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    Avalon Member MorningSong's Avatar
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    Default US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    Now get this! We all knew about the plan to mine asteroids and such... and the interplanetary trade deals and rules are coming right along as well...

    Read on... the article mentions our old friend GoodET as well...

    Quote US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies Written by Dr Michael Salla on June 26, 2015

    On June 15, the U.S. House of Representatives took a major step in passing a bill that provides legal protection to space mining by U.S. based corporations that establish off-world operations. While most members of the House’s “Science, Space and Technology Committee” that passed the bill may have done so with the impression that they would protect the rights of U.S. companies in future space mining missions, they instead have provided legal protection to corporations that have been secretly conducting such operations for decades. This is especially significant given recent claims that off-world space mining by U.S. affiliated corporations have used slave labor on Mars and elsewhere in our solar system.

    The bill, “H.R.1508: Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act of 2015,” was introduced and referred to the Science, Space and Technology Committee by a bipartisan group of eight members on March 19, 2015. On June 15, after an 18-15 vote two days earlier in favor of amending the bill, it was officially sent to the full House for a vote in an upcoming session. An identical bipartisan bill has been introduced into the Senate by Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Patty Murry (D-WA).

    The Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act ostensibly protects the rights of mining companies willing to invest significant financial resources in future space exploration. If, for example, a mining company establishes a base on Mars, then it would have the right to exploit the resources of Mars and be protected under U.S. Federal Law. Here is what the proposed Act has to say in Section 51302:

    (a) Commercialization of space resource exploration and utilization
    (1) IN GENERAL – The President, acting through appropriate Federal agencies, shall— facilitate the commercial exploration and utilization of space resources to meet national needs;

    This clause raises the possibility that under U.S. “national needs” the President of the United States can provide resources and assistance to mining companies to establish off-world bases and mining. There is nothing particularly alarming here at the prospect of companies such as SpaceX being given assistance to plan future Mars missions that establish mining bases to fund themselves. Back on November 16, 2012, SpaceX founder Elon Musk announced his plans to build a colony of 80,000 people: “At Mars, you can start a self-sustaining civilization and grow it into something really big.”

    The next clause of the Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act does raise some disturbing issues however:

    (2) discourage government barriers to the development of economically viable, safe, and stable industries for the exploration and utilization of space resources in manners consistent with the existing international obligations of the United States;

    What exactly does “discourage government barriers” mean? That appears to be short hand for saying that any government regulations are unnecessary and could be a significant impediment for profitable mining operations. For example, if the mining company was to exploit workers in slave-labor like conditions, this would be a problem for the mining company to resolve, rather than federal regulators imposing U.S. labor standards.

    The subsequent clause is even more alarming:

    (3) promote the right of United States commercial entities to explore outer space and utilize space resources, in accordance with the existing international obligations of the United States, free from harmful interference…

    What does “free from harmful interference” mean? In the case of a mining corporation imposing slave labor working conditions, this clause suggests that international organizations such as the International Criminal Court would not have the power to directly intervene. Basically, managers at prospective space mining operations would be protected under U.S. Federal Law from international organizations investigating them for using slave labor.

    Finally, the Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act specifies the U.S. district courts as having “Exclusive Jurisdiction”:

    Exclusive Jurisdiction: The district courts of the United States shall have original jurisdiction over an action under this chapter without regard to the amount in controversy.

    Basically, this means that any human rights issues arising in the mining operations of corporations with off-world bases would have to be addressed through U.S. district courts.

    The Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act raises some very troubling legal issues about future mining operations by U.S. based mining corporations. However, rather than a hypothetical legal problem to be debated by space law attorneys, there is testimonial evidence that space mining operations already secretly exist. Furthermore, it has been claimed that these mining operations use slave labor on Mars and other locations in the solar system.

    According to alleged eyewitness testimony, an inspection of a Mars mining and manufacturing facility was conducted on June 20, 2015. In a detailed report written two days later, Corey Goode claims that he along with a “Lt Col Gonzales” (a pseudonym) were given an official tour of a facility owned by a corporation called the “Interplanetary Corporate Conglomerate” (ICC). The inspection was done to investigate claims of slave labor being used at ICC facilities. According to Goode, a former ICC employee had defected to a rival space program called the “Secret Space Program (SSP) Alliance”, and was willing to testify in future legal proceedings against responsible corporate officials. A Council heading the SSP Alliance, made the necessary arrangements for Goode and Gonzales to travel to Mars and inspect the ICC facility. Based on what Goode and Gonzales directly witnessed, there is testimonial evidence that slave labor is currently being used on Mars to mine and manufacture products for the ICC.

    If Goode’s report is accurate, then the effect of the U.S. Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act would be to give U.S. Federal legal protection to the owners, managers and personnel of these corporations currently using slave labor, against possible investigations by international human rights organizations, including the International Criminal Court.

    Goode’s incredible claims are currently being investigated. It is likely that the corroborating testimony of Lt Col Gonzales will emerge in the near future. In addition, Goode claims that an extensive number of documents are forthcoming that will substantiate his claims.

