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Thread: Pantry Meals

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    Scotland Moderator Billy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Sierra (here)
    Billy,

    What is the make of the yummy Indian food you like?

    Hi Sierra.
    The makes i buy are "Kohinoor" and "Haldirams" Great for camping or emergencies, Heat in a sauce pan, Microwave. Or boil in the bag, which is what i do as you can heat two at the same time with less dishes to wash.

    Kohinoor
    http://www.kohinoorfoods.co.uk/productDetails.asp?id=34

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    Haldirams. (One of my favourites)
    http://www.haldiramsonline.com/minute-khana.html

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    peterpam, it's wonderful to hear that your sister-in-law is so adept at Dutch oven/outdoor cooking. I've done a little but my results have been mixed!

    I'm sure we'd love to hear any tips or recipes she might want to share through you. As I recall, it's regulating the heat that's tricky ... so the food is cooked through. It reminds me of cooking in an old wood-burning cook stove. I got pretty good at that, even baked bread ... but it took some experimenting.

    Something like this ...


    Delight, thanks for those two concepts ... heat retention cooking is new to me, going to look into it. Freeze dried food would be closer to fresh, and definitely fill in some gaps in pantry cooking. I'd focus most on vegetables, I think.

    Please share more if you wish!
    Last edited by Marianne; 16th August 2015 at 20:08.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Marianne (here)

    Delight, thanks for those two concepts ... heat retention cooking is new to me, going to look into it. Freeze dried food would be closer to fresh, and definitely fill in some gaps in pantry cooking. I'd focus most on vegetables, I think.
    What I have tried in freeze dried food when reconstituted tastes GREAT. I highly recommend it if one has the kind of disposable income to buy this kind of food.

    I want to depend on sprouts. They cost way less than freeze dried food. The seeds last for years. I believe we could subsist on sprouts.

    Quote Sprouts are an excellent survival ration. Not only are they a dense source of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and enzymes, they provide a sustained source of energy in emergency situations. Sprouts are a “live” food and are a welcome addition to meals that primarily consist of prepackaged rations. When fresh vegetables are scarce, sprouts are an excellent substitute.

    Seeds for sprouting should be included in every emergency kit. They have a long storage life and require very little space. There are many online sources for seeds or you can package them yourself after purchasing from a health food store. Just make sure they are put in a waterproof, airtight container with a tight seal and store them in a cool, dry place away from the light.

    Neither sunshine nor soil is required for sprouting, and your “crop” will be ready in a matter of days, depending on the type of seed used. Sprouting requires very little space. Basic sprouting equipment is a simple as a Mason jar, a mesh screen to place over the top for rinsing, water, and a towel to cover the jar. Other methods include sprouting trays, sprouting bags, and even elaborate self-rinsing systems.

    When you consider the volume of sprouts grown from a mere teaspoon of seeds, sprouts serve as a powerhouse of nutrition for a minimal investment. Upon germination (sprouting), the nutritional elements in the seeds increase dramatically. For example, a grain of wheat increases its vitamin E content 300% after only 2 days of growth and the B2 vitamin riboflavin jumps from 13 milligrams to 54 mg in the sprout. In general, B vitamins can increase 300% to 1400% depending on the variety.

    Depending on the type of sprouting seed used, the process usually involves an initial period (several hours) of soaking. The seeds are then drained, rinsed, and then drained again. If using a jar, the jar is placed on its side and either covered with a towel or keep in the dark. Most seeds require rinsing and draining at least three times a day. When the sprouts are ready (usually 2-5 days, depending on the type), a final rinse is done and the sprouts are ready to eat – either fresh or lightly cooked. If refrigerated, sprouts will last several days, but rinsing will help prevent spoilage. Don’t use sprouts that have a slimy appearance or a suspicious odor.“Wonder Food” of Emergency Preparedness: Sprouts
    Quote A word of caution: sprouts are not everyone’s dish and if members of your family are among those who need time to get used to them, it’s advisable to start now. The following are some commonly known and easy to grow variations of the sprouts:

    Alfalfa: One of the best-known sprouts.
    Beans: Bean sprouts are grown in a dark environment; mung beans are the bean that is most used to produce bean sprouts.
    Broccoli: The healthiest of all commonly known sprouts.
    Cabbage and Celery: Sprouts of these vegetables are commonly used in breads.
    Mustard: This sprout calls for a warning: use it sparingly, as it is hot.
    Radishes: Radish sprouts are also hot.
    Wheat: Wheat sprouts can be used in breads, cereals, and salads.The Ultimate Urban Survival Food: Sprouts

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Thank you Everybody for all the valuable tips.

