cat)

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by Corncrake (here)
    The film 'Iris' about the celebrated British writer Iris Murdoch is a realistic depiction of losing a loved one to this.

    Thanks, Corncrake. The vid is blocked. In case this 2nd is too, check out the trailer in @ IMBd. It's also available at iTunes.

    IRIS - Kate Winslet as Iris Murdoch


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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    I just spoke to my friend who has been using energy frequency knowledge for 40 years and he stated that he has had success with using the "brain apnea signature" when helping people with chronic conditions that affect the brain. He also using psyionics and reads auras, so he using a variety of methods. He also speculated that the many medications that many alzheimers and parkinson's patients are on are toxic to the brain and can cause cerebellum to shut down from being toxic. My healer friend has been studying the brain quite extensively in recent months because of people seeking help with dementia but also for children with ADHD and autism and brain cancer. He has also found evidence that well water and multi vitamins can end up give people too much iron. Metals are a culprit in interfering with functioning of the nervous system and the brain. So heavy metal cleanses are also helpful. My father had fasted for three weeks when he first was diagnosed with Parkinson's but it did not help him. He had a form of Parkinsons that causes rigidity and imbalance problems but not the shaking, so maybe it was too far advanced by the time he decided to fast? Radionics, apparently, is not legal in Canada so one has to be cautious when speaking about it here, but in Europe it is legal. I don't know about the US. thanks
    Last edited by Aspen; 18th December 2014 at 22:22.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    for those who never experienced someone you love with Alzheimer's, 50 first dates was an incredible movie giving a glimpse into what it is like...



    now imagine instead of it being every morning, it can happen in 5-10 minutes...

    my Dad has it, I live 10 minutes away, he is still in early stages but it is really hard on my mom. I'll get a call he's having a bad day and I drop in, being a healer that has helped so many others it is hard not being able to help my own Dad. I look the same as I did back in high school, so at a glance I snap him back to reality and he'll start chewing me out for a tool I lost back when I was 5. It used to piss me off when he brought it up, but for him to remember just a shred of the past seems to start a snowball and soon he is back to present times.

    Every one of you have something in what you wrote I'd like to respond to, but all I can do is send a hug with my thanks.

    coconut oil is part of his daily intake, and I've taught them to replace salt, with Curry and garlic which has the ingredient Tumeric root but a combination of other spices that make a combination for Cardio along with memory.

    but, let me give all of you a hint to start their day, Honey Cinnamon, they make a paste to go on toast and stir some into his coffee

    I'm not sure why, but for him, it starts his day in the present...

    he gets lost in the night occasionally wandering around their home, but Mom learned calling his name attracts him and orients him as he wakes better than an old lady telling him to come to bed, if at the moment he is in his twenties, he has no clue who mom is...

    imagine our gifts in someone who doesn't believe.

    we do time travel, OBEs, remote viewing...

    what if part of the alzhiemers confusion is understanding what they are going through, the closer you get to heaven, the more gifts seem to return...

    being surrounded by classmates that passed over the years...
    talking with old relatives, he is traveling to the moment they are bringing them to...

    so much is still unknown, but I wanted all of you to consider this possibility, I have looked at times, Spirit is at 100% while the conscious mind is drifting...

    ps... remember the 93 year old Irish lady I told you about a few years back? I'm still a caregiver when she needs it, she's been to deaths door 7 times now and each time a miracle brought her back. it's been 68 years since her cancer treatment in London, she still gets her $5 a month the queen graciously gives her to cover living expenses...

    she's almost 96 now, last year she was begging for someone to kill her, she bounced back with a Christmas Day miracle, she had been lost in loopyville for a few weeks, suddenly sharp as a tack...

    we took a 4 day cruise for a sanity break a few weeks back, when we returned she had injured her leg, now 2 person transfer required to do anything, so it's been a rough return from a well needed vacation...

    I myself enjoy when they are in loopyville watching the birds flying around the room, getting fish for lunch from a picture...

    if that is their step before passing there is nothing to worry about, they won't feel or know anything when the time comes...

    now my favorite thing to do is bring both together, they sit and talk for hours... both on completely different subjects, but the other never notices...

    I can see where a home would be a very good place for them to spend time...

    the problem is the hospital in between, unequipped to handle these patients.

    Dad woke up at 2AM in a conspiracy, they were testing him with bio diseases... He started walking up and down the hallway demanding everyone get out of his house...

    3 security guards to hold him until they could lock down the restraints...

    I walked in at 2:15 he looked up, tears pouring down his cheeks...

    "hi Dave, why are all these people in my house..."

    I released the restraints, brought to the window, and had him look outside...

    I saw him return, he said "this isn't my home, where am I?"

    I explained why he was in the hospital, turned to the nurse and said "I am taking him home now, nothing you can say will change my mind..."

    he got dressed and I rolled Dad out toward my car...

    right then my sister and mom pulled in seeing me roll dad out through the door, I smiled loaded him in the car and sadly watched them drive away...

    it is really hard, so I understand what all of you are going through...

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Yes, so many loving yet painful stories on here! And yes it's very draining to deal with and write about, but helpful as well. So many "oh yeah" memories as well as I read others stories.

    As Billy mentioned, I'd forgotten all about the uti's and how that would make her more difficult and unmanageable. I also went through this with my Dad. His dementia was parkinson related. We, Patty and I had him up here in the woods for several months before a space opened up for him at the local VA hospital. He just lost the ability to walk. He'd been living by himself and was out mowing the yard, took a break in his recliner and then just couldn't walk when he tried to get up. Went through all the tests and found nothing physically wrong with him, somehow the neurons and electrical connections from brain to legs just failed to connect. What made it particularly hard taking care of him was that he couldn't remember he couldn't walk. So all night as we tried to sleep, same room, you tried to keep an ear open to hear him stir or sit up in bed so you could call out to him and settle him down. If you missed his stirring you were awakened by the sound of him hitting the floor. Not fun for him or us, but luckily he never broke anything. A couple of months of that kind of sleep really can drag you down.

    As for as cause, who knows? Patty and I were vegans for over 20 years after we moved to the woods. She was always very health conscious, vitamins, minerals, healthy eating etc. and very active both mentally and physically.

    My youngest brother died in his early 40's from a massive heart attack, no warning signs, just gone. It was way to early to go, but after seeing people go through long, debilitating, degenerative diseases, I've come to have a new appreciation for a quick, done and gone heart attack.

    Love to all!

  38. The Following 20 Users Say Thank You to Joe Sustaire For This Post:

    avid (18th December 2014), Bill Ryan (17th December 2014), Billy (18th December 2014), Dennis Leahy (18th December 2014), earthdreamer (30th January 2015), Hervé (18th December 2014), Jean-Marie (18th December 2014), JRS (18th December 2014), kudzy (18th December 2014), Limor Wolf (18th December 2014), Mike (18th December 2014), NancyV (18th December 2014), Neal (18th December 2014), peterpam (20th December 2014), Reinhard (17th December 2014), Rocky_Shorz (17th December 2014), RunningDeer (17th December 2014), Sierra (17th December 2014), Sophocles (21st December 2014), william r sanford72 (18th December 2014)

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