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Thread: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

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    United States Avalon Member Joe Sustaire's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Me again.

    There was a novel I read one time, don't remember what it was, but it took place on a small island with several extended families that all made their living as fisherman. The old patriarch of the family had dementia and would spend his days walking around and around the island on the beach, finding shells, driftwood, saving starfish etc. The family would just keep an eye out for him as he came around when it was time to eat etc. Always seemed like the perfect setting for one suffering from this disease. Fresh air, exercise, comparative safety from getting lost, and always something new, for ones that live totally in the present.

    Thanks for sharing your stories!

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Hi Billy, I just wanted to tell you something about UTI's and hallucinations. This is a common occurrence for my mother. The major factor of this is that her potassium, sodium, and magnesium levels drop to low. These three work hand in hand with continual balance, when they become out of whack, toxins produce the relative affects of hallucinations. UTI's not only cause bacterial buildup within the bladder cavity, ureter tubes, and kidneys, but also in the brain. With the added depletion of potassium, sodium, and magnesium, this can cause major hallucinatory effects. If you can, consult a professional urologist to help bring back her balance and to reduce the UTI's. My heart goes out to you. Make sure you get plenty of rest for yourself.
    Warmest regards,
    crosby

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    I mentioned how looking inside I could see modern happenings, but it is like their bridge no longer connects, maybe it is the Spirit saddened trying to help the conscious rebuild the bridge... but I see what they share in this clip from 50 1st dates...


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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by RunningDeer (here)
    Quote Posted by Corncrake (here)
    The film 'Iris' about the celebrated British writer Iris Murdoch is a realistic depiction of losing a loved one to this.

    Thanks, Corncrake. The vid is blocked. In case this 2nd is too, check out the trailer in @ IMBd. It's also available at iTunes.

    IRIS - Kate Winslet as Iris Murdoch




    Here is a download link to the entire movie Iris in good quality, AVI format. It's a free download: 803 Mb, valid for 7 days till 25 December.

    http://we.tl/BlCU5iaWjg

    My most sincere thanks, respect and appreciation to everyone posting here. One member told me that it had taken them all day to write their post, because it had been such an emotional experience. (To my surprise, I found it had been for me, too, even 28 years later.)

    This is real, strong stuff. It is also the Avalon forum at its very finest.

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  8. Link to Post #45
    United States Avalon Member Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    there's one more story id like to share. I think it proves that no matter how seemingly compromised their minds are, dementia/alzheimers sufferers true selves are still in there somewhere...


    it involves a man named Bob, a dementia sufferer. ( as I mentioned in my previous post I was employed by a hospital to look over these types of patients as a precaution) Bob was an incredibly sweet man. a smart man too. before he'd gotten ill he was an engineer of some renown. our first day was pretty uneventful. he spoke of his former job with surprisingly clarity and coherence. he spoke of the great love he had for his wife, who he still believed was alive (she wasn't). he told me the story of his marriage to her on a baseball diamond somewhere in the south many, many times (I cant recall where exactly)... and he chuckled affectionately each time he told it, recalling how the manager ("Old Man Freelander") of one of the minor league ball clubs he played for then, married them.

    but he grew worse at an alarming rate.

    he had a daughter who worked at the hospital, and since Bob and I had grown pretty close, she requested I stay with him for the remainder of his stay, which was 3-4 weeks or so. so I did. I developed a real affection for Bob. I tried not to, honestly. the more I cared, the more heartbreaking it became. catch-22.

    I saw emotions flash thru Bob's eyes sometimes, but it was impossible to grab on to them. happiness, fear, despair, joy, mirth...they all seemed to blend and mesh, and it confused him I think. there were times when I was certain he was fully aware of his condition, and all it's ramifications, but he simply couldn't express it verbally. his eyes expressed it though... they reflected a crushing desperation.

    one day he went home for a visit. I met him shortly after he returned to the hospital and asked him about it, curious to see if it had any effect. he was quiet for a long moment - as if he was gathering all his energy to deliver something coherent - and he said to me, with the most profoundly sad eyes id ever seen: "better to have stayed then to have went and come back". he looked at me with a clarity i'd only recognized from the pictures i'd seen of him pre-illness.

    i was completely gutted. i excused myself under the pretense of having to use the bathroom. i left the room and wept like a child
    Last edited by Mike; 18th December 2014 at 18:16.