    For starters, I ordered from Thrive, three fruits, three vegetables, quinoa and #10 lid cans. I sent the link to family members under the guise of “here’s a great site for easy shopping, time saving and healthy eating”.

    Then I’m on to Billy’s quick meals. Nuts.com is a good place to check out, and Amazing Grass organic green superfood.

    I have an artisan well. As a back-up plan, I’ve got 5 gallon buckets of water stacked up and for drinking water, liter glass jars that I rotate out. And back up filters for the Berkley filter system in case I have to draw water from surrounding streams and ponds. The filters use a lot of water to prep them, so I’ve gone ahead with that step already.

    I purchased The BioLite Camp Stove and tinder wood. The stove also generates electricity for charging personal devices.

    One of my two back-up power sources is a 2'X4' solar panel on wheels. It also has a battery back up and wall socket power source. I don't know how practical it’s long term, but my plan is to use the Vitamix blender which uses less than a minute of power.

    Last edited by RunningDeer; 18th August 2015 at 09:54.

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  9. Link to Post #25
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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by RunningDeer (here)
    Thank you Everybody for all the valuable tips.

    For starters, I ordered from Thrive, three fruits, three vegetables, quinoa and #10 lid cans. I sent the link to family members under the guise of “here’s a great site for easy shopping, time saving and healthy eating”.

    Then I’m on to Billy’s quick meals. Nuts.com is a good place to check out, and Amazing Grass organic green superfood.

    I have an artisan well. As a back-up plan, I’ve got 5 gallon buckets of water stacked up and for drinking water, liter glass jars that I rotate out. And back up filters for the Berkley filter system in case I have to draw water from surrounding streams and ponds. The filters use a lot of water to prep them, so I’ve gone ahead with that step already.

    I purchased The BioLite Camp Stove and tinder wood. The stove also generates electricity for charging personal devices.

    One of my two back-up power sources is a 2'X4' solar panel on wheels. It also has a battery back up and wall socket power source. I don't know how practical it’s long term, but my plan is to use the Vitamix blender which uses less than a minute of power.


    Lookin' good

    If there is an interruption in the food supply, soup will be a real help. When more people show up you can add more water to the mix.
    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 17th August 2015 at 22:41.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)

    Lookin' good

    If there is an interruption in the food supply, soup will be a real help. When more people show up you can add more water to the mix.
    LOL Ron, and true enough! My father-in-law used to say, in response to unexpected company arriving at dinner time ... that he was putting another pail of water in the soup.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Sprouts and vegetable powders are important additions to the mix. Thanks Delight and Paula.

    I want to mention protein powders too. Rice and pea protein powders are popular and easily located in health food stores.

    I had to take in a large amount of protein in recovering from surgery, and didn't want anything I found on the shelf. Needed something with a lot of protein, non GMO, no additional garbage added, no sweetener (so many have aspartame derivatives--shudder) so I went looking online and found Naked Whey. It's just whey protein, grass fed, no soy, no gluten, no additives of any kind. No growth hormones. I ordered 5 pounds of it, which is 76 servings of 25 g protein each. It may seem pricey at $90 but it's a bunch of protein, and I was very pleased with it. I added cocoa powder to mine, and a little vanilla extract, ice cubes all pureed in the blender, and it was like a chocolate milkshake. Without power you'd have to whisk it or beat with an egg beater, sans ice.

    http://nkdnutrition.com/products/gra...protein-powder

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    I like to store commercial canned goods, like tomatoes and all kinds of veggies and beans, plus meats, like beef. The reason I like canned goods is because canned foods are already cooked through, and can be eaten straight out of the can, without further cooking, so if cooking is not an option, it really doesn't matter. Plus, they can be made into all kinds tasty cooked soups and stews when cooking is possible.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Selkie (here)
    I like to store commercial canned goods, like tomatoes and all kinds of veggies and beans, plus meats, like beef. The reason I like canned goods is because canned foods are already cooked through, and can be eaten straight out of the can, without further cooking, so if cooking is not an option, it really doesn't matter. Plus, they can be made into all kinds tasty cooked soups and stews when cooking is possible.
    Canned goods are good choices for those on a tight budget. Just purchase a little extra each trip to the grocery store.