    Currently, the Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act has moved to the full House of Representatives for debate and a vote at its next legislative session, while the Senate will follow soon after with its own version of the bill. It appears more than coincidental that at the same time as accusations of slave labor being used at off-world mining operations are being secretly investigated for possible criminal prosecution, that the U.S. Congress is in the midst of passing legislation that would effectively provide legal protection to corporate officials responsible for such crimes.
    http://exopolitics.org/us-congress-t...pace-colonies/

    The bill can be seen here:

    https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-...bill/1508/text
    "Vision without action is merely a dream.
    Action without vision just passes the time.
    Vision with action can change the world." Joel Arthur Barker

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    UK Avalon Member Cidersomerset's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    It won't be 'Slave' labour . But prison slave labour will be fine and penal colonies
    will soon be founded. Just like ' Botany Bay ' convict settlement.................

    Prison slave labor in America



    Uploaded on 29 Jun 2009


    prison slave labor in America land of the free home of the slave

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    There is a new Sky fy series called 'killjoys' about space corporate 'bounty hunters'
    and the first two episodes that set the scene partly about gigantic corporate mining
    co. In one scene they are on a galactic slave ship.

    Last edited by Cidersomerset; 3rd July 2015 at 18:29.

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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    That is just a soft disclosure as we all know that slavery on Mars and on the moon is a fact and it has been going for a long time now.

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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    Also the Mars travelers who signed a clause to never return? Hows that for the "exploration of Mars colonials who will bring new fresh blood to continue their slave trade off planet? My God they've taken human slave labor to a new level. Oooooo...the millions of missing people and the anomalies rebuilt on Mars. Wt?

    Things hidden for 70 yrs. on America's name and soul.Dear God end this evil secret empire of death.

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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    This has shown up today in my internet meanderings.. lots of messages coming to me lately...

    Quote How TO Overthrow A Martian Dictatorship
    The governments we create on other worlds might turn nasty. Richard Hollingham meets a group plotting revolution in space.

    By Richard Hollingham

    22 June 2015

    Two short blocks from the London headquarters of Britain’s security service, MI6, a group of 30 men and women is plotting to overthrow the government.

    Not – and I should make this abundantly clear for any spooks reading this – the British government, nor any government on Earth, but a tyrannical administration on an alien world in the future.

    This is not a game. The scientists, engineers, social scientists, philosophers and writers gathered at the British Interplanetary Society in London are taking their task seriously – studying, with academic rigour, the problem of toppling despotic extraterrestrial regimes.

    This is the third annual conference on extraterrestrial liberty. Last year the event tackled the challenge of writing a constitution for an alien settlement, concluding that successful space colonies should base laws and liberties on the US Constitution and Bill of Rights.

    “This year we’re discussing what happens if you don’t like the government you’ve created and want to overthrow it,” says conference organiser Charles Cockell, a professor of astrobiology at the University of Edinburgh.

    Conclusions from these meetings will be published as essays, designed to serve as manuals for future spacefarers.

    “We hope the discussions we have will constitute the first ideas on extraterrestrial liberty,” Cockell says. “We’ve got a chance to think about what the problems might be in outer space before we go there.”

    The scenarios the group is contemplating are easiest to imagine if you think about what a space colony might be like. Perhaps a domed settlement with a few hundred residents, beneath a thin dusty Martian sky. A fragile and isolated outpost of humanity 225 million kilometres from the home world. With a brutal dictator and his cronies in charge of the oxygen generators, for instance.

    Non-violent opposition

    “Say, for example, you don’t like your government and you resort to revolution,” says Cockell. “Someone goes and smashes up the habitat, destroys the windows and instantly the place is depressurised, the oxygen is lost and everyone dies.

    “The consequences of violence in space could be much more catastrophic than on Earth,” he warns, “So how do you dissent in an environment in which violent disobedience might kill everyone?”

    The answer lies, Cockell believes, in preventing dictatorships emerging in the first place. This would be achieved by building non-violent means of opposition to government into the rulebook, perhaps through organised labour systems – similar to unions on Earth – or by holding the leadership to account through journalism and media.

    “Once you stop a free press in an extraterrestrial environment, you’re actually in deep trouble,” he says.

    The physical structure of the settlements could also be designed to minimise the effects of conflict, with air, water and power systems in multiple locations. Not only would this reduce vulnerabilities to a break down or failure but it would avoid the dangers of a central point of control.

    However, even with a free press or organised unions there are issues in space that do not arise on Earth – particularly when companies are involved.

    “As we know private corporations can be just as ruthless and despotic as the worst governments,” says Cockell. “If you strike, then maybe the corporation says ‘that’s fine – let me show you to the airlock and you can leave’ and off you go into the vacuum of space.”

    And while freedoms, liberties and labour laws have evolved on Earth – at least in democratic nations – they may need to be adapted before anyone settles elsewhere. Space is a unique environment and there is a balance to be struck between slavery and total freedom. Opting out is not an option. A Martian colony that is so libertarian that everyone sits around doing nothing all day is unlikely to survive for long.

    “We need to arrive at a balance between a society that maximises civil liberties but also maximises the potential for people to survive the lethal conditions of space,” says Cockell.