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    Great Britain Avalon Member Puffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    I am grateful to have the chance to speak on this subject to you dear Avalonians.

    My Mother has always been a positive and loving person and this has continued into her later life with the diagnosis of Alzheimer's. It has been such a huge pleasure to help my (very youthful) 89 year old Father care for her and over the last few months I have enjoyed her company more than I ever have done. She is so funny and sweet and makes us laugh even when she doesn't mean to. She is somewhat aware she is ill, but it doesn't seem to trouble her. Over the last couple of months she has said two especially nice things, one to my father; 'You are the best thing that happened in my life.' One to me; 'I like being old'. Indeed she is much loved and cherished by both of us, which must make 100% difference to the way she (or anyone else for that matter) experiences life. She is treated like a Queen!

    Over the last month or two there were noticeable improvements in her health - regaining some control of her bladder and occasionally walking unaided.

    12 days ago she had a major stroke and was admitted to hospital. Its been touch and go since then and a few days ago I thought she was nearing the end. Today she said; 'I could get better'.

    I would love to have her back home again and be able to care for her and enjoy her company for many more years to come.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Yeah Bill,

    I'm sure you noticed how I cut off without finishing...

    It's not easy sharing but does feel important to share, healing is believing facts don't matter...

    I haven't mentioned it yet, but right as we were loading suitcases in the car for our trip, the nurse covering for us tripped on a shoe fell landing on her arm. When she stood up, I saw the bone pressing out an inch, she just broke her arm. We'd miss the ship waiting for another nurse, without thinking, I rubbed my hands, clapped them together creating the energy ball and slid my hands on both sides of her break, and knew it wasn't broken... I felt as the bump went down on her skin, the break was gone...

    I moved my hands and the nurses mouth was hanging, then tears poured down her cheeks as she realized she just witnessed a miracle.

    I gave her a big hug as we ran out the door...

    facts mean nothing to me...

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    United States Avalon Member Gatita's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    A lot of times you have to mentally move into their world. It's their world, everybody knows them there. You're just the nice neighbor that comes to visit.

    Cat

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    Canada Avalon Member Aspen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    a beautiful and touching moment in music therapy used to connect with a severe Alzheimer's patient. . . . .tears


    It is like Gatita says in the previous post - you have to move into their world in order to connect on an emotional level. They must feel quite isolated at times with all the mental confusion

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    ------

    I am most extremely moved by these posts and very personal stories.... thank you all, so much, again.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Crosby mentioned UTI's and hallucinations. Speaking from a nursing perspective, incontinence raises the risk for UTI'S because the individual is marinating in their own output. If it's bowel and bladder both, it's that much worse. Then, when you toss electrolyte imbalances into the mix, it gets worse. Electrolyte imbalances can cause a range of cardiac issues, along with all the hallucinations from the infection and out of whack lab values. We can also factor in "sundowning." Perfectly lucid during the day; perfectly loopy at night. I'm not a cardiologist or a geritrician, but I've worked in nursing for twenty years. There isn't much that scares me anymore. Working the night shift cured that. I do still get surprised by something occasionally. I remember one night when I was saying goodbye to someone I had become quite fond of. Her normal communications were word salad. That night when I told her I was leaving, she said "I hate to see you go." That was the most special goodbye I've ever gotten. Her lucid moments were few and far between, but she chose to spend one of them on me.

