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Thread: Dinosaurs ELE And The Deccan Traps

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    Default Dinosaurs ELE And The Deccan Traps

    Nope! Nothing to do with mouse-traps

    Dinosaur-killing asteroid caused India’s Deccan Traps?

    The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago might have mobilized an existing volcanic system, causing vast lava flows.


    An area in the Deccan Traps, via Gerta Keller.

    The Deccan Traps in India – between 17°–24° North and 73°–74° East – are a place where you can find layer upon layer of solidified rock. This region is thought to have been the site of extremely powerful volcanic activity in the past, so powerful that it caused mile-deep lava over an area as large as the state of California. Last week (April 30, 2015) geophysicists at UC Berkeley announced their evidence that this vast region is related to the asteroid thought to have slammed into the ocean half a world away. The impact near Chicxulub, Mexico – 66 million years ago – is believed by many researchers to have killed the dinosaurs and ushered in the age of mammals. The Berkeley researchers say the impact probably “rang the Earth like a bell,” triggering powerful earthquakes and volcanos around the globe, including those that created the Deccan Traps.

    The Berkeley researchers – who published their work online April 30 in the The Geological Society of America Bulletin – cited the “uncomfortably close” coincidence between the Deccan Traps eruptions and the asteroid impact 66 million years ago. Team leader Mark Richards of UC Berkeley said in a statement:
    Quote If you try to explain why the largest impact we know of in the last billion years happened within 100,000 years of these massive lava flows at Deccan … the chances of that occurring at random are minuscule.

    Illustration of a hot mantle plume “head” pancaked beneath the Indian Plate. The theory by Richards and his colleagues suggests that existing magma within this plume head was mobilized by strong seismic shaking from the Chicxulub asteroid impact, resulting in the largest of the Deccan Traps flood basalt eruptions. Image via UC Berkeley

    Richards had proposed in 1989 that plumes of hot rock, called “plume heads,” rise through Earth’s mantle every 20-30 million years and generate huge lava flows, called flood basalts, like the Deccan Traps. It struck him as more than coincidence that the last four of the six known mass extinctions of life occurred at the same time as one of these massive eruptions.

    Richards teamed up with other experts at UC Berkeley to try to discover faults with his radical idea that the impact triggered the Deccan eruptions. Instead, the team came up with supporting evidence.

    Paul Renne of the Berkeley Geochronology Center re-dated the asteroid impact and mass extinction two years ago and found them essentially simultaneous, but also within approximately 100,000 years of the largest Deccan eruptions.

    A third co-author on the study, UC Cal Berkeley’s Michael Manga, demonstrated that seismic events like large earthquakes could trigger volcanic eruptions. By Richards’ estimate, the asteroid impact must have generated the equivalent of a magnitude 9 or larger earthquake everywhere on Earth, sufficient to ignite the Deccan flood basalts as well as other places around the globe, including at mid-ocean ridges. Manga said:
    Quote It’s inconceivable that the impact could have melted a whole lot of rock away from the impact site itself, but if you had a system that already had magma and you gave it a little extra kick, it could produce a big eruption.
    Richards and his team visited India in April 2014 to obtain lava samples for dating, and noticed pronounced weathering surfaces, or terraces, in one area. Geological evidence suggests that these terraces may signal a period of quiescence in Deccan volcanism prior to the Chicxulub impact. Richards concluded:
    Quote This was an existing massive volcanic system that had been there probably several million years, and the impact gave this thing a shake and it mobilized a huge amount of magma over a short amount of time.
    Bottom line: Vast lava flows in India – known as the Deccan Traps – might have been mobilized into activity by the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

    Read more from UC Berkeley
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    Default Re: Dinosaurs ELE And The Deccan Traps

    no "asteroids" killed off the dinosaurs; if that were fact we "homo sapiens sapiens" as one now refers to us would've also been obliterated by asteroids; read the monumental Michael Cremo/Richard Thompson "Forbidden Archealogy" just for starters;

    he, folks, we had a co-existence with dinosauers; the sources are impeccably documented-

    Larry

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    Default Re: Dinosaurs ELE And The Deccan Traps

    I am sorry you missed the main point of the article which is that one of the hugest basaltic effusion to have ever occurred on "dry" land (a bigger one are the "Siberian Traps") happened to be coeval with that asteroid punch 66 million years ago... so no thanks for the Strawman argument. As for "survivors"... most wildlife are now surviving in what's called "zoos" or "National parks"... at the rate we are now going, give it another century or two and there won't be any other "wild life" left but those artificial sanctuaries.
    Last edited by Hervé; 6th May 2015 at 01:24.
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    Default Re: Dinosaurs ELE And The Deccan Traps

    New infromation from Imperial College London...

    Quote Posted by Star Tsar (here)
    Phys.org

    Dinosaur-Dooming Asteroid Struck Earth @ 'Deadliest Possible' Angle

    Published 26th May 2020



    New simulations from Imperial College London have revealed the asteroid that doomed the dinosaurs struck Earth at the 'deadliest possible' angle.
    The simulations show that the asteroid hit Earth at an angle of about 60 degrees, which maximised the amount of climate-changing gases thrust into the upper atmosphere.
    Such a strike likely unleashed billions of tonnes of sulphur, blocking the sun and triggering the nuclear winter that killed the dinosaurs and 75 per cent of life on Earth 66 million years ago.
    Drawn from a combination of 3-D numerical impact simulations and geophysical data from the site of the impact, the new models are the first ever fully 3-D simulations to reproduce the whole event—from the initial impact to the moment the final crater, now known as Chicxulub, was formed.

    Read all about it here: https://phys.org/news/2020-05-dinosa...deadliest.html

    Source paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-15269-x

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