    Cans are also a good idea if one plans to help one's neighbor. Cans are portable and easy to give away.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)
    Quote Posted by Selkie (here)
    I like to store commercial canned goods, like tomatoes and all kinds of veggies and beans, plus meats, like beef. The reason I like canned goods is because canned foods are already cooked through, and can be eaten straight out of the can, without further cooking, so if cooking is not an option, it really doesn't matter. Plus, they can be made into all kinds tasty cooked soups and stews when cooking is possible.
    Canned goods are good choices for those on a tight budget. Just purchase a little extra each trip to the grocery store.

    Cans are also a good idea if one plans to help one's neighbor. Cans are portable and easy to give away.
    That is what I do. I buy a few extra cans every trip, and before I know it, I have a full larder.

    They say that you should not store things you don't normally eat, and I think that is good advice. By buying a few extra cans each trip, I don't waste money on things I really wouldn't eat in an emergency.

    p.s. I often think of what my neighbors and I would do if the hammer came down. The first thing I think of is the children. Before all else, the children must be taken care of, fed and protected. I would give my last can of beans away to a family with children before I ate it myself.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    I purchased the Naked Whey Protein Powder and checked out their pea protein powder. Then went to nuts.com to purchase organic cacao powder for Marianne's whey protein drink. I found certified gluten free pea soup flour and a simple recipe.

    Green Pea Flour creates a wonderful creamy pea soup with garden fresh color in just three minutes and contains less than 2% fat.

    Instructions: Green Pea Soup

    Ingredients

    • 3 Tbsp Green Pea Flour
    • 2 cups Hot Water
    • 2 tsp Chicken or Vegetable Bouillon

    Stovetop: In a saucepan, heat 2 cups water to just about boiling. Reduce heat to medium and whisk in 3 Tbsp Green Pea Flour and 2 tsp of chicken or vegetable bouillon or soup base. Cook until mixture boils, then boil for 2 minutes.

    Serves 2

    Microwave: Using a 6-cup microwave bowl, whisk flour and bouillon into hot water. Cook 1 minute on high or until mixture boils. Stir well and cook for 2 additional minutes.

    Serves 2

    There are approximately 2 3/4 cups per pound.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Selkie and Ron, very good points about canned goods. The recipes I'm sharing here depend on them quite a bit ... soups and stews made with canned carrots, peas, potatoes, and meats if desired, and using thickening like flour or cornstarch/arrowroot, with herbs and spices. I like having evaporated canned milk too ... it really expands the possibilities.

    As you say, Selkie, you can just open and eat them cold if that's the only option.

    Paula, now I have to get some green pea powder -- split pea soup is delicious and nourishing. Possible to do a stove top pot of it, but yours is so easy and quick. I've seen beet powder and carrot powder. I have powdered carrot ... have only used it in making 'carrot cake' soap (with carrot seed essential oil, very nice for skin conditions) -- makes soap a gorgeous peach color and adds a bit of gentle texture to exfoliate.

    Speaking of that, putting aside some bars of soap is a good idea. Fels naptha is great for household soap (grate and mix with hot water for hands / dishes / laundry. Not the most gentle for skin, but it would do for bath soap in a pinch.

    Thanks for all the contributions!

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Water is critical, more so than food. Three days without clean water to drink and you will need nothing else.

    It is so important to have a plan to retrieve and filter water.

    If the electric grid goes down so does the ability to pump water.

    When unexpected guests show up, clean water is needed to extend the soup.

    Water is needed to re-hydrate freeze dried and dehydrated food.

    Water - Filters, Purifiers and Pasteurization

    Water - Retrieval

    And if one has food and but no water to flush, a homemade sawdust or composting toilet will be a low cost luxury, especially for city dwellers.

    Plan ahead. Those without a plan are likely to fail.
    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 19th August 2015 at 00:15.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company’. It offers pure vegetable powders.



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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by RunningDeer (here)
    I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company’. It offers pure vegetable powders.


    I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
    And I wonder what the shelf life is.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Synergy is an excellent company BTW, I've used some of their products for years.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)
    I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
    And I wonder what the shelf life is.
    I'm not sure of the shelf life. I ordered beet, carrot and kale. I'll check when it comes in.