    Cat

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Aspen, you brought me to tears. The love between those two women was out of this world - literally.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    My mother began a journey into alzheimers for one year before COPD took her out.
    During that time I cared for her and slept on the hospital floor when she went there
    because she didnt remember how to call the nurses if she needed something.
    I wrote a lot of poetry about what we were going through, and here is one
    of them.
    My love to all who care for people with this childlike disease.



    Expiration

    The country of your first breath
    haunts every one
    except your last.

    That last breath
    will take you beyond
    the breaths you were.

    Whatever treasures have fastened
    around your understanding
    lift now.

    The book of life advanced,
    your chapter
    describing what you wanted.

    Your desires fell
    like dominos
    between worlds.

    Those pipes
    underground
    always siphoning you.

    In this dense land of bizarre
    beauty,
    exhaust wafted in windows.

    The only home
    you knew, here
    they spoke your name.

    But now you can’t recall it,
    and without a name
    you step into your last breath.

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    Virgin Islands Avalon Member Selene's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by avid (here)
    Quote Posted by Snowflower (here)
    Coconut oil is very hopeful! No less than 5 Tbsp a day for someone with the disease, 2-3 as a preventative. Also, take every SPECK of wheat out of the diet. Better yet - absolute ketogenic. This means 30 grams or less of carbohydrates from fruits and vegetables but NO grains or legumes at all. "Grain Brain" by David Perlmutter is a must read. The disease is preventable and if caught soon enough, curable with diet.

    My mother had senile dementia, which is not Alzeimers. She spent her last 3 months in a nursing home after a stroke, and I decided I would rather die - literally. If there is no other way, I will stop eating or drinking.
    This is what happened to my father, and many of his friends recently, they refuse to eat, they die. It's happening to at least 4 close families NOW! Nothing can tempt them to eat - even a lovely ice-cream! It seems to be their last stand, and the olde 'double fingered' salute to us who are desperate to keep them going, for US, and really not for them. So don't despair if an aged loved-one won't eat, it would seem that it is a pattern we must accept. Even the heavy breathing is 'normal' at 'the end' - they are just drifting away naturally.

    Many folk who I now have just said the same thing, the olde folks have just 'shutdown', won't eat. So many now, I've tried to tempt lovely food - but really, they want to "switch off" asap! Don't despair - you've done your best, they have not starved!! They just want to"go" - not your problem, they need/want to leave, so let them go with love. "They" know you have have done your best for them. Uncle P and Aunty Edith are together at last, my family have loved them 'in extremis', and a wee visitation in Cockermouth cemetary - a wondrous place, total peace, and a babbling brook Elizabeth Howden, and Patricia King, just over the bridge and to the right..
    Mum and Dad are at Crosby now, but at least they are together, as they both wanted. At least we did that right. Bless all those who follow, and especially Cath and Mary xxxxx
    My mother was a Geriatric Nurse. That is, she worked with the most elderly, often seeing them through to the end.

    And she said that very often the oldest would simply choose to stop eating, refusing all food and drink in order to fade away of their own volition. This was quite common.

    She said it was an easy death, quite painless even if slow. At some point they simply went to sleep and did not wake up again….

    It was their last stand against involuntary incarceration in their bodies, their final assertion of choice and independence.