    Sci-fi signposts

    Although this may be one of the few times that academics have formally contemplated the challenges of off-planet living, science fiction writers have been thinking about it for decades.

    One of the British Interplanetary Society’s most famous members is Arthur C Clarke and conference delegates include one of today’s best-known and acclaimed sci-fi writers, Stephen Baxter.

    Baxter’s 2010 novel Ark, for instance, features a starship on a multi-generational mission to a distant new world where precisely the issues of governance arise. “You have a group of young very competitive candidates applying to get on this thing,” explains Baxter, “and then they find they’re stuck there.”

    “At first it’s military discipline, then they go for a consensual government but that breaks down and a dictator takes over because he gets hold of the water supply – very relevant to this discussion,” Baxter says. “You also have a middle generation who are going to live and die on the ship and they evolve a rebellious teenage culture.” Some people do not even believe they are on a spaceship but in some sort of prison or social experiment.

    “Evolving a society inside a box is a fascinating area to think about,” says Baxter. “Sci-fi writers are always thinking one step beyond, it’s a great bed of thought experiments.”

    In fact one of the first known books on lunar revolution, The Birth of a New Republic, was written by sci-fi author Jack Williamson in the 1930s. The novel explores tensions within society and between the Moon and Earth. Robert Heinlein’s 1966 novel, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, even explores the idea of a prison colony on the Moon with a despotic prison warder who controls the air supply.

    For Baxter, the conference helps shift these sci-fi ideas into practical reality.

    “The more you anticipate, the more chance you have to get it right,” he says. “It’s not that far away before we have long-term missions away from the Earth and we have to look at the psychology of people in enclosed environments and construct a civilisation on this basis.”

    In the 1930s a colony on the Moon was a distant dream. Even in 1966 humanity was three years away from that first step. A long duration mission could happen during our lifetime. If it is to succeed and humans are to successfully colonise new worlds, we need to be prepared.
    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2015...n-dictatorship
    "Vision without action is merely a dream.
    Action without vision just passes the time.
    Vision with action can change the world." Joel Arthur Barker

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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    Now I understand why there can never be disclosure by these government and corporate CRIMINALS! They have been kidnapping all and sundry humans for decades by mutual agreement, torturing them, working them to death, putting them through living hell; from scientists to slaves. The Congress passing Legislation to approve whatever the Murdering Corporations do to sentient beings? They should never be allowed to walk free another DAY!

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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    Quote Posted by MorningSong (here)
    This has shown up today in my internet meanderings.. lots of messages coming to me lately...

    Quote How TO Overthrow A Martian Dictatorship
    The governments we create on other worlds might turn nasty. Richard Hollingham meets a group plotting revolution in space.

    By Richard Hollingham

    22 June 2015


    The answer lies, Cockell believes, in preventing dictatorships emerging in the first place. This would be achieved by building non-violent means of opposition to government into the rulebook, perhaps through organised labour systems – similar to unions on Earth – or by holding the leadership to account through journalism and media.

    “Once you stop a free press in an extraterrestrial environment, you’re actually in deep trouble,” he says.

    However, even with a free press or organised unions there are issues in space that do not arise on Earth – particularly when companies are involved.

    “As we know private corporations can be just as ruthless and despotic as the worst governments,” says Cockell. “If you strike, then maybe the corporation says ‘that’s fine – let me show you to the airlock and you can leave’ and off you go into the vacuum of space.”


    .
    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2015...n-dictatorship
    They haven't mastered preventing dictatorships here on earth. What makes them think they can on Mars? There is no free press on earth to speak of and corporations whack "problem employees" all the time. The movie 'Michael Clayton' does a good job of illustrating this.

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    UK Avalon Member Cidersomerset's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    An article showing exploitation is a alive and well in the ' Land of the not so free '.....



    23 Cents an Hour? The Perfectly Legal Slavery Happening in Modern-Day America

    By ickonic on 7th July 2015 Corporate Crime, Illuminati Criminals, Political Manipulation, The Police State




    ‘If you thought slavery was outlawed in America, you would be wrong. The 13th
    amendment to the Constitution states that “neither slavery nor involuntary
    servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly
    convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

    In plain language, that means slavery in America can still exist for those who are in prison, where you basically
    lose all of your rights. (You don’t gain a lot of your rights back when you get out of prison, either, but that is a
    different story.) So, given the country’s penchant for rapacious capitalism, it may not come as a surprise that
    there is much of the American prison system that exploits American prisoners much like slaves.’

    Read more: 23 Cents an Hour? The Perfectly Legal Slavery Happening in Modern-Day America

    http://www.alternet.org/civil-libert...rn-day-america

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    Default Re: US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies

    The implications of this are huge in a monetary sense. Why do you think there has been such a huge push to convince folks to buy gold?
    If mining operations on Mars are shipping the stuff here with anti-grav and possibly Stargates, it's tough to tell what the real value of the stuff may be. I think there is a decent chance there is far more of it than we think and and such we are in danger of a quick devaluation more so if we are too heavily invested.

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