    Freeze-drying is considered the gold standard and is proven to preserve
    the naturally occurring biochemical "actives" of a substance.






    There is no one size fits all drying method. Each fresh grown ingredient is carefully assessed by Synergy to determine which specialty drying method will best produce a preserved, bioactive, fresh finished powder. The common denominator is the use of low temperatures in an environment that is free of oxygen and light, all elements that have the potential to destroy the vital nutrients within.


    Fresh freeze-dried: Freeze-drying is considered the gold standard and is proven to preserve the naturally occurring biochemical "actives" of a substance. By uniquely bypassing the liquid and evaporative state (where destructive reactions can take place quickly) and going from "frozen" to "dried" in an oxygen-free and UV light-free environment, the bioactive particles of a fresh material are immediately locked into a stable matrix, in effect sealed off from the excessive nutrient losses that would normally take place in the much more common drying processes.

    Vacuum low temperature-dried: Very similar to our fresh freeze-drying, this is a special, patented low temperature drying process that uses a vacuum to create a low pressure, oxygen-free/light-free, cold environment that maximizes nutrient retention.

    CO2 low temperature-dried: A special low temperature drying process that uses a refrigerated and light-free chamber with natural carbon dioxide to create an oxygen-free, cold environment that maximizes nutrient retention.

    Specialty-dried under low heat: For tomatoes, the application of very precise low levels of heat actually optimizes the release of beneficial phytonutrients (like lycopene) when creating our pure tomato juice powder.

    OUR SYNERGIZED® PROTOCOL


    We have always understood the absolute necessity of keeping a plant's "life force" intact-appreciating that it was the "synergy" of the whole plant that endowed it with its special health-promoting qualities. We discovered that this required unwavering care and attention to the process, down to every last detail-from the special heirloom seeds we plant, the rich organic soil we cultivate and care for, our hard-working organic farmers who grow all of our plants, our uniquely developed harvesting schedule and techniques, our proprietary cold temperature drying techniques, our custom designed cold-milling process, all the way to our vacuum-sealed packaging and 100% cold storage. We call this fastidious set of steps our "Synergized®" process. We are completely committed to following each and every step for all of our products and ingredients, while so many other companies fail to understand that even one misstep or compromise along the way diminishes the essence of what makes the plants so valuable for us all.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals


    That was fast. The ‘Naked Whey’ just arrived. It’s huge! Big enough to use as a foot stool.

    The cacao powder hasn’t come in, so I tossed in a blender a little a this and a little a that. It’s frothy and refreshing:
    • 2 c water
    • 1 1/2 scoops of whey
    • frozen banana
    • 4 dried apple slices
    • 1/8 c coconut
    • 1 t vanilla
    • 1/4 t cinnamon



    Last edited by RunningDeer; 20th August 2015 at 10:34.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Marianne (here)
    Sprouts and vegetable powders are important additions to the mix. Thanks Delight and Paula.

    I want to mention protein powders too. Rice and pea protein powders are popular and easily located in health food stores.

    I had to take in a large amount of protein in recovering from surgery, and didn't want anything I found on the shelf. Needed something with a lot of protein, non GMO, no additional garbage added, no sweetener (so many have aspartame derivatives--shudder) so I went looking online and found Naked Whey. It's just whey protein, grass fed, no soy, no gluten, no additives of any kind. No growth hormones. I ordered 5 pounds of it, which is 76 servings of 25 g protein each. It may seem pricey at $90 but it's a bunch of protein, and I was very pleased with it. I added cocoa powder to mine, and a little vanilla extract, ice cubes all pureed in the blender, and it was like a chocolate milkshake. Without power you'd have to whisk it or beat with an egg beater, sans ice.

    http://nkdnutrition.com/products/gra...protein-powder
    Here is a cheaper alternative for anyone that is interested. I've been consuming it on a daily basis for about 2 years. When I started buying it he didn't have his own website and the price was a bit higher because he was using Amazon to process the orders. I think it was recommended by someone else here on the forum so I decided to give it a shot.
    http://mikesmixrecoverydrink.com/nat...trate-4lb.html
    Last edited by GrnEggsNHam; 20th August 2015 at 12:03.

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    United States Avalon Member RunningDeer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    wrong tone...
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 20th August 2015 at 23:18.

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