    With much love to all of us,

    Selene
    Last edited by Selene; 19th December 2014 at 03:46.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    I have shed a few tears too at reading some of these posts. It has helped me grieve my father some more, especially the last few years. It is not easy to recover from watching some one you love die right before your eyes in slow motion over a period of years. I knew he was dying at least two years before. You know, but you don't really want to believe it. But I am very thankful for those precious few months that we were able to love him and care for him. He had never been able to show much affection because of his wartime experiences as a teenager. It was comforting to be able to care for him, but at the same time it is an unreal experience. I also believe that there is a soul in there somewhere right to the very end. My sister and I both had the impression that there was a welcoming committee in the room, like a celebration or reunion when he died. My mother had very vivid dreams for months where she would go to try and find him and she would find him looking handsome and young again, she said she heard him talking about immigrating to Alaska this time. He talked to her in a garden in one dream and told her to stop looking for him, that he had things to do now. He did believe in reincarnation, maybe he has incarnated in another life, a life where he is free again to follow his ambitions. I guess that is the part that is so sad about Alzheimers, it is as if people are trapped, souls trapped in a body that is not working right anymore. But, I guess there are many people with chronic health issues that feel that way. I am glad we had time to say goodbye to him.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by Aspen (here)
    I have shed a few tears too at reading some of these posts. It has helped me grieve my father some more, especially the last few years. It is not easy to recover from watching some one you love die right before your eyes in slow motion over a period of years. I knew he was dying at least two years before. You know, but you don't really want to believe it. But I am very thankful for those precious few months that we were able to love him and care for him. He had never been able to show much affection because of his wartime experiences as a teenager. It was comforting to be able to care for him, but at the same time it is an unreal experience. I also believe that there is a soul in there somewhere right to the very end. My sister and I both had the impression that there was a welcoming committee in the room, like a celebration or reunion when he died. My mother had very vivid dreams for months where she would go to try and find him and she would find him looking handsome and young again, she said she heard him talking about immigrating to Alaska this time. He talked to her in a garden in one dream and told her to stop looking for him, that he had things to do now. He did believe in reincarnation, maybe he has incarnated in another life, a life where he is free again to follow his ambitions. I guess that is the part that is so sad about Alzheimers, it is as if people are trapped, souls trapped in a body that is not working right anymore. But, I guess there are many people with chronic health issues that feel that way. I am glad we had time to say goodbye to him.
    It's interesting you say it was like there was a welcoming committee in the room towards the end. Starting shortly after we took the job care-taking Miss Irma my husband started seeing apparitions of several different people in/around the house. This went on the whole time, with her even turning to say hello to one of them. We often wondered who these beings were and we did not experience this phenomena anymore after she passed.

    There were times when she seemed to realize her situation and started sobbing, and other times when she woke up very disoriented and terrified. Those were tough moments for us all. I also had a hard time not correcting her when she kept calling me by her daughter's name (she did this to my husband too). We did make up Irma songs and it helped our morale even if it didn't do much for her. The terror in her eyes when she was dying was something I'll never forget. I don't think I've ever tried so hard to get through to someone. She couldn't get her breath (she was having a heart attack), and I just kept holding her hand and telling her how much she was loved and how it was okay to let go. I guess her daughter had told her just a few days before the same thing. Maybe she heard her.

    Some powerful stories shared here. Thanks to all.

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    My father started showing issues in 1997 and by 1999 he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. He lasted 11 years more and died in 2010 of Alzheimer's. It was a very long haul and I tribute him lasting over a decade to the fact that we did not check him into a nursing home, he stayed in his own home and my mother took very good care of him. We were fortunate that he did not suffer from depression which is also something that occurs with this disease quite often. Indeed he was a nicer, more gentle soul.

    He was well cared for or he would not have lasted that long. Although the doctors convinced my mother at one point in time that he needed physical therapy and needed to go to a nursing home and she went against my advice and my sister in laws advice to have physical therapy in his home. Instead, they convinced her, he needed to go to a nursing home. He was not in there for a day, no physical therapy was done for him and they dropped him, he was immediately put back into the hospital. He was in worse shape in that 24 hours than when he was checked in. He had never had diaper rash and he was covered in bruises. And we never brought him back to any nursing home.

    I too have a rather humorous story also... it was his birthday and he's like "a party what's going on?" And my mom says "it's your birthday" and asked if "he knew how old he was". He said "85". My mom said "no you're 82", and he replied "how can that be? I'm getting younger"....

    He requested that he die holding my mother's hand and he died holding my mother's hand.... I miss him....
    Last edited by Fairy Friend; 19th December 2014 at 21:03.

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    United States Avalon Member NancyV's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Today would be my older sister’s 70th birthday (Happy Birthday, Carol !!) but she died of early onset Alzheimer’s at age 59. About four years before her death I received a phone call from her boyfriend of several years with whom she had been living. He said that he had just moved her into our mother’s house to live with our mother because she was acting very strangely and he didn’t know what else to do. Carol didn’t have any children so my mother and I were her only close family. My husband and son and I lived in Las Vegas at that time and my mother and sister were in Southern Oregon.

    So we took a trip within a few days to see what was going on with them. It was worse than I could have imagined. My mother was in the throes of dementia and much of the time seemed like she was possessed by an evil spirit or spirits. My sister was depressed, paranoid and confused. She had not yet been diagnosed with Alzheimers but I suspected that was what it might be. We went home to Vegas and quit our jobs, found a renter for our house, packed up everything and moved very close by to my mother’s house in Ashland Oregon. Then began my journey of taking care of two very sick women.

    My mother was quite vicious much of the time and I found the only way to deal with her when she seemed possessed was to give her orders, threaten her and/or yell at her. This seemed to intimidate whatever evil being that was using her. For the first couple of weeks I tried love, understanding, etc etc, but when I finally got angry it worked to stop her insanity and vile behavior for a while….until the next incident. My sister was much happier and relieved that I was there to take care of everything. It also helped that I got my mother to stop being so horribly mean to her and tell her she needed to leave, she didn’t belong there, she didn’t want her there, she hated her, etc. This was not really my mother and I got my sister to understand that she was really sick. She had been somewhat insane her entire life, in my opinion, but she had never been vicious and vile.

    We hired someone to come in daily and I was there for several hours every day, plus when my sister could still use a phone I would get many phone calls from her. I tried all kinds of different alternative healing methods, in addition to her regular doctor, and even a couple of different healers, but she kept getting worse rapidly. My mother was too stubborn to try anything other than what she wanted, so I did not attempt to make her do things she didn’t want to do, aside from making her stop vicious behavior. It was almost like having to do an exorcism several times a week when the entity had a strong hold on her. She would scream nasty crap, throw things, hurl insults, etc. But when I put out even stronger energy, you could almost see the entity leave her. She would then heave a big sigh of relief and entirely forget that she had said or done anything horrible.

    This was the madhouse I lived with for a bit over 2 years, plus I worked as a bookkeeper for an online investment group so I was constantly busy and stressed. My son helped for the last year they lived at home by moving in so someone would be there at night. It eventually became obvious that they could no longer live without constant care and we found a very nice, small home that had only 8 residents. They were taken care of by 2 wonderful ladies and a nurse would come in several times a week. We visited them 2-3 times a week and my sister had gotten to the point where she barely remembered me. I used to tell her that it didn’t matter what she forgot because she was still a whole soul and her soul remembered everything, that she was the lucky one since she would get to leave and experience the afterlife sooner than I would. I told her how much fun it was going to be and that she would wake up to absolute happiness, joy, love and beauty. She believed me and it used to make her a lot happier to think that her illness was not such a horrible thing.

    Our mother died a couple of months before my sister. She was 88. I went to see her the day before she died and in a moment of lucidity she asked me if I really thought there was something after death? All her life she was an agnostic, but she always said she thought there would be nothing after death….just a void and nothingness. I had told her about my near death experience and my years of OBE’s but she didn’t believe me. This time, when she knew she was dying, I think she did believe me. I told her that she was loved and she would soon feel it. She would awake immediately after dying and understand all that she had been through in her life and there would be no shame, blame or harsh judgments. She would be happy and free. She seemed to be completely relieved. I told her to not fight it and just let go. She let go the next morning. We went there the next day and my sister said “Someone just died. She looked like my mother. I wonder who she was.” Then when we were walking down the hall she said “you look like my sister from behind! Do you know her?”

    Within a couple of months my sister forgot how to breathe. If someone with Alzheimer’s is very old when they first show symptoms of Alzheimer’s, they often die of other diseases and don’t reach the point where they forget how to breathe, but Carol was still relatively young at 59 so she reached an end stage of Alzheimer’s. Early onset Alzheimer’s can be much more fast acting and for her it only took about 4-5 years from start to finish. When I came to visit on the day she died, every breath was a gasp for air. She wasn’t breathing automatically. I told her to let go, to relax and wake up to her greater self. I told her how much I loved her and that she was about to begin a very exciting adventure and was very lucky to be moving on. I’m not even sure she heard me but maybe on some level she did. She left within about 30 minutes after that.

    I was happy they were both released finally, but apparently the experience had been so stressful on me that I had a stroke. Taking care of a loved one, much less 2 at a time, is very stressful even if you think you are handling it well. I think we learn a lot about ourselves through taking care of our loved ones with Alzheimer’s and/or dementia, so in a way it was a positive experience….a blessing for all involved.

    After a couple of months of very severe stroke symptoms I found a way to cure myself completely; Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy - PEMFT. Using a Papimi machine I was totally cured within 20 treatments. I have often wondered if it would have worked for my mother and sister and why I didn’t come upon it when there was still time to help them. But ultimately I prefer to think that everything happens for a reason which I don’t often know at this level. I also like to think that no matter how awful things seem or feel, everything happens for the best and highest good for all involved.

    Thanks for all the sharing of experiences....
    Alpha Mike Foxtrot

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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    Quote Posted by Aspen (here)
    I have shed a few tears too at reading some of these posts. It has helped me grieve my father some more, especially the last few years. It is not easy to recover from watching some one you love die right before your eyes in slow motion over a period of years. I knew he was dying at least two years before. You know, but you don't really want to believe it. But I am very thankful for those precious few months that we were able to love him and care for him. He had never been able to show much affection because of his wartime experiences as a teenager. It was comforting to be able to care for him, but at the same time it is an unreal experience. I also believe that there is a soul in there somewhere right to the very end. My sister and I both had the impression that there was a welcoming committee in the room, like a celebration or reunion when he died. My mother had very vivid dreams for months where she would go to try and find him and she would find him looking handsome and young again, she said she heard him talking about immigrating to Alaska this time. He talked to her in a garden in one dream and told her to stop looking for him, that he had things to do now. He did believe in reincarnation, maybe he has incarnated in another life, a life where he is free again to follow his ambitions. I guess that is the part that is so sad about Alzheimers, it is as if people are trapped, souls trapped in a body that is not working right anymore. But, I guess there are many people with chronic health issues that feel that way. I am glad we had time to say goodbye to him.
    Laughing through tears... When my sister was dying, I felt people (that weren't there) sitting down on the bed, and I felt or strangely saw in a way, people standing around the room.

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  37. Link to Post #60
    United States Avalon Member Robin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Caring for relatives with Alzheimer's : the modern curse of the elderly

    The universe is rhythmic music that is harmonic to the core of its vibrational marvels. Music inspires, enlightens, uplifts, generates, encodes, and it even heals.

    I watched this documentary earlier this year when it came out and was deeply moved by it. This documentary is perfectly aligned with the personal stories and alternative care discussed and shared in this thread. I'd recommend it to everybody.

    Here is the description of the documentary on the website :

    "ALIVE INSIDE is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short.

    This stirring documentary follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he fights against a broken healthcare system to demonstrate music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it. Rossato-Bennett visits family members who have witnessed the miraculous effects of personalized music on their loved ones, and offers illuminating interviews with experts including renowned neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks (Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain) and musician Bobby McFerrin (“Don’t Worry, Be Happy”).

    An uplifting cinematic exploration of music and the mind, ALIVE INSIDE’s inspirational and emotional story left audiences humming, clapping and cheering at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Audience Award. "

    This is a snippet from the documentary, which will prove to be more than emotionally stimulating. I'll warn you that it will be difficult to not shed a tear.


    Robin
    "Rather than love, than fame, than money, give me truth."
    ~Henry David Thoreau

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